How Do You Spell OF?

Pronunciation: [ˈɒv] (IPA)

The word "of" is spelled with two letters - O and F. However, its pronunciation can be tricky as it is often reduced to a schwa sound /əv/ in connected speech, especially when unstressed. The IPA phonetic transcription for "of" is /ʌv/ or /əv/. It is a preposition used to indicate a relationship between two things, often indicating possession or association. Despite its small size, the word "of" is a vital part of the English language and cannot be overlooked when it comes to spelling and pronunciation.

OF Meaning and Definition

  1. Of is a preposition in the English language indicating belonging, possession, connection, origin, specification, or measurement. It is commonly used to express the relationship between two entities, conveying that one thing is associated with or part of another.

    The primary usage of of is to denote possession or belonging. It shows that something belongs to or is connected to someone or something else. For instance, "the book of Sarah" means that the book belongs to Sarah or is associated with her.

    Apart from ownership, of also signifies origin or source. For instance, "a piece of cake" indicates that the cake is the source or origin of the piece.

    Additionally, of is used to specify or define an attribute of something. For example, "a man of honor" describes a man who possesses the attribute of integrity or honesty.

    Of can also indicate a measure or quantity. In phrases such as "a cup of coffee" or "a flock of birds," it denotes the amount or group of something.

    Furthermore, of is employed in many idiomatic expressions, such as "out of the blue" or "off the hook." These phrases have abstract meanings that go beyond the literal interpretation of the individual words.

    In summary, of is a versatile preposition that expresses possession, affiliation, origin, quantity, definition, and connection in various contexts within the English language.

  2. • Another form of the prefix ob, which see.
    • From; out of; belonging to; denoting possession or property; according to; denoting properties, qualities, or condition.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Top Common Misspellings for OF *

  • og 5.9127668%
  • pf 3.6987935%
  • eof 2.9696407%
  • oif 2.3730611%
  • iof 2.1874585%
  • opf 1.9355694%
  • oof 1.7499668%
  • sof 1.6306509%
  • ofr 1.5378496%
  • af 1.4980776%
  • tof 1.1799018%
  • odf 1.1533872%
  • ogf 0.8749834%
  • aof 0.8352114%
  • orf 0.7556675%
  • ov 0.7556675%
  • pof 0.7026382%
  • ofd 0.5302929%
  • rof 0.5037783%
  • onf 0.4242343%
  • ofg 0.3844624%
  • lof 0.3579477%
  • dof 0.3446904%
  • gof 0.3314331%
  • nof 0.3181757%
  • ofa 0.2916611%
  • ouf 0.2386318%
  • olf 0.2253745%
  • ofn 0.2253745%
  • uf 0.2121171%
  • ofe 0.1988598%
  • ofl 0.1060585%
  • fof 0.490521%
  • bof 0.0928012%
  • cf 0.0795439%
  • ou 0.0795439%
  • ofv 0.0795439%
  • oi 0.0795439%
  • oe 0.0795439%
  • ofof 0.0662866%
  • mof 0.0662866%
  • ow 0.0662866%
  • oa 0.0662866%
  • ff 0.0530292%
  • ofmy 0.0530292%
  • oj 0.0530292%
  • kof 0.0397719%
  • nf 0.0397719%
  • otf 0.0397719%
  • oy 0.0397719%
  • wof 0.0265146%
  • ef 0.0265146%
  • ofc 0.0265146%
  • ofm 0.0265146%
  • ofhe 0.0265146%
  • osf 0.0265146%
  • ofi 0.0132573%
  • hof 0.0132573%
  • oo 0.0132573%
  • offf 0.0132573%
  • cof 0.0132573%
  • anof 0.0132573%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for OF

Etymology of OF

The word "of" originated from the Old English preposition "of" or "ofe", which was derived from the Proto-Germanic word "ub" or "af". This Proto-Germanic word had various meanings, including "from", "off", or "away". It was further traced back to the Proto-Indo-European root "apo", which also signified "off" or "away". Over time, the spelling and pronunciation of "of" underwent changes, but its basic meaning and usage as a preposition remained consistent.

