How Do You Spell NIP?

Pronunciation: [nˈɪp] (IPA)

The word "nip" is spelled with three letters, n-i-p. The first sound is a voiced alveolar nasal consonant /n/ made by vibrating the vocal cords while stopping the airflow in the mouth with the tongue against the alveolar ridge. The second sound is an unvoiced palatal stop or plosive consonant /ɪp/ formed by completely stopping the airflow in the mouth with the tongue against the hard palate and then releasing the air suddenly. The word has different meanings depending on the context, including a small bite, a sharp twist, or a quick pinch.

NIP Meaning and Definition

Nip is a verb that primarily refers to the action of biting or pinching someone or something, typically with the intention of causing a mild pain or discomfort. It involves using one's teeth or jaws to make a brief, quick, and often light contact with the object being nipped. Nipping can be done by animals, such as dogs or insects, as a way to assert dominance, playfully interact, or defend themselves. However, it can also be used by humans as a playful gesture among friends or loved ones, often accompanied by a light squeeze or pinch.

Nip can also be used metaphorically to describe an action that cuts off or stifles something suddenly, such as nipping a rumor in the bud. It can refer to the act of preventing the development or growth of something negative or harmful, like nipping a plan or an idea in the bud.

Furthermore, nip can refer to a small or quick sip of a drink, usually an alcoholic one, taken in a short amount of time. It implies consuming a small portion rapidly, often for refreshment or a quick boost. For example, taking a nip of whiskey before heading out can be seen as a means to provide a bit of courage or fortitude.

As a noun, nip can refer to the act of nipping or the pain caused by being nipped. It can also denote a small amount or quantity of something, as in "a nip of cold wind" or "a nip in the air," indicating a slight chill or coolness.

Top Common Misspellings for NIP *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for NIP

Etymology of NIP

The word "nip" has multiple etymological origins.

1. From Old English: "nip" can be traced back to the Old English word "hnipian", which means "to pinch" or "to bite". This Old English word later evolved into the Middle English word "nippen", which still retained the same meaning.

2. From Middle Dutch: Another possibility is that "nip" is derived from the Middle Dutch word "nipen", meaning "to pinch" or "to bite". Middle Dutch was a West Germanic language spoken between the 12th and 15th centuries and had significant influence on the English language.

3. From Old Norse: "Nip" may also have been influenced by the Old Norse word "hnippa", which means "to pinch" or "to peck". This theory suggests a Scandinavian influence on the word.