Idioms with the word OF

  • see the point of sth The idiom "see the point of something" means to understand or appreciate the value, importance, or reasoning behind something. It implies comprehending the purpose or significance of a particular idea, action, or concept.
  • this side of sth The idiom "this side of something" refers to a limited or specified time, distance, or condition before reaching a certain point or event. It implies that something major, usually negative or significant, has not yet occurred or been experienced. It can also suggest that an achievement, accomplishment, or level of excellence has not been surpassed or encountered thus far.
  • of sorts The idiom "of sorts" is used to describe something or someone that can be considered in a particular category, but not quite fitting the typical or ideal description of that category. It implies that something is partially or somewhat similar to what it is being compared to, but not fully.
  • sort of The idiom "sort of" is used to express ambiguity or uncertainty about something. It suggests that the speaker's description or statement may not fully align with what is being discussed, indicating a reservation or qualification. It is often used to indicate that the speaker's response or explanation is approximate, not entirely accurate, or lacks complete certainty.
  • waste of space The idiom "waste of space" refers to someone or something that is considered useless, unproductive, or devoid of any valuable qualities or contribution. It implies that the person or thing occupies physical or metaphorical space without offering any meaningful or positive value.
  • the pick of sth The idiom "the pick of something" refers to the best or highest-quality option or selection. It implies choosing or selecting the most desirable or superior item among a group of choices or possibilities. It can be used in various contexts, such as selecting the best candidate for a job or choosing the most exceptional piece of merchandise among several options.
  • the toast of sth The idiom "the toast of sth" refers to someone or something that is widely celebrated, admired, or regarded with great acclaim and popularity in a particular context or setting. It implies that the person or thing mentioned is highly praised and respected by others.
  • tale of woe The idiom "tale of woe" refers to a narrative or story that recounts a series of unfortunate events, hardships, misfortunes, or difficulties experienced by someone. It often describes a sad or distressing account that portrays the hardships faced by an individual or a group.
  • ring of truth The idiom "ring of truth" refers to something that sounds or feels convincing, sincere, or believable. It suggests that there is something authentic or genuine about a statement, story, or explanation. It implies that the information or claim given has a strong likelihood of being true or accurate.
  • sinews of war The idiom "sinews of war" refers to the essential resources or means needed to fund or sustain a conflict. It typically refers to the financial or material resources that are crucial in supporting military operations during times of war.
  • of the week The idiom "of the week" typically refers to a concept, trend, or subject that is currently popular or receiving significant attention during a specific week. It implies that the chosen topic is of temporary significance or prominence and may change or be replaced in the following week.
  • of old The idiom "of old" refers to something that relates to or characteristics of a previous era or time period. It implies antiquity, often signifying something traditional, ancient, or long-standing.
  • request sth of sm The idiom "request something of someone" means to ask someone to do or provide something. It implies making a specific and formal appeal or asking for a favor or assistance. The "sth" generally represents the specific thing being asked for, while "sm" refers to the person whom the request is directed towards.
  • rip sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "rip sth off (of) sm or sth" means to forcefully or quickly remove something from someone or something. It typically implies a sense of taking something without permission or without proper regard for the consequences.
  • rob sm of sth The idiom "rob someone of something" means to take or deprive someone of something valuable, usually through dishonest or unjust means. It implies the act of forcefully or unlawfully taking away possessions, opportunities, rights, or other benefits someone rightfully deserves or should have.
  • roll sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "roll sth off (of) sm or sth" typically means to move or remove something from someone or something with a rolling motion. It can also imply doing something easily or effortlessly without much thought or consideration.
  • turn sb out (of smw) The idiom "turn sb out (of smw)" typically means to force someone to leave a place, usually by making them feel unwelcome or by physically ejecting them.
  • wash sth off (of) sm or sth The idiomatic expression "wash something off (of) someone or something" means to remove dirt, stains, or unwanted substances from the surface of a person or an object by using water or a cleansing agent.
  • ruin of sm or sth The idiom "ruin of someone or something" refers to the destruction, downfall, or complete destruction of someone or something. It implies that the person or thing being referred to has suffered severe or irreversible damage, leading to their demise or failure.
  • pull sth up (out of sth) The idiom "pull something up (out of something)" typically refers to the act of extracting or removing something forcefully from a particular place or situation. It can be both a physical and metaphorical expression.
  • run sm or sth off (of) sth The idiom "run sm or sth off (of) sth" typically means to derive or obtain something from a particular source or resource. It can also refer to using or operating something based on the power generated from a specific source.
  • rake sth off (of) sth The idiom "rake sth off (of) sth" refers to removing or gathering something, typically by using a rake, from a surface or object. It implies the action of carefully or systematically collecting or scraping off something from a larger area or entity.
  • sands of time The idiom "sands of time" refers to the unstoppable passage of time, indicating that time is constantly slipping away or the limited amount of time available for a particular task or event. It emphasizes the fleeting nature of time and the transient nature of life.
  • sing of sm or sth The idiom "sing of someone or something" means to talk or write about someone or something in a highly praising or enthusiastic manner.
  • savor of sth The idiom "savor of sth" means to have a hint or flavor of something, particularly a negative or undesirable quality. It suggests that something seems reminiscent or suggestive of a particular characteristic, often implying suspicion or criticism.
  • saw sth off (of) sth The idiom "saw off (of) something" typically refers to the act of cutting or removing something from a larger object using a saw. However, it can also be used figuratively to mean to separate or detach something, often with effort or difficulty.
  • push sm or sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "push (someone or something) off (of) (someone or something)" means to forcefully move or remove a person or object from a particular place or surface. It implies the act of physically exerting force to drive something away or dislodge it from a position.
  • scrape sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "scrape something off (of) someone or something" means to remove or take away something from the surface of someone or something by using a scraping motion or tool. It implies the act of physically scraping or rubbing off a substance.
  • seep out (of sth) The idiom "seep out (of sth)" means to slowly and gradually escape or leak from something, often implying a hidden or unnoticed release of a substance or information. It suggests that the escape or leakage happens in a subtle or inconspicuous manner, without immediate detection.
  • set of pipes The idiom "set of pipes" refers to someone's voice, particularly their vocal ability or quality. It is often used to describe a person who has a strong or impressive singing voice.
  • short of The idiom "short of" means to be lacking or deficient in something, or to fall just shy of a particular goal or requirement. It implies that there is a shortage or insufficiency in a certain aspect.
  • tricks of the trade The idiom "tricks of the trade" refers to the specific skills, techniques, or methods that are known and utilized by practitioners in a particular profession or field. It implies the insider knowledge or expertise that is acquired through years of experience and practice within that specific trade. These tricks are often not openly shared or known by outsiders, giving professionals a competitive advantage in their work.
  • this side of The idiom "this side of" refers to a situation or event that is within a certain time, place, or limit. It means everything that falls before a specific point or boundary. It is typically used to express that something is unlikely or has not happened within a specified range or period.
  • skim sth off (of) sth The idiom "skim something off (of) something" means to take a small amount of something from a larger quantity, especially in a quick or discreet manner. It often refers to taking a portion, typically for personal gain or advantage, while leaving the majority untouched.
  • slink out (of sm place) The idiom "slink out (of sm place)" means to sneak or exit surreptitiously from a location, typically with a sense of guilt or shame. It implies leaving quietly and without drawing attention to oneself.
  • slop out (of sth) The idiom "slop out (of sth)" generally refers to the act of escaping or leaving something in a messy or careless manner. It typically implies that the person's departure lacks grace or carefulness, often resulting in disorder or spillage.
  • snip sth off (of) sth The idiom "snip something off (of) something" means to cut or remove a small part of something, typically using scissors or other cutting tools. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • soak sth off (of) sth The idiom "soak something off (of) something" refers to the act of removing or extracting something by soaking it in a liquid or dissolving it. It is often used when describing the process of removing a substance or cleaning a surface by allowing it to be submerged in a liquid for a period of time until it can be easily removed or dissolved.
  • sth of sorts The idiom "something of sorts" typically denotes the notion of a thing or person that can be characterized as somewhat similar or comparable to what is being discussed, although perhaps not an exact match or the most ideal example. It indicates that there is an element or aspect of similarity, but not to a great extent or in a complete manner.
  • speak of The idiom "speak of" means to mention or refer to someone or something. It is often used when the mentioned person or thing is currently present or being discussed.
  • spear sth out (of sth) The idiom "spear sth out (of sth)" means to forcefully or skillfully remove or extract something from a particular place or situation using a spear. It implies successfully retrieving or extracting something with precision, strength, or determination.
  • raise the spectre of sth To "raise the spectre of something" means to bring up or introduce a potentially threatening or alarming situation or problem. It refers to the act of highlighting or drawing attention to a particular issue or concern, often in order to create fear or generate a negative reaction.
  • split sth off (of) sth To split something off (of) something means to separate or remove a specific part or component from a whole entity or object. It is often used when referring to isolating or extracting something from a larger context.
  • spurt out (of sm or sth) The idiom "spurt out (of sm or sth)" refers to something forcefully or rapidly emerging or being expelled from someone or something. It implies a sudden and excessive release or eruption.
  • squirt out(of sm or sth) The idiom "squirt out (of something or someone)" typically means to quickly and forcefully emerge or be expelled from a particular place or thing. It often conveys a sense of suddenness, intensity, or urgency. This phrase is commonly used metaphorically to describe when a liquid or substance spurts or gushes out with force, much like a stream of water from a squirt bottle.
  • steam out (of sm place) The idiom "steam out (of sm place)" typically means to leave a place with a significant amount of energy, enthusiasm, or determination. It often implies a sense of excitement or determination to accomplish something.
  • steam sth off (of) sth The idiom "steam sth off (of) sth" refers to the act of removing or eliminating something quickly and forcefully, often through the use of steam. It implies the act of getting rid of something rapidly and effectively.
  • strain sth off of sth "Strain something off of something" is an idiom that refers to the act of separating a liquid or solid substance from its container or another substance by using a sieve, filter, or similar tool. It is commonly used when removing solids from a liquid, such as straining tea leaves from tea or separating pasta from water after cooking.
  • strike sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "strike something off (of) someone or something" means to remove or cross out something from a list, record, or document. It typically refers to the act of eliminating or deleting an item or detail to indicate that it is no longer relevant, accurate, or necessary.
  • strip sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "strip something off (of) someone or something" means to remove or take off a particular item or layer from someone or something. It involves physically peeling or pulling away a part or covering, usually in a forceful or thorough manner.
  • strip sm or sth of sth To "strip someone or something of something" means to remove or take away a particular quality, attribute, or possession from them forcefully or completely. It often signifies the act of depriving someone or something of a specific characteristic or essential element.
  • sue the pants off (of) sm The idiom "sue the pants off (of) someone" means to initiate a legal action against someone in a relentless and aggressive manner, with the objective of obtaining a favorable outcome or seeking maximum compensation or punishment from them.
  • surge out (of sth) The idiom "surge out (of sth)" typically refers to the action of rapidly and forcefully moving or rushing out of a place or thing. It describes a sudden and intense movement or escape, often from a confined or restrictive space. It conveys the idea of a swift and powerful motion of people or objects exiting a location with energy or urgency.
  • sweep sth off (of) sth The idiom "sweep something off (of) something" typically means to remove or clean something from a surface by using a sweeping motion. It can also be used figuratively to mean quickly getting rid of or dismissing something, often in a forceful or decisive manner.
  • swish sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "swish something off (of) someone or something" typically means to remove or brush something away quickly and with a swooshing sound. It often implies the act of getting rid of dust, dirt, or unwanted substances by swiftly moving or brushing them away.
  • take the pulse of sth The idiom "take the pulse of sth" means to assess or gauge the current state, condition, or opinion of something. It involves gathering information or insights to understand the current situation or sentiments related to a particular subject or issue. It can refer to understanding the mood, attitude, or atmosphere of a group of people, an organization, a market, or any other relevant context.
  • talk of The idiom "talk of" refers to something or someone that is being widely discussed or mentioned by others. It suggests that the person or subject in question is currently a popular topic of conversation or interest among individuals.
  • taste of sth The idiom "taste of sth" means to experience a small sample or glimpse of something. It typically refers to getting a brief exposure or understanding of a particular situation, often leaving a desire for more.
  • vale of tears The idiom "vale of tears" refers to the earthly existence or life regarded as full of suffering, trials, and difficulties. It implies that life is seen as a temporary state filled with sadness, challenges, and hardships.
  • tear sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "tear something off (of) someone or something" means to forcefully remove or pull apart a piece or part of someone or something, usually in a quick and aggressive manner. It implies a deliberate and sometimes destructive action of separating or detaching something from its original position.
  • tell of The idiom "tell of" typically means to speak or write about something or someone, usually in a detailed or expressive manner. It implies conveying information, stories, or events related to the mentioned subject.
  • test out (of sth) The idiom "test out (of sth)" refers to the act of demonstrating or proving one's knowledge, skills, or proficiency in a particular subject or area in order to be exempted or excused from further study or examination. It is commonly used when a person wants to skip or bypass a course or requirement by proving they already possess the necessary knowledge or skills to meet the criteria.
  • vote of thanks A vote of thanks is an expression of gratitude or appreciation that is given publicly to someone or a group of people, usually at the end of an event, gathering, or occasion, to acknowledge their contributions, efforts, or assistance. It is a formal way of showing appreciation and thanking them for their involvement or support.
  • trim sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "trim something off (of) someone or something" means to remove or cut away a small amount of something from someone or something. It suggests the act of reducing or altering the size, length, or quantity of something by cutting or trimming it.
  • think well of The idiom "think well of" means to have a positive or favorable opinion or impression of someone or something. It implies that one regards another person or thing in a favorable light and holds a positive perception or judgment about them.
  • think of The idiom "think of" means to conceive or imagine something in one's mind, or to consider or remember something. It can also refer to having affectionate thoughts or sentiments towards someone.
  • think sth of sm or sth The idiom "think something of someone or something" means to have an opinion or judgment about someone or something. It refers to forming an assessment or evaluation based on qualities, abilities, or characteristics.
  • tire of sb/sth The idiom "tire of sb/sth" means to become bored, weary, or fed up with someone or something, losing interest or enthusiasm over time.
  • tire of sm or sth The idiom "tire of someone or something" means to become bored, fed up, or lose interest in someone or something over time. It suggests a feeling of weariness or exhaustion and a desire to move on or seek something new.
  • tons of sth The idiom "tons of something" is an expression used to emphasize a large quantity or a vast amount of something. It implies an abundance or an excessive amount, exaggerating the quantity or intensity.
  • tools of the trade The idiom "tools of the trade" refers to the specific equipment, skills, or techniques that are essential for a particular profession or activity. It embodies the essential tools or items necessary to effectively perform a specific job or task.
  • the tools of the/your trade The idiom "the tools of the trade" or "your tools of the trade" refers to the specific skills, equipment, or knowledge that are essential for carrying out a particular profession or line of work effectively. It encompasses the specialized resources and techniques required to perform tasks or achieve goals within a specific field or occupation.
  • the top of the tree The idiom "the top of the tree" refers to someone or something that is regarded as being in the highest or most successful position within a particular field or domain. It suggests achievement, excellence, or superiority.
  • toss sm or sth off (of) sth The idiom "toss sm or sth off (of) sth" typically means to remove or discard someone or something from a particular place or position, often in a careless or nonchalant manner.
  • touch of The idiom "touch of" refers to a small amount or slight hint of something. It suggests a subtle influence or presence of a quality or characteristic.
  • pry sth off (of) sth The idiom "pry sth off (of) sth" means to forcibly remove or take something off a surface or object, often requiring a tool or effort. It implies the act of separating or detaching something that is tightly fixed or stuck.
  • purge sm or sth of sm or sth The idiom "purge someone or something of someone or something" can be defined as the act of removing, eliminating, or getting rid of someone or something undesirable or unwanted from someone or something else. It generally implies a thorough and complete removal or cleansing process.
  • tweak sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "tweak sth off (of) sm or sth" typically refers to the act of removing or taking something off of a person or an object by making slight adjustments or alterations. It denotes the action of delicately adjusting or manipulating something until it comes loose or is detached.
  • twist sth off (of) sth The idiom "twist sth off (of) sth" typically means to remove or detach something by twisting it, often from a larger object or surface.
  • point of view The idiom "point of view" refers to an individual's unique perspective, opinion, or way of perceiving and understanding things. It highlights the subjective nature of a person's viewpoint in shaping their understanding and interpretation of a particular situation, event, or idea.
  • warn sm of sth The idiom "warn someone of something" means to notify or alert someone about potential danger, harm, or a threat. It implies giving someone information or advice to help them avoid negative consequences or prevent potential harm.
  • wash sth of sth The idiom "wash something off something" means to clean or remove something from a surface by using water or another liquid. It can be used literally, as in washing dirt or stains off an object or surface, or figuratively, to describe removing or getting rid of a negative or unwanted quality or situation.
  • wealth of sth The idiom "wealth of something" refers to a large or abundant amount of something, typically referring to knowledge, information, resources, or options. It implies that there is a significant quantity or quality of a particular thing.
  • wear sth off (of) sth The idiom "wear sth off (of) sth" refers to the gradual removal or disappearance of something from a surface or object due to continuous use or friction. It often implies that the original item is slowly and progressively diminishing or eroding away.
  • out (of) the window The idiom "out (of) the window" is often used to indicate that something has been disregarded, abandoned, or invalidated. It suggests that a previous rule, expectation, or concept is no longer applicable or relevant. It can also refer to discarding or ignoring restrictions, regulations, or constraints.
  • under the wing of sth The idiom "under the wing of something" means to be protected, guided, or taken care of by someone or something. It suggests a sense of dependence and being closely monitored or supported. It often implies being under the supervision or mentorship of a more experienced or knowledgeable person or organization.
  • wrest sth off (of) sth The idiom "wrest sth off (of) sth" means to forcibly or with great effort remove or take something from someone or something else, often by using physical strength or cunning tactics.
  • yank sm or sth off (of) sth The idiom "yank something off (of) something" generally means to forcefully pull or remove something from a particular place or surface.
  • pare sth off (of) sth The idiom "pare sth off (of) sth" means to remove or cut away a small, thin layer or portion from something, usually using a sharp tool or instrument. It is often used when referring to shaping or smoothing an object by carefully trimming its surface.
  • read of The idiom "read of" usually means to learn or acquire knowledge about someone or something through reading or hearing about them/it.
  • sick of The idiom "sick of" means to feel extremely fed up, annoyed, or bored with someone or something.
  • raise the spectre of The idiom "raise the spectre of" means to introduce or bring up something that is seen as threatening, alarming, or unwelcome. It implies the act of invoking or drawing attention to a potential issue or problem that could cause fear, concern, or negative consequences. The phrase often suggests the creation of a sense of fear or unease regarding a particular topic or possibility.
  • the pick of The idiom "the pick of" means the best or finest selection from a group of options or choices. It refers to choosing or selecting the most desirable or superior option among several available alternatives.
  • take pick of The idiom "take pick of" means to have the opportunity to choose freely from a selection of options, usually implying there are many desirable choices available.
  • pick of The idiom "pick of" means the best or highest-quality option amongst a group of choices or individuals. It implies selecting the most desirable or preferable option out of a range of alternatives.
  • quiz out (of sth) The idiom "quiz out (of sth)" refers to successfully completing or passing a quiz or examination in a particular subject or topic, typically with a high score or grade. It implies that the person has demonstrated sufficient knowledge and understanding to be exempted or excused from further testing or requirements related to that subject or topic.
  • peel sth off (of) (sth) The idiom "peel something off (of) something" refers to the act of removing or taking off a layer, covering, or substance from another surface. It often implies that whatever is being removed is sticky, adhesive, or clinging onto the surface. It can be used both literally and metaphorically to describe the process of detaching or separating one thing from another.
  • think well of sb/sth The idiom "think well of somebody/something" means to have a favorable or positive opinion or view of someone or something. It implies holding a positive attitude, perception, or admiration towards a person or thing.
  • pinch sth off (of) sth The idiom "pinch something off (of) something" usually means to separate or detach a small part of something by pinching or grasping it. It can also refer to taking something quickly or discreetly.
  • order sm off (of sth) The idiom "order sm off (of sth)" refers to the act of requesting or commanding someone to move away or dismount from a particular object or location. It indicates an authoritative or commanding tone in instructing someone to vacate a place or detach themselves from something.
  • see sm out (of sth) The idiom "see someone out (of something)" means to accompany or escort someone until they are safely out of a particular place or situation. It implies taking the responsibility of ensuring someone's departure or transition from a specific location or circumstance.
  • on pain of sth The idiom "on pain of sth" typically means that a specific consequence, often a punishment or penalty, will be imposed if someone fails to comply with a certain requirement or instruction. It is used to emphasize the seriousness or importance of adhering to the stated condition.
  • pick sm or sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "pick sm or sth off (of) sm or sth" means to remove or detach something small and usually with precision from a larger item or surface. It can also refer to plucking or taking hold of something, often in a quick and efficient manner.
  • of set purpose The idiom "of set purpose" refers to doing something intentionally or with a clear motive or objective in mind. It implies that a particular action or decision was made deliberately and purposefully, often indicating a focused mindset or determined intention to achieve a specific outcome.
  • proud of The idiom "proud of" means to have a feeling of satisfaction, accomplishment, or contentment towards someone or something due to their achievements, qualities, or actions. It denotes a sense of admiration, approval, or delight in a person or thing.
  • on the point of The idiomatic expression "on the point of" means being very close to a particular situation or state, often implying that something is about to happen or be achieved. It signifies being at the brink or verge of something.
  • take the place of The idiom "take the place of" means to substitute or replace someone or something in a particular role, position, or function. It refers to assuming the duties, responsibilities, or significance of another person or thing.
  • peer of the realm The idiom "peer of the realm" refers to someone who holds a high-ranking noble title in the British peerage system, such as a duke, marquess, earl, viscount, or baron. It specifically denotes a member of the House of Lords, the upper house of the British Parliament, who has been granted a hereditary or life peerage.
  • of one's own The definition of the idiom "of one's own" is something that belongs to or is characteristic of a specific person, typically emphasizing independence, uniqueness, or personal choice. It implies individual ownership or personal preference in relation to something.
  • out of The idiom "out of" has multiple meanings and can be interpreted differently depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. Used to indicate the physical movement or separation from inside to outside of something or a place. Example: "The cat jumped out of the window." 2. Used to express the idea of having none left or being depleted. Example: "We ran out of milk. I need to buy some more." 3. Used to denote being removed or excluded from a particular group, organization, or participation. Example: "She was kicked out of the club for breaking the rules." 4. Used to indicate deviation from a norm or accepted standard. Example: "His behavior is out of line; he needs to apologize
  • under the shadow of The idiom "under the shadow of" means being in the presence or influence of someone or something greatly superior or dominant, often leading to a feeling of intimidation, insignificance, or being overshadowed.
  • shut of The idiom "shut off" refers to ceasing or stopping something, often abruptly or abruptly disconnecting or isolating oneself or something from a particular situation, conversation, or environment.
  • under the sign of Under the sign of is an idiom used to indicate that something is happening or being done in the name or influence of a particular person, principle, or quality. It suggests that the actions or events are guided by the characteristics or traits associated with that person or principle. It can also imply that the person or principle being referenced has a strong presence or influence in the situation.
  • on the order of The idiom "on the order of" is used to describe something that is similar to, or comparable to, something else in terms of quantity, quality, or degree. It implies a rough estimate or approximation without specifying an exact figure or value.
  • can’t stand the sight of The idiom "can't stand the sight of" means to feel extreme dislike, aversion, or disgust towards someone or something, to the point where one finds it difficult or unbearable to even look at them.
  • in/out of step (with somebody/something) The idiom "in/out of step (with somebody/something)" refers to being in agreement or alignment with someone or something, or the lack thereof. When someone is "in step," they are aligned in their thoughts, actions, or opinions with others or a certain situation. Conversely, being "out of step" indicates a lack of harmony or conformity, often suggesting that the person or thing is not in line with the norm or the majority.
  • of bad/good report The idiom "of bad/good report" refers to the reputation, opinion, or appraisal concerning someone or something. It indicates whether the subject is perceived negatively or positively by others.
  • in/under the shadow of The idiom "in/under the shadow of" is used to describe being in a situation where one is influenced or affected by someone or something more powerful or influential. It often implies a sense of being under the control, influence, or authority of someone or something.
  • be/get shot of somebody/something To be or get shot of somebody/something means to get rid of or remove someone or something from a situation or one's life, often because they are causing problems, inconvenience, or annoyance. It implies a desire to distance oneself from that person or thing.
  • of steel The idiom "of steel" is used to describe someone or something that is exceptionally strong, resilient, or unyielding. It implies that the person or object possesses unwavering determination, endurance, or courage.
  • war of words A "war of words" refers to a heated or intense argument or conflict, typically characterized by strong and aggressive language, verbal attacks, or hostile exchanges. It describes a situation where individuals or groups engage in a verbal battle, using words as weapons to attack or refute each other's arguments or beliefs. This phrase suggests a confrontational and combative dispute that primarily occurs in the form of verbal exchanges, rather than physical violence.
  • slice of the pie The idiom "slice of the pie" refers to a share or part of a larger whole, usually used in contexts related to sharing resources, benefits, or opportunities. It implies the division or distribution of something among several people or groups. It can symbolize an individual's portion or stake in something that is being shared or divided.
  • proof of the pudding, the The idiom "proof of the pudding, the" means that the success or effectiveness of something can only be determined when it is put to the test or experienced firsthand. It implies that one can only judge the quality or true nature of something after having tried or experienced it for oneself.
  • take the pulse of The idiom "take the pulse of" means to gauge or assess the current state or condition of something, generally by getting a sense of the opinions, feelings, or attitudes of people involved or affected by the situation. It involves evaluating the overall mood, sentiment, or level of support in order to understand or make informed decisions regarding a particular matter.
  • shadow of one's self To be a shadow of one's self means to be noticeably weaker, less energetic, or less capable than one usually is. It implies a significant decline in physical or mental abilities, vitality, or overall performance.
  • sure of (oneself) The idiom "sure of oneself" means to have confidence in one's abilities, opinions, or decisions. It refers to being self-assured, assuredly knowing what one wants or believes, and being confident in one's actions or judgments.
  • make a fool (out) of (someone or oneself) The idiom "make a fool (out) of (someone or oneself)" means to cause someone to look foolish or to humiliate oneself by doing something foolish or embarrassing. It refers to an action or behavior that undermines someone's reputation or causes embarrassment.
  • bored out of (one's) skull The idiom "bored out of (one's) skull" means to be extremely bored or uninterested to the point of complete mental exhaustion. It implies that someone is so bored that they feel their brain is becoming numb or empty, lacking any stimulation or entertainment.
  • be just a matter of time The idiom "be just a matter of time" means that something is inevitably going to happen or occur; it is only a question of when it will happen rather than if it will happen. It implies that the outcome or event is certain and will naturally happen in due course.
  • incapacitate someone (for something) (for a period of time) The idiom "incapacitate someone (for something) (for a period of time)" means to render someone unable to perform a specific action or activity for a certain duration. It typically refers to physically or mentally disabling someone, hindering their ability to carry out a particular task or engage in a specific endeavor for a temporary period.
  • luck of the draw The idiom "luck of the draw" refers to a situation where the outcome or result is based entirely on chance or luck, and cannot be influenced or controlled by any individual. It suggests that there is no control over who or what is chosen, and that one's success or failure is determined purely by random selection.
  • a fair crack of the whip The idiom "a fair crack of the whip" means giving someone a fair opportunity or chance to succeed, accomplish, or prove themselves. It implies providing equal and just treatment without any bias or disadvantage.
  • in spite of sth The idiom "in spite of something" means to do or accomplish something despite a particular obstacle, difficulty, or unfavorable circumstances. It implies a deliberate act of defiance or determination to achieve a goal, regardless of the hindrance or setback.
  • the idea of it!, at what an idea! "The idea of it!" or "At what an idea!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, disbelief, or astonishment regarding a suggestion or concept. It emphasizes that the idea being presented is unexpected, unusual, or intriguing.
  • the tail end of The idiom "the tail end of" refers to the final or last part of something, typically a time period or sequence. It implies that the mentioned person or thing is towards the end of a particular situation or event.
  • a fine kettle of fish The idiom "a fine kettle of fish" refers to a difficult or confusing situation, often with troublesome or unexpected consequences. The phrase implies being in a predicament or mess.
  • (like) a breath of fresh air The idiom "(like) a breath of fresh air" refers to something or someone that is refreshing, invigorating, or brings new energy and vitality to a situation or environment. It implies that the person or thing is different from what is usual or expected, providing a positive change or relief from monotony.
  • get an amount of money for sth The definition of the idiom "get an amount of money for something" means to receive or earn a specific sum of money in exchange for a particular item, service, or action. It implies the act of obtaining financial compensation for a specific purpose or transaction.
  • citizen of the world The idiom "citizen of the world" refers to someone who has a broad perspective and feels a sense of belonging to all of humanity, rather than being limited to a specific nationality, culture, or geographic location. It suggests that the person is open-minded, embraces diversity, and seeks to understand and connect with people from different cultures and backgrounds.
  • Believe nothing of what you hear, and only half of what you see The idiom "Believe nothing of what you hear, and only half of what you see" means that one should be skeptical and cautious about the information they receive. It suggests that verbal claims may not always be trustworthy and visual evidence may be misleading. It encourages the listener or observer to carefully evaluate and verify information before accepting it as true.
  • kill (an amount of time) The idiom "kill (an amount of time)" means to pass or spend a period of time in a way that does not feel productive or enjoyable, usually because one is waiting for something or there is a lack of engaging activities.
  • a slice/share of the cake The idiom "a slice/share of the cake" means receiving a fair portion or share of something, particularly referring to benefits, rewards, or opportunities. It implies the distribution of resources, wealth, or advantages among multiple individuals or groups.
  • the ways of the world The idiom "the ways of the world" refers to the norms, customs, and practices prevalent in society. It signifies an understanding or acceptance of the often complicated, unpredictable, or immoral aspects of human behavior and the world at large. It implies a recognition of the realities of life and the way things are typically done in the world.
  • take it out of The idiom "take it out of" is used to describe the physical or emotional drain caused by a particular situation or activity. It means that something is exerting a lot of effort or energy from someone, tiring them or causing them to feel exhausted or drained.
  • lose the use of The idiom "lose the use of" refers to the inability to employ or operate something, typically due to damage, impairment, or loss of function. It implies that one no longer has the ability or capability to utilize or access something effectively.
  • fly out of The idiom "fly out of" typically means to have an abrupt or sudden exit or departure, often with a great amount of energy or speed. It implies that the person or object in question leaves quickly and unexpectedly.
  • groan with/under (the weight of) sth The idiom "groan with/under (the weight of) sth" means to be strained or burdened by the heaviness or pressure of something. It signifies that a person or thing is overwhelmed, physically or metaphorically, due to excessive weight, responsibility, or problem.
  • the best/better part of The idiom "the best/better part of" refers to a significant or majority portion of something. It is used when referring to the largest or most important aspect of a particular thing or situation.
  • of the first order The idiom "of the first order" is used to describe something that is of the highest or most extreme quality, level, or degree. It signifies that something is superior, exceptional, or top-notch in its category or domain.
  • despoil sth of sth The idiom "despoil sth of sth" means to strip or confiscate something forcibly or illegally, often resulting in damage or loss. It implies taking away someone's possessions, rights, or beauty by force or through wrongful means.
  • be on the tip of (one's) tongue The idiom "be on the tip of (one's) tongue" means to have something, typically a word or a piece of information, nearly remembered or just within reach of one's memory or ability to articulate.
  • the black sheep (of the family) The idiom "the black sheep (of the family)" refers to a person who is considered different, or a misfit, from the rest of their family or social group. It often implies that this person is perceived negatively or disapproved of by others due to their behavior, lifestyle choices, or beliefs that diverge from the norms or expectations set by their family or social circle.
  • nothing of the kind/sort The idiom "nothing of the kind/sort" is used to express disagreement or denial in response to a suggested possibility or statement. It indicates that something is not true or does not exist as claimed or assumed. It emphasizes the speaker's contrasting opinion or belief.
  • jump off (of sth) The idiom "jump off (of sth)" refers to taking a leap or physically propelling oneself off an object or surface, typically with the intention of reaching another location or avoiding danger. It can also be used in a metaphorical sense to mean starting or initiating something, often with enthusiasm or energy.
  • at the top of one's voice The idiom "at the top of one's voice" means to shout or speak loudly, with all of one's strength and energy.
  • a wind/the winds of change The idiom "a wind/the winds of change" refers to a metaphorical force or influence that brings about significant alterations or shifts in a particular situation, usually with an implication of progress or transformation. It implies a noticeable and transformative shift in circumstances or attitudes.
  • the holy of holies The idiom "the holy of holies" refers to a place, person, or thing that is regarded as the most sacred, revered, or deeply significant. It originates from the inner sanctuary or most sacred area of the ancient Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, where only the high priest was allowed to enter. Metaphorically, it implies an area or concept that is held in high esteem, revered, or shrouded in mystery and is not easily accessible to or understood by everyone.
  • build up/work up, etc. a head of steam The idiom "build up/work up, etc. a head of steam" refers to the process of gradually gathering momentum or enthusiasm for a particular task, activity, or goal. It suggests the idea of generating a sense of energy, readiness, or determination to accomplish something. This idiom is often used to describe the process of mentally or emotionally preparing oneself or others for action.
  • port of call The idiom "port of call" originated from maritime vocabulary and refers to a specific location or destination where a ship or vessel stops during its journey. In a broader sense, outside of nautical contexts, it is used figuratively to describe a planned stop or destination during a trip or journey. It can also refer to a specific place or establishment that someone regularly visits or stops at.
  • rush out (of sth) The idiom "rush out (of sth)" typically means to quickly exit or leave a place in a hurried or frantic manner. It implies a sense of urgency or haste in departing from a particular location or situation.
  • beguile sm out of sth The idiom "beguile someone out of something" means to trick, deceive, or manipulate someone in order to obtain something from them, typically through cunning or flattery. It implies taking advantage of someone's trust or vulnerability to acquire something, such as money, possessions, or information, in a dishonest or dishonestly persuasive manner.
  • scare the life out of (one) The idiom "scare the life out of (one)" means to frighten or terrify someone to an extreme degree. It implies a sudden and intense scare that causes one to be extremely frightened or shaken.
  • sacrifice (something) on the altar of The idiom "sacrifice (something) on the altar of" means to willingly give up or lose something valuable or important for the sake of another cause or principle. It implies making a significant or costly sacrifice, often symbolically comparing it to the act of offering something to a sacred or higher purpose.
  • be a barrel of laughs/fun The idiom "be a barrel of laughs/fun" is used to describe someone or something that is very entertaining, amusing, or humorous. It implies that being in the presence of that person or engaging in that activity is guaranteed to bring joy, laughter, and enjoyment.
  • muster out of sth The idiom "muster out of something" refers to the process of leaving or being discharged from a group, organization, or activity, typically involving a formal or official procedure. It often refers to military personnel ending their service or leaving a particular military unit.
  • sell sb a pup, at sell sb a bill of goods The idiom "sell someone a pup" or "sell someone a bill of goods" means to deceive or trick someone into buying or accepting something that is not as good as promised. It typically refers to selling something that is defective, faulty, or of poor quality, while intentionally misrepresenting its true value or condition.
  • speak highly of (someone or something) The idiom "speak highly of (someone or something)" means to express positive opinions, admiration, or praise for someone or something. It implies giving favorable remarks or portraying them in a favorable light, often emphasizing their qualities, abilities, or accomplishments.
  • a few bricks short of a (full) load The idiom "a few bricks short of a (full) load" is used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or mentally deficient. It suggests that the person is lacking some essential mental or intellectual capacity, likening it to a load of bricks missing a few.
  • in favor of (someone or something) The idiom "in favor of (someone or something)" means to support or be in agreement with someone or something, often with a sense of preference or approval. It implies taking a positive stance or showing a preference for a particular person, idea, or action, often at the expense of an alternative.
  • come out smelling of roses The idiom "come out smelling of roses" means to emerge from a situation with a favorable outcome or a positive perception, especially after facing challenges or criticism. It implies that someone has managed to maintain their reputation, win admiration, or avoid blame despite difficult circumstances.
  • draw out of and draw out The idiom "draw out of and draw out" typically refers to the act of extracting information, feelings, or opinions from someone, often by encouraging them to speak or express themselves. It suggests the importance of actively engaging with others to elicit their thoughts or to uncover hidden aspects.
  • be of your own making The idiom "be of your own making" means to be responsible or the cause of one's own problems, difficulties, or failures. It implies that the situation one finds oneself in is a result of their own choices, actions, or decisions.
  • frighten the hell out of sm The idiom "frighten the hell out of someone" means to terrify or scare someone intensely. It implies causing immense fear, shock, or panic to the point where the person is extremely frightened or disturbed.
  • in lieu of The idiom "in lieu of" means instead of or as a substitute for something. It is used to indicate that one thing is being used or done in place of another.
  • change of venue The idiom "change of venue" means to move a trial or legal proceeding from one location to another, usually due to a request made by one of the involved parties. It can also refer to moving an event, conference, or any scheduled activity to a different location.
  • beat/scare the daylights out of somebody The idiom "beat/scare the daylights out of somebody" means to frighten or intimidate someone to a great extent. It implies causing an intense fear or terror that may make the person feel completely overwhelmed or paralyzed with fear.
  • long arm of the law The idiom "long arm of the law" typically refers to the far reach and power of law enforcement or legal authorities. It suggests that the law has the ability to catch and punish wrongdoers even if they are far away or believe they can escape justice.
  • scare the shit out of somebody The idiom "scare the shit out of somebody" is an informal expression that means to frighten or startle someone intensely or to cause extreme fear. It is used to describe a situation where someone is so scared that it feels as though all the fear has been expelled from their body.
  • to the point of something/of doing something The idiom "to the point of something/of doing something" means to an extent where an action or situation is extreme or excessive. It implies reaching a limit or degree beyond which something becomes excessive or almost unbearable.
  • a change of tack The idiom "a change of tack" refers to altering one's strategy or approach in order to achieve a different outcome or make progress in a different direction. It is often used to describe a shift in plans, techniques, or methods.
  • be a matter of record The idiom "be a matter of record" means that something has been officially documented or recorded and can be readily verified or confirmed. It refers to information or events that are well-documented and established in an official or authoritative manner.
  • break someone or something of something The idiom "break someone or something of something" means to train, discipline, or help someone or something to stop a bad habit, behavior, or addiction. It typically involves assisting someone in overcoming a negative routine or pattern by enforcing different actions or behaviors.
  • knock the tar out of (someone) The idiom "knock the tar out of (someone)" means to beat someone up severely or forcefully. It implies causing physical harm or delivering a heavy blow to an individual.
  • have a good command of sth The idiom "have a good command of something" means to have a thorough understanding or mastery of a particular subject, skill, or language. It suggests that someone possesses a high level of knowledge or is proficient in their ability to utilize and control that specific thing effectively.
  • a disaster of epic proportions The idiom "a disaster of epic proportions" refers to an event or situation that is incredibly catastrophic or disastrous, typically on a grand scale or magnitude. It implies that the level of destruction or adverse consequences caused by the disaster is immense and far-reaching.
  • (smw) in the neighborhood of sth The idiom "in the neighborhood of (something)" is used to express an approximate or rough estimate of a quantity or value. It implies that the mentioned thing is close to or approximately equal to the stated value or quantity, without providing an exact figure.
  • go out in search of sm or sth The idiom "go out in search of someone or something" means to actively seek or look for someone or something, often with determination or an intention to find them. It refers to the act of purposefully going out or embarking on a quest in pursuit of a specific person or thing.
  • be in the middle of something/of doing something The idiom "be in the middle of something/of doing something" means to be actively engaged or occupied with a task, activity, or situation at a particular point in time. It implies that the person is currently involved in that specific action or process and has not yet completed it.
  • arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time The idiom "arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time" means to reach a particular place exactly at the designated or expected time. It implies that the person arrives punctually and precisely as the clock strikes the given hour.
  • capable of The idiom "capable of" means having the ability, potential, or skill to do something. It signifies being competent or having the capacity to accomplish a particular task or handle a situation effectively.
  • in spite of The idiom "in spite of" means to do or achieve something despite facing difficulties, obstacles, or opposing factors. It implies that despite the presence of something that may typically hinder or discourage progress, one manages to proceed or succeed regardless.
  • in the heat of The idiom "in the heat of" refers to a situation or moment characterized by strong emotions, intense activity, or impulsive behavior. It often implies that one's actions or decisions are influenced by heightened emotions or a lack of rational thinking due to the intensity of the moment.
  • at the instance of The idiom "at the instance of" refers to something being done or happening upon someone's request or order. It implies that an action or decision is being carried out because of the insistence or influence of a particular individual or entity.
  • take a bite of the reality sandwich To "take a bite of the reality sandwich" is an idiomatic expression that means facing or accepting the truth, often when it is unpleasant or hard to deal with. It implies acknowledging and confronting the facts or circumstances, even if they are difficult, challenging, or not what one wants to hear.
  • tear out of The idiom "tear out of" typically means to depart or exit a place suddenly and rapidly, often with great force or urgency. It can imply a sense of hastiness or impatience in one's departure.
  • pilot sth out of sth The idiom "pilot something out of something" typically means to navigate or steer something out of a difficult or dangerous situation. It can refer to physically guiding a vehicle or object out of a challenging environment, or metaphorically managing a situation or problem skillfully to achieve a desired outcome.
  • bail out (of sth) The idiom "bail out (of sth)" refers to the act of extracting oneself or others from a difficult, dangerous, or undesirable situation. It originated from the practice of using a bail, often a bucket, to remove water from a boat that is taking on too much water and at risk of sinking. In a figurative sense, "bail out" means to rescue or support someone or something that is struggling. It can also be used when someone withdraws or backs out of a commitment or responsibility.
  • keep you on the edge of your chair The idiom "keep you on the edge of your chair" means to keep someone in a state of suspense, excitement, or high anticipation. It refers to a situation or experience that is extremely engaging, captivating, or thrilling, causing someone to be fully absorbed or engrossed, as if sitting on the edge of their chair in anticipation.
  • be the best of a bad bunch/lot The idiom "be the best of a bad bunch/lot" means to be the least undesirable option or the most competent or skilled choice among a group of mediocre alternatives. It implies that although none of the available options are ideal or outstanding, one stands out as relatively better than the rest.
  • go the way of (something) The idiom "go the way of (something)" suggests that a person, thing, or organization is on the path to a similar fate as another person, thing, or organization that is declining or becoming obsolete. It implies that the subject will experience a similar outcome or meet the same fate.
  • in a couple of shakes The idiom "in a couple of shakes" means to complete a task or accomplish something quickly or in a very short period of time.
  • at the mercy of The idiom "at the mercy of" means being in a situation where one has no control or power, and is entirely reliant on someone or something else. It implies being vulnerable or subjected to the will, influence, or mercy of others, often without the ability to resist or defend oneself.
  • flirt with the idea of doing The idiom "flirt with the idea of doing something" means to consider or contemplate doing something, usually without committing to it fully. It implies a brief or casual interest in an idea or possibility, without any serious intention of pursuing it further.
  • dead of night The idiom "dead of night" refers to the period of time when it is extremely dark, usually in the middle of the night. It signifies a time when most people are asleep and there is little to no activity or noise.
  • lay the ghost of (something) to rest The idiom "lay the ghost of (something) to rest" means to finally put an end to or resolve something that has been a persistent source of fear, anxiety, or unresolved issues. It implies finding closure or peace regarding a troubling or haunting element from the past.
  • knock the spots out of The idiom "knock the spots out of" is typically used to describe someone who performs exceptionally well or surpasses all expectations in a particular activity or competition. It implies that the person is able to completely outshine or surpass others, leaving no room for comparison.
  • heal sm of sth The idiom "heal someone of something" means to help or assist someone in recovering from a physical or emotional ailment or a negative habit or behavior. It implies the process of alleviating someone's suffering, improving their condition, or enabling them to overcome a problem or difficulty.
  • at the forefront (of sth) The idiom "at the forefront (of sth)" refers to being in a leading, advanced, or prominent position in a certain field or area. It suggests being at the cutting edge of development, innovation, or progress in a specific context or industry. It can also imply being at the most important or influential position within a particular group or organization.
  • squeeze sth out of sb/sth The idiom "squeeze something out of someone/something" means to obtain or extract something, often through persuasion or effort, from someone or something, even if it is difficult or reluctant. It implies the act of obtaining information, money, or any other resource through persistent questioning, bargaining, or negotiation. It can also refer to obtaining the last remaining amount of something or the maximum effort from a person or thing.
  • be out of your depth Being "out of your depth" means to be in a situation that is too difficult or complicated for you to handle or understand properly. It often implies that a person lacks the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to successfully navigate or comprehend a particular situation.
  • at the zenith of sth The idiom "at the zenith of something" refers to being at the highest point or peak of something. It typically indicates a period of maximum success, power, or influence. It is commonly used to describe the highest point in one's career, the peak of an empire or civilization, or the climax of an event or phenomenon.
  • by way of sth The idiom "by way of something" means taking a certain route or method to reach a particular destination or outcome. It implies using a particular means or method to achieve a goal or to communicate something.
  • the length and breadth of smw The idiom "the length and breadth of smw" means covering or including the entirety, extent, or range of something. It suggests that one has explored, examined, or traversed every part or aspect of a place, topic, or situation.
  • price yourself/something out of the market The idiom "price yourself/something out of the market" means to set a price or cost that is so high that it becomes uncompetitive or unaffordable compared to other similar products or services available in the market. By doing so, one or a company excludes themselves from being a viable option for potential buyers or customers.
  • out of the question The idiom "out of the question" is used to express that something is not possible, not allowed, or not under consideration.
  • at the mercy of sm The idiom "at the mercy of someone" means being in a situation where one has no control or power, and is completely dependent on the actions or decisions of another person or entity. It implies vulnerability and helplessness.
  • make heads or tails (out) of (someone or something) The idiom "make heads or tails (out) of (someone or something)" means to try and understand or make sense of someone or something that is confusing, illogical, or unclear. It implies that the situation or person is difficult to comprehend or decipher.
  • give (someone or something) the benefit of the doubt To give someone or something the benefit of the doubt means to believe in someone's or something's innocence, goodness, or positive intentions, even in the absence of clear evidence. It implies choosing to have a favorable opinion or view despite doubts or suspicions. It is a willingness to trust or have faith in someone or something until proven otherwise.
  • not see hide nor hair of somebody/something The idiom "not see hide nor hair of somebody/something" means not to see any sign or trace of someone or something. It suggests that there has been no physical evidence or presence of the person or thing mentioned.
  • frighten the shit out of (someone) The idiom "frighten the shit out of (someone)" is an expression used to describe an extreme level of fear or terror experienced by someone. It suggests that the person is so terrified that they feel as if they have lost control or are experiencing a bodily reaction, often exaggerating the intensity of the fear they experienced.
  • in the safe hands of somebody The idiom "in the safe hands of somebody" means that someone is entrusted with or responsible for something and can be relied upon to handle it with great care, skill, or expertise, ensuring its well-being or success. It signifies a high level of trust and confidence in the person's ability to handle the given task or responsibility.
  • charge out (of sm place) The idiom "charge out (of sm place)" typically means to quickly and energetically leave a place or location. It implies moving with force or determination, as if charging forward.
  • burst out (of sth) The idiom "burst out (of sth)" means to suddenly and forcefully come out of or emerge from something. It usually implies a sudden or explosive movement or action.
  • a riot of colour The idiom "a riot of colour" refers to a vivid and vibrant display of various bright and bold colors. It signifies an overwhelming or extravagant arrangement or combination of colors that create a visually stunning and rich effect.
  • the kiss of life The idiom "the kiss of life" refers to an act of resuscitation, typically involving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, performed on someone who is unconscious or experiencing a life-threatening situation. It symbolizes an attempt to revive or save someone from danger or near-death.
  • be (in) the nature of the beast The idiom "be (in) the nature of the beast" refers to a situation or characteristic that is an inherent or fundamental part of a particular thing or person, and is difficult or impossible to change. It implies that certain traits or behaviors are natural and expected due to the inherent qualities of a specific subject or situation.
  • (just) taking care of business The idiom "(just) taking care of business" means to handle or complete necessary tasks or responsibilities efficiently and effectively. It implies taking action or getting things done in a focused and productive manner.
  • not see hide nor hair of sb The idiom "not see hide nor hair of someone" means to have no sight or trace of someone, indicating that the person is completely absent or missing.
  • pluck something out of the air The idiom "pluck something out of the air" means to come up with an idea or answer without any logical reasoning or basis, often hastily and without careful thought. It implies to invent or state something spontaneously without any prior knowledge or preparation.
  • in the gift of (someone) The idiom "in the gift of (someone)" typically refers to a situation where someone has the authority or power to decide or determine the outcome of a particular matter. It implies that the final decision or control over something lies within that person's jurisdiction or discretion.
  • at the feet of The idiom "at the feet of" means to be in the presence of, or to be under the power, influence, or guidance of someone or something. It suggests being in a subordinate position, acknowledging their authority, expertise, or wisdom. It can also imply learning from or being taught by someone with profound knowledge or skill.
  • in a class of (one's)/its own The idiom "in a class of one's/its own" refers to something or someone outstanding, superior, or unique in comparison to others. It implies that the person or thing being referred to stands out and is unparalleled or unmatched. It suggests a level of excellence or distinction that is unmatched by other similar things or individuals.
  • talk out of The idiom "talk out of" refers to persuading or convincing someone not to do something they had intended or wanted to do, generally by presenting arguments or reasons against it. It involves dissuading or discouraging someone from taking a particular course of action.
  • be the wrong side of 30 etc The idiom "be the wrong side of 30 (or any other age)" refers to someone being older than a particular milestone age, indicating that they have crossed over into the next decade of their life. For example, if someone is "on the wrong side of 30," they are older than 30 years old. This idiom is often used to imply that someone is no longer considered young or in their prime age, possibly suggesting that they are losing some of their youthful energy or abilities.
  • the top of the heap "The top of the heap" is an idiom used to describe someone or something that is at the highest level, position, or rank within a certain group or category. It refers to being the most successful, accomplished, or influential among others. It suggests being on top in terms of status, achievement, or excellence.
  • kneehigh by the 4th of July The idiom "kneehigh by the 4th of July" commonly refers to the height of agricultural crops, particularly corn, by Independence Day in the United States. The phrase means that the crops have grown to knee height or higher, indicating a healthy and successful growing season. It is often used to gauge the progress of crops and indicates favorable growing conditions.
  • get it out of your system The idiom "get it out of your system" means to express or release one's emotions, desires, or impulses in order to alleviate the urge or obsession. It suggests finding a way to rid oneself of a particular feeling or behavior to bring relief or a sense of closure.
  • a bed of nails The idiom "a bed of nails" is a phrase used to describe a situation or condition that is uncomfortable, challenging, or fraught with difficulties. It implies being in a state of constant stress, tension, or hardship, similar to the discomfort someone would experience by lying on a bed made of nails.
  • strike at the heart of The idiom "strike at the heart of" refers to taking action that directly affects or weakens the core or central aspect of something, often with the intention of causing significant damage or impact. It can also mean targeting the most important or vulnerable part of a system, organization, belief, or issue, in order to disrupt or dismantle it.
  • follow you to the ends of the earth The idiom "follow you to the ends of the earth" means to support and remain loyal to someone unconditionally, going to any lengths or doing anything necessary for their sake, regardless of the difficulties or challenges involved. It signifies a deep and unwavering commitment to someone.
  • streak of good luck The idiom "streak of good luck" refers to a continuous or consecutive series of fortunate or favorable events or outcomes experienced by an individual. It signifies a period during which luck seems to be consistently in someone's favor, often leading to positive opportunities or achievements.
  • run a risk (of sth) The idiom "run a risk (of sth)" means to take a chance or put oneself in a situation where there is a possibility of something negative or harmful happening. It refers to undertaking an action or decision that involves potential danger, loss, or unfavorable consequences.
  • dead of The idiom "dead of" is used to describe the exact middle or most intense part of a particular time or situation. It implies the peak or absolute center of something. It is often used to refer to a specific time of day or night, as well as the middle of a season or a particular event.
  • not be a barrel of laughs The idiom "not be a barrel of laughs" is used to describe someone or something that is not entertaining, amusing, or fun. It implies that the person or situation is dull, boring, or lacking in humor or enjoyment.
  • never have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say for (someone or something)" means that a person always speaks negatively or disparagingly about someone or something, without finding anything positive or commendable to mention. It refers to a constant tendency to criticize or find fault, lacking any ability or willingness to offer praise or in any way acknowledge the positive aspects.
  • the common run of (something) The idiom "the common run of (something)" refers to the average or typical type of something or someone within a particular category or group. It implies the norm or standard characteristics or qualities that are commonly found in that particular context or group.
  • decide in favor of sm or sth The idiom "decide in favor of someone or something" means to make a decision or judgment that is advantageous or supportive of a particular person, group, or thing. It implies choosing or determining in a way that demonstrates support or preference for that person or thing.
  • on the wrong side of history The idiom "on the wrong side of history" means being in opposition to social, moral, or cultural progress, and therefore likely to be judged negatively in the future. It suggests that someone or something is supporting or advocating for ideas, actions, or policies that are considered outdated, regressive, or morally wrong, and are likely to be disapproved or condemned by future generations.
  • piece of garbage The idiom "piece of garbage" is a derogatory term used to describe something or someone of extremely low quality, value, or worth. It implies that the object or person being referred to is regarded as worthless, useless, or contemptible.
  • pull the chestnuts out of the fire The idiom "pull the chestnuts out of the fire" means to rescue or protect someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at personal risk or by making an effort on behalf of others. It implies taking on a challenging task or responsibility in order to help or benefit someone else.
  • go (right) through (one) like a dose of salts The idiom "go (right) through (one) like a dose of salts" refers to something or someone having a powerful and rapid effect, often causing discomfort or distress. It originates from the phrase "like a dose of salts," which refers to the strong effects of a laxative medication or any other substance that generates a quick and intense response in the body. Therefore, when something "goes through someone like a dose of salts," it means it affects them swiftly, forcefully, and without mercy.
  • a/the gathering of the clans The idiom "a/the gathering of the clans" typically refers to a formal or informal meeting or event where members of a particular family or group come together. Often used to describe a reunion or assembly of relatives or individuals with shared ancestry, the phrase highlights a sense of unity, camaraderie, and collective identity within the group.
  • get no change out of somebody The idiom "get no change out of somebody" means that one is unable to gain any response, cooperation, or meaningful interaction from someone else, indicating that the person is unresponsive, uncooperative, or unyielding. It implies that all attempts to engage or elicit a reaction from the person are unsuccessful and do not yield any positive results.
  • make the best of a bad job The idiom "make the best of a bad job" means to accept and deal with a situation or task that is unpleasant, unsatisfactory, or undesirable in the best possible way. It implies making an effort to find some positive aspects or outcomes despite the challenging circumstances.
  • camel through the eye of a needle The idiom "camel through the eye of a needle" refers to a situation or task that is extremely difficult or nearly impossible to accomplish. It originates from a biblical passage where Jesus states, "It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God." This is often used figuratively to highlight the magnitude of a challenging or seemingly impossible endeavor.
  • dime's worth of difference The idiom "dime's worth of difference" refers to a situation where there is an insignificant or minimal distinction between two things or options. It implies that the difference is so small that it is practically negligible or inconsequential. It can be used to express that there is almost no disparity or advantage in choosing one option over another.
  • clip sth out of sth The idiom "clip something out of something" refers to the act of removing or cutting out a specific portion or piece from a larger whole or source. It can be a physical action of physically cutting or removing with scissors or similar tools, or it can refer to digitally extracting or selecting specific content from a document, article, image, or any other source material.
  • law of averages The idiom "law of averages" refers to the belief or principle that over a sufficiently long period, the possible outcomes of a particular event or situation will be evenly distributed, resulting in an average or expected result. It suggests that the likelihood of a certain outcome will increase or decrease to balance out deviations from the expected outcome.
  • be the tip of the iceberg The idiom "be the tip of the iceberg" means that something mentioned or seen is just a small, visible part of a much larger, hidden problem or issue. It implies that there is more to a situation than what is readily apparent, and the visible part is just an indication of a much larger, potentially more serious problem.
  • in the interest of justice The idiom "in the interest of justice" refers to doing something that is fair, morally right, or aligned with the principles of justice. It suggests that an action or decision is made with an objective to uphold fairness, promote equity, or serve the greater good.
  • hate the sight of (someone or something) The idiom "hate the sight of (someone or something)" means to strongly dislike or have deep aversion towards someone or something, to the extent that even their mere presence is distressing or repugnant.
  • get (someone) out of (somewhere) The idiom "get (someone) out of (somewhere)" means to help or assist someone in leaving a specific place or situation. It often implies rescue or liberation from a difficult, unpleasant, or dangerous environment.
  • part of the furniture The idiom "part of the furniture" refers to someone or something that has been around for so long or has become so familiar that they are taken for granted or seen as an integral and permanent part of a particular setting or group. It implies that the person or thing is so familiar to the extent that they are almost unnoticed or overlooked.
  • reap a/the harvest of (something) The idiom "reap a/the harvest of (something)" means to experience the results or consequences of previous actions, often referring to the positive or negative outcomes that come as a result of one's efforts or decisions in the past. It implies that the effects, whether positive or negative, have been earned or deserved.
  • of course not The idiom "of course not" is a direct and emphatic response typically used to express clear disagreement or negation in a situation. It usually indicates that the stated or implied statement is incorrect or impossible.
  • burst the bubble of (someone) The idiom "burst the bubble of (someone)" refers to the act of making someone face a harsh or unpleasant reality that shatters their innocent, optimistic, or deluded beliefs or expectations. It involves the revelation of a truth that contradicts or punctures their idealized view of a situation.
  • the gift of the gab The idiom "the gift of the gab" refers to the ability to speak eloquently, persuasively, and convincingly. It suggests having a natural talent for engaging and captivating others through one's words and speech.
  • a whale of a (good) time The idiom "a whale of a (good) time" is used to describe an incredibly enjoyable, exciting, or remarkable experience. It emphasizes that the experience was exceptionally fun, entertaining, or memorable, often implying that it was larger or grander than expected.
  • a few fries short of a Happy Meal The idiom "a few fries short of a Happy Meal" is used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence or common sense. It implies that the person is missing something essential, just like a Happy Meal would be incomplete without all its components.
  • consist of someone or something The idiom "consist of someone or something" means to be composed or made up of a particular person, thing, or group of people or things. It describes the essential elements or components that form a whole.
  • copy sth out of sth The idiom "copy something out of something" means to transcribe or duplicate something from one source or document into another, usually by hand. It refers to the act of reproducing or replicating information or text word for word.
  • the wrong side of the bed The idiom "the wrong side of the bed" is used to describe someone who woke up or started their day in a grumpy, irritable, or bad mood, which influences their behavior throughout the day. It suggests that their mood was negatively affected right from the beginning, possibly due to a bad night's sleep or other factors.
  • conceive of sm or sth The idiom "conceive of sm or sth" means to imagine, visualize, or form a mental image or idea of something. It refers to the process of mentally creating or understanding something that may be difficult to comprehend or envision.
  • cure sm of sth The idiom "cure someone of something" generally means to eliminate or relieve someone of a undesirable habit, behavior, or condition. It implies finding a solution or remedy that helps someone overcome a specific problem or issue they are facing.
  • out of kilter The idiom "out of kilter" means that something is not functioning or working properly. It refers to a situation or object that is imbalanced, disordered, or not aligned correctly. It suggests a state of being out of harmony, with some aspect being out of place or not in its usual or expected condition.
  • the cream of sth The idiom "the cream of something" refers to the best or most talented individuals or things within a particular category or group. It represents the highest quality or most exceptional part of something.
  • go out of way The idiom "go out of the way" means to make an extra effort or take additional actions to help someone, accommodate their needs, or fulfill a request. It suggests going beyond what is expected or required to assist or support someone.
  • bend sm out of shape The idiom "bend someone out of shape" means to cause someone to become upset, angry, or disturbed. It suggests that something has deeply affected someone emotionally or mentally, causing them to lose their composure or become overly agitated.
  • take cognizance of something The idiom "take cognizance of something" means to become aware of or acknowledge the existence, presence, or importance of something. It implies paying attention, recognizing, or taking note of a particular situation, information, or fact.
  • none of your beeswax The idiom "none of your beeswax" is a playful and slightly humorous way of telling someone that what they are asking or talking about is not their concern or none of their business. It is a polite and informal way of indicating that the topic is private, personal, or simply not relevant to the person being addressed.
  • take up the cudgels (on behalf of someone or something) To "take up the cudgels (on behalf of someone or something)" means to vigorously defend or support someone or something, often in a public or outspoken manner. It implies taking a stand, advocating, or fighting for someone's rights, interests, or causes. The phrase originates from the idea of taking up a cudgel (a short, thick stick used as a weapon) to engage in a physical confrontation on behalf of another person. However, in modern usage, it is used metaphorically to describe actively defending or championing a person, idea, or cause.
  • stretch the length of sth The idiom "stretch the length of something" means to extend or prolong the duration or distance of something. It suggests making something longer in terms of time or physical space.
  • keep (up) (one's) end of the bargain The idiom "keep (up) (one's) end of the bargain" means to fulfill or honor one's part of an agreement, contract, or promise. It implies that each party involved has specific responsibilities or obligations, and it emphasizes the importance of maintaining one's commitment. The phrase suggests that each person should meet their obligations and not let the other person down.
  • on a/the toss of a/the coin The idiom "on a/the toss of a/the coin" refers to a situation or decision that is determined by chance or luck. It implies that the outcome or resolution is completely unpredictable and relies solely on the result of a coin being tossed into the air and landing on either side. It suggests that there are equal chances for both possibilities, with no clear advantage or preference.
  • under the auspices of somebody/something The idiom "under the auspices of somebody/something" refers to an arrangement or situation in which someone or something provides support, protection, sponsorship, or guidance. It typically indicates that a particular person or organization has authority, control, or influence over a particular activity or event.
  • be full of (oneself) The idiom "be full of oneself" means to be excessively self-centered, conceited, or arrogant. It describes someone who has an inflated sense of self-importance and is excessively proud or boastful about their achievements.
  • want out of The idiom "want out of" typically means having a strong desire or intention to leave or escape from a particular situation, circumstance, or obligation. It suggests a feeling of being trapped, dissatisfied, or wanting a change from the present condition.
  • along the lines of sth The idiom "along the lines of something" means to be similar in nature or concept to something else. It suggests that something is based on a similar idea or follows a similar pattern as the thing being mentioned.
  • get nose out of joint and have nose out of joint put nose out of ... The idiom "get nose out of joint," or "have nose out of joint," refers to someone feeling upset, offended, or resentful due to someone else's actions or remarks. It conveys the idea of a person's ego or pride being wounded, resulting in irritation or anger. Alternatively, "put nose out of joint" means causing someone to feel annoyed, irritated, or upset by one's actions or comments.
  • bear the brunt of To "bear the brunt of" means to endure or suffer the most significant and direct impact or consequences of something, usually negative. It refers to being the primary target or recipient of the full force or weight of an action, situation, or event.
  • nearly fall out of (one's) chair The idiom "nearly fall out of (one's) chair" means to be extremely surprised or shocked by something to the point where one's reaction is exaggerated, often physically expressed by almost falling out of a chair. It implies that the person's astonishment is so great that it causes a strong physical reaction.
  • in the teeth of The idiom "in the teeth of" means to confront or face something directly and forcefully, often in the face of strong opposition or adverse circumstances. It implies a sense of defiance and determination despite obstacles or resistance.
  • in consequence (of sth) The idiom "in consequence (of sth)" means as a result or due to something. It signifies that an action or event occurred as a direct outcome or consequence of a certain circumstance or event.
  • at my, your, etc. time of life The idiom "at my/your/etc. time of life" refers to the specific period in one's life, often indicating a certain age or stage of development. It is generally used to convey the idea that certain experiences, circumstances, or expectations are typical or appropriate for that particular stage in life.
  • in the good (or bad) graces of The idiom "in the good (or bad) graces of" means to be in favor with someone or to have gained their approval and positive regard (in the good graces), or to have fallen out of favor and lost their approval (in the bad graces). It refers to the subjective evaluation of one's relationship or standing with another person.
  • lose sight of sm or sth The idiom "lose sight of someone or something" means to no longer stay focused or aware of someone or something, usually due to distractions or lack of attention. It can also refer to forgetting the importance or value of someone or something.
  • help sm (or an animal) out (of sth) The idiom "help someone (or an animal) out (of something)" means to provide assistance or aid to someone or something in getting out of a difficult, challenging, or undesirable situation or predicament. It implies offering support, guidance, or physical assistance to help someone or an animal escape or overcome a particular circumstance or problem.
  • come short of sth The idiom "come short of something" means to fail to achieve or reach a certain goal, expectation, or standard. It implies falling inadequate or lacking in a particular aspect.
  • have had more than your fair share of sth The idiom "have had more than your fair share of something" means to have received or experienced a larger amount or portion of something than one is entitled to or than is considered equitable or reasonable. It suggests that someone has had an excessive or disproportionate amount of something, often implying that they have had advantages or benefits at the expense of others.
  • ask of The idiom "ask of" means to request or expect something from someone. It implies that you are seeking assistance, help, or a favor from someone.
  • balls of the/(one's) feet The idiom "balls of the/(one's) feet" refers to the padded area between the toes and the arch of the foot. It specifically describes the part of the foot that is used for balance and agility, particularly during physical activities or when performing actions that require quick and precise movements.
  • clear out of sm place To "clear out of some place" means to leave or vacate a particular location or area, often quickly or without hesitation. It suggests a sense of urgency or a need to remove oneself from a situation or environment.
  • a flight of fancy/fantasy/imagination The idiom "a flight of fancy/fantasy/imagination" refers to a spontaneous or whimsical thought or idea that is not based on reality or practicality. It denotes a moment of imagination, daydreaming, or indulging in unrealistic ideas or scenarios.
  • make an example of someone The idiom "make an example of someone" refers to the act of punishing or disciplining a person in a severe manner in order to serve as a warning or deterrent to others. It conveys the idea of using someone's punishment as a public demonstration to discourage similar behavior from others.
  • take the brunt of (something) The idiom "take the brunt of (something)" means to bear the main force, impact, or responsibility of something, often referring to enduring the worst or harshest aspects or consequences of a situation. It implies being at the forefront or receiving the most severe effects of a particular event or circumstance.
  • labor of love The idiom "labor of love" refers to any work or task that a person willingly and enthusiastically does, despite the challenges and lack of financial gain, because they find deep personal fulfillment and satisfaction in it. It denotes an activity or project that is pursued out of love, passion, or dedication rather than for monetary rewards.
  • a man of God The idiom "a man of God" is typically used to describe a person, usually a religious leader or someone dedicated to their faith, who is seen as pious, virtuous, and deeply connected to their beliefs and spiritual practices. It implies that the person embodies the principles, values, and teachings of their respective religion and strives to live a righteous and moral life.
  • have a heart of stone The idiom "have a heart of stone" refers to someone who lacks empathy, compassion, or the ability to feel or express emotions towards others. It suggests that the person is cold, cruel, and unfeeling.
  • shell out (an amount of money) The idiom "shell out" means to spend or pay a significant amount of money, often reluctantly or unwillingly.
  • think highly of (someone or something) The idiom "think highly of (someone or something)" means to have a favorable or positive opinion, regard, or esteem for someone or something. It implies holding a high level of respect or admiration.
  • do/make a good/bad job of sth The idiom "do/make a good/bad job of something" means to perform a task or complete a project in a satisfactory or unsatisfactory manner, respectively. It refers to the quality or level of success achieved in accomplishing a particular task or endeavor.
  • the rule of law The idiom "the rule of law" refers to the principle that all individuals, including those in positions of power, are subject to and accountable to the law, as opposed to being governed by arbitrary decisions or personal whims. It implies that no one is above the law, and that laws should be applied fairly and consistently to all members of a society. The concept emphasizes the importance of a just legal system in upholding individual rights, maintaining order, and ensuring equality before the law.
  • the lap of luxury The idiom "the lap of luxury" refers to an extremely comfortable and luxurious lifestyle or setting. It implies indulgence, opulence, and being surrounded by lavishness or abundance in terms of wealth, material possessions, and comfort.
  • by dint of (something) The idiom "by dint of (something)" refers to accomplishing or achieving something through great effort, determination, or force. It suggests that success or a result is obtained as a direct consequence of the said effort or force.
  • come within an ace of sth/doing sth The idiom "come within an ace of sth/doing sth" means to come very close to achieving or experiencing something, but ultimately falling just short. It implies that the person or thing was just one step away from success or completion. The phrase "an ace" is derived from card games, particularly in games like poker where an ace is the highest-ranking card, therefore representing a narrow miss or a near victory.
  • let go of The idiom "let go of" means to release or stop holding onto something, either physically or emotionally. It can refer to physically releasing an object or emotionally detaching oneself from a person, situation, or negative feelings.
  • not have a ghost of a chance The idiom "not have a ghost of a chance" means that someone has no possibility or likelihood of success in a situation. It implies that the chances of achieving something are extremely slim or nonexistent.
  • run afoul of The idiom "run afoul of" means to come into conflict or disagreement with someone or something, often unintentionally, resulting in difficulties or problems. It can also refer to violating rules, laws, or regulations and facing consequences as a result.
  • the face of sth The idiom "the face of something" refers to the representation or appearance of something, often highlighting its characteristic features or qualities. It can also refer to a person who is closely associated with a particular cause, movement, or organization, often being seen as the prominent figure or spokesperson.
  • can’t hit the side of a barn The idiom "can't hit the side of a barn" is used to describe someone who has very poor aim or accuracy, especially in sports or any situation requiring precision. It indicates that the person is unable to hit even a large, easy target, implying a lack of skill or ability.
  • jolt someone out of something The idiom "jolt someone out of something" means to shock or startle someone abruptly, causing them to stop or break free from a particular state, such as a daydream, trance, or inattentiveness. It implies a sudden interruption that snaps someone back to reality or awareness.
  • to the end of (one's) days The idiom "to the end of (one's) days" means throughout one's entire life or until the day they die. It refers to a commitment, duty, or condition that will persist without exception or conclusion until the person's death.
  • because of sth The idiom "because of something" is used to explain the reason or cause behind a particular action, situation, or outcome. It indicates that there is a specific factor or circumstance that directly led to the stated result.
  • bust sm out of sm place The idiom "bust sm out of sm place" typically means to rescue or liberate someone from a difficult or undesirable situation, often involving a location or institution. It suggests a forceful or daring action to free someone from confinement, oppression, or captivity.
  • bug the hell/crap/shit out of somebody The idiom "bug the hell/crap/shit out of somebody" means to annoyingly pester, bother, or irritate someone excessively. It implies that the person's actions or presence are causing extreme frustration or agitation.
  • make much of sth The idiom "make much of something" means to attach great importance or significance to something or someone. It implies giving a lot of attention, praise, or value to a particular thing or person.
  • full of hot air The idiom "full of hot air" refers to someone who talks a lot, but lacks substance or credibility in what they say. It describes a person who often exaggerates or boasts, but rarely delivers on their promises or claims. It suggests that someone is filled with empty words or ideas, lacking genuine or well-founded knowledge or competence.
  • beast of burden The idiom "beast of burden" refers to a person or thing that is relied upon or used to carry out difficult or tedious tasks or responsibilities. It originates from the practice of utilizing animals (beasts of burden) like horses or oxen for carrying heavy loads. In a figurative sense, it describes someone who is burdened with a lot of work, responsibilities, or obligations.
  • dispossess sm of sth The idiom "dispossess someone of something" means to take away or deprive someone of their possessions or property, often forcefully or unlawfully.
  • cross sm or sth off (of) sth The idiom "cross sm or sth off (of) sth" means to remove or eliminate someone or something from a list, schedule, or plan. It typically involves marking a line through an item on a physical or mental list to indicate that it is no longer valid or active. It suggests the act of canceling or disregarding something.
  • (almost) jump out of one's skin The idiom "(almost) jump out of one's skin" refers to a state of extreme surprise, fear, or anticipation that causes someone to react with an exaggerated physical or emotional response. It implies that the person is so startled or excited that they feel as if they could literally jump out of their own skin.
  • a hell of a lot of The idiom "a hell of a lot of" is used to emphasize a large quantity or amount of something. It is often used to express the speaker's surprise, astonishment, or intensity of feelings regarding the extent of what they are describing.
  • the ends of the earth The idiom "the ends of the earth" refers to a faraway or distant place, often used to emphasize the extent of someone's effort or determination to reach or accomplish something. It implies that they are willing to go to great lengths or overcome significant obstacles, suggesting a figurative journey to the furthest, most remote corners of the world.
  • fight shy of something/of doing something The idiom "fight shy of something/of doing something" means to avoid or hesitate to engage in a particular action or situation, often due to fear, uncertainty, or caution. It implies a reluctance or unwillingness to fully commit or get involved.
  • the first flush of youth, enthusiasm, etc. The idiom "the first flush of youth, enthusiasm, etc." refers to the initial, vibrant stage of a person's youthfulness, enthusiasm, or any other positive quality. It describes the early period when these traits are at their peak and most vibrant.
  • give someone a dose of their own medicine The idiom "give someone a dose of their own medicine" means to treat someone in the same negative or retributive way that they have treated others, usually as a form of retaliation or payback. It suggests that the person should experience firsthand the consequences or pain that they have inflicted on others, serving as a form of justice or comeuppance.
  • in the great scheme of things "In the great scheme of things" is an idiom used to emphasize the perspective that something is not particularly important or significant when considering the larger, broader context or the overall grand scheme of life or the universe. It emphasizes the insignificance of an individual or event in relation to the larger scale of things.
  • sell someone a bill of goods The idiom "sell someone a bill of goods" means to deceive or trick someone by giving them false or misleading information to persuade or convince them of something that is not true or accurate. It implies that someone has been convinced of a false belief or misled into making a poor decision.
  • out of touch (with sth) The idiom "out of touch (with sth)" means to be unaware or not fully understanding something, typically because one has not kept up with recent developments or changes related to a particular topic, idea, or group of people. It suggests a lack of knowledge, familiarity, or connection with the current situation or trends.
  • be in the grip of The idiom "be in the grip of" means to be strongly affected or influenced by something, typically in a negative or restrictive way. It suggests that someone or something has a firm hold or control over a person or situation, making it difficult to escape or overcome its impact.
  • bow down in the house of Rimmon The idiom "bow down in the house of Rimmon" refers to a situation where someone compromises their principles or beliefs for personal gain or to appease others. It originates from a biblical story in the Second Book of Kings where the Syrian commander Naaman, who is afflicted with leprosy, seeks healing from the prophet Elisha. Elisha instructs Naaman to wash in the Jordan River seven times, but Naaman is initially reluctant. He eventually follows the instruction and is healed. However, after being healed, Naaman asks Elisha for forgiveness in advance as he is obligated to accompany his king to the temple of the god Rimmon and bow down there, even though he does not personally worship Rimmon. Elish
  • a land of milk and honey The idiom "a land of milk and honey" refers to a place or situation that is abundant, prosperous, and filled with great opportunities, particularly in terms of wealth, success, comfort, or satisfaction. It implies a place where everything is plentiful and desirable, often associated with prosperity or a promised land. The phrase originates from biblical references and is often used metaphorically to describe an idealized or highly favorable condition or place.
  • fall out of favor The idiom "fall out of favor" means to lose popularity, support, or approval, usually due to a change in circumstances, attitude, or behavior. It implies a decline in someone's or something's reputation or perceived value.
  • act of faith The idiom "act of faith" refers to a belief or action that requires trust, confidence, and dedication in the absence of conclusive evidence or proof. It often involves taking a leap of faith or making a commitment based on confidence in something or someone, regardless of uncertainty or doubt.
  • by the look(s) of it/things The idiom "by the look(s) of it/things" refers to making a judgment or inference based on the visual or general appearance of a situation or object. It indicates forming an opinion or conclusion without further evidence or detailed knowledge.
  • of a kind/sort The idiom "of a kind/sort" refers to something that is similar or comparable to another thing or things in terms of their characteristics, qualities, or nature. It suggests that the objects being compared share common traits, features, or attributes that make them belong to the same category or group.
  • (very) picture of sth The idiom "(very) picture of sth" refers to a person or thing that perfectly exemplifies or represents a particular quality, characteristic, or condition. It describes someone or something as being the epitome or perfect example of a specific concept or appearance.
  • a bitch of (something) The idiom "a bitch of (something)" is a colloquial expression that typically means a difficult or challenging situation or task. It is commonly used to convey frustration, struggle, or annoyance when dealing with something problematic or demanding. The term "bitch" in this context is a slang term for something unpleasant or troublesome.
  • dark side of sm or sth The idiom "dark side of sm or sth" refers to the negative or hidden aspects or consequences of a specific person, situation, or thing that are not immediately apparent or widely known. It implies that there is a downside or potential harm associated with the subject at hand, which may be obscured or overlooked.
  • out of the mouths of babes and sucklings The expression "out of the mouths of babes and sucklings" means that young children or infants sometimes say profound or wise things, despite their lack of experience or knowledge. It emphasizes the unexpected wisdom that can come from the innocent and uninhibited perspective of the young.
  • in the depth(s) of winter The idiom "in the depth(s) of winter" refers to the coldest and most severe part of the winter season. It implies a period of extreme cold, darkness, or harshness typically experienced during the winter months.
  • be a shadow of (someone or something's) former self The idiom "be a shadow of (someone or something's) former self" means to be much less successful, powerful, or impressive in comparison to what or who it used to be. It refers to a significant decline or deterioration in quality, abilities, or achievements.
  • be tired of (something) The idiom "be tired of (something)" means to become bored, fed up, or lacking interest or enthusiasm toward something. It refers to a feeling of weariness or dissatisfaction that arises from repeated exposure or experience with that particular thing.
  • make a mess of sth The idiom "make a mess of something" means to handle or manage something poorly or incompetently, resulting in a disorderly, chaotic, or unsuccessful outcome. It implies making mistakes, causing confusion or disruption, and failing to accomplish the task efficiently or effectively.
  • keep out of sight The idiom "keep out of sight" means to remain unseen or hidden, or to stay out of view in order to avoid being noticed or detected by others. It suggests being discreet, staying in the background, or intentionally concealing oneself or something from public or specific individual's attention.
  • be, come, etc. within a whisker of something/of doing something The idiom "be, come, etc. within a whisker of something/of doing something" means to be very close or almost achieving or completing something. It implies being at the verge or on the brink of accomplishing a certain goal or outcome. The use of "whisker" refers to a very small distance or gap, emphasizing how close one is to achieving what they desire.
  • make an example of sm The idiom "make an example of someone" means to punish or discipline someone in a severe manner in order to serve as a warning to others.
  • bust someone out of somewhere The idiom "bust someone out of somewhere" means to rescue or liberate a person forcibly or covertly from a place, typically a prison, detention facility, or a difficult or unwanted situation. It implies a daring or illicit operation to free someone against their will or against the intended regulations and protocols.
  • the shit out of sb/sth The idiom "the shit out of someone/something" is an informal expression that means to do something vigorously, forcefully, or intensely. It often implies doing something to an excessive or extreme extent. However, it is important to note that this is an idiomatic, colloquial phrase that can be considered vulgar or offensive in certain contexts.
  • night of the long knives The idiom "night of the long knives" refers to a sudden and brutal act of political purging or a series of ruthless actions against perceived opponents within an organization or government. It originated from the historical event known as the "Night of the Long Knives" that took place on June 30, 1934, in Nazi Germany, where Adolf Hitler ordered the execution of political rivals and dissenting members of the Nazi Party. Today, the idiom is used to describe any surprising and drastic elimination or expulsion of individuals deemed as a threat or obstacle.
  • make a fool of The idiom "make a fool of" means to cause someone to appear silly, foolish, or ridiculous in front of others, typically by one's own actions or words. It implies embarrassing or humiliating someone by making them look foolish or incompetent.
  • the pit of your/the stomach The idiom "the pit of your/the stomach" refers to a feeling of intense uneasiness or strong emotion, typically located in the lower part of the abdomen. It is often associated with sensations of fear, anxiety, or unease. This phrase is used metaphorically to describe a deep-seated and powerful emotional reaction that can be physically felt in one's gut.
  • a pillar of strength The idiom "a pillar of strength" refers to someone who is a reliable and unwavering source of support, comfort, and stability. They are strong and dependable, often providing guidance and assistance during challenging times.
  • keep inside (of sth) The idiom "keep inside (of sth)" typically means to contain or restrain one's emotions, thoughts, or feelings, without expressing them outwardly or making them known to others. It refers to the act of hiding or suppressing what one truly feels or thinks.
  • be of (one's) own making The idiomatic expression "be of (one's) own making" means that a certain situation or problem has been caused or created by the individual themselves. It suggests that the person is solely responsible for their predicament due to their own decisions, actions, or choices.
  • out of the ballpark The definition of the idiom "out of the ballpark" is when something exceeds expectations, is immensely successful, or surpasses all previous accomplishments or efforts. This phrase is often used to describe a remarkable achievement or an exceptional performance.
  • be in favor of (something) The idiom "be in favor of something" means to support or approve of a particular idea, action, or proposal. It suggests having a positive opinion or preference for something and being inclined towards its implementation or success.
  • least of all The idiom "least of all" means that someone or something is the last or the most unlikely to possess a particular quality or characteristic among a group of people or things. It is used to emphasize that the mentioned person or thing is the least or the most unexpected of all.
  • love of life The idiom "love of life" refers to an individual's strong affection, enthusiasm, and appreciation for their own existence, often characterized by a positive and optimistic outlook on life and a deep enjoyment of the present moment. It represents a genuine passion for living, embracing experiences, and finding joy in various aspects of life.
  • be/get/run/etc. out of control The idiom "be/get/run/etc. out of control" typically describes a situation or behaviour that has become unmanageable, chaotic, or impossible to regulate. It implies a lack of restraint, discipline, or oversight, resulting in an unpredictable or uncontrollable state.
  • owe someone a debt of gratitude The idiom "owe someone a debt of gratitude" means to have a strong sense of gratitude and appreciation towards someone for their help, kindness, or support. It implies being deeply indebted to that person and feeling a moral or emotional obligation to repay them.
  • from the corner of eye The idiom "from the corner of the eye" refers to seeing or perceiving something indirectly or out of one's periphery vision, rather than looking directly at it. It suggests a subtle or discreet observation of something or someone.
  • have a good/healthy pair of lungs The idiom "have a good/healthy pair of lungs" refers to someone who has strong and healthy respiratory organs and is able to breathe easily and take in deep breaths. It is often used to praise someone's ability to speak loudly, sing well, or sustain physical activities that require endurance.
  • cream of the crop, the The idiom "cream of the crop, the" refers to the top or highest quality individuals or things within a specific group or category. It signifies the very best or most exceptional out of a larger group.
  • in pursuit of sth The idiom "in pursuit of something" refers to the act of actively seeking, pursuing, or striving to attain a specific goal, purpose, or objective. It implies making efforts, taking actions, or dedicating oneself to the task of achieving or obtaining something desired.
  • see the last of sth/sb The idiom "see the last of sth/sb" means to experience or witness the final appearance or departure of something or someone. It implies that one does not expect to encounter or experience it again in the future.
  • tissue of lies The idiom "tissue of lies" is used to describe a web or network of deceitful or false statements or stories. It refers to a series of lies that are interconnected or woven together, creating a complex and elaborate fabric of falsehoods.
  • time of one's life The idiom "time of one's life" refers to an exceptionally enjoyable, exciting, or memorable period in a person's existence. It indicates an experience or moment filled with happiness, joy, and fulfillment.
  • get out of a fix The idiom "get out of a fix" means to find a solution or way to escape a difficult or challenging situation. It typically refers to successfully resolving a problem or predicament that one is in.
  • chicken out (of sth) The idiom "chicken out (of sth)" means to back down or retract from a situation or commitment because of fear, apprehension, or cowardice. It refers to someone lacking the courage or determination to follow through with something they had agreed or planned to do.
  • inclusive of The idiom "inclusive of" means to include something or someone. It indicates that the mentioned item or person is part of a larger group or total.
  • over the course of The idiom "over the course of" means throughout a period of time or during the entire duration of something. It refers to an action, event, or process that occurs gradually or changes gradually over a specific time period.
  • You scared the hell out of me The idiom "You scared the hell out of me" means that someone has frightened or terrified someone else to an extreme degree. It expresses the feeling of being scared or startled to the point of feeling intense fear or anxiety.
  • in the course of time The idiom "in the course of time" refers to the passage of time or the gradual progression of events or actions over a period, often implying that something will happen or change naturally or inevitably as time goes by. It suggests that patience and persistence are necessary for the outcome or desired result to occur.
  • peel off (of) (sth) The idiom "peel off (of) (sth)" refers to the act of separating or removing oneself from a group or situation. It can be applied to physical as well as metaphorical situations. Literal meaning: To remove or separate one's self from a surface or object by peeling. Example: "He peels off the sticker from his laptop." Metaphorical meaning: To withdraw or detach oneself from a group, activity, or situation. Example: "After finishing their project, she decided to peel off from the team and pursue a different opportunity."
  • multitude of sins The idiom "multitude of sins" refers to the idea that one's positive qualities or actions can outweigh or compensate for a wide range of negative qualities or actions. It suggests that despite having flaws or making mistakes, an individual's overall character or accomplishments can still be considered favorable.