Idioms with the word NIP

  • nip sth off (of) sth The idiom "nip sth off (of) sth" refers to the act of quickly removing or cutting a small piece or portion of something from a larger whole. It often implies an action done swiftly and with precision.
  • nip in the bud To nip something in the bud means to take action to prevent a problem or undesirable situation from developing or worsening. It refers to addressing an issue or concern at an early stage, before it has the chance to grow or become more difficult to manage. The phrase is often used to emphasize the importance of addressing problems promptly and decisively to prevent them from escalating.
  • a nip in the air The idiom "a nip in the air" is used to describe a chilly or cold feeling in the atmosphere, typically during autumn or winter. It suggests that there is a slight, sharp sensation in the air that could cause a subtle discomfort due to low temperatures.
  • (little) nip in the air "(Little) nip in the air" is an idiomatic expression used to describe a slight chill or coolness felt in the atmosphere, especially during the transition from warm to cool weather seasons like autumn or early spring. It suggests a noticeable temperature change that may cause people to feel a slight shivering or a tingling sensation.
  • a nip and (a) tuck The idiom "a nip and (a) tuck" refers to a cosmetic surgical procedure designed to enhance or improve a person's physical appearance, typically by reducing sagging skin, wrinkles, or other signs of aging. It can also be used metaphorically to describe any minor modification or adjustment made to something to improve its overall quality or appearance.
  • nip in the air The idiom "nip in the air" refers to the feeling or indication that the weather is becoming colder, often with a crisp or sharp sensation. It suggests that winter or colder temperatures are approaching.
  • a nip (here) and a tuck (there) The idiom "a nip (here) and a tuck (there)" refers to making minor adjustments or changes to improve something, usually in terms of appearance. It often implies small alterations that enhance the overall result. The phrase is derived from the cosmetic surgical procedures called "nip and tuck," where small amounts of excess skin or fat are removed to improve the appearance of the face or body. Metaphorically, it suggests fine-tuning or polishing aspects to achieve a desired outcome.
  • nip and tuck The idiom "nip and tuck" is typically used to describe a situation where the outcome is extremely close or uncertain, usually referring to a small margin of difference between two competing parties or outcomes. It originated from the world of surgery, specifically plastic surgery, where "nip" refers to a small surgical incision and "tuck" refers to the tightening or reshaping of tissues. Therefore, "nip and tuck" figuratively signifies a situation in which victory or success can be achieved by a very narrow margin.
  • a nip and tuck The idiom "a nip and tuck" is typically used to describe a situation or competition that is extremely close or tightly contested. It refers to a small and precise adjustment made to gain an advantage or to make something better or more competitive. It can also be used to describe a cosmetic or surgical procedure performed to improve one's physical appearance.
  • nip at sm or sth The idiom "nip at someone or something" means to bite or snip lightly at someone or something. It can also refer to making quick or small bites, usually in a playful or aggressive manner.
  • be nip and tuck The idiom "be nip and tuck" means that two or more competitors or teams are extremely close or evenly matched in a contest, competition, or race, making it uncertain or difficult to determine the winner. It is often used to describe a situation where the outcome is uncertain until the very end and could go either way.
  • nip something in the bud The idiom "nip something in the bud" means to prevent or stop an issue or problem from developing or growing into something more serious or harmful. It refers to taking swift action at an early stage to eliminate or address a matter before it becomes larger or harder to control.
  • nip sth in the bud The idiom "nip something in the bud" means to stop something at an early stage, before it develops into something more serious or problematic. It involves taking action to prevent a situation or problem from growing or spreading further. Just as nipping the bud of a plant prevents it from blossoming or growing into a full-grown flower, this idiom suggests intervening early to avoid future complications.

Similar spelling words for NIP

Plural form of NIP is NIPS

Conjugate verb Nip

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have nipped
you would have nipped
he/she/it would have nipped
we would have nipped
they would have nipped
I would have nip
you would have nip
he/she/it would have nip
we would have nip
they would have nip

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been nipping
you would have been nipping
he/she/it would have been nipping
we would have been nipping
they would have been nipping

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would nip
you would nip
he/she/it would nip
we would nip
they would nip

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be nipping
you would be nipping
he/she/it would be nipping
we would be nipping
they would be nipping

FUTURE

I will nip
you will nip
he/she/it will nip
we will nip
they will nip

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be nipping
you will be nipping
he/she/it will be nipping
we will be nipping
they will be nipping

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have nipped
you will have nipped
he/she/it will have nipped
we will have nipped
they will have nipped

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been nipping
you will have been nipping
he/she/it will have been nipping
we will have been nipping
they will have been nipping

IMPERATIVE

you nip
we let´s nip

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to nip

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was nipping
you were nipping
he/she/it was nipping
we were nipping
they were nipping

PAST PARTICIPLE

nipped

PAST PERFECT

I had nipped
you had nipped
he/she/it had nipped
we had nipped
they had nipped

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been nipping
you had been nipping
he/she/it had been nipping
we had been nipping
they had been nipping

PRESENT

I nip
you nip
he/she/it nips
we nip
they nip

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am nipping
you are nipping
he/she/it is nipping
we are nipping
they are nipping

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

nipping

PRESENT PERFECT

I have nipped
you have nipped
he/she/it has nipped
we have nipped
they have nipped

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been nipping
you have been nipping
he/she/it has been nipping
we have been nipping
they have been nipping

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it nip

SIMPLE PAST

I nipped
you nipped
he/she/it nipped
we nipped
they nipped

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