  • out of date The idiom "out of date" refers to something that is no longer relevant, current, or up-to-date. It suggests that the thing in question is old-fashioned, antiquated, or past its prime.
  • copy (something) out of (something) The idiom "copy (something) out of (something)" means to replicate or transcribe specific information or content found in a particular source, such as a book, document, or website, onto paper or into another medium. It implies the act of carefully reproducing or duplicating the selected material.
  • put sm or sth out of the way The idiom "put something out of the way" means to move or place something in a location where it is no longer in the direct path or within reach, often to create more space or to prevent obstruction. It is often used figuratively to indicate the act of resolving or completing a task or problem so it is no longer a source of concern or hindrance.
  • take the bread out of people's mouths The idiom "take the bread out of people's mouths" means to take away or deprive someone of their means of livelihood or income, often by competing for the same resources or job opportunities. It refers to a situation where one's actions or decisions negatively impact others' ability to support themselves or their families.
  • Adequacy of coverage The idiom "adequacy of coverage" refers to the extent or level of protection provided by an insurance policy or the sufficient amount of insurance coverage one has for potential risks or claims. It implies that the policy or coverage is enough to meet financial needs in case of a loss, damage, or liability.
  • be a figment of your/the imagination The idiom "be a figment of your/the imagination" means that something or someone does not exist in reality and is only a creation of one's mind or imagination. It suggests that the perceived thing or person is not tangible or has no basis in truth.
  • know the time of day The idiom "know the time of day" means to have knowledge or understanding of a situation or to be aware of what is happening. It refers to being well-informed, knowledgeable, or up-to-date about a particular matter.
  • piece (of the action) The idiom "piece (of the action)" typically refers to being involved in a particular event or activity, usually one that is exciting, profitable, or prestigious. It suggests having a share or participation in something desirable or advantageous.
  • smack of sth The idiom "smack of something" means that something strongly suggests or displays a particular quality or characteristic. It implies that there is a clear and distinct indication or flavor of something.
  • play (a game of) cat and mouse The idiom "play (a game of) cat and mouse" refers to a situation where someone deliberately teases, manipulates, or tricks another person, typically by alternating between being elusive and pursuing them. It involves tactics similar to that of a cat toying with a mouse, creating a sense of suspense, unpredictability, and power dynamics between the individuals involved.
  • a game of musical chairs The idiom "a game of musical chairs" refers to a situation in which there is limited availability or opportunity, and multiple people are vying for that limited resource or position. It describes a competitive and uncertain environment where people must constantly try to secure a place or advantage before it is taken by someone else. The idiom draws its inspiration from the children's game, where players walk or dance around a set of chairs while the music is playing, and must quickly find a seat when the music stops.
  • reek of sth The idiom "reek of sth" refers to a situation or object having a strong, distinct, and often unpleasant smell or odor. It implies that the smell is overwhelming or dominant, and can be used to describe situations, places, or objects that exude a strong scent or aura.
  • see no further than the end of one's nose The idiom "see no further than the end of one's nose" means to have a limited perspective or lack the ability to consider or understand anything beyond one's immediate surroundings or personal interests. It refers to someone who fails to look at the bigger picture or think beyond their own perspective.
  • evening of life The idiom "evening of life" refers to the later years in a person's life, typically associated with old age or the period approaching the end of one's life. It symbolizes the twilight years, suggesting the closing stages of one's existence or the final chapter of life's journey.
  • hard on the heels of something The idiom "hard on the heels of something" refers to something that occurs very soon after or closely follows another event or situation. It signifies a rapid sequence or immediate succession of events.
  • (have, get, want, etc.) your pound of flesh The idiom "(have, get, want, etc.) your pound of flesh" originates from William Shakespeare's play "The Merchant of Venice." It refers to someone's demand for their full revenge or rightful dues, often with an unforgiving or exacting attitude. It implies a deep desire for justice or retribution without any consideration for mercy or leniency. The phrase emphasizes the severity and inflexibility of a person's demand, regardless of the consequences it may have on others.
  • get the hang of The idiom "get the hang of" means to become proficient or skilled at something, to understand how to do or use something successfully, or to grasp the basic concept or technique of something.
  • breeze out (of sm place) The idiom "breeze out (of sm place)" means to exit or leave a place quickly and effortlessly. It implies leaving without causing any fuss or attracting much attention.
  • make mincemeat (out) of someone The idiom "make mincemeat (out) of someone" means to defeat or overpower someone easily and quickly. It implies a complete and thorough victory or domination over the opponent. It often suggests that the defeat is so severe that the person is metaphorically "chopped into small pieces," like meat which has been minced.
  • scour sth off (of) sth The idiom "scour sth off (of) sth" typically refers to the act of removing or cleaning something vigorously from a surface. It can be used to describe the action of scrubbing or scrubbing away dirt, residue, or other substances from an object or a particular area.
  • order sm out of sm place The idiom "order someone out of somewhere" means to command or instruct someone to leave or exit a particular place. It suggests the act of forcefully ejecting or removing a person from a specific location.
  • see the light of day The idiom "see the light of day" means to come into existence or to become known or revealed. It refers to something that was previously concealed, hidden, or unknown, finally being brought to light or becoming visible.
  • out of key The idiom "out of key" refers to something or someone that is not in harmony or agreement with a particular situation or group. It suggests a lack of compatibility or being out of sync with the prevailing circumstances or expectations.
  • be/come down on sb like a ton of bricks The idiom "be/come down on sb like a ton of bricks" means to criticize, reprimand, or punish someone severely and abruptly. It implies a forceful and intense response to someone's actions or behavior.
  • a sword of Damocles hangs over head The idiom "a sword of Damocles hangs over one's head" refers to a constant or imminent threat or danger that someone faces. It originated from a Greek mythological story about Damocles, a courtier who was invited to sit on the king's throne. However, above his head, a sword was suspended by a single hair, signifying the constant risk and vulnerability of those in power. Thus, the phrase is used to depict a precarious situation where a person feels a significant threat or impending doom.
  • in the name of (someone or something) The idiom "in the name of (someone or something)" refers to performing an action, making a request, or proclaiming a belief in the authority or cause of someone or something. It implies that the action is done as a representation or on behalf of the mentioned figure or principle. It can also suggest that the action or request is carried out with the intention of honoring, supporting, or justifying the mentioned entity or concept.
  • having the time of my life The idiom "having the time of my life" means to be experiencing an exceptionally enjoyable or exciting time. It implies that one is thoroughly enjoying a particular moment or period, often to an extent that it feels like the best time they have ever had.
  • wash hands of The idiom "wash hands of" means to disassociate oneself from or be free of any responsibility, blame, or involvement in a situation or problem. It implies a desire to remove oneself from a difficult or troublesome situation and avoid any future consequences or repercussions.
  • scare, annoy, etc. the hell out of somebody The idiom "scare, annoy, etc. the hell out of somebody" refers to an extreme or intensified expression of fright, annoyance, or any other strong emotion that greatly affects someone. It implies causing intense fear, irritation, disturbance, or discomfort to an individual. The addition of "the hell out of somebody" intensifies the impact of the verb, emphasizing a powerful or overwhelming effect on the person's emotions or state of mind.
  • bottom of the line The idiom "bottom of the line" refers to the lowest point or the worst outcome of a situation. It implies a situation or result that is undesirable, inferior, or of poor quality.
  • at the bottom of the heap/pile The idiom "at the bottom of the heap/pile" typically refers to being in the lowest position or ranking within a group, organization, or hierarchy. It suggests being in the least favorable or advantageous position where opportunities and resources may be scarce or limited.
  • a man of means The idiom "a man of means" refers to an individual who is wealthy or financially well-off. It implies that the person has significant financial resources at their disposal and is capable of affording an affluent lifestyle.
  • whole ball of wax The idiom "whole ball of wax" refers to the entirety or entirety of something, including all its aspects, components, or elements. It often implies that everything related to a particular situation or topic is being taken into consideration or addressed.
  • speak of the devil, and he appears The idiom "speak of the devil, and he appears" is used to express the coincidence of someone being mentioned and then suddenly appearing or entering the scene. It signifies that talking about someone unexpectedly summons or attracts their presence.
  • be the best of a bad bunch The expression "be the best of a bad bunch" means that even though something or someone may not be ideal or exceptional, they are still the most desirable or competent option among a group of unsatisfactory alternatives.
  • on the wrong end of something The idiom "on the wrong end of something" typically means being in a disadvantageous or unfavorable position in a particular situation or outcome. It suggests that someone is experiencing the negative consequences or results of a situation instead of benefiting from it.
  • be on the threshold of doing sth The idiom "be on the threshold of doing something" means to be at the point just before starting or achieving something significant. It refers to being on the verge or about to begin an important action, event, or accomplishment.
  • lack the courage of (one's) convictions The idiom "lack the courage of one's convictions" means to be hesitant or reluctant to act upon or defend one's beliefs or principles, especially in the face of opposition or adversity. It refers to a person who lacks the confidence or determination to stand up for what they believe in.
  • be of two minds, at be in two minds The idiom "be of two minds" or "be in two minds" means to be uncertain or undecided about something, experiencing conflicting thoughts or emotions regarding a particular situation or choice. It refers to the state of being torn between two different opinions, options, or courses of action, making it challenging to come to a definitive decision.
  • flunk out (of sth) The idiom "flunk out (of sth)" refers to failing or performing poorly in a specific area of study or a course, leading to being expelled or forced to withdraw. It is commonly used in the context of academic pursuits, such as school or university.
  • breach of promise The idiom "breach of promise" refers to the failure or refusal to fulfill a commitment or agreement, especially in the context of a romantic relationship or engagement. It implies breaking one's promise or failing to live up to expectations or obligations.
  • dream of (someone or something) The idiom "dream of (someone or something)" means to have thoughts, desires, or aspirations related to a particular person or thing. It implies a strong inclination or longing for someone or something.
  • come down on sb like a ton of bricks The idiom "come down on someone like a ton of bricks" means to reprimand or criticize someone severely and aggressively. It describes the act of treating someone harshly or with no mercy, overwhelming them with criticism or punishment, similar to a heavy weight falling on them abruptly.
  • go through someone like a dose of (the) salts The idiom "go through someone like a dose of (the) salts" means that something or someone is very effective or impactful, usually in a negative or overwhelming way. It implies that the impact is abrupt, intense, and leaves no chance for resistance or recovery. The phrase "dose of (the) salts" specifically refers to the harsh and purgative effect of a strong laxative, representing the speed and forcefulness with which someone or something has an effect on another person.
  • a bit of rough The idiom "a bit of rough" typically refers to a person with a more rugged or rough appearance or mannerisms. It is often used to describe someone who is not refined or polished, and may have a more rough-around-the-edges or tough attitude.
  • Great balls of fire! The idiom "Great balls of fire!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, astonishment, or sometimes, excitement. It is similar to saying "Wow!" or "Oh my goodness!" and is often used to describe a situation or event that is impressive, unexpected, or extraordinary. The expression can also convey a sense of enthusiasm or admiration towards something remarkable or impressive.
  • get to the bottom of The idiom "get to the bottom of" means to uncover or discover the true cause, origin, or explanation of something, typically by conducting a thorough investigation or examination. It implies reaching a definitive understanding or finding the fundamental truth regarding a particular issue or situation.
  • come within an ace of The idiom "come within an ace of" means to come extremely close to achieving or accomplishing something, but falling just short in the end. It refers to being on the brink of success, victory, or achieving a goal, but missing it by the narrowest margin or by a stroke of bad luck.
  • be in a class of (one's)/its own The idiom "be in a class of (one's)/its own" means to be uniquely exceptional or unparalleled in quality, excellence, or distinctiveness compared to others. It implies that the person, object, or entity stands out from the rest due to their unmatched superiority or distinct characteristics.
  • in place of someone or something The idiom "in place of someone or something" means to substitute or replace someone or something or to act as their representative or alternative.
  • the man of the match The idiom "the man of the match" refers to the player who has performed exceptionally well and contributed significantly to their team's success in a particular sporting event. This title is often awarded to the most outstanding or influential player in that match.
  • one of those days The idiom "one of those days" refers to a day when everything seems to go wrong or is particularly challenging, with various frustrating or unpleasant occurrences happening one after another. It implies that the day is not going well and is characterized by a series of unfortunate events or difficulties.
  • in/out of favour The idiom "in/out of favour" refers to someone or something being liked or approved of by others, or the opposite, being disliked or disapproved of. It can describe a person's popularity or acceptance in a particular group or society, often subject to changes in opinion or circumstances.
  • remand someone (in)to the custody of someone The idiom "remand someone (in)to the custody of someone" refers to a legal decision made by a court or authority to detain a person in the care or possession of another individual or institution. It indicates the temporary or ongoing transfer of responsibility and control over a person's custody to another party.
  • can of corn The idiom "can of corn" typically refers to something that is very easy or unchallenging. It originated from baseball and originally referred to a fly ball hit to an outfielder that is easy to catch, akin to taking a can of corn off a shelf at a grocery store.
  • come within an inch of doing sth The idiom "come within an inch of doing something" means to have come very close to doing or achieving something but ultimately falling short or narrowly avoiding it. It implies that the person was almost successful but missed it by a very small margin or narrowly avoided a negative outcome.
  • in sb's/sth's name, at in the name of sb/sth The idiom "in sb's/sth's name" or "in the name of sb/sth" refers to performing an action or carrying out a task on behalf of someone or something else. It implies acting as a representative or agent for the mentioned person or entity. It can also pertain to conducting an action for the sake of a specific cause or principle.
  • someone's bag of tricks The idiom "someone's bag of tricks" refers to the collection of skills, strategies, techniques, or resources that a person has at their disposal and can employ to achieve a desired outcome or to gain an advantage in various situations. It implies someone's range of abilities or clever strategies that can be used effectively.
  • take a leaf out of somebody's book The idiom "take a leaf out of somebody's book" means to emulate or adopt someone's behavior, actions, or approach in order to achieve similar success or to improve oneself. It suggests learning from someone's example or following their lead.
  • difference of opinion The idiom "difference of opinion" refers to a situation where two or more people have opposing views or beliefs on a particular matter. It implies a disagreement or a conflict arising from conflicting perspectives, ideas, or interpretations.
  • the cream of the crop The idiom "the cream of the crop" refers to the best or highest-quality people or things within a particular group or category. It emphasizes the superiority of a select few who stand out from the rest due to their exceptional qualities, skills, or achievements.
  • get ahold of, at get hold of The idiom "get ahold of" or "get hold of" means to successfully make contact with someone or to find or obtain something. It expresses the act of getting in touch with someone or getting possession of something you want or need.
  • take a leaf out of sm's book The idiom "take a leaf out of someone's book" means to adopt or imitate the behavior or habits of someone else, usually because they are successful, admirable, or knowledgeable in a particular area. It suggests learning from someone's example and applying their strategies or techniques to one's own life or situation.
  • get sth out of the way The idiom "get something out of the way" means to complete or deal with something that needs to be done or addressed as soon as possible, in order to clear it from the list of tasks or responsibilities. It implies that the task or issue is perceived as an obstacle or hindrance that should be resolved quickly so that one can focus on other more important matters.
  • hell of a The idiom "hell of a" is used to emphasize or intensify a particular situation, thing, or person, often implying an extremely impressive, extreme, or unfavorable quality.
  • lay hold of sm or sth The idiom "lay hold of someone or something" means to grasp, seize, or take firm control of someone or something physically or metaphorically. It implies taking possession, gaining control, or making a strong grasp on a person, object, or situation. It can also indicate capturing someone's attention or understanding in a forceful or determined manner.
  • clear off (of sm place) The idiom "clear off (of sm place)" means to remove oneself from a specific location or to vacate an area. It implies the act of leaving or moving away from a particular place, often to give space to others or to allow for an activity to take place.
  • on the back of something The idiom "on the back of something" typically means to do something immediately after or as a result of a previous action or situation. It can also refer to the reliance on or support from someone or something to accomplish a task or achieve success.
  • on the edge of your seat The idiom "on the edge of your seat" means to be in a state of intense anticipation, excitement, or suspense, often due to something thrilling, suspenseful, or unpredictable happening. It describes a feeling of being fully engrossed or emotionally invested in a situation or event. The phrase suggests that one is so engaged that they are figuratively sitting at the edge of their seat, as if ready to jump or react to any sudden development.
  • make fun of someone or something To "make fun of someone or something" means to mock or ridicule them in a humorous or derisive manner. It involves teasing, joking, or laughing at someone or something, often with the intention to humiliate or belittle them. This idiom usually involves making sarcastic or critical comments, imitating someone's behavior or appearance in a mocking way, or highlighting aspects that others might find amusing or embarrassing.
  • fall short of The idiom "fall short of" means to not reach a desired goal, standard, or expectation. It refers to the failure to achieve something fully or adequately.
  • stop short of sth The idiom "stop short of something" means to come to a halt or cease just before reaching or achieving something specific. It denotes stopping or abstaining from going beyond a certain limit, point, action, or outcome.
  • make mincemeat of The idiom "make mincemeat of" means to swiftly and easily defeat or overpower someone or something in a decisive manner. It implies that the task or opponent is completely overwhelmed or destroyed.
  • not to speak of The idiom "not to speak of" typically means that something is not even worth mentioning or is of such little importance that it does not deserve further discussion or consideration. It is often used to emphasize the insignificance or lack of significance of a particular thing or topic.
  • harbinger of things to come The idiom "harbinger of things to come" refers to a person, event, or situation that serves as a sign or indication of what will happen in the future. It signifies something that precedes or predicts future developments or occurrences, often carrying symbolic or significant meaning.
  • a lease of life The idiom "a lease of life" refers to a renewed, extended, or additional chance at life or a new opportunity to thrive or succeed. It suggests a revitalization or resurrection, often after a period of difficulty or decline.
  • the best of three, five, etc. The idiom "the best of three, five, etc." refers to a situation where multiple attempts or rounds are competed, and the participant who wins the majority or the pre-determined number of those attempts is considered as the overall winner. It emphasizes the concept of needing to prove oneself consistently over a series of tests or trials in order to claim victory.
  • break the back of To "break the back of" something is an idiomatic expression that means to complete the majority, or the most difficult part, of a task or project. It refers to overcoming the most challenging or crucial aspect of a task that allows for the rest to be more manageable. This phrase often implies that by completing this critical part, the success of the entire endeavor is more likely.
  • get a load of (someone or something) The idiom "get a load of (someone or something)" means to observe or look closely at someone or something, often with a sense of astonishment, surprise, or curiosity. It implies paying strong attention or considering someone or something remarkable or noteworthy.
  • get to the heart of (something) The idiom "get to the heart of (something)" means to reach the core or essential part of an issue, topic, or problem. It involves understanding and discovering the most important or fundamental aspects of a subject matter.
  • believe (something) of (someone) The idiom "believe (something) of (someone)" means to think or assume that someone is capable of a particular action, behavior, or quality, usually implying something negative or unexpected. It suggests that someone's actions or behavior align with one's expectations, beliefs, or stereotypes about them.
  • not able to make head or tail of sth The idiom "not able to make head or tail of something" means being completely unable to understand or comprehend something. It suggests that the subject matter is confusing or disorganized, making it difficult to make sense of it.
  • the law of the Medes and Persians "The law of the Medes and Persians" is an idiom that refers to a rule or decree that is unalterable, absolute, or rigidly enforced. It originates from the ancient Persian Empire, where the laws were believed to be fixed and unchangeable, bound even the kings themselves. As an idiom, it signifies a law or principle that cannot be altered or broken under any circumstance.
  • abuse of distress The idiom "abuse of distress" refers to taking unfair advantage or exploiting someone's vulnerability or difficult situation for personal gain. It implies using another person's distress or misfortune to exploit, manipulate, or mistreat them in some way.
  • Oh, ye of little faith. The idiom "Oh, ye of little faith" is an expression used to chide or criticize someone for lacking belief, trust, or confidence in something or someone. It often implies that the person is being pessimistic or doubting the likelihood of success or positive outcome. It can be understood as a way to remind someone to have more confidence or faith in a particular situation.
  • see the color of money The idiom "see the color of money" means to experience or receive actual financial payment or see tangible evidence of wealth. It is often used when someone wants assurance that they will receive the money they are owed or to emphasize the importance of financial matters.
  • appear, etc. out of thin air The idiom "appear out of thin air" or "come out of thin air" is used to describe something that seemingly emerges or appears suddenly and unexpectedly, with no apparent explanation or prior indication. It suggests that someone or something has materialized or come into existence without any visible cause or origin.
  • be on top of sth The idiom "be on top of sth" means to be fully informed or in control of something. It implies being aware and knowledgeable about a particular situation or task, and being able to manage it effectively. It signifies having a good understanding and being proactive in handling the matter at hand.
  • brink of disaster The idiom "brink of disaster" refers to a situation where something is very close to complete failure or catastrophe. It suggests being at the edge or verge of a highly negative outcome or a point of no return.
  • never have a good word to say about (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say about (someone or something)" means to consistently and habitually speak negatively or disparagingly about someone or something, without finding any positive or redeeming qualities. It suggests a persistent tendency to criticize or find fault, rather than offering praise or recognizing any positive aspects.
  • get euchred out of sth The idiom "get euchred out of something" means being deceived, tricked, or swindled out of something, often through unfair or manipulative means. It suggests a situation where someone is unexpectedly and unfairly deprived of what they were entitled to or expected to receive.
  • dispose of sm or sth The idiom "dispose of sm or sth" means to get rid of or eliminate someone or something, usually by selling, giving away, or throwing it away.
  • remand sm (in)to the custody of sm The idiom "remand someone (in)to the custody of someone" refers to the action of sending a person back or returning them to the legal care, control, or supervision of someone else, usually the authorities or a particular person or institution. It typically occurs when an individual is detained or arrested and is ordered to be held in custody until a later court appearance or until certain conditions are met.
  • full of yourself The idiom "full of yourself" refers to someone who is excessively self-centered, boastful, and confident in their own abilities or accomplishments. It suggests that the person is overly egotistical, arrogant, and often exhibits a superiority complex.
  • pull sth out of the bag/hat The idiom "pull something out of the bag/hat" means to succeed in achieving or producing something, especially when it is unexpected or difficult. It implies that a person manages to accomplish something using their skills, abilities, or resources that were not initially apparent or anticipated.
  • delusions of grandeur The idiom "delusions of grandeur" refers to having a false or exaggerated belief in one's own importance, power, or abilities. It describes a situation where someone holds a belief that they are superior or more significant than they actually are. Typically, it implies a sense of grandiosity or a tendency to overestimate oneself without any real basis for such beliefs.
  • take note of sm or sth The idiom "take note of someone or something" means to pay attention to or acknowledge someone or something. It implies that one should observe or remember specific details about the person or thing being referred to.
  • impatient of The idiom "impatient of" means lacking tolerance or an inability to wait or endure something, often resulting in frustration or irritability. It refers to a person's impatience towards a particular situation, person, or action.
  • the still of the night The idiom "the still of the night" refers to a period of time during the evening or nighttime when everything is calm, quiet, and peaceful. It describes the moment when there is little to no activity, noise, or disturbance, and one can fully experience and appreciate the tranquility and serenity of the late hours.
  • be out of hands The idiom "be out of hands" means to be beyond control, order, or management. It suggests a situation or problem that has become uncontrollable or unmanageable.
  • have had your fill of somebody/something The idiom "have had your fill of somebody/something" means to have experienced, encountered, or endured enough of someone or something, often implying a sense of being fed up, tired, or satisfied to the point of not wanting or needing any more. It suggests reaching a limit or saturation point with a particular person or thing, indicating that one has had enough and desires no further involvement or engagement.
  • beat to within an inch of life The idiom "beat to within an inch of life" typically means to severely beat or physically assault someone, causing them serious injury or harm. It implies the intensity and brutality of the assault, suggesting that the person was harmed to the maximum extent without actually causing death.
  • in the sight of somebody/in somebody’s sight The idiom "in the sight of somebody/in somebody's sight" means to be in someone's presence or within their field of vision. It implies being observed or under someone's watchful eye.
  • there are plenty of (other) pebbles on the beach The idiom "there are plenty of (other) pebbles on the beach" means that there are many other options, opportunities, or alternatives available, indicating that one should not be overly concerned or worried about a particular situation or individual. It implies that there are numerous similar choices or possibilities, and the current one should not be considered as extraordinary or irreplaceable.
  • be rid of The idiom "be rid of" means to eliminate or get rid of someone or something unpleasant or unwanted. It implies a sense of relief or liberation from that particular person or thing.
  • make a martyr of sb To "make a martyr of someone" means to exaggerate their suffering, sacrifice, or victimhood, often for personal or political reasons. It refers to the act of glorifying or portraying someone as a martyr, typically to gain sympathy or support for a cause or to paint them as a righteous or heroic figure.
  • get an amount of money for The idiom "get an amount of money for" typically means to receive or acquire a specific sum of money in exchange for something, such as a product, service, or work done.
  • run out (of sth) The idiom "run out (of sth)" means to exhaust or use up a supply of something completely. It implies that there is no more of that particular thing left and it is no longer available.
  • image of health The idiom "image of health" refers to someone who appears to be in excellent physical condition or displaying a vibrant and radiant appearance that signifies good health. It implies that the person's outward appearance suggests that they are free from any health issues or ailments.
  • get the wrong end of the stick The idiom "get the wrong end of the stick" means to misunderstand or misinterpret a situation, usually due to a lack of information or confusion. It refers to someone grasping the less favorable or incorrect end of a stick or situation instead of the intended or correct one.
  • as of now The idiom "as of now" means at the present moment, or from this point onward. It is commonly used to indicate the current status or situation, typically implying that things may change in the future.
  • convince someone of something The idiom "convince someone of something" means to persuade or make someone believe or accept a particular idea, argument, or viewpoint. It involves using reasoning, evidence, or effective communication to change someone's opinion, perception, or conviction about a certain matter.
  • take a rise out of, at get a rise out of The idiom "take a rise out of" or "get a rise out of" is used to describe the act of intentionally provoking or teasing someone in order to get a reaction or response from them. The goal is to elicit strong emotions or make the person become angry, frustrated, or irritated.
  • groves of Academe The idiom "groves of Academe" refers to the world of higher education or academia. It represents the serene and intellectual environment typically associated with universities, colleges, and other educational institutions. The idiom suggests a place of learning, scholarship, and intellectual pursuits.
  • any number of things The idiom "any number of things" typically refers to an unspecified or indefinite quantity of items or possibilities. It suggests that there are numerous options or opportunities available, without specifying a specific number or limit. It implies that there are many potential choices, courses of action, or items to consider.
  • in the arms of Morpheus The idiom "in the arms of Morpheus" means to be in a deep, peaceful, and usually dream-filled sleep. It refers to the Greek god Morpheus, who was responsible for shaping and creating dreams. Therefore, when someone is said to be in the arms of Morpheus, it implies that they are fully embraced by sleep and experiencing a state of profound rest.
  • school/university of life The idiom "school/university of life" refers to the idea that life and personal experiences can be just as valuable as formal education in acquiring knowledge, wisdom, and practical skills. It suggests that one can learn and gain important life lessons through the challenges, hardships, and interactions encountered in everyday life.
  • necessity is the mother of invention The idiom "necessity is the mother of invention" means that innovative solutions or creations are often stimulated by a need or a problem. It suggests that when faced with a difficult situation or a lack of resources, people are motivated to find inventive and creative ways to overcome those challenges and fulfill their needs.
  • a month of Sundays The idiom "a month of Sundays" refers to a long or seemingly endless period of time, suggesting a very long duration or an exceptionally rare occurrence. It is often used to emphasize the notion of an extended and indefinite period, typically prolonging a task, event, or appointment.
  • see the color of (one's) money The idiom "see the color of (one's) money" means to confirm someone's ability to pay or prove their financial capability before entering into a business transaction, agreement, or providing a service. It is often used to ensure that someone is actually able to afford or fulfill their payment obligations.
  • a matter of life and death The idiom "a matter of life and death" refers to a situation or decision that is extremely important, and where the consequences can be life-threatening or have a significant impact on one's existence or well-being. It signifies that the matter at hand is of utmost urgency and should be treated with the utmost seriousness and importance.
  • hell of a note The idiom "hell of a note" is commonly used to express exasperation, frustration, or disappointment over a particular situation or event. It conveys a sense of strong dissatisfaction or annoyance, emphasizing the negative or unfavorable aspects of the situation.
  • full of years The definition of the idiom "full of years" is when someone has lived a long, fulfilled, and prosperous life. It suggests that the person has experienced and accomplished a lot throughout their lifetime and has reached a content and satisfied stage of life.
  • the four corners of the earth The idiom "the four corners of the earth" refers to the most distant or far-reaching locations on the planet. It implies covering or reaching every corner or part of the world, symbolizing the extremities or various geographical regions.
  • the best of the best The idiom "the best of the best" refers to the highest ranking or most superior individuals or things within a particular category. It denotes the top level of excellence and quality.
  • after the fashion of sm or sth The idiom "after the fashion of someone or something" means imitating or in a style similar to a particular person or thing. It suggests a resemblance or similarity in terms of behavior, style, appearance, or mannerism.
  • wouldn't dream of sth/doing sth The idiom "wouldn't dream of something/doing something" means that one would never consider or think about doing a particular thing, as it is completely outside of their thoughts or intentions. It expresses a strong sense of disbelief or opposition towards the suggested action.
  • in the hands of The idiom "in the hands of" is typically used to suggest that someone or something is under the control, possession, or responsibility of another person or entity. It implies that someone has power, authority, or influence over a situation or individual and can determine the outcome or fate. It can also indicate trusting or relying on someone to make good decisions or take proper actions.
  • know somebody/something like the back of your hand The idiom "know somebody/something like the back of your hand" means to have a very familiar and thorough understanding of someone or something, usually suggesting a deep knowledge and awareness. It implies that one is extremely familiar with a person or thing, just as they would know every detail and aspect of the back of their hand.
  • make little of The idiom "make little of" means to downplay or underestimate the importance, value, or significance of something or someone. It refers to when someone does not give proper recognition or appreciation to someone or something.
  • have/lack the courage of your convictions The idiom "have/lack the courage of your convictions" refers to whether someone is prepared to act confidently and decisively in accordance with their beliefs or opinions. It suggests that merely holding strong convictions or beliefs is not enough, and that a person must also possess the courage and determination to follow through with actions that align with those convictions. Conversely, if someone lacks the courage of their convictions, it means they may hesitate or back down from acting on their beliefs due to fear, doubt, or a lack of confidence.
  • conceive of sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "conceive of someone or something as someone or something" means to imagine or perceive someone or something in a particular way, often contrary to their actual nature or role. It implies forming an idea or belief about someone or something based on preconceived notions or personal expectations.
  • be one of the boys The idiom "be one of the boys" means to be socially accepted and included among a group of males. It typically implies that a person, usually a female, is comfortable being part of activities, conversations, or interactions traditionally associated with a particular male group, often exhibiting similar behavior, interests, or attitudes.
  • approve of sm or sth The idiom "approve of someone or something" means to have a favorable opinion or to be in agreement with someone or something. It implies supporting or showing acceptance towards a person, action, decision, or idea.
  • be knocked out of the box The idiom "be knocked out of the box" typically refers to being caught off guard, surprised, or disoriented due to an unexpected event or circumstance. It implies being thrown off balance or losing one's composure.
  • miscarriage of justice A miscarriage of justice refers to a situation where a person is wrongly convicted or punished for a crime they did not commit, typically as a result of errors or flaws in the legal system. It could involve wrongful arrests, biased investigations, or unfair trials leading to an unjust outcome.
  • at the top of the/sb's agenda The idiom "at the top of the/sb's agenda" means that something is the most important or urgent matter that needs to be discussed or addressed. It refers to a priority item on a list of things to be done or topics to be discussed.
  • your pound of flesh The idiom "your pound of flesh" is derived from Shakespeare's play "The Merchant of Venice." It refers to an insistence on obtaining one's strict rights or due, even if it causes harm or suffering to another person. The phrase usually implies a demand for revenge or retribution, regardless of the consequences. It signifies an unwavering pursuit of what one believes they are owed, often at the expense of others.
  • a ball of fire The idiom "a ball of fire" is used to describe someone who is extremely energetic, enthusiastic, and highly productive. It refers to a person who is full of energy and constantly achieving or accomplishing things with great passion and drive.
  • fruit of the union The idiom "fruit of the union" refers to the offspring or result of a marriage or relationship. It symbolizes the tangible outcome or product that is born out of the partnership or collaboration between two individuals.
  • out of a clear sky The idiom "out of a clear sky" is used to describe something unexpected or surprising that happens suddenly and without any prior indication or warning. It refers to an event or statement that comes as a complete surprise, as if it had fallen from the clear blue sky.
  • get your fill (of sth) The idiom "get your fill (of sth)" means to have enough of something, often referring to having enough to eat or drink, or experiencing something to the utmost degree until satisfied. It implies consuming or experiencing a sufficient or satisfying amount of a particular thing.
  • make a note of sth The idiom "make a note of something" means to write down or take note of something important or significant. It implies the action of recording information for future reference or remembrance.
  • of few words, man of The phrase "of few words, man of" typically describes someone who is not inclined to speak much or communicate extensively. It implies that the person tends to be quiet, reserved, or speaks only when necessary.
  • pass the time of day The idiom "pass the time of day" means engaging in casual conversation or exchanging greetings with someone in a friendly manner in order to pass time or alleviate boredom. It refers to the act of engaging in small talk or light conversation without any specific purpose or agenda.
  • get sm kind of mileage out of The idiom "get some kind of mileage out of" means to gain advantage or benefit from something or to find usefulness or value in something. It often refers to making the most of a situation, using it to achieve a particular goal, or getting a desired outcome.
  • have heard/seen the last of sb/sth The idiom "have heard/seen the last of sb/sth" means to believe that someone or something will not be encountered or experienced again in the future. It implies that the person or thing is now finished or gone and will not be appearing or reappearing.
  • take advantage of someone The idiom "take advantage of someone" means to exploit or manipulate someone's vulnerability, trust, or inexperience for personal gain or benefit, often by using deceit, dishonesty, or unfairness. It implies using another person's situation or weakness to achieve one's own objectives or to gain an unfair advantage.
  • blown (all) out of proportion The idiom "blown (all) out of proportion" means to exaggerate or overemphasize the importance, significance, or seriousness of something beyond what is reasonable or necessary. It refers to the act of making something seem much bigger, worse, or more significant than it actually is.
  • full of beans/life The idiom "full of beans/life" means to be energetic, enthusiastic, and full of vitality or excitement. It refers to a person who is lively, animated, and has a vibrant and spirited nature.
  • go to the expense of (something) The idiom "go to the expense of (something)" means to expend money or resources on something, often implying that it is a significant or unnecessary cost. It suggests spending a reasonable amount of money or effort to achieve a particular goal or outcome, even if it may be costly or burdensome. This idiom typically highlights the financial or resource implications of taking a particular action.
  • assure (one) of The idiom "assure (one) of" means to give someone confidence or certainty about something, often by offering reassurance or guaranteeing its outcome. It implies providing support or evidence that eliminates doubts or fears.
  • blow (something) out of (all) proportion The idiom "blow (something) out of (all) proportion" means to exaggerate the importance, magnitude, or significance of something, making it seem much larger or more significant than it actually is. It refers to the act of amplifying or magnifying a situation, event, or problem beyond its actual scale or impact.
  • lion's share of The idiom "lion's share of" refers to the largest or biggest portion of something. It implies that someone or something gets the majority or most significant part of a whole, often denoting a disproportionately large amount in relation to others involved. The phrase is derived from the concept of a lion being the dominant member of a pride and taking the majority of the resources or recognition.
  • the ebb and flow of sth The idiom "the ebb and flow of something" refers to the natural rhythm or cyclical pattern of change, fluctuation, or alternation in a particular situation or phenomenon. It suggests the constant, recurring shifts between opposite or contrasting states or conditions, where one phase or aspect diminishes or declines (ebb), while another phase or aspect grows or increases (flow). This expression is often used to describe the dynamic nature of various processes, emotions, relationships, or any other situation that experiences regular ups and downs.
  • during the course of The idiomatic phrase "during the course of" means throughout or over the duration of a particular activity, event, or period of time. It refers to something that happens or occurs within the span or progression of a specific situation or process.
  • be out of humour The idiom "be out of humour" refers to being in a bad mood or feeling annoyed, irritated or disgruntled.
  • catch the eye of (someone) The idiom "catch the eye of (someone)" means to attract someone's attention or to be visually appealing or noticeable to someone.
  • wash one's hands of sm or sth The idiom "wash one's hands of someone or something" means to disassociate or free oneself from any responsibility, blame, or involvement with someone or something. It implies a deliberate decision to no longer be involved or concerned about a particular person or situation.
  • beyond the shadow of a doubt The idiom "beyond the shadow of a doubt" means to be completely certain or convinced about something, with no room for any skepticism or uncertainty. It signifies a level of confidence that leaves no doubt or ambiguity.
  • to say nothing of ... The idiom "to say nothing of ..." is used to introduce another, often more significant or surprising, item or point that adds to a previous statement or argument. It suggests that the previous statement was already noteworthy or problematic, and the additional item or point only amplifies that fact. It is usually used to emphasize a related matter that further supports or exemplifies the original statement.
  • the swing of things The idiom "the swing of things" refers to being fully engaged and accustomed to a particular routine, situation, or activity, often after a period of adjustment or unfamiliarity. It suggests being in a state of comfort, efficiency, and familiarity with the way things are done.
  • of somebody’s day The idiom "of somebody’s day" typically refers to the most impressive, significant, or notable period or event in a person's life or career. It signifies a time or achievement that stands out and remains memorable for that individual.
  • of your own accord The idiom "of your own accord" means to do something willingly or voluntarily, without being compelled or influenced by anyone else. It suggests taking independent action or making decisions without external pressure or assistance.
  • shades of sb/sth The idiom "shades of sb/sth" refers to a situation or person that reminds you of someone or something from the past. It implies a similarity or resemblance between the current situation or person and a previous one. It can also suggest a sense of nostalgia or familiarity.
  • get the best of you The idiom "get the best of you" means that a situation or emotion has overwhelmed or overcome a person, causing them to lose control or act in a way that is not in their best interest. It implies that one's emotions, weaknesses, or negative influences have become stronger or dominant, leading to an unfavorable outcome or reaction.
  • have eyes in the back of (one's) head The idiom "have eyes in the back of (one's) head" means to be highly observant or vigilant, as if one has the ability to see or be aware of things happening behind them, even though they physically cannot. It suggests that someone is extremely perceptive and can notice and anticipate things that others might miss.
  • pissed out of (one's) head The idiom "pissed out of (one's) head" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated due to excessive alcohol consumption. It implies a state of being extremely drunk or inebriated.
  • the lady of the house The idiom "the lady of the house" refers to the woman or female head of a household. It implies that she is in charge, responsible, or has authority within her own home.
  • fall afoul of The idiom "fall afoul of" means to come into conflict or disagreement with someone or something, often resulting in an adverse outcome or consequences. It refers to being on the wrong side of a situation or authority, encountering opposition, or violating rules or laws.
  • make great play of The idiom "make great play of" means to emphasize, exaggerate, or put excessive emphasis on something in order to draw attention or make a strong impression. It often involves inflating the significance or importance of a situation, event, or topic.
  • a pillar of society, etc. The idiom "a pillar of society" typically refers to an individual who is highly regarded and respected within their community or society. They are often seen as a reliable, upstanding, and influential member who promotes and upholds societal values and norms. The metaphorical use of "pillar" suggests that they provide support, stability, and strength to the community or society as a whole.
  • make a man (out) of sb The idiom "make a man (out) of sb" means to help or encourage someone, often a young person, to develop qualities such as courage, resilience, or maturity that are typically associated with being an adult or a strong individual. It implies transforming someone into a more established or competent person.
  • pulled out of (one's) ass The idiom "pulled out of (one's) ass" is an informal expression that means to present or create something without proper thought, evidence, or preparation. It implies that the information or idea is baseless, fabricated, or completely made up on the spot.
  • deliver oneself of The idiom "deliver oneself of" means to express or communicate something, usually in a verbal manner, often used when referring to expressing one's thoughts, feelings, or opinions in a deliberate and intentional manner.
  • frighten (or scare) the (living) daylights out of The idiom "frighten (or scare) the (living) daylights out of" means to cause extreme fear, alarm, or terror in someone. It emphasizes the intensity of the scare or fright, suggesting that it is so powerful that it figuratively forces the person's "daylights" (or life energy) to almost vanish. It implies a profound and overwhelming level of fear.
  • have eyes in the back of your head The idiom "have eyes in the back of your head" means to be extremely observant and aware of what is happening around you, even when it is not directly in your line of sight. It often refers to someone who is able to notice and react to things happening behind them, metaphorically suggesting an exceptional level of alertness and perception.
  • fiddle (someone) out of (something) The idiom "fiddle (someone) out of (something)" means to deceive or trick someone into giving up or losing something, often through dishonest or manipulative means. It implies the act of swindling, cheating, or defrauding someone of their possessions, money, rights, or opportunities.
  • cloud of suspicion The idiom "cloud of suspicion" refers to a situation where someone is under doubt, mistrust, or uncertainty. It implies that suspicion surrounds a person or an event, creating a sense of unease or skepticism.
  • for fear of The idiom "for fear of" refers to the act of avoiding or refraining from doing something out of concern or anxiety about a negative outcome or consequence.
  • A thing of beauty is a joy forever. The idiom "A thing of beauty is a joy forever" means that an object or experience that possesses beauty and elegance will always bring pleasure and happiness, surpassing the limitations of time. It emphasizes the enduring and timeless nature of beauty, suggesting that it can provide an eternal source of joy and satisfaction.
  • matter of fact, a A "matter of fact" is a phrase used to describe something that is straightforward, practical or not emotional, lacking any extravagance or embellishment. It refers to a statement or attitude that is objective, impartial, and without any personal bias. "A matter of fact" can also refer to an event or situation that is plain, undeniable, or unarguable.
  • Celebration of Marriage The idiom "Celebration of Marriage" refers to a joyous and festive event or ceremony that commemorates the union of two people in a formal marriage. It signifies the acknowledgement and recognition of their commitment, love, and partnership, often involving rituals, customs, and traditions specific to various cultures and religions.
  • the bottom falls out of something The idiom "the bottom falls out of something" means that a situation or market suddenly collapses or fails, often resulting in a significant decrease in value, support, or success. It suggests a sudden and unexpected decline or downfall in a particular area or aspect.
  • in/out of the running (for something) The idiom "in/out of the running (for something)" refers to being either capable or incapable of winning or being successful in a particular competition, election, or pursuit. When someone is "in the running," it means they have a chance to win or succeed, while being "out of the running" indicates that they no longer have a realistic possibility of winning or being successful.
  • kick out of The idiom "kick out of" means to forcefully or abruptly remove or expel someone or something from a particular place or situation. It often implies that the person or thing being kicked out is being rejected or excluded due to their behavior, actions, or nonconformity to a certain standard or expectation.
  • life is a bowl of cherries The idiom "life is a bowl of cherries" is used to convey that life is pleasant, enjoyable, and full of happiness or success. It suggests that everything is going well and there are no major challenges or problems.
  • born on the wrong side of the blanket The idiom "born on the wrong side of the blanket" refers to a person who is born out of wedlock or to parents who are not married. It suggests that the individual's birth situation carries some societal stigma or is considered morally disapproved.
  • couldn't pour water out of a boot (if there was instructions on the heel) The idiom "couldn't pour water out of a boot (if there were instructions on the heel)" is a humorous way of saying that someone is extremely inept, incapable, or lacking basic skills or common sense. It emphasizes the person's complete incompetence in performing even the simplest tasks.
  • do something like it's going out of style The idiom "do something like it's going out of style" means to do something excessively or with great intensity, as if it will no longer be acceptable, popular, or feasible in the near future. It implies doing an activity or behaving in a manner as if there is limited time or opportunity to do so, often suggesting an exaggerated or over-the-top approach.
  • be worth a hill of beans The idiom "be worth a hill of beans" refers to something or someone having little or no value or significance. It suggests that the thing or person being talked about is of little importance or utility, similar to a pile of beans which cannot amount to much.
  • think the world of sb The idiom "think the world of someone" means to have a very high opinion and great affection for a person, to regard them with utmost admiration and respect. It implies that one holds the person in extremely high regard and believes them to be exceptional.
  • come to a parting of the ways The idiom "come to a parting of the ways" means reaching a point where two or more people or groups no longer have the same goals, interests, or opinions, and therefore, must separate or go their separate ways. It implies the end of a shared path or relationship due to diverging paths or conflicting beliefs.
  • make a laughingstock of (oneself or something) The idiom "make a laughingstock of (oneself or something)" refers to embarrassing or humiliating oneself or something else in a way that causes others to mock, ridicule, or make fun of it. It implies that someone's actions or behavior are so foolish, ridiculous, or absurd that they become the subject of laughter and mockery.
  • beat the hell out of (someone) The idiom "beat the hell out of (someone)" refers to inflicting severe physical harm or engaging in a fierce physical confrontation with someone. It implies a situation where someone is violently attacked or beaten up. The phrase is often used figuratively to describe defeating someone decisively or winning a competition convincingly.
  • in the prime of life The idiom "in the prime of life" refers to the period of life when a person is at their peak physical or mental condition, typically characterized by youth, vitality, and health. It suggests that someone is at their most productive or successful stage of life and has reached an optimal state of strength and expertise.
  • full of it The idiom "full of it" is typically used to describe someone who is being insincere, dishonest, or exaggerating. It implies that the person is not being truthful or reliable in what they say or claim.
  • courage of one's convictions, have the The idiom "have the courage of one's convictions" means to have the bravery and determination to hold and stand by one's beliefs, even when facing opposition or disapproval from others. It refers to the strength of character and firmness in one's principles to remain steadfast in their convictions, regardless of the circumstances.
  • out of whack The idiom "out of whack" means that something is not operating or functioning properly or is out of order. It suggests a sense of imbalance, disorganization, or being in a state of dysfunction.
  • one of those days (or weeks, etc.) The idiom "one of those days (or weeks, etc.)" refers to a period of time, usually a day or week, when everything seems to go wrong or be difficult. It implies that whatever can go wrong does go wrong, and it feels like there are a series of unfortunate events or setbacks occurring during that particular period.
  • capable of doing The idiom "capable of doing" refers to someone's ability to perform a particular action or task. It implies that the person has the skills, knowledge, or qualities necessary to successfully accomplish the said action.
  • hit speeds of The idiom "hit speeds of" typically refers to reaching or achieving high velocities or rates. It is commonly used when describing the speed at which something or someone is moving or operating.
  • give sth under (the) threat of sth The idiom "give something under (the) threat of something" refers to the act of surrendering or submitting to a demand or request due to the fear or possibility of negative consequences. It implies that the person or entity being threatened feels compelled to comply with the demand to avoid potential harm or punishment.
  • on the other side of the fence The idiom "on the other side of the fence" means having a different perspective or opinion in a given situation. It suggests that someone has an opposing point of view or is experiencing something different from what the speaker is currently experiencing.
  • bottom (or top) of the hour The idiom "bottom (or top) of the hour" refers to a specific time on the clock when the minute hand is pointing at either the 6 or 12, respectively. For example, if it is 2:30, the bottom of the hour would be 2:30, while the top of the hour would be 3:00.
  • be out of action The idiom "be out of action" means to be temporarily unable to function or operate properly, often due to damage, illness, or other issues. It is commonly used in contexts referring to people or objects that are unable to perform their usual tasks or duties for a specific period.
  • man/woman/gentleman/lady of leisure The idiom "man/woman/gentleman/lady of leisure" refers to someone who does not have to work and instead spends their time engaged in recreational activities or luxury pursuits. It implies a person with a lot of free time and minimal responsibilities, often due to their wealth or financial independence. They are typically not burdened with the obligations of a regular job or household chores, allowing them to enjoy a life of leisure and indulgence.
  • hold one's end of the bargain up The idiom "hold one's end of the bargain up" means to fulfill or carry out one's part of an agreement, deal, or promise. It implies being reliable, trustworthy, and true to one's word in honoring the agreed-upon terms or responsibilities.
  • Nothing comes of nothing The idiom "Nothing comes of nothing" implies that without any effort or input, one cannot expect any positive outcome or result. It suggests that in order to achieve something or see progress, one must put in the necessary effort, work, or action. In simpler terms, one cannot expect to gain or achieve anything significant without putting in any effort or work.
  • be in the thick of things The idiom "be in the thick of things" means to be actively involved or deeply immersed in a particular situation or event. It refers to being in the middle of the action or at the center of an important or intense situation.
  • drive one out of mind The idiomatic expression "drive one out of mind" means to cause extreme frustration, annoyance, or irritation. It suggests that something or someone is so bothersome or overwhelming that they occupy all of one's thoughts, making it difficult to focus or remain calm.
  • the acceptable face of The idiom "the acceptable face of" refers to a situation or representation of something that is viewed as positive, respectable, or desirable within a particular context or domain. It implies that something or someone is seen as a more favorable or palatable version of a larger concept or group, often used to convey an image of credibility, acceptability, or social endorsement.
  • I'm not made of money! The idiom "I'm not made of money!" is used to convey that one does not have an unlimited amount of money or resources. It is typically said in response to someone asking for something expensive or expecting one to spend excessively. The phrase emphasizes the idea that one's financial resources are limited and cannot fulfill every whim or demand.
  • out of the (starting) blocks The idiom "out of the (starting) blocks" refers to someone who starts a task, project, or race quickly or efficiently, gaining an early advantage over others. It originates from athletic races, where competitors start from blocks placed on the ground, and being quick out of the blocks gives them a head start. The phrase is commonly used to describe someone who demonstrates a prompt and effective start in various situations, not limited to sports.
  • pull out of a hat The idiom "pull out of a hat" refers to a sudden and unexpected solution or idea, as if it magically appeared out of nowhere, similar to pulling a rabbit out of a magician's hat. It implies the ability to come up with something surprising or impressive when faced with a difficult situation.
  • despair of (something) The idiom "despair of (something)" means to lose hope or confidence in a particular situation, outcome, or person. It signifies a feeling of pessimism or hopelessness regarding the possibility or success of something.
  • time is of the essence The idiom "time is of the essence" means that time is crucial and should be taken into account, as it is an important factor in making decisions or completing a task. It emphasizes the importance of acting quickly or efficiently to achieve a desired outcome.
  • get someone or something out of someone or something The idiom "get someone or something out of someone or something" typically means to extract or remove someone or something from a specific situation or place. It can also refer to getting information, emotions, or a specific outcome from someone or something.
  • not harm/touch a hair of somebody's head The idiom "not harm/touch a hair of somebody's head" means to not cause any physical harm or injury to someone, implying a strong desire to protect or defend that person. It signifies the commitment to their safety and well-being, ensuring that no harm comes to them.
  • flake something off of something The phrase "flake something off of something" means to remove or make something come off a surface in small, thin, and flat pieces or fragments. It typically refers to the act of gently or delicately removing a substance or material from a surface by breaking or peeling it into flakes.
  • make a federal case (out) of (something) The idiom "make a federal case (out) of (something)" means to make an excessive or exaggerated fuss or complaint about something. It originates from American English slang, where referring to something as a "federal case" implies blowing a situation out of proportion and making it unnecessarily complex or serious.
  • a blanket of sth The idiom "a blanket of something" refers to a large, complete, and continuous coverage of a particular thing. It is often used metaphorically to describe a situation where something completely covers or encompasses an area or object, creating a sense of abundance or saturation. It can also imply a dense or overwhelming quantity of something.
  • not for want/lack of trying The idiom "not for want/lack of trying" means that someone has put in great effort and made sincere attempts to accomplish something, but regardless of their efforts, they have not been successful. It emphasizes the individual's determination and hard work despite their failure to achieve the desired outcome.
  • be on the tip of your tongue The idiom "be on the tip of your tongue" refers to a situation where you are aware of a word, name, or information but are unable to recall or express it at the moment. It suggests that the information is at the verge of being remembered or spoken, but remains momentarily out of reach.
  • go by the name of The idiom "go by the name of" means to be known or referred to with a particular name or alias. It implies that the person or thing being described is commonly identified by that name.
  • the sweet smell of success The idiom "the sweet smell of success" is a phrase used to describe the feeling of triumph or accomplishment. It refers to the satisfaction and gratification one experiences when achieving their goals or attaining prosperity. This phrase conjures the imagery of a pleasing scent, indicating that success brings a sense of reward and contentment.
  • have the best of sm or sth The idiom "have the best of someone or something" means to outperform, outwit, or gain an advantage over someone or something. It implies being in a superior position or having the upper hand in a particular situation.
  • of advanced years The idiom "of advanced years" refers to someone who is elderly or in the later stages of life. It indicates that the person has reached a significant age or has lived a long life.
  • sit in judgment (of sb) The idiom "sit in judgment (of sb)" refers to the act of forming an opinion or making a critical evaluation of someone's actions, behavior, or character. It implies a position of authority or superiority, where one assumes the role of a judge to assess someone else's actions or decisions. It commonly implies a negative connotation, indicating a tendency to criticize or evaluate others harshly.
  • stay clear of The idiom "stay clear of" means to avoid or steer away from someone or something, usually due to a potential negative or harmful outcome. It implies keeping a safe and cautious distance to prevent any involvement or interference.
  • come out of (or retreat into) your shell The idiom "come out of (or retreat into) your shell" refers to someone's behavior of either becoming more sociable and outgoing or withdrawing and being less sociable and isolated. It metaphorically alludes to the behavior of a turtle that either comes out of its protective shell, exposing itself to the outside world, or retreats back into its shell, seeking safety and seclusion.
  • the fright of (one's) life The idiom "the fright of (one's) life" refers to an extreme or intense scare or experience that terrifies someone completely. It describes a situation in which a person becomes extremely frightened or scared, often to the point of feeling their life is in danger or being paralyzed with fear.
  • give the time of day To "give someone the time of day" is an idiomatic expression that means to acknowledge or give attention to someone, usually in a polite manner or to show respect. It implies being willing to engage in conversation or interact with someone, rather than ignoring or avoiding them.
  • parade sm or sth in front of sm or sth The idiom "parade someone or something in front of someone or something" means to display or showcase someone or something intentionally in front of others, usually to garner attention, admiration, or to make a statement. It often implies a sense of using someone or something to boast, impress, or prove a point.
  • fly by the seat of (one's) pants The idiom "fly by the seat of (one's) pants" means to act or make decisions spontaneously or based on intuition and instinct rather than careful planning or preparation. It implies relying on one's experience, judgement, and skills in a situation without any predetermined or calculated approach.
  • a bowl of cherries The idiom "a bowl of cherries" is used to describe a situation or experience that is pleasant, enjoyable, or highly positive. It suggests that everything is going well or is incredibly rewarding, similar to the feeling of having a bowl filled with sweet cherries.
  • in the teeth of sth The idiom "in the teeth of something" means to confront or face a difficult or challenging situation directly, often with determination and persistence. It implies struggling against opposition or obstacles head-on.
  • Why break the habit of a lifetime? The idiom "Why break the habit of a lifetime?" is typically used sarcastically to question why someone would change or do something that is out of character for them, especially if it goes against a long-established habit or pattern of behavior. It implies that it is unlikely or unexpected for the person to deviate from their usual way of doing things.
  • have the honour of something/of doing something The idiom "have the honour of something/of doing something" refers to the privilege or distinction of being given a particular opportunity, role, or task, often considered prestigious or valuable. It implies that the person feels proud or privileged to have been entrusted with such a responsibility or opportunity.
  • bust ass out of somewhere The idiom "bust ass out of somewhere" is an informal expression that means to leave a place quickly and energetically, often in a rush or with urgency. It conveys a sense of determination and urgency in escaping or getting away from a particular location.
  • the day of reckoning The idiom "the day of reckoning" refers to a time when one must face the consequences or be held accountable for their actions or decisions. It signifies a critical moment of judgment or realization, often associated with the consequences of past actions catching up to someone. It can also imply a time of reckoning or final judgment in a broader sense, such as the culmination of a particular event or period.
  • likes of The idiom "likes of" is used to refer to a group of people or things that are similar, comparable, or of the same kind. It is often used to emphasize a particular category or type of individuals or objects.
  • go the way of the dinosaur(s) The idiom "go the way of the dinosaur(s)" means to become extinct or outdated. It refers to something or someone that gradually disappears or falls out of use, similar to how dinosaurs vanished from the Earth millions of years ago. It implies that the subject in question is no longer relevant or in demand, and has been replaced by newer, more advanced alternatives.
  • the best-laid plans of mice and men The idiom "the best-laid plans of mice and men" refers to a situation where carefully made plans or intentions often go wrong or are disrupted by unforeseen circumstances. It is derived from a line in the poem "To a Mouse" by Robert Burns, where he reflects on how even the most thoughtful plans can be derailed.
  • take the liberty of doing The idiom "take the liberty of doing" means to do something without asking for permission or without considering if it is proper or appropriate to do so. It implies acting independently or presumptuously, often in a situation where one may not have the authority to do so.
  • bird of passage The idiom "bird of passage" refers to a person who continually moves or travels from one place to another, often without any specific destination, staying temporarily in each place before moving on again. It suggests that the person is restless and constantly seeks new experiences or adventures.
  • put out of The idiom "put out of" typically means to cause someone inconvenience, annoyance, or distress, or to disrupt their usual routine or plans. It can also refer to forcing someone to leave or evicting them from a place.
  • denude sm or sth of sth The idiom "denude somebody or something of something" means to remove, strip, or take away something from someone or something, leaving them bare, exposed, or lacking that particular thing. It can refer to the physical act of removing clothing, coverings, or possessions, as well as metaphorical actions such as taking away rights, privileges, or resources.
  • be one card short of a full deck The idiom "be one card short of a full deck" means that someone is lacking intelligence, rationality, or mental stability. It suggests that the person is not fully functioning or is slightly crazy.
  • disapprove of sm or sth The idiom "disapprove of someone or something" means to have a negative opinion or judgment towards someone or something, considering them as not acceptable or appropriate.
  • Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989 The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) is a U.S. federal law enacted to address the savings and loan (S&L) crisis of the 1980s. It aimed to provide a comprehensive framework for reform, recovery, and enforcement within the financial industry. FIRREA established regulations and guidelines to enhance the stability and integrity of financial institutions, strengthen regulatory authorities, and promote sound practices within the banking and thrift industry. It also created the Resolution Trust Corporation (RTC), which was responsible for managing the assets and liabilities of failed S&Ls. Overall, FIRREA was designed to prevent future financial crises and restore confidence in the banking system.
  • get hold of sth The idiom "get hold of something" means to acquire or obtain something, typically by making an effort or taking necessary measures. It implies gaining possession or control over something, especially when it may be difficult or take some time to achieve.
  • go to the trouble (of doing sth) The idiom "go to the trouble of doing something" means making an extra effort or going out of one's way to do something, especially when it involves a significant amount of work or inconvenience. It implies undertaking a task that requires time, effort, or resources beyond what is normally expected or necessary.
  • a shadow of your/its former self The idiom "a shadow of your/its former self" refers to someone or something that has experienced a significant decline in quality, ability, or effectiveness compared to what it used to be. It suggests that the individual or object has lost some of its former vitality, power, or success and is now much less impressive or formidable.
  • pot of gold The idiom "pot of gold" refers to a valuable or desirable reward or prize at the end of a particular endeavor or pursuit. It represents a highly sought-after or lucrative outcome, often used to describe a significant financial gain or a fulfilling achievement. The origin of the idiom can be traced back to Irish folklore, where a mythical pot of gold is said to be hidden at the end of a rainbow.
  • beyond/within the realms of possibility The idiom "beyond/within the realms of possibility" means something that is either extremely unlikely or entirely possible to happen. It refers to events or circumstances that are either beyond what can be reasonably expected or well within the bounds of what can be reasonably expected.
  • a heck of a sth The idiom "a heck of a [something]" is an informal expression used to emphasize or intensify qualities or characteristics of a person, thing, or situation. It is often used to convey a strong positive or negative impression. It can mean that something or someone is extremely impressive, extraordinary, remarkable, notable, challenging, difficult, troublesome, etc. Overall, it adds emphasis to the uniqueness or intensity of the described thing or situation.
  • the best/happiest days of your life The idiom "the best/happiest days of your life" refers to a period or experience that is considered the most enjoyable or memorable in a person's life. It often implies nostalgia for a time when one had fewer responsibilities, less stress, and perhaps greater freedom or happiness.
  • a new lease on life, at a new lease of life The idiom "a new lease on life" or "a new lease of life" refers to a fresh start or an opportunity to improve one's situation, usually after facing hardship or adversity. It implies a renewal of energy, enthusiasm, or optimism to make positive changes and pursue new goals or experiences.
  • life and soul of the party The idiom "life and soul of the party" refers to a person who is lively, outgoing, and who brings energy and fun to social gatherings or events. They are often the center of attention, engaging others in conversation, laughter, and entertainment.
  • north of sth The idiom "north of something" is typically used to describe an amount or quantity that exceeds a certain value significantly or by a considerable margin. It implies being greater, higher, or more than what is stated or expected.
  • what will become of (someone or something) The idiom "what will become of (someone or something)" refers to a question or expression of concern about the future or fate of someone or something. It is often used when there is uncertainty or doubt about the outcome or consequences of a particular situation, and it conveys a sense of worrying about what will happen or how things will turn out for the person or thing in question.
  • press out of The idiom "press out of" means to extract or obtain something forcefully or with great effort. It implies the act of exerting pressure or applying force to get desired results.
  • dig sm or sth out of sth To "dig something/someone out of something" means to extract, find or retrieve something or someone from a particular place or situation. It can be used both in a literal and figurative sense. Literally, it refers to physically digging or excavating to find or remove something or someone. Figuratively, it is often used to describe the process of uncovering information, retrieving something from a cluttered space, or overcoming a challenging situation.
  • There is a tide in the affairs of men. The idiom "There is a tide in the affairs of men" is a quote from William Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar. It means that there are opportune moments or decisive times in a person's life when they must seize the opportunity and take action. It suggests that there is a natural ebb and flow of events, and it is important to recognize and act upon the right moment to achieve success or make a significant impact.
  • best of luck The idiom "best of luck" is a phrase used to express good wishes or support to someone in their endeavors or endeavors. It signifies a sincere hope that the person achieves success or favorable outcomes in their actions or pursuits.
  • bottom fell out (of sth) The idiom "bottom fell out (of sth)" is used to describe a sudden and significant collapse or decline in a situation or event. It implies that the support or foundation of something has vanished or disintegrated, leading to a complete and often unexpected failure. This expression is typically used to depict a sudden and drastic loss, such as in business, relationships, or fortunes.
  • let out of The idiom "let out of" means to release, set free, or allow someone or something to leave a particular place or situation. It implies granting permission or granting freedom of movement.
  • put somebody/something out of their/its misery The idiom "put somebody/something out of their/its misery" means to end or relieve someone or something from an uncomfortable, painful, or unendurable situation. It often implies ending suffering or troubles in a swift and compassionate manner.
  • cancel out (of sth) The idiom "cancel out (of sth)" typically means to negate or eliminate the effect or influence of something. It implies that two opposing or contradictory factors or forces neutralize each other, resulting in no overall impact or consequence.
  • under the aegis of somebody/something The idiom "under the aegis of somebody/something" refers to being under the protection, support, or sponsorship of a particular person, organization, or authority. It implies that one is operating or functioning with the backing and supervision of someone or something more influential or powerful.
  • relieve sm of sth The idiom "relieve someone of something" means to take away or remove something from someone, often in a helpful or considerate manner. It can pertain to physically taking an object or responsibility off someone's hands, or metaphorically relieving someone of a burden, duty, or problem.
  • a mind of own The idiom "a mind of its own" refers to someone or something that behaves independently and does not always follow instructions or expectations. It implies that the person or thing has its own thoughts, desires, or opinions, which may not align with others. It suggests individuality and having a strong sense of self.
  • in the eye of the storm The idiom "in the eye of the storm" refers to being in the center or midst of a chaotic or difficult situation, while maintaining a sense of calm or stability. It implies being surrounded by turmoil or conflict, yet managing to remain composed and unaffected.
  • care of somebody The idiom "care of somebody" refers to one's responsibility or duty to take care of or look after someone else. It implies that a person is responsible for the well-being, safety, or happiness of someone else, typically in a nurturing or protective manner.
  • speak/think ill of somebody The idiom "speak/think ill of somebody" means to express or hold negative opinions or beliefs about someone. It implies making unfavorable comments, spreading gossip, or having a negative perception or judgment of someone.
  • be another different kettle of fish The idiom "be another different kettle of fish" is used to describe a situation or person that is entirely distinct or separate from what is being discussed or compared to. It implies that the new subject cannot be easily categorized or compared to the previous one because of its unique characteristics or circumstances.
  • Self-preservation is the first law of nature The idiom "Self-preservation is the first law of nature" means that the instinctual drive to protect oneself and ensure one's own survival is the most basic and fundamental instinct that all living beings possess. It suggests that individuals will naturally prioritize their own well-being and survival before considering the needs or interests of others.
  • make a clean breast of The idiom "make a clean breast of" means to confess or reveal something, typically a secret or wrongdoing, in a frank and honest manner, without withholding any details. It implies a complete and sincere disclosure of information or feelings.
  • break someone of something The idiom "break someone of something" refers to the act of helping someone to stop or change a particular habit, behavior, or attitude, often through persistent effort, discipline, or training.
  • the best of both worlds The idiom "the best of both worlds" refers to a situation or outcome where someone is able to enjoy the advantages or benefits of two different or contradictory things simultaneously, without having to compromise on either.
  • be sth of a sth The idiom "be sth of a sth" is used to describe someone or something that possesses some characteristics or qualities of a particular thing or category. It implies that the person or thing is somewhat or to some degree like the specified thing, but not entirely or fully.
  • make sth out of nothing The idiom "make something out of nothing" refers to the act of creating or producing something significant, valuable, or meaningful from meager or seemingly unimportant resources or circumstances. It implies resourcefulness, creativity, and the ability to find or recognize value in situations that might appear unproductive or unpromising.
  • knock the stuffing out of (one) The idiom "knock the stuffing out of (one)" means to severely weaken, defeat, or demoralize someone. It implies causing a significant blow or setback that leaves someone feeling overwhelmed, beaten, or disheartened.
  • be the making of sb The idiom "be the making of sb" means that someone or something has a significant positive impact on a person's success, development, or achievements. It refers to how a particular person, event, or opportunity plays a crucial role in shaping and enhancing someone's abilities, potential, or circumstances.
  • be (a/the) model of The idiom "be (a/the) model of" means to be an ideal example of something or someone, exhibiting exceptional qualities, behavior, or characteristics. It suggests being a paragon or epitome that others should strive to emulate or follow.
  • at this stage of the game The idiom "at this stage of the game" means at this particular point or phase of a process, endeavor, or situation. It suggests that it is the current state of affairs or progress, often implying that it is too late or difficult to make significant changes or alterations.
  • give sb the benefit of the doubt The idiom "give someone the benefit of the doubt" means to believe or trust someone's statement or explanation, even if it seems doubtful or uncertain. It implies choosing to be more understanding and lenient towards someone by assuming that they are being truthful or acting with good intentions, rather than immediately suspecting them of wrongdoing or dishonesty.
  • fall into the hands of (someone or something) The idiom "fall into the hands of (someone or something)" means to become the possession or control of someone or something, usually by chance or accident. It implies a loss of control or vulnerability.
  • not have a good word to say about (someone of something) The idiom "not have a good word to say about (someone or something)" means to have only negative opinions or criticisms about a particular person or thing. It implies that the individual has nothing positive or favorable to express regarding the subject in question.
  • Close your eyes and think of England The idiom "Close your eyes and think of England" is a phrase commonly used to encourage someone, particularly a woman, to endure an unpleasant or unwanted experience by mentally detaching themselves from it. It originated during the Victorian era, when English women were encouraged to suppress their emotions and endure physical intimacy with their husbands, even if they found it unpleasurable. The phrase suggests that by mentally "escaping" to a more pleasant thought or focusing on a sense of duty, one can endure a difficult situation.
  • knock the bottom out of sth To "knock the bottom out of something" is an idiomatic expression meaning to significantly diminish or undermine the value, effectiveness, or stability of something. It implies causing a significant decline or weakening, often relating to someone's plans, efforts, or expectations.
  • in a state of grace In a state of grace, in a religious sense, refers to a spiritual condition where someone is in harmony with a higher power or has obtained divine favor. It implies that the person is living virtuously, free from sin or guilt, and enjoys a close relationship with God or spiritual enlightenment. In a broader context, the idiom can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is in a peaceful, calm, or content state, often unaffected by external disturbances.
  • forty minutes of hell The idiom "forty minutes of hell" refers to a specific situation or experience that is extremely intense, challenging, or difficult to endure for a prolonged period. It originated in the context of basketball, specifically associated with the University of Arkansas Razorbacks' basketball team coached by Nolan Richardson, who famously employed an aggressive and relentless style of defense for the entire forty minutes of a game, earning the team the nickname "Forty Minutes of Hell." Thus, the idiom is often used to describe any intense or grueling situation that requires prolonged effort, resilience, and hard work.
  • few bricks short of a load The idiom "few bricks short of a load" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived to be mentally lacking or not fully understanding a situation. It implies that the person is missing some crucial or essential components, similar to a load of bricks that is incomplete or insufficient.
  • a man of the world The idiom "a man of the world" refers to an individual who is knowledgeable, experienced, and at ease in various aspects of life. The phrase implies that the person has traveled extensively, interacted with diverse cultures, and acquired a broad understanding of worldly affairs. Such a person is often regarded as sophisticated, cosmopolitan, and adaptable.
  • not sb's cup of tea The idiom "not someone's cup of tea" means that something is not to someone's liking or preference. It is often used when referring to a particular activity, object, or topic that does not interest or appeal to the person using the phrase.
  • of a lifetime The idiom "of a lifetime" refers to something incredibly rare, exceptional, or exceptional in quality or scope, often implying that it is the best or most significant opportunity or experience that one is likely to encounter in their lifetime.
  • get (or have) wind of The idiom "get (or have) wind of" means to hear or receive information about something, often in a secretive or indirect manner. It implies learning about something through speculation, rumor, or indirect sources rather than directly or officially.
  • a change of mind The idiom "a change of mind" refers to the act of changing one's opinion, decision, or viewpoint about something. It implies a shift in thinking or a different perspective from one's initial stance or belief.
  • have the makings of (something) The idiom "have the makings of (something)" means to possess the necessary qualities or potential to become or achieve something specific. It suggests that the person, thing, or situation being referred to has the fundamental elements or attributes required for success or a particular outcome.
  • the top of the ladder The idiom "the top of the ladder" refers to reaching the highest level of success, achievement, or hierarchy in a particular field, profession, or endeavor. It represents the pinnacle or ultimate goal one can aspire to reach.
  • in behalf of The idiom "in behalf of" means speaking or acting on behalf of someone else, typically done with the intention of supporting or defending them. It is often used to indicate that one is representing or advocating for another person or cause.
  • of a sort, at of sorts The idiom "of a sort" or "at of sorts" is used to imply that something or someone is not typical, ideal, or perfect, but can still be categorized or considered as such to a certain degree. It suggests that while the thing or person may possess some qualities or characteristics that make it similar to what is expected or desired, it falls short in other aspects, making it somewhat inadequate or unusual.
  • the best part of (something) The idiom "the best part of (something)" refers to the most favorable or enjoyable aspect or element of a situation, event, or experience. It indicates that there is a particular aspect that is considered superior or more desirable compared to other parts or aspects.
  • be a chapter of accidents The idiom "be a chapter of accidents" typically means a series of unrelated and unforeseen events or incidents that lead to an unfortunate outcome or failure. It refers to a situation where things go wrong unexpectedly and uncontrollably.
  • put (one's) nose out of joint The idiom "put (one's) nose out of joint" means to make someone feel annoyed, offended, or upset because their position or status has been threatened, challenged, or undermined.
  • in contempt (of court) The idiom "in contempt (of court)" refers to a situation where an individual violates or disrespects the authority, dignity, or orders of a court of law. It can involve behaviors such as showing disrespect towards the judge, disrupting court proceedings, or refusing to comply with court orders. Being found in contempt of court may result in various penalties or consequences, including fines, imprisonment, or other disciplinary actions.
  • have an easy time of it The idiom "have an easy time of it" means to experience or complete something without much effort, difficulty, or hardship. It implies that the person has a relatively stress-free or effortless experience in dealing with a situation or performing a task.
  • a whole lot of The idiom "a whole lot of" means a large or significant amount of something. It emphasizes that there is a considerable quantity or extent of the particular thing being referred to.
  • ends of the earth The idiom "ends of the earth" refers to the farthest or most remote places on Earth. It emphasizes a great distance or extreme effort required to reach a destination or pursue a goal.
  • in the hope of The idiom "in the hope of" typically means doing something with the expectation or desire for a particular outcome or result. It suggests a sense of optimism or anticipation regarding achieving a desired goal.
  • think the world of sm or sth The idiom "think the world of someone or something" means to have a high opinion or great regard for someone or something. It indicates that the person or thing is highly valued, admired, or respected.
  • close of play The idiom "close of play" refers to the end of the working day or business hours. It is often used in business or professional settings to indicate a deadline or the completion of a task by the end of the day.
  • the butt of a/the joke The idiom "the butt of a/the joke" refers to a person or thing that is the target of mockery or ridicule in a particular situation. It denotes someone who becomes the focus of humor, often at their expense, and is laughed at or made fun of by others.
  • beware of sm or sth The idiom "beware of someone or something" means to be cautious or careful of the person or thing being mentioned. It is a warning or advice to be aware of potential dangers, threats, or negative consequences associated with a particular person, object, situation, or action.
  • take the heat out of (something) The idiom "take the heat out of (something)" means to alleviate or reduce the intensity or tension of a situation, typically an argument, conflict, or difficult circumstance. It implies calming or diffusing emotions and creating a less heated or contentious atmosphere.
  • close out of The idiom "close out of" typically refers to the act of exiting or closing a program, application, or screen on a digital device, such as a computer, smartphone, or tablet. It means to terminate the active session or window and return to the previous state or home screen.
  • as if it is going out of style The idiom "as if it is going out of style" means doing something excessively or to an extreme extent. It implies that the action or behavior is being done in such a way that suggests it is rapidly losing popularity or relevance.
  • relieve you of sth The idiom "relieve you of something" means to take away or remove a burden, responsibility, or possession from someone. It implies freeing or liberating someone from a task, duty, or object, usually with the intention of helping or assisting them.
  • pull out (of sth) The idiom "pull out (of sth)" means to withdraw, retreat, or remove oneself or something from a particular situation, agreement, or location. It can refer to ending involvement in a project, ending a commitment, exiting a relationship, or physically removing oneself from a place or event.
  • live off the fat of the land The idiom "live off the fat of the land" refers to a situation where someone is able to enjoy a prosperous and comfortable life, often without having to work hard for it. It suggests living off the abundance and richness of resources or opportunities available, usually without much effort or struggle.
  • make a good fist of (something) The idiom "make a good fist of (something)" means to make a serious effort, putting in one's best attempt or skill to accomplish or succeed at something. It implies giving it one's all and doing a task to the best of one's abilities.
  • get some kind of mileage out of The idiom "get some kind of mileage out of" means to derive some benefit or value from a particular situation, item, or experience. It is often used to describe making use of or gaining advantage from something, often beyond its original or expected purpose. It suggests finding additional worth or usefulness in something that may have been overlooked or underestimated.
  • reap the harvest (or fruits) of The idiom "reap the harvest (or fruits) of" refers to enjoying or benefiting from the results of one's efforts or actions, particularly after a period of hard work or investment. It implies that one is experiencing the positive outcomes or rewards that come as a result of their previous labor or endeavors.
  • corridors of power The idiom "corridors of power" refers to the influential places or spaces where important decisions are made in politics or government. It signifies the areas or networks where those in positions of authority or influence hold sway and exercise their power. It can also imply the behind-the-scenes locations where significant negotiations, discussions, or manipulations occur that shape policies, legislation, or the direction of a nation or organization.
  • eat (something) out of (something) The idiom "eat (something) out of (something)" typically means consuming all or most of the available resources or supply of something, often in an excessive or wasteful manner.
  • a pack of lies The idiom "a pack of lies" refers to a collection or series of untruths, falsehoods, or deceitful statements. It implies that the information or narrative being presented is completely false and lacking any foundation of truth.
  • at the rear of sth The idiom "at the rear of something" refers to being positioned or located at the back or behind something, usually indicating a physical position or relative placement.
  • be made of money 2 The idiom "be made of money" is used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or seems to have an unlimited amount of money. They are often perceived as having extravagant spending habits or being able to afford anything they desire.
  • an act of God The idiom "an act of God" refers to an event or occurrence that is beyond human control and is usually attributed to natural forces or divine intervention. It implies that the event is unforeseen, unavoidable, and cannot be attributed to any human action or negligence. It is often used in legal and insurance contexts to exclude liability for damages or losses caused by such events.
  • be out of (one's) shell The idiom "be out of (one's) shell" means to be more social, confident, or extroverted than one usually is. It implies that the person is no longer reserved or withdrawn, but has become more interactive and comfortable in social situations.
  • taste of own medicine The idiom "taste of own medicine" refers to experiencing the same negative treatment or consequences that one has previously inflicted upon others. It suggests that someone is receiving an added perspective or understanding of how their actions affect others by being subjected to a similar situation themselves.
  • out of plumb The idiom "out of plumb" refers to something that is not straight or not aligned correctly. This expression is commonly used to describe objects or structures that are not vertically or horizontally perpendicular as they should be. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone's behavior or decisions that are not morally upright or correct.
  • snatch defeat from the jaws of victory The phrase "snatch defeat from the jaws of victory" is an idiom that refers to a situation where someone or a team, despite being in a highly advantageous position or close to achieving success, ends up making a mistake or series of mistakes that lead to their ultimate failure or loss. It implies the act of turning a certain victory into a sudden and unexpected defeat due to a blunder or error.
  • in the name of The idiom "in the name of" can be defined as acting or doing something on behalf of, or with the authority, permission, or support of someone or something. It is often used when someone is justifying their actions or invoking a person, cause, or higher power as the reason or motivation for what they are doing.
  • the life of Riley The idiom "the life of Riley" refers to a carefree and luxurious lifestyle or an easy and enjoyable existence. It implies living without worries, responsibilities, or any form of hardship.
  • take advantage of something The idiom "take advantage of something" means to make the most of a situation or opportunity in order to benefit oneself, often in an unfair or morally questionable way. It suggests exploiting or using something to gain an advantage or benefit, sometimes at the expense of others.
  • never tire of doing something The idiom "never tire of doing something" means to never become bored, exhausted, or lose interest in an activity or task. It implies a continuous enjoyment or enthusiasm for a particular action, regardless of how frequently or repetitively it is done.
  • form sth out of sth The idiom "form something out of something" means to create or shape something using certain materials or resources. It refers to the process of making or constructing something by gathering or combining various elements.
  • be in a spot of bother The idiom "be in a spot of bother" means to be in a difficult or troublesome situation, facing a problem or challenge. It implies being in a bit of trouble or experiencing a moment of distress.
  • the man of the moment The idiom "the man of the moment" refers to a person who is currently in the spotlight or the center of attention due to their exceptional qualities, actions, or achievements. This person is considered the most significant or influential individual at a particular time or in a specific situation.
  • ahead of one's time The idiom "ahead of one's time" refers to someone or something that is progressive, innovative, or ahead in terms of ideas, knowledge, or technology relative to the prevailing norms or standards of their time. It is used to praise or acknowledge individuals or concepts that are exceptionally advanced or revolutionary in comparison to their contemporaries.
  • lady of the evening The term "lady of the evening" is a euphemistic expression commonly used to refer to a prostitute or a sex worker. It is used to describe a woman who engages in the profession of providing sexual services in exchange for money or other forms of payment during the nighttime hours.
  • (the) top of the line The idiom "(the) top of the line" refers to something that is of the highest quality, excellence, or superiority within its category or field. It suggests that the item or entity being referred to is the best choice available and represents the highest standard or level of performance. It can be used to describe products, services, or anything that stands out as exceptional or superior.
  • oceans of sm or sth The idiom "oceans of sm or sth" means a large amount or abundance of something. It is often used to express an overwhelming quantity, similar to the vastness of the ocean.
  • slice of the action The idiom "slice of the action" typically means getting a share or involvement in an exciting or profitable activity or situation. It conveys the idea of participating or benefiting from a certain event or opportunity.
  • feel out of things The idiom "feel out of things" means to experience a sense of exclusion, alienation, or detachment from a particular situation, group, or social circle. It implies feeling disconnected or out of touch with what is currently happening or being involved.
  • a whale of a bill/difference/problem etc. The idiom "a whale of a bill/difference/problem etc." is used to describe something that is exceptionally large, significant, or impressive in size or magnitude. It is often used to emphasize the enormity or severity of a particular situation or issue.
  • not for the life of me The idiom "not for the life of me" is used to express a strong and certain refusal or inability to do or understand something. It implies that no matter how much effort or persuasion is exerted, one will never be able to accomplish or comprehend the mentioned thing.
  • get up on the wrong side of the bed, at get out of bed (on) the wrong side The idiom "get up on the wrong side of the bed" or "get out of bed (on) the wrong side" refers to starting the day in a grumpy or irritable mood for no apparent reason. It suggests that someone has woken up with a negative attitude or bad temper, which can happen metaphorically if they get out of bed on the wrong side. It highlights an unfavorable start to the day, often resulting in a person being easily irritated or in a bad mood from the very beginning.
  • out of shape The idiom "out of shape" refers to being physically unfit or not in good physical condition. It implies a lack of regular exercise or physical activity, resulting in decreased fitness levels.
  • bust out of some place The idiom "bust out of some place" means to forcefully or dramatically escape from a particular location. It typically implies breaking free from confinement or escaping with great energy and determination. This phrase can be used metaphorically to convey the idea of liberating oneself from a restrictive situation or environment.
  • beat/kick (the) hell out of somebody/something The idiom "beat/kick (the) hell out of somebody/something" means to physically or figuratively attack or defeat someone or something aggressively and thoroughly, causing significant damage or harm. It can refer to delivering forceful blows, overpowering an opponent, or overwhelmingly outperforming or outshining another entity.
  • take care of The idiom "take care of" means to assume responsibility for someone or something, to provide necessary attention, protection, or assistance. It implies ensuring the well-being or handling a situation with diligence and consideration.
  • dose of one's own medicine The idiom "a dose of one's own medicine" refers to being treated in the same negative way as one has treated others. It suggests that someone is experiencing the consequences or negative effects of their own actions or behavior that they have previously imposed on others.
  • have pride of place The idiom "have pride of place" means to occupy the most prominent or esteemed position or spot in a particular setting or context. It refers to something that is given special importance or recognition, often being displayed or positioned in a way that demonstrates its significance.
  • get a rise out of The idiom "get a rise out of" means to intentionally provoke a reaction or response, typically in order to elicit an emotional or passionate response from someone. It refers to purposely causing someone to become upset, angry, or agitated in order to derive amusement or satisfaction from their reaction.
  • the call of nature The idiom "the call of nature" refers to the basic biological urge to relieve oneself, especially in reference to needing to use the bathroom or answering the need to urinate or defecate.
  • cull sm or sth out of sth The idiom "cull sm or sth out of sth" means to carefully select and remove or eliminate something or someone from a larger group or from a specific situation. It often implies that the selection is based on certain criteria or qualities.
  • It's the story of my life The idiom "It's the story of my life" is an expression used to convey the feeling that a particular situation or experience is a typical or recurring occurrence in one's life. It implies a sense of resignation or acceptance that this situation embodies the overall narrative or essence of one's personal experiences.
  • not a ghost of a chance The idiom "not a ghost of a chance" means to have absolutely no possibility or likelihood of success or survival. It implies that there is virtually no chance or hope for achieving a desired outcome or overcoming a difficult situation.
  • be out of your league The phrase "be out of your league" is an idiom commonly used to indicate that someone or something is beyond one's abilities, skills, or social status. It implies that a person or object is too superior or advanced, making it unattainable or inappropriate for the person being referred to. It often relates to romantic or competitive situations, suggesting that someone is attempting to engage with or pursue someone or something far superior to them.
  • stoned out of one’s head The idiom "stoned out of one's head" refers to being under the influence of drugs or alcohol to an extreme degree. It suggests a state of intense intoxication where the person's mind is greatly altered, often resulting in impaired judgment, distorted perception, and a loss of control.
  • be laughed out of court The idiom "be laughed out of court" means to be ridiculed or dismissed with contempt in a formal or serious setting, typically a legal proceeding or a discussion where one's arguments or claims are deemed absurd or lacking merit.
  • a nasty piece of work The idiom "a nasty piece of work" refers to a person who is unpleasant, unkind, and has a mean-spirited or malicious behavior or character. It implies that the individual is difficult to deal with or is generally unpleasant to be around.
  • throng out (of sth) The idiom "throng out (of sth)" refers to a large number of people exiting or leaving a place all at once. It implies a crowded and bustling situation where the movement is often energetic or hurried. This phrase is typically used when describing a busy event, venue, or location where a significant mass of individuals is leaving simultaneously.
  • lots of love (from) The idiom "lots of love (from)" is an informal way to express affection and warmth towards someone, typically used in a closing of a letter or message. It implies sending heartfelt emotions, care, and good wishes to the recipient.
  • run out of sm place The idiom "run out of (somewhere)" means to exhaust or deplete the supply of something and no longer have any remaining in a particular place. It can refer to a physical location or a figurative situation.
  • in the eyes of the law The idiom "in the eyes of the law" means according to legal standards or from a legal perspective; to be judged or considered in relation to the laws and regulations of a particular jurisdiction.
  • show (someone) the back of (one's) hand The idiom "show (someone) the back of (one's) hand" means to display disrespect or rejection towards someone. It implies a dismissive gesture or attitude, indicating that the person is unworthy of attention or consideration.
  • at the top of your voice The idiom "at the top of your voice" means shouting or speaking very loudly.
  • a figure of fun The idiom "a figure of fun" typically refers to someone who is ridiculed or mocked in a lighthearted or humorous manner. It is used to describe individuals who are often the subject of jokes or jests, bringing amusement or entertainment to others.
  • have carnal knowledge of The idiom "have carnal knowledge of" refers to engaging in sexual intercourse with someone. It implies having intimate, physical contact with another person, specifically in a sexual context.
  • price sm or sth out of the market The idiom "price someone or something out of the market" refers to a situation where the cost of a product or service becomes so inflated that it becomes unaffordable for most customers or businesses, leading to decreased demand and potential business failure. It implies that the pricing strategy used causes the item or service to be uncompetitive or economically unsustainable, consequently forcing it out of the market.
  • cheat (one) out of (something) The idiom "cheat (one) out of (something)" means to deceive or swindle someone in order to deprive them of something they rightfully deserve or were expecting to receive. It implies dishonesty or unfairness in manipulating a situation or transaction for personal gain at the expense of another person.
  • on the back of sth The idiom "on the back of something" is typically used to describe a situation where one event or achievement is a result or consequence of another. It suggests that the success or advancement of a particular thing is directly tied to or supported by another related factor. It often implies that there is a close relationship between the two concepts or that they are dependent on each other.
  • run out of time The idiom "run out of time" means to have a limited amount of time available and not have enough time to complete a task or reach a goal. It implies that time has completely elapsed or nearly elapsed, leaving no opportunity for further action.
  • act of God The idiom "act of God" refers to events or circumstances that are beyond human control or influence, typically associated with natural disasters or phenomena, such as earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, or extreme weather conditions. These occurrences are seen as unavoidable and unforeseeable, causing damage or destruction without any negligence or intervention by humans.
  • frighten the (living) daylights out of (someone) The idiom "frighten the (living) daylights out of (someone)" means to terrify or scare someone severely. It implies causing extreme fear or panic, often to the point where the person feels utterly scared or shaken.
  • fetch sth out of sth The idiom "fetch something out of something" means to retrieve or bring something out from a specific location or container. It can be used both literally and metaphorically to refer to the act of extracting or obtaining something from a source or situation.
  • pick out of The idiom "pick out of" typically means to select or choose someone or something from a group or selection. It implies the act of singling out one particular option or individual among others.
  • sb's bag of tricks The idiom "sb's bag of tricks" refers to the wide range of skills, strategies, or methods that someone possesses or has at their disposal in a particular field or situation. It suggests that the person is highly resourceful and has numerous techniques or abilities they can use to achieve their goals or solve problems.
  • born out of wedlock The idiom "born out of wedlock" refers to a person who is born to parents who are not legally married to each other at the time of their child's birth. It typically signifies that the child's parents were not in a formal or recognized marital union.
  • like it's going out of fashion The idiom "like it's going out of fashion" is used to describe doing something with a high level of enthusiasm, intensity, or speed. It suggests that someone is engaging in an activity to such an excessive degree that they are enjoying or indulging in it as if it were going to become outdated or cease to exist soon.
  • bear/take the brunt of sth The idiom "bear/take the brunt of sth" means to endure or experience the most negative or unpleasant effects or consequences of something, often due to being the most directly affected or involved. It refers to bearing the heaviest burden or facing the full force of an impact, whether it is a physical, emotional, or psychological one.
  • be, etc. in/out of touch The idiom "be in/out of touch" is used to describe someone's level of awareness or understanding of a particular subject or situation. When someone is "in touch," it means they are well-informed, knowledgeable, and up-to-date on current issues or trends, while being "out of touch" implies a lack of awareness, understanding, or connection with the subject matter. It can refer to someone's understanding of popular culture, technology, or even societal changes.
  • take the wind out of someone's sails The idiom "take the wind out of someone's sails" means to diminish or undermine someone's enthusiasm or confidence, usually by saying or doing something unexpected or discouraging. It is like removing the power or momentum from someone's efforts or arguments, similar to how deflating sails would cause a ship to lose its forward motion.
  • nine times out of ten, at ninetynine times out of a hundred The idiom "nine times out of ten, at ninetynine times out of a hundred" refers to a situation or outcome that occurs nearly all of the time or in the vast majority of instances. It indicates a high probability or likelihood of something happening.
  • the crack of dawn The idiom "the crack of dawn" is used to describe the very early hours of the morning, typically referring to when the first light of day begins to appear. It implies an early start or an activity that takes place at the earliest possible time in the morning.
  • make a muck of sth To "make a muck of something" means to make a mess or failure of a task or situation. It implies that the person has done something clumsily or ineptly, leading to a situation with negative consequences or outcomes.
  • the light of somebody's life The idiom "the light of somebody's life" refers to a person who brings immense joy, happiness, and fulfillment to someone's existence. This phrase is often used to describe deeply loved family members, partners, or significant others who hold a special place in someone's heart and whose presence brings immense joy and brightness into their life.
  • make something of (one's) life The idiom "make something of (one's) life" refers to the act of achieving success, fulfillment, or progress in one's personal or professional life. It often implies that the individual has overcome obstacles, utilized their talents, and worked toward their goals to lead a meaningful and accomplished life.
  • house of ill repute The idiom "house of ill repute" refers to a place, typically a brothel or a location known for illegal or immoral activities, such as prostitution or other forms of illicit entertainment. It suggests a questionable or disreputable establishment.
  • a fine/pretty kettle of fish The idiom "a fine/pretty kettle of fish" refers to a situation that has become complicated, problematic, or difficult to resolve. It often implies that the situation has taken a turn for the worse and is now entangled or messy.
  • show someone or something a clean pair of heels The idiom "show someone or something a clean pair of heels" means to outdistance someone or something in a race or competitive situation, especially by quickly running away from them. It implies leaving someone or something far behind and demonstrating one's superior speed, agility, or ability.
  • order of the day The idiom "order of the day" refers to the prevailing or current trend, routine, or practice that is expected or required in a particular situation or context. It signifies the primary or main focus or the commonly accepted course of action at a given time.
  • spoil the ship for a ha’p’orth/ha’pennyworth of tar The idiom "spoil the ship for a ha’p’orth/ha’pennyworth of tar" means to ruin or destroy something of great value or importance due to neglect or carelessness over something minor or inexpensive. It suggests that neglecting a small aspect can have detrimental consequences for the larger whole. The term "ha’p’orth" or "ha’pennyworth" refers to a small quantity of tar, while "ship" symbolizes something significant or valuable that should be taken care of properly.
  • be one of a kind The idiomatic expression "be one of a kind" refers to a person, thing, or experience that is unique, unparalleled, or unlike anything else. It suggests that the individual or object in question stands out and cannot be easily compared or replicated.
  • born within the sound of Bow bells The idiom "born within the sound of Bow bells" refers to being born and raised in the area near St. Mary-le-Bow Church in the City of London, particularly in the East End. It is specifically used to denote someone who is a true, authentic Cockney, as the sound of the church bells was historically believed to mark the borders of the Cockney dialect and culture. Therefore, someone who is "born within the sound of Bow bells" is considered a genuine Cockney.
  • cajole (someone) out of (something) The idiom "cajole (someone) out of (something)" means to persuade or coax someone to give up or relinquish something, usually through flattery, manipulation, or gentle, persistent persuasion. It implies using charm or subtle tactics to convince someone to part with a possession, belief, or action they might initially be reluctant to surrender.
  • be put out of humour The idiom "be put out of humour" means to become upset, annoyed, or irritable due to a particular person, situation, or event. It refers to a state of being in a bad mood or experiencing a temporary loss of one's cheerful or positive disposition.
  • be (on) the right side of (an age) The idiom "be (on) the right side of (an age)" means to be younger than a particular age, often implying that someone is still quite young or does not have the experience or maturity associated with being older. It suggests being at a favorable, advantageous, or more desirable stage in life.
  • at the end of the line The idiom "at the end of the line" typically means being in the last or final position, or reaching a point beyond which there is no further advancement or progress possible. It can also refer to a situation where there are no more options, choices, or possibilities available.
  • hear a peep out of sm The idiom "hear a peep out of someone" means to not receive any sound or communication from a person, indicating their silence or lack of response.
  • take care of number one The definition of the idiom "take care of number one" is to prioritize oneself and one's own interests or well-being above others. It refers to focusing on self-preservation and looking out for one's own needs first.
  • I've only got one pair of hands The idiom "I've only got one pair of hands" is used to express the limitation of being able to accomplish only one task at a time or to convey that one's abilities or resources are finite. It implies that there is a limit to what an individual can do or handle.
  • put the fear of God into somebody The idiom "put the fear of God into somebody" means to intimidate or frighten someone severely, typically in order to make them change their behavior or actions. It implies instilling extreme fear or awe, as if one's actions will have immediate and dire consequences, often drawing on religious or moral connotations.
  • in the bosom of something The idiom "in the bosom of something" typically means within the innermost or deepest part of something, often used metaphorically to express being deeply involved or immersed in a situation or environment. It can also refer to being in the comfort, protection, or close unity of a particular group or family.
  • as a matter of form The idiom "as a matter of form" is used to indicate that something is being done out of obligation or as a customary practice, even though it may not necessarily hold much significance or true intent behind it.
  • be on the edge of (something) The idiom "be on the edge of (something)" means to be very close to experiencing or reaching a particular state, condition, or situation. It implies being at the brink or verge of something, usually with a sense of anticipation, uncertainty, or danger.
  • after the fashion of The idiom "after the fashion of" means to imitate or resemble someone or something, typically in terms of style, manner, or behavior. It suggests that someone is acting, behaving, or doing something in a way similar to someone else or a specific style or pattern.
  • jolt sm out of sth The idiom "jolt someone out of something" means to shock or startle someone into a different state or mindset, typically by presenting them with unexpected or surprising information or events. It disrupts their current state of thinking or feeling, causing them to reevaluate or change their perspective.
  • keep (something of someone's or something's) The idiom "keep (something of someone's or something's)" means to retain or hold on to something that belongs to someone or something. It implies maintaining possession or control over the mentioned item or aspect.
  • get a bang out of someone/something The idiom "get a bang out of someone/something" means to derive great enjoyment, excitement, or amusement from someone or something. It suggests that the person or thing brings delight or entertainment that is highly satisfying or pleasurable.
  • this side of the black stump The idiom "this side of the black stump" is an Australian expression used to describe a place or situation that is remote, isolated, or far away from populated areas. It implies a sense of being in the middle of nowhere or beyond familiar territory. The phrase originates from the practice of using blackened tree stumps as boundaries or landmarks in the Australian outback, making the black stump a symbol of the limits of civilization or known territory.
  • in the palm of hand The idiom "in the palm of hand" means to have complete control or power over someone or something. It implies having someone or something easily under one's influence or authority.
  • within the realms of possibility "Within the realms of possibility" is an idiom that means something is possible or feasible. It refers to an idea, action, or outcome that can reasonably be achieved or accomplished.
  • accident of birth The idiom "accident of birth" refers to the notion that an individual's circumstances and opportunities in life, including their social status, wealth, nationality, or any other advantages or disadvantages, are solely determined by the circumstances and location of their birth. It highlights the idea that these factors are out of one's control and are merely a result of chance or fate.
  • get a kick out of The idiom "get a kick out of" means to derive pleasure, enjoyment, or amusement from something. It implies finding something exciting, funny, or entertaining.
  • change of pace The expression "change of pace" refers to doing something different or experiencing something new in order to break away from routine or monotony. It implies altering the usual rhythm or speed of an activity or situation for the purpose of refreshing or rejuvenating oneself.
  • make a pig's ear of sth The idiom "make a pig's ear of sth" means to do something very badly or mess it up completely. It implies that the task or situation has been handled poorly, resulting in a disastrous outcome.
  • beware of (someone or something) The idiom "beware of (someone or something)" means to be cautious or careful about someone or something, to be aware of potential danger or harm they may pose. It implies a warning to stay alert and guarded, avoiding potential risks or negative consequences.
  • the lay of the land The idiom "the lay of the land" refers to understanding or having knowledge about a situation or environment in a particular context. It can be used to describe the current state or conditions of a place, situation, or group of people. It implies having familiarity with the overall structure, dynamics, or characteristics of a given situation in order to make informed decisions or assessments.
  • dance out of step The idiom "dance out of step" means to deviate from the expected or accepted behavior or to behave in a nonconforming manner. It refers to being different or out of sync with the majority or prevailing norms.
  • sell (one's) birthright for a bowl of soup The idiom "sell (one's) birthright for a bowl of soup" is based on a biblical story and refers to someone giving up or sacrificing something of great value or significance for immediate or temporary gratification. It suggests making a foolish or short-sighted decision by prioritizing instant rewards over long-term benefits.
  • sound the death knell of something The idiom "sound the death knell of something" means to cause or indicate the imminent demise or end of something, usually a situation, idea, or institution. It suggests that the event or action will bring about irreversible consequences, leading to its downfall or termination.
  • fall short of goal The idiom "fall short of a goal" refers to not reaching or achieving a desired objective or target. It implies that one's efforts or accomplishments have not been sufficient or successful enough to meet the set expectation.
  • out of station The idiom "out of station" refers to someone being away or absent from their usual place of work or residence. It is commonly used to describe someone who is temporarily away from their duty station, such as a soldier or an employee assigned to a specific location.
  • upon the heels of The idiom "upon the heels of" means occurring immediately after or closely following something. It refers to events or actions that happen in quick succession or in quick response to each other.
  • scare out of The idiom "scare out of" means to frighten or intimidate someone so much that they are compelled to leave or abandon a particular place or situation. It implies causing fear or anxiety to the point of forcing someone to give up or retreat.
  • take a leaf out of life, book The idiom "take a leaf out of someone's book" means to imitate or emulate someone's behavior or actions, usually because they have been successful or accomplished in some way. It suggests that one should adopt similar tactics, strategies, or methods as the person being referred to in order to achieve similar results or accomplishments. It emphasizes the idea of learning from someone's example and following their lead.
  • none of your business! The idiom "none of your business!" is a colloquial expression used to indicate that the information being asked or discussed is not someone else's concern or something they are entitled to know. It is a straightforward way of asserting one's right to privacy or signaling that a topic or query is off-limits.
  • on the coat-tails of someone/something The idiom "on the coat-tails of someone/something" refers to someone benefiting or achieving success by relying on the success or popularity of another person or thing. It implies that the individual is taking advantage of or riding the wave of another's accomplishments rather than relying on their own efforts or merit.
  • pound of flesh The idiom "pound of flesh" refers to an idiom from Shakespeare's play "The Merchant of Venice", specifically referring to the character Shylock's demand for a pound of Antonio's flesh as collateral for a debt. It is used to describe a demand or insistence for something to be given or taken, regardless of the consequences or hardship it may cause. It typically implies a ruthless and uncompromising pursuit to obtain what is owed, often at the expense of others.
  • beauty is in the eye of the beholder The idiom "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" means that perceptions of beauty are subjective and vary from person to person. What one person finds beautiful or appealing may not be the same for another person. Beauty is a subjective and personal judgment, influenced by individual tastes, preferences, and experiences.
  • there's no danger of that! The idiom "there's no danger of that!" is used to express certainty or assurance that a certain event or situation will not occur or happen. It implies that the possibility of something happening is completely unlikely or not a concern.
  • think of sm or sth The idiom "think of someone or something" means to consider, remember, or recognize someone or something. It refers to the act of giving attention or thought to a particular person or thing in a positive or appreciative manner. It implies being mindful or conscious of someone's existence or something's significance.
  • with the exception of The idiom "with the exception of" means excluding or not including someone or something. It signifies that all individuals or things are included in a list or category, except for the one or few mentioned after the phrase.
  • wash your hands of sth The idiom "wash your hands of sth" means to disassociate oneself from a particular situation or responsibility. It implies that one has made a conscious decision to no longer be involved or associated with a certain matter, often due to its negative or problematic nature.
  • all manner of sm or sth The idiom "all manner of sm or sth" is used to refer to a wide range or variety of something. It means that there are multiple different types, forms, or kinds of a particular thing.
  • make a meal (out) of sth The idiom "make a meal (out) of something" means to exaggerate the importance or significance of something, often unnecessarily, and give it more attention or effort than it deserves. It often implies that a situation or task is being unnecessarily complicated, drawn out, or made more difficult than it should be.
  • the lesser evil (or the lesser of two evils) The idiom "the lesser evil (or the lesser of two evils)" refers to a situation where there are multiple options, none of which are ideal, but one is seen as slightly better or less harmful than the others. It implies choosing the option that is considered less negative or detrimental compared to the alternatives, even if it is still not a perfect or preferred choice.
  • burst out of The idiom "burst out of" means to suddenly and forcefully come out of a place, usually in a rapid or explosive manner. It often implies a strong or intense emergence from a confined space or situation.
  • not cup of tea The idiom "not cup of tea" is a phrase that implies someone does not prefer or have an interest in a specific person, thing, activity, or situation. It indicates a lack of enjoyment or suitability for an individual.
  • make game of (someone or something) The idiom "make game of (someone or something)" means to mock or ridicule someone or something in a teasing or taunting manner. It refers to when a person intentionally makes fun of another person or something, often to belittle or humiliate them for amusement or entertainment purposes.
  • make the best of it The idiom "make the best of it" means to accept and adapt to a difficult or undesirable situation, and to try to find the positive or make the most out of it despite the circumstances. It implies making an effort to cope with the situation rather than complaining or becoming discouraged.
  • a (or the) grand old man of The idiom "a (or the) grand old man of" typically refers to a person who is respected, influential, or revered in a particular field or community, especially when they have been involved for a long time and have made significant contributions. It conveys the image of someone who is wise, experienced, and highly regarded.
  • beginning of the end The definition of the idiom "beginning of the end" is when a series of events mark the start or initiation of a decline, downfall, or the eventual demise of something or someone. It implies that the current situation or circumstances are leading towards an inevitable and negative outcome.
  • the living image of (someone or something) The idiom "the living image of (someone or something)" is used to describe someone who closely resembles another person or thing, either in physical appearance or behavior. It implies a strong resemblance, often suggesting that the person or thing being referred to is an exact replica or a very accurate representation.
  • man of the cloth "Man of the cloth" is an idiomatic expression that refers to a male clergyman or a religious leader, especially from Christian denominations. It is often used to describe individuals who hold positions such as priests, ministers, pastors, or other members of the clergy. The term "cloth" in this context refers to the garments or robes typically worn by religious figures, symbolizing their role and connection to their faith.
  • on the back of a postage stamp The idiom "on the back of a postage stamp" is an expression used to emphasize a small or limited amount of space, typically referring to the limited scope or depth of someone's knowledge, understanding, or explanation about a particular topic or subject. It suggests that there is very little room to elaborate or provide significant information, similar to the limited area available on the back of a postage stamp.
  • harder than the back of God's head The idiom "harder than the back of God's head" typically means extremely difficult or nearly impossible. It implies a level of hardness or difficulty that is beyond comprehension or beyond any human capability.
  • loads of sth The idiom "loads of something" is used to indicate a large quantity or abundance of something. It implies that there is an excessive or significant amount of the mentioned thing.
  • I could murder (some kind of food) The idiom "I could murder (some kind of food)" is a colloquial phrase used to express an intense craving or desire for a particular type of food. It emphasizes the speaker's strong desire or hunger, often exaggerating their willingness to go to extreme lengths to satisfy their cravings.
  • fly in the face of something The expression "fly in the face of something" means to directly oppose or contradict something, often in a defiant or deliberate manner. It refers to going against established norms, expectations, or beliefs, disregarding them completely. It suggests a defiance that challenges the prevailing wisdom or consensus.
  • bring an amount of money in The idiom "bring an amount of money in" typically refers to the act of earning or generating a certain sum of money. It implies the action of acquiring or collecting funds, often through employment, business transactions, or any other means of generating income.
  • give someone the benefit of The idiom "give someone the benefit of" means to accept or view someone's words or actions in a positive light, giving them the advantage of doubt or a favorable interpretation. It entails being open-minded and assuming the best intentions behind someone's behavior, even if it may seem questionable or unclear initially.
  • hear tell (of) The idiom "hear tell (of)" means to have heard rumors or news about someone or something. It implies learning about information through word of mouth or hearsay.
  • Out of the mouths of babes (oft times come gems). The idiom "Out of the mouths of babes (oft times come gems)" means that children can sometimes say something very wise or insightful despite their young age and lack of experience. It suggests that profound or unexpected wisdom can be expressed by the innocent and inexperienced.
  • out of bounds The idiom "out of bounds" refers to something or someone that is prohibited, forbidden, or beyond acceptable limits or boundaries. It often signifies situations, actions, or places that are off-limits or not allowed.
  • not by any stretch of the imagination, at by no stretch of the imagination The idiom "not by any stretch of the imagination" or "at by no stretch of the imagination" is used to express a strong denial or disbelief in something. It implies that the idea or situation being mentioned is clearly beyond any reasonable or logical consideration.
  • of your own making The idiom "of your own making" means that a situation or problem is entirely caused by one's own actions, choices, or mistakes, emphasizing personal responsibility or accountability for the outcome.
  • can't hit the side of a barn The idiom "can't hit the side of a barn" means that someone's aim or accuracy is very poor. It is often used to describe someone who consistently fails to hit a target even when it is large and easy to hit.
  • make use of sm or sth The idiom "make use of someone or something" means to utilize or take advantage of someone or something in order to benefit or achieve a specific purpose or goal. It implies making effective, practical, or meaningful use of available resources, skills, or opportunities.
  • rule in favor of The idiom "rule in favor of" refers to a decision made by a judge or decision-maker that supports or favors a particular party or viewpoint in a legal or official context. It means to make a judgment or verdict in support of someone or something, typically based on the evidence, arguments, or legal principles presented.
  • under the care of somebody The idiom "under the care of somebody" means to be under the authority, responsibility, or supervision of someone, who takes charge of or looks after the well-being, guidance, or protection of another person or entity. It suggests the notion of being entrusted to someone's care or being dependent on them for support, guidance, or assistance.
  • make something of yourself The idiom "make something of yourself" means to achieve success or improve one's life situation through personal efforts and accomplishments. It refers to a person striving to become accomplished, successful, or respected in their chosen field or in life in general. It often implies personal growth, self-improvement, and reaching one's full potential.
  • the bane of life The idiom "the bane of life" refers to something that is a constant source of annoyance, frustration, or misery in one's life. It symbolizes a persistent and relentless problem or burden that negatively affects one's well-being and happiness.
  • full of The idiom "full of" means to be filled or saturated with something, typically referring to emotions, qualities, or characteristics. It can describe a person who possesses a significant amount of a particular attribute or feeling. It suggests a state or condition of being completely immersed or engulfed in something.
  • lose sight of sth 1 The idiom "lose sight of something" means to forget or lose focus on something important, often due to being occupied or distracted by other tasks or goals. It implies that one's attention or awareness regarding a particular matter diminishes or disappears altogether.
  • do somebody/something a power/world of good The idiom "do somebody/something a power/world of good" means to have a profoundly positive impact or bring immense benefit to someone or something. It implies that the action or situation being referred to significantly improves the well-being, health, or overall state of the subject.
  • be a mass of something The idiom "be a mass of something" refers to a situation or state where something is completely filled or covered with a particular substance or item, often in a disorganized or chaotic manner. It implies a significant amount or quantity of that particular thing, making it difficult to distinguish or separate individual elements.
  • in the midst of The idiom "in the midst of" means being in the middle of a particular situation, event, or activity. It implies that someone is currently engaged or involved in something and it often suggests a sense of being surrounded or surrounded by a particular circumstance or environment.
  • take the wind out of sm's sails To "take the wind out of someone's sails" is an idiom that means to deflate or diminish someone's enthusiasm, confidence, or momentum, usually by saying or doing something unexpected or demoralizing. It is often used when describing someone's ability to ruin another person's plans or optimistic disposition.
  • of color The idiom "of color" is used to refer to individuals who belong to non-white racial or ethnic groups. It is commonly used to acknowledge and identify people who are not from the white or Caucasian race. The term is typically used in discussions about race, diversity, and social issues.
  • talking of sb/sth The idiom "talking of sb/sth" typically means that someone is discussing or mentioning a particular person or thing in the current conversation. It implies a transition to a topic that is related to the person or thing being talked about.
  • How long is a piece of string? The idiom "How long is a piece of string?" is typically used to describe a question that is impossible or difficult to answer because it lacks specific parameters or a clear answer. It highlights the lack of information or guidance provided, making it challenging to determine a precise or logical response.
  • make a big thing of The idiom "make a big thing of" means to exaggerate the importance or significance of something, typically by drawing excessive attention, creating unnecessary drama, or making a major issue out of it.
  • conflict of interest(s) The idiom "conflict of interest(s)" refers to a situation where an individual or organization has competing or conflicting interests or loyalties that could compromise their impartiality, objectivity, or judgment. It implies a conflict between personal or financial motivations and professional duties, potentially leading to biased or compromised decision-making.
  • in need (of sth) The idiom "in need (of sth)" refers to a situation or condition where someone requires something. It implies that a person or thing lacks or requires something necessary or desired for a particular purpose. This phrase is often used to express a state of deficiency or scarcity and suggests that assistance or fulfillment is required.
  • out of season The idiom "out of season" refers to something that is not currently in the appropriate or expected time period or period of activity. It usually refers to products, activities, or events that are not occurring or available during their usual or customary time.
  • lie (one's) way out of (something) The idiom "lie one's way out of (something)" refers to the act of using deception or dishonesty to avoid or escape from a difficult or undesirable situation. It implies that someone is fabricating false information or making up stories in order to evade responsibility, punishment, or any negative consequences that may arise from a particular situation.
  • in the hands of somebody The idiom "in the hands of somebody" typically refers to the control or possession of something being entrusted to a specific individual or group. It implies that the responsibility, power, or decision-making authority rests with a particular person or entity.
  • on the edge of one's seat The idiom "on the edge of one's seat" means to be in a state of suspense, excitement, or anticipation. It implies that someone is fully engrossed or captivated by a situation or event, often unable to relax or sit comfortably due to heightened emotional involvement.
  • made of sterner stuff The idiom "made of sterner stuff" refers to a person who is mentally or emotionally stronger, tougher, or more resilient than others. It suggests that they possess a higher level of strength, determination, or endurance in the face of difficulties or challenges.
  • year of our Lord The idiom "year of our Lord" is a phrase used to indicate the specific year in the Gregorian calendar. It is commonly abbreviated as "AD" (Anno Domini in Latin). The term signifies the number of years that have passed since the estimated birth year of Jesus Christ, regardless of one's religious beliefs. It is often used to distinguish a specific year from other dating systems.
  • fish out of water The idiom "fish out of water" refers to a person who feels uncomfortable, out of place, or inadequate in a specific situation or environment. It suggests a sense of unfamiliarity and awkwardness, similar to a fish being removed from its natural habitat and placed in an environment where it cannot thrive.
  • den of iniquity The idiom "den of iniquity" refers to a place or location that is known for immoral or wicked activities. It signifies a space that is associated with vice, corruption, and wrongdoing.
  • con sm out of sth The idiom "con someone out of something" means to deceive or trick someone in order to obtain or acquire something from them, typically money or valuables, through dishonest means.
  • take care of sm The idiom "take care of someone" means to look after or attend to someone's needs, well-being, or responsibilities, often involving taking on a protective or supportive role.
  • have coming out of ears The idiom "have coming out of ears" means to have an overwhelming abundance or excess of something. It suggests that someone has such a large quantity or number of a particular thing that it is almost overflowing or spilling out.
  • in the thick of sth The idiom "in the thick of something" means to be fully and actively engaged or involved in a particular situation, often a busy, challenging, or intense one. It implies being deeply in the midst of an event, project, or experience.
  • do sm a power of good The idiom "do someone a power of good" means that something has a significant positive impact on someone's well-being or state of mind. It implies that the mentioned action or experience has transformative effects and greatly improves someone's condition or mood.
  • in/out of keeping (with sth) The idiom "in/out of keeping (with sth)" refers to whether something is consistent or appropriate in relation to a specific context, situation, or standard. If something is said to be "in keeping with" something else, it means it aligns or is harmonious with it. On the other hand, if something is "out of keeping with" something else, it means it is not consistent or fails to match the expected standards or surroundings.
  • be on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "be on the horns of a dilemma" means to be faced with a difficult choice between two equally undesirable options. It refers to the feeling of being caught between two conflicting and challenging decisions, often leaving the person feeling trapped and uncertain of which path to choose.
  • on the back of The idiom "on the back of" typically means to be based or reliant on something or someone, often in a positive or advantageous manner. It implies that something is built or achieved as a result of another thing or person's support or success.
  • ahead of schedule The idiom "ahead of schedule" means to be in front of or ahead of the planned or expected time for a particular task or event. It indicates that something is being completed or achieved earlier than originally planned or expected.
  • variety is the spice of life The idiom "variety is the spice of life" means that experiencing new things or having a diverse range of experiences makes life more interesting and enjoyable. It suggests that having different options, activities, or experiences adds excitement and flavor to life, making it more vibrant and fulfilling.
  • make the best of The idiom "make the best of" means to take advantage of or try to make a positive outcome or satisfactory situation out of a difficult or less than ideal circumstance. It involves utilizing available resources and putting in efforts to improve the situation or make it as good as possible despite the limitations or challenges.
  • beat the living daylights out of The idiom "beat the living daylights out of" is used to describe an act of extreme physical violence or aggression towards someone or something. It implies causing severe harm or damage, often through a brutal and merciless beating.
  • be out of (one's) depth The idiom "be out of (one's) depth" means to be in a situation or involved in something that is beyond one's ability, experience, or understanding. It suggests a feeling of being overwhelmed, lacking the necessary knowledge or skills to properly handle the situation.
  • in the thick of it The idiom "in the thick of it" means to be deeply involved or immersed in a situation, particularly a difficult or intense one. It implies being in the midst of action or a challenging activity, often facing obstacles or dealing with high levels of stress.
  • come out/up smelling of roses The idiom "come out/up smelling of roses" means to emerge from a difficult situation or to resolve a problem successfully, often with a positive image or reputation. It suggests that someone has managed to avoid any negative consequences and instead gains admiration or praise.
  • you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear The idiom "you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear" means that it is impossible to create something valuable or refined out of inferior or low-quality materials. It suggests that no matter how much effort or skill is put into it, the end result will never be of high quality or worth.
  • a fat lot of good, use, etc. The idiom "a fat lot of good, use, etc." is used to express disappointment or skepticism about something or someone's abilities or qualities. It implies that whatever is being referred to is perceived as being completely useless, ineffective, or of very little value.
  • make a point of doing something The definition of the idiom "make a point of doing something" is to deliberately or purposefully ensure that a particular action is taken or a certain behavior is adopted consistently. It suggests that one places importance or priority on accomplishing or adhering to a particular task, habit, or goal.
  • think a lot of someone or something The idiom "think a lot of someone or something" means to have a high opinion or regard for someone or something. It implies admiration, respect, or favorable consideration towards the person or thing being referred to.
  • a different kettle of fish The idiom "a different kettle of fish" is used to describe something or someone that is completely different from what was previously mentioned or discussed. It implies that the new subject or situation is unrelated, distinct, or separate from the one being compared to.
  • live out of cans The idiom "live out of cans" typically means to subsist or primarily consume pre-packaged or canned food, indicating a lack of access to fresh or home-cooked meals. It can also suggest a limited or basic lifestyle, devoid of variety or culinary sophistication.
  • never hear the end of something The idiom "never hear the end of something" means to continuously hear about or be reminded of a particular event, mistake, or issue in a repetitive or bothersome manner. It refers to a situation where the topic repeatedly arises in conversations, discussions, or criticisms, often causing annoyance or frustration.
  • come out of the closet The idiom "come out of the closet" refers to the act of openly and honestly revealing one's true sexual orientation or gender identity, especially when it differs from societal norms or expectations. It signifies embracing and expressing one's identity, often after a period of secrecy or self-denial.
  • the line of least resistance The idiom "the line of least resistance" refers to the path or course of action that is easiest, requires the least effort, or encounters the least opposition or resistance. It implies choosing the path of minimal resistance or effort rather than taking a more difficult or challenging route.
  • in the teeth of danger, opposition, etc. The idiom "in the teeth of danger, opposition, etc." means to confront or face something dangerous, challenging, or unfavorable head-on, without fear or hesitation. It implies being directly exposed to the difficult or threatening situation, often with determination and resilience.
  • of one's life The idiom "of one's life" typically refers to an extraordinary or unforgettable experience or event that is considered the most significant or memorable in a person's lifetime. It emphasizes the exceptional nature of an occurrence that is unlikely to be repeated or surpassed.
  • a crock of gold The idiom "a crock of gold" refers to an imaginary or illusory source of great wealth, usually used to describe something that is highly desirable but ultimately unattainable or unrealistic.
  • do out of The idiom "do out of" means to deceive, cheat, or trick someone out of something, such as money, possessions, or an opportunity. It is used when someone is unfairly deprived of what rightfully belongs to them through dishonest means.
  • abreast of sm or sth The idiom "abreast of something" means to stay informed or knowledgeable about a particular subject or topic. It refers to keeping up with the latest information, developments, or advancements related to someone or something.
  • case of the blind leading the blind The idiom "a case of the blind leading the blind" refers to a situation where a person or group, who are themselves lacking knowledge or expertise in a particular matter, try to guide or instruct others who are equally uninformed or inexperienced. It implies that none of the individuals involved have the necessary understanding or insight, therefore leading to confusion, misguidance, or failure.
  • of all places The idiom "of all places" is used to express surprise or disbelief about something being in a particular location or situation that seems unlikely or unexpected given the circumstances. It implies that the mentioned place is the last or most unlikely place one would expect to find or encounter something.
  • out of humor The idiom "out of humor" means to be in a bad mood or to be easily irritated and not easily pleased. It refers to someone who is not feeling cheerful or happy and may display signs of irritability or displeasure in their behavior.
  • pots of money The idiom "pots of money" refers to a vast amount of wealth or money. It implies that someone has a significant amount of financial resources or is extremely wealthy.
  • hew something out of something The idiom "hew something out of something" means to carve or shape something, typically from a larger or existing material, using force, effort, or determination. It suggests the idea of creating or constructing something through hard work or perseverance.
  • a sword of Damocles hangs over sb's head The idiom "a sword of Damocles hangs over someone's head" refers to a constant threat or impending danger that someone is constantly aware of or anxious about. It alludes to the ancient Greek myth of Damocles, where a sword was suspended by a single horsehair above Damocles' head, symbolizing the constant danger and fear that could strike him at any moment.
  • along the lines of (something) The idiom "along the lines of (something)" means that something is similar in nature or concept to something else. It suggests that the idea being presented may not be an exact match, but rather shares similarities or falls under the same broad category as the thing being referred to.
  • the pick of the bunch, at the pick of sth "The pick of the bunch" is an idiom that implies choosing the best or most outstanding option from a group or selection. It refers to selecting the most desirable or superior item or person. For example, if someone says, "She's the pick of the bunch," it means she is the best or most exceptional among the group. The phrase "at the pick of something" can mean at the most opportune or advantageous moment or point in time.
  • outside of sb/sth The idiom "outside of sb/sth" typically means beyond or excluding someone or something. It refers to being exterior or not part of a specific person or thing's scope, influence, or involvement.
  • the rough edge of your tongue "The rough edge of your tongue" is an idiom commonly used to describe someone speaking harshly or using offensive and hurtful language towards others. It suggests that the person is being disrespectful, impolite, or lacking in tact when expressing their thoughts, often causing distress or annoyance to those around them.
  • out of the box The idiom "out of the box" typically refers to thinking or approaching something in a creative, unconventional, or original way, rather than sticking to traditional or expected methods or ideas. It suggests innovation, uniqueness, and a willingness to go beyond conventional boundaries to solve problems or address situations.
  • woods are full of The idiom "woods are full of" typically means that there are a large number of a particular kind of people or things around, often implying that they are untrustworthy, deceitful, or dangerous. It suggests that a certain group or category is prevalent or abundant, often in a negative or undesirable way.
  • talk of the devil, and he is sure to appear The idiom "talk of the devil, and he is sure to appear" means that when you mention someone, they often show up unexpectedly or at the exact moment you mention them. It implies that the person you were talking about has a tendency to appear or make their presence known when they are being discussed.
  • month of Sundays The idiom "month of Sundays" is used to refer to an exceptionally long period of time. It implies a duration that feels unusually lengthy, similar to the extended period encompassing a whole month made up of consecutive Sundays.
  • twist sth out of sth The idiom "twist something out of something" means to manipulate or obtain a desired outcome or result through skillful or forceful means, often involving significant effort or exertion. It implies the idea of extracting or extracting something by twisting or turning it, figuratively speaking.
  • in honor of The idiom "in honor of" means to show respect, admiration, or recognition towards someone or something by commemorating or celebrating them. It signifies an action undertaken as a tribute or acknowledgment of a person, event, achievement, or cause.
  • a/the land of milk and honey The idiom "a/the land of milk and honey" refers to a place or situation that is perceived as abundant, prosperous, and full of opportunities, often suggesting an ideal or highly favorable condition to live in or experience. It originates from biblical references to the promised land of Canaan, which described it as a fertile and bountiful region flowing with milk and honey.
  • be a/the model of (something) The idiom "be a/the model of (something)" means to be a perfect or ideal example of a particular quality, behavior, or standard. It suggests that someone or something possesses all the desired characteristics or serves as a benchmark for others to follow.
  • any amount of something The idiom "any amount of something" refers to a large or significant quantity of that thing, emphasizing that there is a plentiful or excessive supply or quantity available. It suggests that one has an abundant or unlimited source or access to the mentioned item or resource.
  • at the back of your mind The idiom "at the back of your mind" refers to something that is not at the forefront or actively being thought about, but rather subconsciously or in one's underlying thoughts or awareness. It suggests that an idea or thought is present but may not be the immediate focus or being expressed.
  • short end of the stick The idiom "short end of the stick" means to receive an unfair or unfavorable outcome or to be in a disadvantageous position in a situation. It refers to being at the receiving end of something undesirable, often as a result of being treated unfairly or less favorably than others involved. The phrase suggests that one may have drawn the proverbial "short end" or the less desirable part of an arrangement or deal.
  • heap coals of fire on someone's head The idiom "heap coals of fire on someone's head" means to repay someone's kindness or good behavior with even greater kindness or generosity. It originates from a biblical proverb found in Proverbs 25:21-22: "If your enemy is hungry, give him food to eat; if he is thirsty, give him water to drink. In doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head, and the Lord will reward you." It suggests that by responding to hostility or mistreatment with goodwill, one can potentially shame or stir remorse in the wrongdoer.
  • king of the jungle The idiom "king of the jungle" refers to someone who is regarded as the most dominant or powerful individual in a particular setting or group, drawing an analogy with the lion, which is commonly associated as the king of the jungle due to its strength and leadership within its habitat. It typically implies someone who is authoritative, influential, or holds a position of superior power.
  • talk out of arse The idiom "talk out of arse" is a vulgar phrase that means someone is speaking without any basis in truth or knowledge. It implies that the person is making things up or saying nonsense.
  • in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" means to do something very quickly or in a very short amount of time. It implies that the task or action will be completed or accomplished swiftly, often without much effort or delay.
  • make an example of sb The idiom "make an example of sb" means to punish someone severely or publicly in order to serve as a warning or deterrent to others. It involves using someone as a representative case to demonstrate the consequences of a certain action or behavior.
  • you be the judge of that The idiom "you be the judge of that" means that the person being addressed should make their own decision or judgment about a particular situation or matter. It implies that the speaker is leaving the final judgment or decision up to the other person, as they may have the necessary knowledge or perspective to assess and evaluate the situation accurately.
  • by reason of The idiom "by reason of" means because of or on account of a particular reason or cause. It indicates that something is occurring or happening due to or as a result of a specific factor or circumstance.
  • the object of the exercise The expression "the object of the exercise" is an idiom used to refer to the main or ultimate goal or purpose of something, particularly an action, activity, or endeavor. It emphasizes the desired outcome or result that one is trying to achieve through their efforts.
  • be a bit of all right The idiom "be a bit of all right" is used to describe someone or something as appealing, attractive, or satisfactory in some way. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is considered good, acceptable, or impressive.
  • the love of (one's) life The expression "the love of (one's) life" refers to the person considered the most loved and cherished by an individual. This idiom signifies an intense and profound romantic or emotional connection, often implying that the person is an ideal partner and holds a special place in one's heart.
  • be of one/the same mind (about somebody/something) The idiom "be of one/the same mind (about somebody/something)" means to have a consensus or agreement of opinion or attitude towards someone or something. It suggests that individuals or a group share the same beliefs, ideas, or perspectives. They are unified in their thoughts and viewpoints.
  • a bit of fluff/stuff/skirt The idiom "a bit of fluff/stuff/skirt" is a derogatory slang term that is used to refer to a woman, typically in a superficial and objectifying manner. It implies that she is considered to be nothing more than a trivial or temporary romantic partner or a purely physical object of attraction without any significant qualities or substance beyond appearance.
  • Procrastination is the thief of time. The idiom "Procrastination is the thief of time" means that delaying or putting off tasks or responsibilities will ultimately result in wasted time and missed opportunities. It implies that procrastination can prevent one from making efficient use of their time and achieving their goals.
  • think little of The idiom "think little of" means to have a low opinion or regard for someone or something. It implies that the person does not consider or value them highly or think they are important or significant.
  • all of a sudden The idiom "all of a sudden" means happening unexpectedly or without warning, in a very sudden or abrupt manner. It signifies a sudden change or event that takes place rapidly, catching someone by surprise.
  • take a piece out of The idiom "take a piece out of" typically means to scold, criticize, or reprimand someone severely, often in an aggressive or confrontational manner. It implies harshly pointing out someone's mistakes, shortcomings, or misbehavior.
  • let the genie out of the bottle The idiom "let the genie out of the bottle" means to allow a situation or an issue to become apparent or be made public, often with unintended or unpredictable consequences. It refers to the tale of Aladdin, where a genie is released from a bottle and grants the person who releases it three wishes. The phrase is typically used to caution against opening up a situation that may have unforeseen and potentially negative results.
  • don't amount to a bucket of spit The idiom "don't amount to a bucket of spit" is an expression used to convey that something or someone is worthless, insignificant, or holds no value. It implies that the subject being referred to is unimportant or lacks any real impact or significance.
  • sit at the feet of The idiom "sit at the feet of" typically refers to the act of humbly learning from or being mentored by someone who is highly knowledgeable or experienced in a particular field. It implies being a student or disciple, seeking wisdom or guidance from an expert or revered figure.
  • have name inscribed in the book of life The idiom "have name inscribed in the book of life" refers to the belief or expression that a person's name is recorded or registered in a higher power's book or list, signifying their righteousness, good deeds, or salvation. It typically connotes religious or spiritual significance, where having one's name in the book of life implies a favorable status or eternal reward in the afterlife.
  • big drink of water The idiom "big drink of water" is typically used to describe someone who is tall and/or well-built. It alludes to the idea of someone who needs more water due to their larger size or physicality.
  • the course of true love never did run smooth The idiom "the course of true love never did run smooth" means that love and romantic relationships are often complicated and filled with obstacles, challenges, and setbacks. It emphasizes the idea that love is not always easy or straightforward, and that there will always be bumps in the road to a successful and fulfilling romantic relationship.
  • not able to make head or tail of The idiom "not able to make head or tail of" means being unable to understand or make sense of something. It implies confusion or lack of comprehension regarding a particular situation, information, or concept.
  • come out of the box The idiom "come out of the box" refers to someone or something that is unconventional, innovative, or unique. It means to approach a situation or problem in a different or unconventional way, thinking creatively and departing from traditional methods or ideas. It implies being original, imaginative, or out-of-the-ordinary in one's thinking or actions.
  • can't make heads or tails of The idiom "can't make heads or tails of" means to not be able to understand or comprehend something, often referring to a confusing or nonsensical situation, information, or instructions. It implies that the person is completely puzzled or unable to make any sense of it.
  • for the good of The idiom "for the good of" means acting or making a decision with the intention of benefiting someone or something, often emphasizing the long-term well-being or betterment of a person, group, organization, community, or society as a whole. It embodies the idea of considering the best interests and overall welfare.
  • from/out of the top drawer The idiom "from/out of the top drawer" means of exceptional quality or excellently distinguished. It typically refers to someone or something that is of the highest level or top-tier in terms of skill, talent, or distinction.
  • be out of (one's) hair The idiom "be out of (one's) hair" means to no longer be bothersome, to be freed from someone's presence or attention, or to have someone or something removed from one's responsibilities or concerns.
  • be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind" refers to an extreme state of boredom, fear, anger, intoxication, or any other emotional or mental state where one feels overwhelmed or excessively impacted by a particular experience or situation. It suggests that the intensity of the feeling or state mentioned is so extreme that it completely consumes or overwhelms one's mind.
  • get up a head of steam The idiom "get up a head of steam" refers to building up momentum, energy, enthusiasm, or determination to complete a task or achieve a goal. It originates from steam engines, where "getting up a head of steam" means building up enough pressure in the boiler to power the engine and start moving. In a figurative sense, it means gathering enough drive or motivation to start or continue with great intensity and determination.
  • cop hold of (someone or something) The idiom "cop hold of (someone or something)" means to catch or seize someone or something, often with difficulty or after a pursuit. It implies successfully obtaining or apprehending someone or something, typically after a struggle, chase, or search.
  • be talking out of both sides of (one's) mouth The idiom "be talking out of both sides of one's mouth" refers to someone speaking in a contradictory or deceitful manner. It describes a situation where a person says different things to different people or expresses conflicting opinions simultaneously. It implies that the person cannot be trusted or is being insincere.
  • get shut of sm or sth The idiom "get shut of someone or something" means to dispose of, get rid of, or eliminate someone or something, often quickly or permanently. It implies a desire to be free from the person or thing in order to improve a situation or avoid problems.
  • knock the wind out of sails The idiom "knock the wind out of sails" means to greatly discourage or deflate someone's enthusiasm, confidence, or ambition, often by delivering unexpected news or criticism that leaves them feeling disheartened or demotivated. It is often used to describe a situation where someone's excitement or momentum is abruptly deflated.
  • run the gamut of (something) To "run the gamut of (something)" means to experience or go through a wide range or full spectrum of something, usually referring to a series of emotions, experiences, or circumstances. It implies covering or encountering everything within a particular category or domain.
  • worry an animal out of sth The idiom "worry an animal out of sth" means to cause an animal to leave or abandon something through persistent or aggressive nagging, annoyance, or harassment. It suggests that one's actions or behavior towards an animal are so irritating or bothersome that it is compelled to give up or relinquish its possession, location, or activity.
  • make the most of (oneself) The idiom "make the most of oneself" means to fully utilize one's abilities, skills, or potential in order to achieve success, make a positive impact, or maximize one's personal growth and development. It implies making the best possible use of one's resources and opportunities to reach one's fullest potential.
  • not stand the sight of The idiom "not stand the sight of" means to feel intense dislike, aversion, or irritation towards someone or something, to the extent that one cannot tolerate or be in their presence.
  • a/the/somebody's way of life The idiom "a/the/somebody's way of life" refers to the habits, customs, and daily routine that characterize a person or a particular group of people. It encompasses the overall lifestyle, values, and behaviors that shape and define an individual or a community's existence. This idiom often implies a deep-rooted and consistent pattern of living that reflects someone's personal choices, beliefs, and cultural identity.
  • do not spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar The idiom "do not spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar" means not to compromise or neglect an important outcome or objective due to a lack of care, attention, or investment in a small or inexpensive detail. It warns against making significant sacrifices or compromises for the sake of saving a small amount of money or effort, which could ultimately lead to detrimental consequences or the failure of a larger endeavor. The phrase alludes to the importance of properly maintaining a ship by applying enough tar, a cheap substance, to protect it from damage, with the implication that neglecting such a small investment may result in the ruin of the entire ship.
  • diddle sm out of sth The idiom "diddle someone out of something" means to deceive, cheat, or swindle someone out of something, typically in a sneaky or dishonest way. It suggests taking advantage of someone's trust or naivety to wrongfully acquire their possessions, money, or resources.
  • bluff one's way out (of sth) The idiom "bluff one's way out (of sth)" refers to the act of using deception or bluffing to escape a difficult or challenging situation. It implies that someone tries to persuade or convince others of something that may not be entirely true in order to avoid negative consequences or responsibility.
  • have the time of life The idiom "have the time of life" refers to having a hugely enjoyable or exciting experience. It implies that one is experiencing such a great time that it becomes a cherished and memorable moment.
  • stay on top of The idiom "stay on top of" means to remain informed and knowledgeable about something, to monitor it closely, and to keep it under control. It implies being proactive and attentive in order to stay updated and manage a situation effectively.
  • one jump ahead of someone/something The idiom "one jump ahead of someone/something" means to be slightly ahead or more advanced or prepared than someone or something. It implies being able to anticipate or predict someone's or something's actions or staying one step ahead in any situation.
  • on the shady side of The idiom "on the shady side of" typically means that someone or something is considered to be older or past their prime. It suggests that they are in a state of decline or deterioration.
  • a horse of another different color The idiom "a horse of another different color" is used to describe a situation or subject that is distinct, different, or unrelated to the current topic being discussed. It implies a notable contrast or significant difference between two matters or issues.
  • bust ass out of (some place) The idiom "bust ass out of (some place)" is an informal expression that means to leave or escape a location with great speed, urgency, or determination. It implies a sense of haste or being in a hurry to depart from a situation or location, often due to a desire to avoid trouble or conflict. It can also suggest a strong will to achieve a goal or reach a destination promptly.
  • by the sweat of your brow "By the sweat of your brow" is an idiom that means to achieve or accomplish something by working hard, putting in a lot of physical or mental effort, and exerting oneself. It implies that success or progress is obtained through personal labor, dedication, and perseverance.
  • meeting of the minds The idiom "meeting of the minds" refers to a situation or agreement that occurs when two or more people come to a mutual understanding or consensus on a particular issue or idea. It implies that the individuals involved have reached a shared understanding and are on the same page regarding a specific matter or objective.
  • get up on the wrong side of bed The idiom "get up on the wrong side of bed" means to wake up in a bad mood or with a negative attitude that can persist throughout the day.
  • arrive on the stroke of sm time The idiom "arrive on the stroke of [some time]" means to arrive at an exact or precise time. It suggests punctuality and being right on time, not a minute before or after the designated time.
  • the dark side of (someone or something) The idiom "the dark side of (someone or something)" refers to the negative or hidden aspects, characteristics, or qualities of a person, entity, or situation. It implies that behind a seemingly positive or desirable exterior, there are underlying flaws, problems, or unfavorable consequences. It suggests that there is a more sinister or less desirable aspect that is not immediately apparent or commonly acknowledged.
  • out of (one's) league The idiom "out of (one's) league" refers to the understanding that someone or something is beyond or superior to one's abilities, qualifications, or social status. It implies that the person or thing in question is not attainable or cannot be competed with due to a significant difference in perceived capability or desirability.
  • diddle something out of someone The idiom "diddle something out of someone" refers to manipulating or tricking someone into giving or surrendering something without their full awareness, consent, or understanding. It often involves using deceitful tactics or cunning strategies to extract something from someone.
  • business end of something The idiom "business end of something" refers to the active or functional part of an object or situation. It typically implies the part that is involved in the action or that can cause a significant impact or effect.
  • hear/see the last of sth The idiom "hear/see the last of something" means to experience the final occurrence or the end of a particular situation, event, or person's involvement. It implies that there will be no further continuation or occurrence of that thing in the future.
  • sweep out of sm place The idiom "sweep out of sm place" means to leave a location quickly and abruptly, often with a strong sense of urgency or haste. It signifies a sudden and forceful departure, as if one is being carried away by a metaphorical sweeping motion.
  • (a) sort of The idiom "(a) sort of" is used to express a level of uncertainty or hesitation when describing something, suggesting that the statement is not accurate or precise.
  • off the face of the earth The idiom "off the face of the earth" refers to someone or something disappearing completely or without a trace. It implies that the person or thing has vanished to the extent that there is no information or evidence of their existence or whereabouts.
  • be the (living/spitting) image of sb The idiom "be the (living/spitting) image of sb" is used to describe someone who strongly resembles another person, usually in appearance or physical features. It means that the person being referred to bears a striking resemblance to the other person, often to the point where they could be mistaken for being related or even identical.
  • most of all The idiom "most of all" means primarily, chiefly, or above all others. It emphasizes that something or someone is the most important or significant aspect in a given situation.
  • beat/knock/whale the tar out of sb The idiom "beat/knock/whale the tar out of someone" is an informal expression used to describe physically beating or attacking another person forcefully and aggressively, often resulting in severe injuries or a complete defeat. It implies a one-sided, merciless assault, emphasizing the extent of the punishment inflicted on the person at the receiving end.
  • can't make head nor/or tail of sth The idiom "can't make head nor/or tail of something" means to be unable to understand or make sense of something. It implies that the subject or situation is confusing or incomprehensible.
  • The wages of sin is death. The idiom "The wages of sin is death" refers to the consequences or punishments that one may face as a result of engaging in sinful or morally wrong actions. It suggests that immoral behavior leads to negative outcomes, often bringing about hardship, suffering, or even death. The phrase highlights the idea that immoral actions have grave consequences and serves as a warning against engaging in sinful behavior.
  • day of reckoning The idiom "day of reckoning" generally refers to a future time or event when one will face the consequences of their actions or be held accountable for their behavior or decisions. It signifies the moment of truth or judgement when one has to confront the outcome of their actions or the resolution of a situation.
  • force out of office The idiom "force out of office" refers to the act of compelling or pressuring someone to leave their position or power, particularly in a political or professional context. It suggests using various means, such as public pressure, protests, or legal actions, to make an individual resign or be removed from their role.
  • make much/a lot of sb The idiom "make much/a lot of sb" is usually used to describe someone who is overly impressed, enamored, or gushing with admiration or praise for someone else. It suggests that the person holds a high opinion or puts a great deal of importance on the individual being referred to.
  • be/get on top of something The idiom "be/get on top of something" means to have control over or manage a situation effectively. It refers to being aware of and staying ahead of responsibilities, tasks, or problems. When someone is on top of something, they are well-organized, proactive, and in command of the situation.
  • story of (one's) life The idiom "story of (one's) life" is a phrase used when something unfortunate or disappointing happens to someone, which they consider to be a common or recurring theme in their life. It sarcastically implies that the event or situation is a typical or predictable occurrence for that individual.
  • land of Nod The idiom "land of Nod" refers to a place or state of sleep or slumber. It is often used to describe a peaceful and restful location or the act of falling asleep. The phrase is derived from the biblical story of Cain, where it is mentioned as the location where Cain settled after he was banished for murdering his brother, Abel.
  • leave (someone) to the mercy/mercies of (someone or something) The idiom "leave (someone) to the mercy/mercies of (someone or something)" means to abandon or entrust someone to the control or influence of someone or something, often implying a lack of protection or assistance. It suggests that the person being left has no choice but to face the consequences or actions of the other person or thing.
  • be a matter of something/doing something The idiom "be a matter of something/doing something" means that something is the main or crucial point at hand, or that a particular action or task is required or necessary. It emphasizes that the issue or action being discussed is of great importance or significance.
  • make sth up out of whole cloth The idiom "make something up out of whole cloth" means to fabricate or invent something entirely without any basis in truth or reality. It refers to creating a story, information, or an idea from scratch, without any factual foundation. This idiom is commonly used to describe situations where someone completely invents or concocts something without any evidence or supporting facts.
  • by all means of (something) The definition of the idiom "by all means of (something)" is to use every possible method or resource available in order to achieve a desired outcome or goal. It implies an unrestricted or enthusiastic approach towards attaining something.
  • get a bang out of (something) The idiom "get a bang out of (something)" means to derive great enjoyment, excitement, or satisfaction from a particular activity, event, or experience. It implies finding something extremely enjoyable, entertaining, or pleasurable.
  • under the heel of sth/sb The idiom "under the heel of something/someone" refers to being in a position of strong control or dominance by a certain entity or individual. It indicates a state of subordination, oppression, or being subjected to one's authority.
  • the patience of Job/a saint The idiom "the patience of Job/a saint" refers to someone who displays exceptional tolerance, endurance, and forbearance in the face of difficult or trying circumstances. It is derived from the biblical figure Job and saints, who are traditionally depicted as having extraordinary perseverance and self-control in the midst of great adversity or suffering.
  • fill full of lead The idiom "fill full of lead" originated in the context of weaponry and firearms. It refers to shooting someone or something repeatedly, with the intention of causing severe harm or death. This expression is often used metaphorically to indicate a form of intense or excessive criticism, attack, or assault.
  • wheel sm or sth out of sth The idiom "wheel something or someone out of something" means to bring or roll something or someone out of a particular place or situation. It can also imply presenting or showcasing someone or something for public view or scrutiny. This phrase is often used metaphorically to refer to introducing or revealing a new concept, product, or idea.
  • the scum of the earth The idiom "the scum of the earth" refers to individuals or a group of people who are seen as the lowest, most despicable or morally reprehensible in society. It implies that they possess no redeeming qualities and are considered to be highly contemptible or worthless.
  • frightened of (one's) (own) shadow The idiom "frightened of (one's) (own) shadow" refers to someone who is extremely easily scared or timid. It implies that the person is so fearful that even the slightest thing can cause them to become frightened.
  • take the bread out of somebody’s mouth The idiom "take the bread out of somebody's mouth" means to deprive someone of their livelihood, typically by taking away their source of income or employment. It implies causing someone to lose something essential for their survival or well-being.
  • give (one) a taste of (one's) own medicine The idiom "give (one) a taste of (one's) own medicine" refers to retaliating or treating someone the same way they have treated you, in order to make them experience the same negative consequences or treatment they have inflicted on others. It implies giving someone a similar unpleasant or negative experience that they themselves have caused for others.
  • a fat lot of good/use The idiom "a fat lot of good/use" is used to express disappointment or frustration about something that has been ineffective, useless, or not beneficial at all. It implies that whatever was expected to be helpful or advantageous turned out to be of no use or value.
  • the grand old man of sth The idiom "the grand old man of something" refers to a person who is highly respected, influential, and experienced in a particular field or area. This individual is often seen as a pillar or elder statesman, representing deep knowledge and wisdom. The term can be used to show reverence for someone who has made significant contributions and holds a prominent position within their field or community.
  • eyes in the back of one's head, have The idiom "eyes in the back of one's head" is used to describe someone who seems to have an uncanny ability to be aware of everything that is happening around them, even without physically seeing it. It suggests that the person is extremely observant and can anticipate events or actions before they occur.
  • the laborer is worthy of his hire The idiom "the laborer is worthy of his hire" means that a person who works or provides services should be justly compensated for their efforts. It emphasizes the idea that individuals should receive fair payment for the work they perform or the services they offer.
  • crawl out (of sth) The idiom "crawl out (of sth)" refers to the act of emerging or coming out of a difficult or unpleasant situation or circumstance, usually with great effort or struggle. It implies a sense of gradually escaping or freeing oneself from a challenging or undesirable state.
  • top of the line The idiom "top of the line" refers to something that is of the highest quality, superior, or at the utmost level. It suggests that an object or service is the very best available in its category.
  • be delivered of The idiom "be delivered of" means to give birth to or be relieved of something, typically used when referring to the act of giving birth. It can be used both literally and figuratively to indicate the completion or release of something significant or burdensome.
  • enter/get into the spirit of sth To "enter/get into the spirit of something" means to fully embrace the mood, atmosphere, or attitude that is associated with a particular event, occasion, activity, or festive season. It suggests actively participating and engaging with enthusiasm, adopting the appropriate mindset or mindset, and immersing oneself in the experience or customs related to that context.
  • annoy, frighten, scare, etc. the hell out of sb The idiom "annoy, frighten, scare, etc. the hell out of somebody" is an informal and intense expression used to describe a situation where someone is greatly annoyed, frightened, scared, or disturbed by something or someone. It signifies an extreme level of intensity or impact on the emotions or well-being of an individual.
  • splinter off (of) (sth) The idiom "splinter off (of) (sth)" refers to the act of breaking away or separating from a larger group or entity. It implies the formation of a distinct and separate entity, typically due to differences or disagreements within the original group.
  • out of the top drawer The idiom "out of the top drawer" means something of exceptional quality or excellence. It suggests that something or someone is of the highest standard or caliber.
  • in the best of health The idiom "in the best of health" means to be in excellent physical condition or to have an optimal state of well-being and vitality.
  • moment of truth Definition: The phrase "moment of truth" refers to the critical moment or decisive point in a situation or experience where a person's true character, intentions, or abilities are revealed or tested. It is often used to describe a pivotal moment that can have a significant impact on the outcome of a situation or relationship.
  • be art and part of The idiom "be art and part of" means to be deeply involved or complicit in a particular action or wrongdoing. It suggests that the person is not merely an observer or bystander, but actively participates or contributes to the situation or event in question. They share responsibility and are a key factor in the overall outcome or consequences.
  • nothing to speak of The idiom "nothing to speak of" is used to convey that something or someone is not significant or noteworthy. It implies that there is little or nothing worth mentioning or discussing about the topic at hand.
  • a frame of mind The idiom "a frame of mind" refers to an individual's particular mindset, attitude, or state of thinking at a given time. It is often used to describe someone's mental or emotional state, which influences their perception, reactions, and behavior in a specific situation.
  • get rid of (someone or something) The idiom "get rid of (someone or something)" means to dispose of, eliminate, or remove someone or something unwanted or undesirable. It implies getting rid of someone or something as a means of getting rid of a problem or inconvenience.
  • the tip of an iceberg The idiom "the tip of an iceberg" is used to describe a situation where the visible or obvious part is only a small portion of a larger, more complex or significant issue or problem. It implies that there is much more beneath the surface that is yet to be discovered or understood.
  • out of tempo The idiom "out of tempo" refers to a musical term that means playing or performing a piece of music at an incorrect or inconsistent speed or rhythm. It can also be used metaphorically to describe actions or events that are happening at an inappropriate or unexpected pace or rhythm, usually resulting in a lack of coordination or synchronization.
  • build out of (something) The phrase "build out of (something)" typically refers to the act of constructing or creating something using specific materials or components. It implies the process of building, assembling, or constructing an object, structure, or system from certain elements or materials.
  • squeeze something out of something The idiom "squeeze something out of something" typically means to extract or obtain something, typically a small or limited amount, from a source or situation. It implies making an effort or applying pressure to obtain a desired outcome or result.
  • be the creature of sb/sth The idiom "be the creature of sb/sth" means to be under the control or influence of someone or something and lack the ability to make independent decisions or actions. It suggests being entirely dependent on another person or entity, often highlighting a lack of autonomy or freedom.
  • the order of the day The idiom "the order of the day" means the current prevailing trend or practice, or the most important or frequently occurring thing at a given time. It refers to something that is commonly or regularly happening or being done.
  • steer clear of sb/sth The idiom "steer clear of sb/sth" means to avoid or stay away from someone or something, typically because they are dangerous, harmful, or likely to cause trouble. It implies keeping a safe distance or not getting involved with a particular person or situation.
  • in the wake of somebody/something The idiom "in the wake of somebody/something" is used to describe the aftermath or consequences of a particular event, action, or person. It implies that something has occurred directly following or as a result of the event or person in question. It conveys the idea of being influenced or impacted by what came before.
  • come out of left field The idiom "come out of left field" means something that is unexpected, surprising, or unrelated to the current situation. It originates from baseball terminology, where "left field" is the area in the outfield farthest from home plate, and unexpected events or actions happening from that direction catch the players off guard.
  • You're out of your mind! The idiom "You're out of your mind!" is a phrase used to express disbelief, astonishment, or disagreement with someone's thoughts, ideas, or actions. It implies that the person being referred to is being irrational, illogical, or crazy.
  • a couple of (people or things) The idiom "a couple of (people or things)" means a small number of people or things, typically two or a few more than two, but usually not many. It implies a general approximation or a small quantity.
  • of a sort The idiom "of a sort" generally means that something is of a particular type or kind, but not necessarily the ideal or usual one. It suggests that while there may be some resemblance or similarity, it is not a perfect or complete example of that type or kind.
  • have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of somebody/something The idiom "have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of somebody/something" refers to the evaluation or judgment one makes about someone or something. It implies forming a personal view or belief guided by personal experiences, knowledge, or observations. The phrase can be used to describe one's positive, negative, favorable, unfavorable, optimistic, pessimistic, or any other subjective assessment of a person or item.
  • learn of sm or sth The idiom "learn of someone or something" means to discover or become aware of someone or something, typically through information, news, or experience. It implies gaining knowledge or finding out about a person or thing for the first time.
  • out of sorts The idiom "out of sorts" typically refers to a state of feeling unwell, physically or mentally. It can also mean feeling irritable, listless, or not quite oneself.
  • be out of this world The idiom "be out of this world" typically means something is extraordinary, exceptional, or surpasses normal standards or expectations. It is often used to describe something that is exceptionally amazing, impressive, or mind-blowing.
  • at the back of mind The idiom "at the back of mind" refers to a thought, idea, or memory that is not at the forefront of one's consciousness but is still present and influencing their thoughts or actions. It suggests that something is constantly present but not receiving immediate attention or focus.
  • not believe a word of it The idiom "not believe a word of it" means that someone does not believe any or all of what has been said or claimed. It expresses a complete lack of trust or doubt in the truth or accuracy of the statement, story, or information shared.
  • be talking out of your arse The idiom "be talking out of your arse" is an informal and vulgar expression used to convey that someone is speaking nonsense, making unfounded claims, or providing information that is completely untrue or exaggerated. It suggests that the person's statements are baseless or lacking in credibility.
  • other side of the tracks The idiom "other side of the tracks" refers to a metaphorical division of a community or society based on socio-economic disparities. It typically implies contrasting levels of wealth, privilege, or social status between different neighborhoods or areas. The idiom suggests that there is a clear distinction between the more affluent or privileged side and the less prosperous or disadvantaged side of a community, often symbolized by a railroad track that separates the two areas.
  • What's that got to do with the price of fish? The idiom "What's that got to do with the price of fish?" is used to express indifference or skepticism towards a statement or question that seems irrelevant or unrelated to the topic at hand. It implies that the information or remark being discussed has little or no significance or impact on the current situation or discussion.
  • ride a wave of The idiom "ride a wave of" typically means to take advantage of or benefit from a favorable situation or trend. It refers to metaphorically riding a wave, which implies going with the flow, harnessing the momentum, or capitalizing on a current trend or momentum to achieve success or progress.
  • go through like a dose of salts The idiom "go through like a dose of salts" refers to something or someone passing or moving through a situation or process rapidly, forcefully, or without difficulty. It suggests swift or easy progress, often implying that the passage is so quick or efficient that it may surprise others.
  • not your cup of tea The idiom "not your cup of tea" means that something is not to your liking or preference. It is typically used to express that someone does not enjoy or have an interest in a particular activity, style, or type of thing.
  • take the piss (out of) sb or sth The idiom "take the piss (out of) someone or something" is a colloquial phrase, primarily used in British English, that means to mock, ridicule, or make fun of someone or something. It involves teasing or jokingly criticizing someone in a light-hearted or sometimes sarcastic manner.
  • speak of the devil, and he is sure to appear The idiom "speak of the devil, and he is sure to appear" means that when you mention someone, especially in a negative or critical way, they suddenly arrive or make an unexpected appearance. It is often used humorously or in a superstitious manner.
  • give someone a piece of one's mind To give someone a piece of one's mind means to express one's anger, frustration, or disagreement with someone assertively and openly, often in a confrontational or direct manner. It implies expressing one's true feelings, opinions, or criticism without holding back, often with the intention of reprimanding or admonishing the person.
  • seal of approval The idiom "seal of approval" refers to a mark, sign, or indication that something or someone has been officially endorsed, accredited, or approved by someone in authority or accepted as satisfactory or reliable. It signifies that the person or thing has met the standards or criteria set by the approving authority.
  • make an example of The idiom "make an example of" means to punish someone severely or publicly in order to serve as a warning or deterrent to others. It involves using someone's punishment as a means to set a precedent or demonstrate the consequences of particular behavior or actions.
  • in spite of sm or sth The idiom "in spite of someone or something" means to do or accomplish something despite the presence or influence of a particular person or thing that typically poses a challenge, obstacle, or opposition. It signifies overcoming barriers or prevailing over unfavorable circumstances.
  • go out of (one's) way to (do something) The idiom "go out of (one's) way to (do something)" means to make a special effort or exert extra energy to do something, often going beyond what is expected or required. It suggests going to great lengths or taking additional steps to accommodate or fulfill a task or favor.
  • it's/that's the story of my life The phrase "it's/that's the story of my life" is an idiom used to express resignation or exasperation about a situation that has happened repeatedly or encapsulates one's typical experiences or luck. It conveys a feeling of familiarity with unfortunate or frustrating events happening over and over again.
  • the end of the world The idiom "the end of the world" is used to describe a situation or event that is considered extremely catastrophic or disastrous. It is often used metaphorically to emphasize the severity or importance of a particular event, exaggerating its negative impact.
  • scoop sth out of sth The idiom "scoop something out of something" means to remove or extract the content from a particular object or container, typically using a scooping or digging motion. It implies the act of taking something out or emptying the contents from a larger entity, often with a tool like a spoon or scoop. This expression can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • end of The idiom "end of" typically refers to a conclusion or a definitive ending, often indicating that there is no more to be said or done on a certain matter. It signifies the point at which something finishes or reaches its limit, leaving no further room for continuation or discussion.
  • pull a rabbit out of a hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of a hat" means to perform an extraordinary or surprising feat, solve a difficult problem, or achieve success in a seemingly impossible situation, often in a way that no one expects. This can be done through sudden inspiration, resourcefulness, or ingenuity. The phrase is often used to describe someone who accomplishes something impressive or unexpected with limited resources or time.
  • gnashing of teeth The idiom "gnashing of teeth" refers to a display of extreme frustration, anger, or anguish, often accompanied by the grinding or clenching of one's teeth. It conveys a sense of intense despair or distress in response to a challenging or undesirable situation.
  • think nothing of The idiom "think nothing of" means to consider something to be unimportant or insignificant, as if it does not require any thought or attention. It implies that the action or situation is trivial and does not deserve significant consideration or worry.
  • make a fuss of (someone or something) The idiom "make a fuss of (someone or something)" means to give someone or something a lot of attention, care, or special treatment. It often implies showing excessive or exaggerated affection, concern, or admiration towards someone or something.
  • lay the foundations of/for The idiom "lay the foundations of/for" generally means to establish or create the basic principles or structure upon which something can be built or developed. It refers to the initial steps or actions taken to provide a solid base or groundwork for future progress, growth, or success. It implies setting up a strong and stable starting point for further advancements or achievements.
  • not the half of it/(something) The idiom "not the half of it/(something)" is typically used to convey that what has been said or shown is only a fraction or a small part of the whole story or situation. It emphasizes that there is much more to the situation or story than what has been revealed or discussed.
  • make a martyr of yourself The idiom "make a martyr of yourself" means deliberately putting oneself in a situation where one portrays themselves as a victim or sacrifices their own well-being or personal happiness for a cause or belief. It implies seeking recognition or sympathy by taking on a difficult or burdensome role and often suggests an excessive or unnecessary self-sacrifice.
  • be in the lap of the gods The idiom "be in the lap of the gods" means to be in a situation where the outcome is uncertain and beyond one's control. It implies that the decision or fate lies in the hands of a higher power or destiny, and there is nothing one can do to influence or change it.
  • the eye of a needle The idiom "the eye of a needle" typically refers to a very narrow opening or a small space that is difficult to pass through. It has its origins in a biblical passage which states, "It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God." This idiom is often used to depict the idea of something being extremely challenging or near impossible to achieve or accomplish.
  • the kiss of death The idiom "the kiss of death" refers to something or someone that is believed to bring about failure, downfall, or ruin. It implies that the mentioned thing or person is highly detrimental or destructive to a particular outcome or endeavor.
  • a jack of all trades The idiom "a jack of all trades" refers to a person who is able to do a variety of tasks or has a wide range of skills in different areas. It implies that the person is competent in many different fields but may not excel in any one particular area.
  • inquire sth of sm The idiom "inquire something of someone" means to ask someone about something, seeking information or clarification from them. It implies seeking an answer, opinion, or details from a specific person.
  • frighten/scare the (living) daylights out of sb The idiom "frighten/scare the (living) daylights out of someone" means to cause extreme fear, terror, or great shock to someone. It implies a situation or event that is so terrifying or shocking that it seems to drain the person of their vitality or daylight.
  • err on the side of caution The idiom "err on the side of caution" means to be excessively careful or to act in a cautious manner, especially when making decisions or taking actions, in order to avoid any potential risks or negative consequences.
  • as of/from The idiom "as of/from" refers to a specific point in time or a reference starting point. It indicates the time or date from which something is considered valid, relevant, or applicable. It is often used to indicate the beginning of a particular period or a change in a situation.
  • milk of human kindness The idiom "milk of human kindness" means the compassionate and kind nature of human beings. It refers to a person's innate ability to show empathy, sympathy, and generosity towards others.
  • at the stroke of a pen The idiom "at the stroke of a pen" refers to the ability to accomplish or change something easily and quickly by simply signing or authorizing a document or making a decision. It implies that the action can be completed effortlessly and without much effort or deliberation.
  • the worst of both worlds The idiom "the worst of both worlds" refers to a situation where a person or entity experiences the negative aspects or consequences of two different options or choices, rather than benefiting from the positive aspects of either option. It implies that the outcome or experience is exceptionally negative or unfavorable.
  • prisoner of conscience The idiom "prisoner of conscience" refers to an individual who is imprisoned or detained due to their beliefs, opinions, or actions, which are considered to be in opposition to the established authority or ideology. This term is commonly used to depict individuals who are imprisoned for political, religious, or social reasons, and who are often seen as activists advocating for human rights or justice. Prisoners of conscience are typically viewed as victims of unjust or oppressive systems, as their imprisonment stems from their refusal to compromise or renounce their deeply held convictions.
  • be out of the way The idiom "be out of the way" typically means to be removed, distant, or no longer an obstacle or hindrance.
  • take a lot out of The idiom "take a lot out of" means to exhaust or deplete someone physically, emotionally, or mentally. It refers to an activity or situation that consumes a significant amount of energy, effort, or resources, thus leaving the person drained or depleted afterward.
  • a change of heart A change of heart is an idiom that refers to a significant shift or reversal in someone's attitude, opinion, or feelings about something or someone. It implies that the person's perspective or stance has been completely transformed or altered.
  • build up a head of steam The idiom "build up a head of steam" means to gather momentum or energy, often referring to increasing enthusiasm, motivation, or power to accomplish something.
  • have somebody eating out of your hand The idiom "have somebody eating out of your hand" means to have control or influence over someone, usually through charm or persuasion, to the point where they are completely obedient or reliant on you.
  • make a secret of sth The idiom "make a secret of something" means to intentionally keep information, knowledge, or a fact concealed or hidden from others. It implies that the person involved wants to ensure that the specific information is not shared or disclosed.
  • sb couldn't act, argue, fight, etc. their way out of a paper bag The idiom "sb couldn't act, argue, fight, etc. their way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone's complete lack of skill or ability in a particular area. It suggests that the person is so inept that they would struggle or fail even at the simplest tasks, like getting out of a paper bag. This expression is often used humorously or to express a strong opinion about someone's lack of competence.
  • be full of crap The idiom "be full of crap" means to be dishonest, insincere, or not telling the truth. It is often used to describe someone who frequently makes false or misleading statements.
  • at the mercy of sb/sth The idiom "at the mercy of someone or something" means being entirely under the control or power of someone or something, with no ability to defend oneself or change the situation. It implies being completely vulnerable or dependent, without any say or influence in the matter.
  • make a better, good, poor, etc. fist of something The idiom "make a better, good, poor, etc. fist of something" means to do something with varying levels of skill, competence, or success. It is typically used to express how well someone is able to manage or handle a particular task, activity, or situation. The phrase "make a fist" in this idiom alludes to the action of clenching one's hand into a fist, symbolizing the attempt to tackle something.
  • under the heel of The idiom "under the heel of someone" typically refers to a situation where someone is oppressed, controlled, or dominated by someone else. It suggests that the person is figuratively crushed or subjected to the authority, power, or harsh treatment of another individual or group.
  • push (the edge of) the envelope The idiom "push (the edge of) the envelope" means to exceed or go beyond the conventional limits or boundaries in order to innovate, explore new possibilities, or achieve exceptional results. It originated from the concept of pushing the limits of a literal envelope (like the ones used in aviation) to test its performance or capabilities. In a figurative sense, it refers to taking risks, thinking outside the box, or challenging established norms to make advancements or achieve breakthroughs.
  • press sth out of sth The idiom "press something out of something" refers to the act of extracting or obtaining something forcibly or with great effort from a particular source or situation.
  • the four corners of the world The idiom "the four corners of the world" refers to all parts or regions of the world, indicating a broad and comprehensive scope that covers every imaginable place. It emphasizes the idea of encompassing all corners or regions, suggesting a global perspective or inclusiveness.
  • short of sth The idiom "short of sth" means to have a lack or shortage of something. It implies that there is less than the required or desired amount of something.
  • the likes of sb/sth The idiom "the likes of sb/sth" refers to a group of people or things similar to a particular person or thing being mentioned. It is often used to express a comparison or likeness between different individuals or objects.
  • think better of it The idiom "think better of it" means to reconsider or change one's decision or course of action after realizing it may not be wise or beneficial. It suggests that the person has had a change of heart or has second thoughts about their original intention.
  • tear/rip the heart out of something The idiom "tear/rip the heart out of something" is used metaphorically to describe an action in which the most essential or important part of something is taken away or destroyed, causing devastation or significant damage. It implies a deep and painful loss that affects the core or essence of the person, situation, or thing being referred to.
  • drum sm out of sth The idiom "drum (someone) out of something" means to force or expel someone from a particular group, organization, or place due to their misconduct, incompetence, or unacceptable behavior. It conveys the idea of a forceful and public removal, often accompanied by humiliation or disgrace.
  • bloom of youth The idiom "bloom of youth" refers to the period in a person's life when they are at the peak of their physical beauty, energy, and vitality. It usually denotes the time of adolescence and early adulthood when individuals are in their prime and experiencing the fullness of their potential.
  • have a heart of glass The idiom "have a heart of glass" refers to someone who is emotionally fragile, sensitive, or easily hurt. It suggests that their emotions are delicate and can be easily broken, just like glass.
  • You don't know the half of it The idiom "You don't know the half of it" is used to indicate that the person being spoken to lacks knowledge or understanding about a particular situation or subject. It suggests that the person has limited information and they are not aware of the complete and more significant aspects of the matter.
  • course of true love never ran smoothly, the The idiom "the course of true love never ran smoothly" means that the path to a successful or fulfilling romantic relationship is often filled with difficulties, obstacles, or challenges. It suggests that love and relationships are rarely effortless or without problems.
  • not get/have a wink of sleep The idiom "not get/have a wink of sleep" means to be unable to sleep at all. It implies a complete lack of sleep, suggesting that one has not even closed their eyes for a moment.
  • gales of laughter The idiom "gales of laughter" refers to a situation where people are laughing very loudly, uncontrollably, and with great intensity. It emphasizes the idea that the laughter is powerful and roaring, often causing the individuals involved to struggle to regain their composure.
  • speak ill of The idiom "speak ill of" refers to the act of saying negative or derogatory things about someone or something. It means to make disparaging remarks or criticisms, often in a malicious or harmful manner.
  • pocket of resistance The idiom "pocket of resistance" refers to a small group or area that refuses to yield or surrender in a larger context or situation where most others have given in or succumbed. It implies a determined and stubborn group that continues to fight or oppose despite overwhelming odds or opposition.
  • work of art The idiom "work of art" refers to a creation or piece, usually in the field of visual arts, that is considered to be exceptional in terms of its creativity, skill, and aesthetic qualities. It is a unique and noteworthy expression of human creativity that is often appreciated for its beauty, originality, and emotional or intellectual impact.
  • flex something out of shape The idiom "flex something out of shape" means to deform or distort something, typically through excessive force or pressure. It is used figuratively to describe situations where an object or concept is stretched or manipulated beyond its intended or original form.
  • a free bit of advice The idiom "a free bit of advice" refers to offering unsolicited or gratuitous advice or wisdom to someone without any cost or expectation of reciprocation or gratitude. It implies that the advice is valuable or useful, regardless of its being given freely.
  • give someone the worst of it The idiom "give someone the worst of it" means to subject someone to severe criticism, scolding, or punishment. It refers to emphasizing the negative aspects or consequences of a situation or taking a harsh approach towards someone.
  • be on the tip of tongue When someone says that something is "on the tip of their tongue," it means that they know or remember the word, phrase, or piece of information they are referring to, but they cannot recall it at that moment. It is a way of expressing the feeling of having a word or thought right on the verge of being remembered or spoken, but just out of reach.
  • make an exhibition of yourself To "make an exhibition of yourself" means to embarrass or bring attention to oneself through foolish or inappropriate behavior. It suggests acting in a manner that draws negative attention or results in public humiliation.
  • make demands of sm or sth The idiom "make demands of someone or something" means to request or insist on specific actions, expectations, or requirements from someone or something. It implies ordering or expecting a certain level of performance or compliance.
  • frighten the life out of someone The idiom "frighten the life out of someone" means to terrify or scare someone to an extreme degree. It suggests causing such intense fear that it feels as though their life force or vitality is being drained.
  • in the depths of (something) The idiom "in the depths of (something)" typically refers to being in the lowest or most extreme point of a difficult or negative situation, emotion, or experience. It suggests being deeply engulfed or immersed in something, often implying a sense of despair, darkness, or intensity.
  • not the end of the world The idiom "not the end of the world" means that a particular situation or event is not as disastrous or catastrophic as it may initially seem. It signifies that the problem is manageable and that there are other options or opportunities available. It suggests a sense of perspective and resilience in the face of challenges.
  • the forces of evil The idiom "the forces of evil" refers to the collective power, influence, or entities that represent wickedness, malevolence, or immorality in the world. It implies a combination of negative, destructive, or harmful elements that aim to undermine or perpetrate evil actions or intentions.
  • have the better of (someone or something) The idiom "have the better of (someone or something)" refers to when someone or something gains an advantage or prevails over another person or thing in a particular situation or competition. It implies having the upper hand, being more successful, or achieving a greater level of control or dominance.
  • let (sm or an animal) (get) out (of sth) The idiom "let (someone or an animal) (get) out (of something)" means to allow someone or an animal to exit or be released from a confined space or situation. It can be used literally when referring to physically opening a door or a container to allow someone or an animal to leave. Additionally, it can be used figuratively to suggest providing freedom or relief from a constraint or oppressive environment.
  • get tired of (something) The idiom "get tired of (something)" refers to experiencing a feeling of boredom, dissatisfaction, or annoyance towards something due to its repetitive nature or lack of interest. It signifies losing enthusiasm or interest in a particular activity, person, or situation.
  • sacrifice someone or something on the altar of The idiom "sacrifice someone or something on the altar of" refers to giving up or willingly offering someone or something, typically for a specific goal or purpose. It suggests a level of selflessness or dedication in prioritizing the desired outcome over the well-being or interests of the person or thing being sacrificed. It can be used metaphorically to describe situations where individuals make personal sacrifices in order to achieve a greater objective or fulfill a particular ambition.
  • lord/master/mistress/king/queen of all you survey The idiom "lord/master/mistress/king/queen of all you survey" refers to a person or entity who has complete control and authority over a particular area or domain. It implies being in a position of power and being able to exercise unlimited control and influence over everything within one's immediate surroundings or domain. The phrase often conveys a sense of superiority, dominance, and ownership.
  • frighten one out of one's wits The idiom "frighten one out of one's wits" means to terrify or scare someone to an extreme extent, causing them to lose their composure or become extremely frightened.
  • jerk someone or something out of something The idiom "jerk someone or something out of something" means to forcefully remove or abruptly interrupt someone or something from a state of comfort, stability, or routine. It implies a sudden and often unwelcome disruption or disturbance.
  • a fish out of water The idiom "a fish out of water" is used to describe someone who feels uncomfortable, awkward, or out of place in a particular situation or environment. It refers to someone being in unfamiliar territory, similar to a fish being removed from its natural habitat, such as water.
  • beat the shit out of The idiom "beat the shit out of" means to physically assault or severely beat someone, usually resulting in excessive force or violence. It is an intensifier used to emphasize the severity of the beating. It is a vulgar expression often used figuratively to describe domination, overwhelming victory, extreme force, or thorough defeat in a non-literal sense as well.
  • in the wake of (something) The idiom "in the wake of (something)" means to occur as a result of something, or to happen after a particular event or situation, often implying that it directly follows or is influenced by that event. It suggests a sense of aftermath or consequences.
  • make a laughingstock of (oneself or sth) The idiom "make a laughingstock of (oneself or sth)" means to behave or perform in a way that becomes an object of ridicule or mockery, resulting in one becoming the target of laughter or derision. It refers to an action or behavior that exposes someone or something to public embarrassment or amusement.
  • the slice/share of the cake The idiom "the slice/share of the cake" is used to refer to someone's portion or share of something, typically an opportunity, reward, or benefit. It suggests that there is a limited amount available that needs to be divided among several people, and each person will receive their fair or agreed-upon share.
  • dispossess someone of something The idiom "dispossess someone of something" means to take away or deprive someone of their possessions, rights, or belongings, often forcefully or unjustly. It can refer to physical belongings, property, or rights, but it can also be used in a more abstract sense, such as taking away someone's power, position, or opportunities.
  • to the tune of $500, etc. The idiom "to the tune of $500, etc." means the approximate cost or amount of something, often an expensive or significant sum of money. It signifies that a particular expense or value is similar or comparable to the mentioned figure or range.
  • send sm or sth on (ahead) (of sm or sth) The idiom "send someone or something on (ahead) (of someone or something)" means to dispatch or forward a person or object ahead of the expected arrival time or the rest of the group. It typically suggests that the person or object is being sent in advance to prepare or make arrangements for others who will follow.
  • be sacrificed on the altar of sth The idiom "be sacrificed on the altar of sth" means to be harmed, damaged, or disregarded as a result of pursuing or prioritizing something else, often an abstract concept or goal. It implies that one's well-being or interests are being overlooked or sacrificed in favor of something else considered more important or valuable.
  • hell of a lot of The idiom "hell of a lot of" is used to emphasize a large quantity or amount of something. It is often used colloquially and informally to express a strong degree of emphasis or exaggeration.
  • two jumps ahead of To be "two jumps ahead of" someone means to be two steps ahead, to anticipate their actions or thoughts, and to be more prepared or knowledgeable in a situation. It implies being highly strategic, clever, or insightful, often outmaneuvering or outsmarting others. This idiom suggests being in an advantageous position by having the ability to predict and plan ahead of others.
  • run sth out of sth To "run something out of something" means to deplete or exhaust the supply or quantity of something, typically by using it excessively or continuously. It refers to using up a resource or substance until none is left. For example, "They ran out of milk, so they couldn't make coffee" means they had no more milk available and, as a result, were unable to make coffee.
  • lose sight of sth The idiom "lose sight of (something)" means to forget or neglect something that was previously important or the focus of attention. It can also refer to losing perspective or the ability to see or understand something clearly.
  • make heavy going of (something) The idiom "make heavy going of (something)" means to struggle or progress slowly and laboriously in doing or achieving something. It implies that the task or activity requires more effort and time than expected or desired.
  • breathe a sigh of relief The idiom "breathe a sigh of relief" can be defined as expressing a feeling of relief or a release of tension after a worrying or stressful situation has been resolved or avoided.
  • out of the goodness of heart The idiom "out of the goodness of one's heart" refers to performing an act or showing kindness or generosity solely based on an individual's innate compassion, empathy, or altruism. It implies that the person is driven by a sincere desire to help others without expecting anything in return.
  • out of joint The idiom "out of joint" refers to something that is disordered, disorganized, or not functioning properly. It can also mean being in a state of imbalance, inconvenience, or unease.
  • horns of a dilemma, on the The idiom "horns of a dilemma" refers to being faced with a difficult or challenging situation where neither choice or option seems favorable. It implies feeling trapped or stuck between two equally unpleasant alternatives, creating a sense of uncertainty or predicament.
  • without a shadow of a doubt The idiom "without a shadow of a doubt" means to be completely certain or unquestionably sure about something, leaving no possibility for doubt or uncertainty.
  • marry one's way out of sth The idiom "marry one's way out of something" typically means to escape or alleviate a difficult situation or circumstance through marriage, specifically by marrying someone who is wealthy or influential. It implies using marriage as a means to improve one's social or financial standing, rather than relying on individual effort or hard work.
  • (whole) mess of sm or sth The idiom "(whole) mess of sm or sth" refers to a large, disorganized, or chaotic collection or quantity of something. It implies an abundance or excessive amount of things that may be difficult to sort through or manage.
  • a prophet of doom The idiom "a prophet of doom" refers to someone who consistently predicts negative outcomes or disasters, often with a sense of foreboding or pessimism. It implies that the person is constantly warning about or expecting bad things to happen, sometimes without any solid evidence to support their claims.
  • join the ranks of sth The idiom "join the ranks of something" refers to becoming a member of a particular group or category, often implying that one is joining a group of respected or influential individuals. It signifies becoming part of a larger body or collective that shares similar characteristics, goals, or pursuits.
  • come of The idiom "come of" refers to the end result or outcome of a particular situation or event. It implies that something is the consequence or result of a preceding action, decision, or circumstance.
  • answer to the description of someone The idiom "answer to the description of someone" means that a person closely resembles or matches the given description or characteristics of someone. It implies that the person in question fits the profile or matches the expected attributes, appearance, or qualities associated with another individual as described.
  • in the palm of (one's) hand The idiom "in the palm of (one's) hand" refers to having complete control or influence over someone or something. It suggests that the person or object being referred to is easily managed or manipulated, as if one had a firm grip on it within their hand.
  • take advantage of sm or sth The idiom "take advantage of someone or something" means to exploit or make the most of a person, situation, or opportunity for personal gain or benefit. It implies using circumstances to gain an advantage, often without considering the needs or rights of others.
  • the ABCs of sth The idiom "the ABCs of something" refers to the fundamental or basic aspects or knowledge of a particular subject or activity. It typically implies that understanding these basic principles is essential for further comprehension or competence in that area. The phrase is often used to indicate the foundational knowledge or skills necessary to grasp a topic before delving into more complex or advanced aspects.
  • knock sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "knock sth off (of) sm or sth" means to cause something to fall or come off from someone or something, usually by accidental or forceful impact. It can also refer to removing or taking something away from someone or something.
  • out of mind The idiom "out of mind" refers to when something or someone is forgotten, neglected, or not given attention. It can also indicate a state of being crazy or mentally unstable.
  • force sm out of office The idiom "force someone out of office" refers to the act of compelling or pressuring a person to leave their position or role in an authoritative or political capacity. It suggests using various means or tactics to make someone quit, resign, or be removed from their position against their will.
  • on the edge of (something) The idiom "on the edge of (something)" typically refers to being at the limit or brink of a particular situation, often implying that someone is close to a significant change, outcome, or decision. It can indicate a tense or precarious state, with a sense of anticipation or apprehension about what might happen next.
  • in the shape of sth The idiom "in the shape of something" typically means that something takes on the form, appearance, or structure of a particular thing or entity. It implies that the subject closely resembles or is modeled after the mentioned thing.
  • have none of sth The idiom "have none of sth" means to refuse or reject something completely or categorically. It indicates a strong disapproval or unwillingness to accept something.
  • fathom the depths of (something) The idiom "fathom the depths of (something)" means to fully understand or comprehend the complexity, extent, or profound nature of a particular thing, situation, or concept. It implies attempting to unravel or explore the profound or intricate aspects of something.
  • of own accord The idiom "of own accord" means to do something willingly or without being prompted or influenced by external factors or someone else's instructions. It implies taking the initiative or acting independently.
  • in (one's) hour of need The idiom "in (one's) hour of need" refers to a situation or moment when someone requires help, support, or assistance the most. It signifies a critical moment or a time of difficulty and emphasizes the importance of being there for someone during their most challenging times.
  • in the thick of something/of doing something "In the thick of something/of doing something" is an idiomatic expression used to denote being fully involved or deeply immersed in a particular activity, situation, or event. It refers to being in the midst of the action, experiencing the intensity and chaos associated with it.
  • have a mind of (one's)/its own The idiom "have a mind of (one's)/its own" is used to describe something that behaves or acts independently, often contrary to the expectations or desires of others. It refers to a person or thing's ability to make independent decisions or choices, disregarding external influence. This idiom implies that the person or thing has a strong sense of autonomy or independence.
  • out of it The idiom "out of it" is generally used to describe a state where someone is disoriented, uninvolved, or unaware of their surroundings. It can refer to physical or mental detachment from a situation or a feeling of being disconnected.
  • put somebody to the expense of something/of doing something The idiom "put somebody to the expense of something/of doing something" means to burden or inconvenience someone by causing them to incur costs or expenses in a particular situation or task. It implies that the person is being made to pay for something or spend money due to someone else's actions or demands.
  • shy of sth The idiom "shy of something" means to be slightly less or short of a particular amount or goal. It implies being just below the expected or desired quantity, usually by a small margin. It can also refer to being hesitant or reluctant to do or engage in something.
  • bounce off (of sth) The idiom "bounce off (of something)" refers to an idea, suggestion, or comment that is introduced and then quickly rejected or not taken seriously by others. It implies that the idea or opinion did not have any impact or influence and was essentially disregarded or dismissed. It can also refer to a situation where someone shares information or stories with little or no response or engagement from the listeners.
  • a lady of leisure "A lady of leisure" refers to a woman who does not have to work or have any regular occupation, but instead spends her time engaging in leisurely activities. It implies that she is financially stable and does not have to worry about earning a living.
  • passage of arms The idiom "passage of arms" typically refers to a friendly or competitive encounter, often figuratively representing a battle or conflict, between two individuals or groups. It can also describe a series of challenges or obstacles that one must go through to accomplish a goal or gain recognition. The term "passage of arms" originates from medieval times, when knights would engage in friendly combat or tournaments to showcase their skills and prowess.
  • a pretty (or fine) kettle of fish The idiom "a pretty (or fine) kettle of fish" is used to describe a difficult, awkward, or messy situation. It implies that something has gone wrong or has become complicated, often causing confusion or trouble.
  • sb's field of vision The idiom "sb's field of vision" refers to the area or range that someone can see or perceive. It represents the extent to which someone is aware of or able to observe their surroundings.
  • tear the heart out of (something) The idiom "tear the heart out of (something)" means to completely destroy or ruin the most essential or vital part of something, which leaves the rest without meaning, value, or purpose. It signifies an action that greatly affects the core or essence of a person, situation, or thing, causing significant damage or harm.
  • make heavy weather of The idiom "make heavy weather of" means to overcomplicate or struggle unnecessarily with a task or situation, often making it more difficult than it actually is.
  • a page in/of history "A page in/of history" is an idiom that refers to an event, period, or action that is significant or memorable, causing it to be recorded and remembered for future generations. It implies that the event is noteworthy enough to be considered a significant part of the overall narrative of history.
  • get the fright of (one's) life The idiom "get the fright of (one's) life" refers to an extremely intense or shocking experience that causes someone to become terrified or scared to an extreme degree. This expression is often used to describe situations that catch someone completely off guard and result in an overwhelming feeling of fear or horror.
  • of yore The idiom "of yore" is used to refer to something from a past era or time period that is now distant or no longer present. It suggests a sense of nostalgia or fondness for the past.
  • the one/a ray of hope The idiom "the one/a ray of hope" refers to a small glimmer or flicker of optimism amidst a difficult or challenging situation. It signifies a source of inspiration or optimism that provides relief or encouragement, however small it may be. It suggests that even in the darkest of times, there is still a chance for things to improve or for a positive outcome to occur.
  • be glad to see the back of someone or something The idiom "be glad to see the back of someone or something" means to be happy or relieved when someone or something is finally gone or no longer present. It implies that the person or thing was causing unhappiness, trouble, or annoyance, and their departure is seen as a positive outcome.
  • not much of a The idiom "not much of a" is used to express that someone or something lacks the qualities normally associated with a particular thing or role. It implies a lack of competency, skill, size, talent, or significance.
  • be afraid of your own shadow The idiom "be afraid of your own shadow" means to be excessively fearful or easily frightened by even the slightest or most insignificant things. It implies that someone is overly anxious or paranoid, reacting to situations or people in an exaggeratedly apprehensive manner.
  • be a different kettle of fish The idiom "be a different kettle of fish" means that something or someone is entirely different from what was previously mentioned or considered. It refers to a situation or topic that is distinct or unrelated to the current one. It suggests a major contrast or change in circumstances.
  • on the face of it The idiom "on the face of it" means that based on initial appearances or superficial evidence, something seems to be true or valid. However, there may be underlying factors or hidden details that could change the perspective or conclusion.
  • in the light of something The idiom "in the light of something" means considering or taking into account a particular event, fact, or circumstance when making judgments, decisions, or evaluations. It suggests that new information or knowledge has come to light and should be considered while analyzing or interpreting a situation.
  • wash your hands of sb/sth The idiom "wash your hands of someone/something" means to disassociate or disclaim any responsibility, guilt, or connection with a particular person or situation. It implies that someone no longer wants to be involved or associated with someone or something, usually due to frustration, disappointment, or a desire to distance themselves from the situation.
  • out of touch The idiom "out of touch" refers to someone being unaware or unfamiliar with current trends, ideas, or developments, usually due to a lack of communication or disconnect from the reality or opinions of others. It describes a person who is outdated, ignorant, or has lost touch with the general public's perspectives or changing circumstances.
  • the butt of the joke The idiom "the butt of the joke" refers to someone who is the target or subject of a joke, often being made fun of or subjected to ridicule. They are typically the one that the joke or humorous situation revolves around, often causing amusement at their expense.
  • be a question of time The idiom "be a question of time" means that something is inevitable or bound to happen eventually, despite uncertainty or delays. It refers to a situation or event that is only a matter of time before it occurs.
  • black sheep of the family The idiom "black sheep of the family" refers to a person who is seen as different, odd, or disreputable within their own family or social group. They often deviate from the accepted norms and values upheld by their family members, making them an outcast or the subject of disapproval.
  • hear of someone or something The idiom "hear of someone or something" means to be informed about someone or something, usually through word of mouth or by receiving news or information. It implies that one has become aware of the existence, reputation, or news related to a particular person or thing.
  • laugh on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh on the other side of your face" means to experience a sudden reversal of fortune or a negative outcome after feeling confident or superior. It implies that one's initial happiness or joy will turn into disappointment or regret.
  • get the measure of (someone or something) The idiom "get the measure of (someone or something)" means to accurately assess, evaluate, or understand someone or something, often their true nature, abilities, or intentions. It implies gaining a comprehensive understanding or knowledge that allows for making accurate judgments or predictions.
  • line of sight The idiom "line of sight" refers to the uninterrupted and direct visual connection between two points or objects. It suggests the ability to see or observe something without any obstructions blocking the view.
  • not give (one) the time of day The idiom "not give (one) the time of day" means to refuse or ignore someone, usually by not acknowledging their presence or not providing them with attention or recognition. It suggests that the person being ignored is not worth even a small amount of consideration or interaction.
  • be in the land of nod The idiom "be in the land of nod" means to be asleep or in a state of deep sleep. It often refers to someone who is soundly and comfortably asleep.
  • deliver (someone or oneself) of (something) The idiom "deliver (someone or oneself) of (something)" means to free or relieve either someone else or oneself from a burden, problem, or distress. It refers to the act of providing a solution or remedy that removes a troublesome situation or feelings of unease.
  • chisel sm out of sth The idiom "chisel someone out of something" means to deceive or manipulate someone in order to obtain something from them, often through dishonest or cunning means. It implies the act of slyly or subtly extracting something from someone against their will or without their knowledge.
  • be on the lowest/bottom rung of the ladder The idiom "be on the lowest/bottom rung of the ladder" refers to someone being at the starting point or the lowest level of a hierarchy or career progression. It suggests that the individual has just begun their journey or has not yet advanced and lacks experience or opportunities for growth.
  • a box of tricks The idiom "a box of tricks" refers to someone or something that possesses a wide range of skills, abilities, or resources, making them versatile and unpredictable. It often implies that the person or object is clever, resourceful, and capable of solving problems or achieving goals in various inventive ways.
  • by the sweat of brow The idiom "by the sweat of brow" means to achieve something through hard work, physical effort, or manual labor. It is often used to emphasize the active exertion of one's energy to accomplish a task or goal.
  • mold sth out of sth The idiom "mold sth out of sth" means to shape or form something by using a mold or a template. It refers to the act of creating or constructing an object or idea by shaping a material, typically a malleable substance, into a desired form.
  • be (not) the end of the world The idiom "be (not) the end of the world" means that something, usually a negative or unfortunate event, is not as catastrophic or disastrous as it may initially seem. It implies that although the situation may be challenging or disappointing, it is still manageable or there are still opportunities for recovery and progress. The idiom is used to emphasize the importance of maintaining perspective and not overreacting to minor setbacks or setbacks that are beyond one's control.
  • pull down (an amount of money) The idiom "pull down (an amount of money)" typically means to earn or make a specific amount of money. It suggests the act of receiving or acquiring a particular sum of money through work or other means.
  • become of someone or something The idiom "become of someone or something" means to inquire about the current status, whereabouts, or outcome of a person or thing. It is often used when wondering what has happened to someone or something since the last known interaction or situation.
  • give a good account of oneself The idiom "give a good account of oneself" means to perform well or to do something to the best of one's abilities, particularly in a challenging or important situation. It refers to proving one's capabilities, skills, or character in a satisfactory or impressive manner.
  • not give anyone the time of day The idiom "not give anyone the time of day" means to completely ignore or refuse to acknowledge or respond to someone. It implies that one has no interest or regard for the person in question.
  • days of yore The idiom "days of yore" refers to a past time, generally with a sense of nostalgia, that is long gone or no longer present. It is used to describe a bygone era or a time in history that is considered old-fashioned or distant.
  • a few bricks shy of a load The idiom "a few bricks shy of a load" means that someone lacks intelligence or common sense. It implies that the person is not fully mentally competent or is missing something necessary for proper reasoning or understanding.
  • jump out of your skin The idiom "jump out of your skin" refers to experiencing extreme surprise, fright, or shock to the point where one's physical reaction is akin to jumping or jerking involuntarily. It implies being startled or startled to such an extent that it feels as if one's body is momentarily leaving their control.
  • lose trace of The idiom "lose trace of" means to no longer have any knowledge or information about someone or something's whereabouts or activities. It refers to the inability to maintain contact or keep track of something or someone.
  • get the advantage of The idiom "get the advantage of" means to gain an edge or to obtain a beneficial position over someone or something in a particular situation. It implies taking advantage of a circumstance or exploiting it to one's benefit.
  • show what are made of The idiom "show what you're made of" means to demonstrate one's true abilities, skills, or character in a challenging or difficult situation. It implies proving your worth or capabilities when faced with adversity or when put to the test.
  • by the grace of God The idiom "by the grace of God" refers to acknowledging that something positive or fortunate has happened solely due to divine intervention or God's favor. It is often used to express gratitude for an outcome that is beyond one's control or that defies explanation.
  • put out of mind The idiom "put out of mind" means to forget about or intentionally stop thinking about something or someone. It refers to deliberately removing thoughts or memories from one's consciousness or distracting oneself from them.
  • clear (someone or something) out of (some place) The idiom "clear (someone or something) out of (some place)" refers to the act of removing or evacuating someone or something from a particular location. It means to get rid of or eliminate whatever or whoever is present in a place.
  • wash one's hands of To "wash one's hands of" is an idiom that means to disassociate oneself from any responsibility, guilt, or involvement in a certain matter or situation. It implies deliberately distancing oneself from the consequences or outcome of a particular action or decision.
  • the likes of (someone or something) The idiom "the likes of (someone or something)" refers to people or things of a similar kind, quality, or nature as the person or thing being referred to. It is often used to denote a specific category or group that shares similar characteristics or qualities.
  • stick out (of sm or sth) The idiom "stick out (of sm or sth)" means to protrude or extend outward from something or someone. It implies that a particular part or object is visibly longer, larger, or more noticeable than the rest of its surroundings.
  • die of shame The idiom "die of shame" means to feel extreme embarrassment or humiliation, often to the extent that one wishes they could disappear or cease to exist. It signifies a level of disgrace or regret that causes emotional distress, as if the person would rather die than face the consequences or humiliation of their actions.
  • eyes in the back of (one's) head The idiom "eyes in the back of (one's) head" refers to the ability to be extremely observant or aware of one's surroundings, as if one had an additional set of eyes on the back of their head. It implies that someone is very vigilant and perceptive, able to anticipate or notice things that others may miss.
  • the best of friends must part The idiom "the best of friends must part" means that even the closest and most loyal friendships will eventually come to an end or be separated, possibly due to various circumstances or life changes. It emphasizes the inevitability of saying goodbye or going separate ways, regardless of the strength of the bond between individuals.
  • fruits of one's labor(s) The idiom "fruits of one's labor(s)" refers to the rewards or benefits that come as a result of one's hard work, efforts, or investments. It signifies the positive outcomes or achievements that can be enjoyed after putting in significant time, energy, or resources into a particular endeavor.
  • case of the jitters A "case of the jitters" refers to a state of nervousness, anxiety, or uneasiness that one experiences before a particular event or situation. It is usually characterized by feelings of restlessness, trembling, or a fluttering sensation in the stomach.
  • on the strength of sth The idiom "on the strength of something" refers to the reliance or dependence on something as the basis or reason for action, decision, or belief. It means acting or making a judgment based solely or primarily on the presence or quality of that particular thing.
  • the dead of night The idiom "the dead of night" refers to the darkest, quietest, and most still period during nighttime, usually referring to the period between midnight and dawn. It suggests a time when most people are asleep and there is minimal activity or noise.
  • filter something out of something The idiom "filter something out of something" means to remove or separate undesirable elements or substances from something in order to obtain a purer or cleaner result. This can be used metaphorically to describe the process of removing unwanted information or noise from data, ideas, or situations.
  • think better of it/(something) The idiom "think better of it/(something)" means to change one's decision or opinion about something, usually because one realizes that it is not a good idea or will have negative consequences. It is often used when someone reconsidered an action or plan after initially considering or starting to do it.
  • of course The idiom "of course" is used to express agreement, certainty, or the obviousness of something in a polite or confirming manner. It is often used to indicate that something is expected, understood, or naturally true without any doubt.
  • a load of baloney The idiom "a load of baloney" is used to describe something that is completely untrue or nonsense. It implies that the information or statement being referred to is ridiculous, unbelievable, or lacking any factual basis.
  • a thing of the past The idiom "a thing of the past" refers to something that used to exist or be relevant in the past but no longer exists or is no longer relevant in the present. It implies that the thing or concept is outdated or obsolete.
  • heart of gold The idiom "heart of gold" is used to describe someone who is very kind, generous, and compassionate. It refers to a person's inherent goodness and selflessness.
  • make ducks and drakes of The idiom "make ducks and drakes of" means to squander or waste something recklessly and thoughtlessly, often referring to money or resources. It implies a careless and irresponsible attitude towards handling or using something, without any regard for its value or importance.
  • be cocksure of (oneself) The idiom "be cocksure of oneself" means to be excessively or arrogantly confident or sure of oneself, often bordering on being conceited or overestimating one's abilities or knowledge. It implies a lack of humility or open-mindedness in one's beliefs or actions.
  • in the twinkle of an eye The idiom "in the twinkle of an eye" means to happen very quickly or to occur instantaneously. It implies that something happens in the blink of an eye, almost too fast to notice or comprehend.
  • the villain of the piece The idiom "the villain of the piece" refers to a person or entity who is considered the main cause of trouble or conflict in a particular situation or event. This individual or group is often perceived as being responsible for the negative outcomes or actions that occur. The term "piece" in this context typically refers to a story, play, or any narrative in which the villain plays a significant role.
  • out of sync The idiom "out of sync" refers to something that is not aligned or coordinated with something else, most commonly used to describe situations or events that are not happening in harmony or at the same pace. It signifies a lack of synchronization or coordination between different elements, causing a discrepancy or inconsistency.
  • have the presence of mind to do The idiom "have the presence of mind to do" means to be aware, composed, and mentally quick enough to act appropriately or make the right decision in a sudden or unexpected situation. It refers to someone's ability to stay calm and think clearly during challenging or stressful moments.
  • shades of somebody/something The idiom "shades of somebody/something" refers to similarities or reminders of a particular person, thing, or situation. It implies that there are elements or characteristics present that resemble or evoke memories of someone or something that has made a significant impact in the past.
  • start sm out at an amount of money The idiom "start someone out at an amount of money" means to initially provide or offer a certain amount of money to someone as their starting salary, wage, or payment for a particular job or task. It refers to the initial amount of money that a person receives when beginning a job or entering into an agreement, before any potential increases or negotiations occur.
  • be in a minority of one The idiom "be in a minority of one" means to hold a belief or opinion that is contrary to everyone else, making you the only person with such a viewpoint. It implies that you are alone or isolated in your thoughts or ideas.
  • full of shit The idiom "full of shit" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is deemed dishonest, deceitful, or insincere in their words or actions. It suggests that the person is not being truthful or trustworthy, often exaggerating or fabricating information.
  • hoodwink sm out of sth The idiom "hoodwink someone out of something" means to deceive or trick someone into giving up or losing something, typically through dishonest or crafty means. It suggests that the person has been lured into a false sense of security or manipulated into relinquishing their possession, usually without their knowledge or consent.
  • the spirit of the law The idiom "the spirit of the law" refers to the intended or underlying principle or purpose of a law, rather than its literal or strict interpretation. It emphasizes understanding and applying the law based on the original intention behind it, rather than just adhering to the exact wording. It suggests that the true intention of a law should guide its interpretation and application, taking into account the broader societal or moral objectives it aims to achieve.
  • be the talk of smw The idiom "be the talk of somewhere" refers to a situation where someone or something has become a topic of discussion or gossip in a particular place or community. It means that the person or thing being referred to is the subject of conversation, often due to something noteworthy, unusual, or controversial that they have done.
  • not have a/the ghost of a chance The idiom "not have a/the ghost of a chance" means to have no realistic or conceivable possibility of succeeding or achieving a particular outcome. It implies a complete lack of hope or probability for success.
  • get hold of The idiom "get hold of" means to obtain or acquire something, typically through effort or persistence. It refers to the act of getting one's hands on something or gaining control or possession of it. It can also describe the act of successfully contacting or communicating with someone.
  • matter of course, a A "matter of course" is an event or action that occurs naturally or expectedly without requiring any special consideration or attention. It refers to something that is customary, routine, or taken for granted.
  • be a bag/bundle of nerves The idiom "be a bag/bundle of nerves" means to be extremely anxious, nervous, or tense. It suggests a state of high emotional or psychological distress, characterized by jitteriness, restlessness, and easily triggered nervousness.
  • make heavy weather of something/of doing something The idiom "make heavy weather of something/of doing something" means to overcomplicate or exaggerate the difficulty of a task or situation, making it seem more challenging or complex than it actually is. It refers to someone taking longer or putting in more effort than necessary to complete or understand something. It can also suggest a tendency to complain or be overly dramatic about a situation.
  • south of The idiom "south of" generally means a location or value that is below or less than a certain point or standard. It can refer to a geographic direction, as well as a metaphorical concept.
  • beat/kick/knock the stuffing out of sb The idiom "beat/kick/knock the stuffing out of sb" means to severely defeat or physically harm someone, often causing them to lose confidence, energy, or the will to continue. It implies overwhelming force or a significant setback.
  • (a) nail in the coffin of sth The idiom "(a) nail in the coffin of sth" refers to an action or event that contributes to the downfall, failure, or definitive end of something, typically a plan, idea, relationship, or project. It signifies a final blow or irreversible damage that diminishes all remaining chances of recovery or success.
  • horse of a different color, a The idiom "horse of a different color" refers to a completely different matter or issue, usually unrelated to the current topic of discussion. It signifies a significant shift in subject or a change in the nature of the situation at hand. This idiom suggests that the new matter should be treated separately and not considered as part of the previous topic.
  • bail someone out of jail The idiom "bail someone out of jail" means to provide financial assistance or support to someone who has been detained or arrested by paying their bail. It involves paying a certain amount of money to secure their temporary release from jail until their court appearance.
  • a mother lode of sth The idiom "a mother lode of something" refers to a large, abundant or rich source of something valuable or desirable. It is often used to describe a discovery or find that is exceptionally valuable or significant. The term originated from mining, where a mother lode referred to a principal vein of ore in a mine.
  • Keep out of my way The idiom "Keep out of my way" means to request or order someone to stay clear or avoid interfering with one's activities or personal space. It is often expressed when someone is annoyed, discontented, or wants to be left alone.
  • have a lot of time for sb The idiom "have a lot of time for someone" means to have a great deal of respect, admiration, or affection for them. It indicates that you hold someone in high regard and are willing to dedicate your time and attention to them.
  • in awe (of sm or sth) The idiom "in awe (of someone or something)" means to be filled with a deep sense of admiration, respect, or reverence for someone or something. It signifies being amazed or overwhelmed by someone's abilities, achievements, or the grandeur of something.
  • pop the bubble of (someone) The idiom "pop the bubble of (someone)" refers to the act of shattering or bursting someone's illusion, assumption, or dream by presenting them with harsh or disappointing realities or facts. It can also imply undermining or disproving someone's overly optimistic or idealistic perspective.
  • want a piece of me? The idiom "want a piece of me?" is a confrontational or challenging expression implying that someone is inviting or provoking another person to engage in physical or verbal conflict. It suggests that the speaker is confident in their abilities and is ready to defend or assert themselves.
  • fall off the back of a lorry The idiom "fall off the back of a lorry" is used to describe goods that are believed to have been acquired illegally or without legitimate documentation. It suggests that the goods in question were likely stolen, obtained through dishonest means, or acquired without proper authorization.
  • go to the ends of the earth The phrase "go to the ends of the earth" means to make every possible effort, even if it requires extreme measures or great sacrifices, in order to achieve or obtain something. It implies going to the farthest, most remote or difficult places to accomplish a goal or fulfill a commitment.
  • sarcasm is the lowest form of wit/humour The idiom "sarcasm is the lowest form of wit/humor" is a saying that implies that using sarcasm as a form of wit or humor is considered to be inferior or of low quality. It suggests that there are more sophisticated or intelligent forms of humor available, and relying on sarcasm may be seen as lazy or lacking cleverness.
  • frighten the life out of (one) The idiom "frighten the life out of (one)" means to scare or terrify someone to an extreme degree. It implies that the person is so frightened that they feel as if their life force or vitality is being drained away.
  • ferret sth out (of sm or sth) The idiom "ferret something out (of someone or something)" means to search or find something, often with great determination or persistence, especially when it is hidden or not easily accessible. It implies diligently investigating or uncovering something that may be concealed or hard to locate.
  • follow in the footsteps of To "follow in the footsteps of" means to emulate or imitate someone else's actions, behavior, or achievements, often with the intention of achieving similar success or outcomes. It refers to the act of following a similar path or course that someone else has taken before, in order to learn from their experiences or to continue a particular tradition or legacy.
  • (just) for the love of something The idiom "(just) for the love of something" indicates doing or pursuing something purely out of passion, enjoyment, or personal satisfaction rather than for any tangible rewards or benefits. It implies that the person engaging in the activity does it because they genuinely love and find joy in it, regardless of any external factors.
  • put nose out of joint The idiom "put nose out of joint" means to upset or offend someone, especially by usurping their position or causing them to feel slighted or undermined. It refers to a situation where someone's pride or self-importance is wounded, often resulting in feelings of annoyance, irritation, or resentment.
  • in the nick of time The idiom "in the nick of time" means to do something or arrive at a particular moment or just at the right moment, just before it is too late or just in time to prevent a negative outcome.
  • have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders" means to feel an overwhelming burden or responsibility. It refers to someone who carries a great deal of stress, worries, or problems, often feeling as though they are responsible for solving all the problems of the world or shouldering all the burdens that come their way.
  • inform someone of something The idiom "inform someone of something" means to provide someone with necessary or new information about a specific topic, event, or situation. It refers to the act of communicating or updating someone about something they may not be aware of.
  • the best-laid plans of mice and men oft go astray The definition for the idiom "the best-laid plans of mice and men oft go astray" is: Despite careful preparation and intentions, even the most well-thought-out or organized plans can often go wrong or fail unexpectedly. This phrase is derived from a line in the poem "To a Mouse" by Robert Burns.
  • woman of few words A "woman of few words" is an idiom used to describe a woman who tends to speak very little or is not inclined to engage in lengthy conversations. It implies that she is reserved or cautious in her communication style and prefers to express herself succinctly.
  • pester the life out of The idiom "pester the life out of" means to annoy or bother someone incessantly or persistently to such an extent that it becomes extremely irritating or bothersome. It implies that the person being pestered is being continuously disturbed or troubled to the point of extreme exasperation.
  • out of the blocks The idiom "out of the blocks" refers to a fast or strong start in a competition, project, or endeavor. It often implies a quick and efficient manner of beginning or initiating something, similar to the rapid sprint a runner makes after starting a race from the blocks.
  • (as) cocky as the king of spades The idiom "as cocky as the king of spades" refers to someone who is extremely self-confident, arrogant, or proud. It implies that the person in question possesses an excessive amount of confidence in their abilities, often to the point of being dismissive or disrespectful towards others.
  • pull (one's) chestnuts out of the fire The idiom "pull (one's) chestnuts out of the fire" means to rescue or save someone else from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at great personal risk or effort. It implies that the person being rescued has willingly or irresponsibly put themselves in jeopardy and now needs assistance to escape the consequences of their actions.
  • sick to death of The idiom "sick to death of" means to be extremely tired, frustrated, or irritated by something or someone. It indicates being fed up and having a strong aversion or dislike towards a particular situation, person, or thing.
  • through the eyes of somebody The idiom "through the eyes of somebody" means to view or understand a situation, experience, or perspective from someone else's point of view. It implies seeing things or perceiving them as someone else would, taking into account their perspective, emotions, and understanding of the matter.
  • be, get, etc. out of control The idiom "be, get, etc. out of control" refers to a situation or behavior that becomes uncontrollable or unmanageable. It suggests that the situation or behavior has exceeded the limits of control or has ceased to be orderly or manageable.
  • in the eyes of The idiom "in the eyes of" is used to express someone's or something's perception or judgment from a particular perspective or viewpoint. It implies how someone is seen, judged, or evaluated by others. It signifies considering someone or something from a specific subjective standpoint.
  • Of all things! The idiom "Of all things!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, disbelief, or frustration about something unexpected or extraordinary happening. It is often used to convey astonishment in response to a highly unlikely or ironic situation.
  • crawling with sm kind of creature The idiom "crawling with some kind of creature" means that there are a large number of a specific type of living organism or creature present in a particular place. It implies a sense of abundance or overwhelming presence.
  • push sm or sth on (ahead) (of sm or sth) The idiom "push someone or something on (ahead) (of someone or something)" refers to the act of leading or advancing someone or something ahead of others, typically with force or determination. It can imply exerting pressure to ensure progress or success, often at the expense of others who may be equally or more deserving. This idiom is often used in situations where there is competition or a desire to achieve something quickly.
  • be/get tired of something/doing something The idiom "be/get tired of something/doing something" means to become weary, bored, or annoyed by something or someone, often because of its repetitiveness or lack of interest. It suggests a feeling of wanting a change or finding something to be irksome or unappealing.
  • get blood out of/from a stone The idiom "get blood out of/from a stone" means to attempt to extract something or gain information from someone who is unwilling or incapable of giving it. It is used to illustrate a difficult or impossible task, implying that the desired outcome is highly unlikely or impractical.
  • a show of hands The idiom "a show of hands" refers to a method of voting or expressing an opinion by physically raising one's hand. It is typically used in a group setting to quickly gauge the general consensus or to make a democratic decision.
  • be the spit (and image) of sb, at be the spitting image of sb The idiom "be the spit (and image) of sb" or "be the spitting image of sb" means to closely resemble someone, typically to the point where it is almost an exact replica in terms of physical appearance. It suggests that the person in question bears a striking resemblance to another individual, often a family member or ancestor. The term "spitting image" may have originated from the idea that the likeness is so accurate that one could be imagined as being spat out or replicated by the other person.
  • out of style The idiom "out of style" refers to something that is no longer trendy or fashionable. It suggests that a particular item, trend, or behavior has become outdated and is no longer in vogue.
  • be different/opposite sides of the same coin, at be two sides of the same coin The idiom "be different/opposite sides of the same coin" or "be two sides of the same coin" refers to two things or people that may seem different or opposite on the surface but are fundamentally interconnected or similar in some way. It suggests that despite appearing contradictory, they are actually part of the same whole or share a common origin, essence, or characteristics.
  • by the look(s) of things The idiom "by the look(s) of things" refers to making a judgment or inference based on available visual evidence or observations. It implies that one is forming an opinion or conclusion on a situation, subject, or outcome based solely on outward appearances or initial impressions.
  • make light of something To make light of something means to treat or regard something as trivial or unimportant, often by minimizing its significance or implications. It implies minimization, trivialization, or joking about a serious or important matter.
  • in favor of someone The idiom "in favor of someone" typically means to support or be in agreement with someone or their ideas, opinions, or actions. It implies that one is giving preference or showing favor towards that person and their choices.
  • like waving a red flag in front of a bull The idiom "like waving a red flag in front of a bull" means to do or say something that is likely to provoke or anger someone, just like how a waving red flag typically triggers a charging bull. It suggests that the action or statement is seen as deliberately provocative and likely to cause a strong reaction.
  • a dose of (one's) own medicine The idiom "a dose of (one's) own medicine" refers to experiencing the same negative treatment or actions that one has inflicted on others, often with the intention of teaching them a lesson or making them understand how it feels to be treated in such a manner. It implies that the person is receiving the same kind of treatment they have been giving to others.
  • hit the side of a barn The idiom "hit the side of a barn" typically means to have extremely poor aim, accuracy, or skill when attempting to hit a target. It suggests that someone's aim is so bad that they cannot even hit something as large and easy to hit as the side of a barn, which is a generally very large and easy-to-hit target.
  • all manner of someone or something The idiom "all manner of someone or something" typically means a wide variety or assortment of someone or something. It implies that every possible type or kind is included, without excluding any options.
  • One of these days is none of these days. The idiom "One of these days is none of these days" means that procrastinating or putting off tasks until some unspecified future time will likely lead to those tasks remaining unfinished or undone. It highlights the importance of taking timely action and not relying on vague future promises or intentions.
  • get free of The idiom "get free of" typically means to escape or liberate oneself from a situation, obligation, or constraint. It implies breaking free from something that holds you back or restricts your freedom.
  • not be in the business of sth The idiom "not be in the business of something" means to not be involved in a particular activity or task. It suggests that a person or entity does not have the expertise, responsibility, or interest in engaging in a certain matter. It implies that they do not make it their concern or area of focus.
  • of your choice The phrase "of your choice" refers to the freedom or opportunity to select or decide between various options or alternatives based on personal preference or liking.
  • make (a) great play of (something) To "make (a) great play of (something)" means to emphasize or give excessive attention to something in order to impress or gain attention from others. It refers to making a big fuss or display about a particular situation, event, or accomplishment, often with the intention of garnering praise, admiration, or further benefits.
  • soak sth out of sth The idiom "soak something out of something" refers to the act of extracting or absorbing something, typically a liquid, from a particular substance or material by soaking it. It implies the process of removing or obtaining a desired component or quality by immersing it in a liquid and allowing it to seep or dissolve.
  • the flip side of something The idiom "the flip side of something" refers to an alternative perspective or contrasting aspect of a situation or argument. It suggests that there is another side to consider, often highlighting the negative or unintended consequences of a particular choice, decision, or action. In essence, it implies looking at the opposite, less obvious, or less favorable aspect of a given situation or idea.
  • a counsel of perfection The idiom "a counsel of perfection" refers to an ideal or perfect advice or suggestion that may be difficult or impractical to achieve in reality. It implies a standard or recommendation that may seem excellent in theory but may not be easily implemented or followed in practice.
  • cull (someone or something) out of (something) The idiom "cull (someone or something) out of (something)" means to selectively remove or separate someone or something from a group, usually for a specific purpose or due to a particular criterion. It implies the act of carefully choosing or eliminating certain individuals or elements, often to improve overall quality or efficiency.
  • put the fear of God into The idiom "put the fear of God into" means to instill a strong sense of fear or awe, typically through intimidation, punishment, or a stern warning. It implies making someone deeply afraid or intimidated by one's actions or words, often to induce a change in behavior or prevent a negative outcome.
  • the fall of the cards The idiom "the fall of the cards" refers to an unpredictable or unexpected outcome or result. It is often used to describe a situation where events or circumstances unfold in a particular way that was beyond control or anticipation. The analogy comes from card games such as poker, where the way the cards are dealt ultimately determines the outcome of the game.
  • horror of horrors The idiom "horror of horrors" is an expression used to emphasize extreme shock or dismay in response to a situation or event that is considered unimaginably terrible or distressing. It highlights a heightened sense of fear, surprise, or disappointment in an exaggerated manner.
  • conceive of (someone or something) The idiom "conceive of (someone or something)" means to form a mental image or idea of someone or something, often in terms of their capabilities, characteristics, or potential. It involves creating a mental concept or understanding of the person or thing in question.
  • discretion is the better part of valour The idiom "discretion is the better part of valour" means that it is often wiser to avoid taking unnecessary risks or engaging in conflict. It implies that using caution and making calculated decisions can be more valuable than acting bravely or impulsively in certain situations.
  • out of your depth The idiom "out of your depth" is used to describe a situation where someone does not have the necessary experience, knowledge, or skills to handle or understand something. It often indicates that a person is overwhelmed or struggling in a particular situation due to their lack of expertise or understanding.
  • out of the running The idiom "out of the running" typically means to be eliminated or no longer in contention for a particular competition, position, or opportunity. It refers to being out of the race or unable to achieve success in a specific endeavor.
  • err on the side of sth The idiom "err on the side of sth" means to choose or decide in favor of a particular option or course of action, even if it involves making a mistake, in order to ensure greater safety, caution, or benefit. It implies that it is better to be overly cautious or careful in a situation, rather than taking unnecessary risks or making potentially harmful decisions.
  • fly in the teeth of The idiom "fly in the teeth of" means to directly oppose or contradict something, often defying common sense or conventional wisdom. It suggests going against established norms or expectations, challenging or resisting authority or prevailing opinions, even though it may seem illogical or irrational.
  • make a world of difference The idiom "make a world of difference" is used to emphasize the significant positive impact or change something or someone can bring about in a particular context or situation. It implies that the mentioned contribution or alteration has the power to greatly improve or transform a given circumstance.
  • opt in favor of The idiom "opt in favor of" means to choose or select something or someone over other alternatives because it is preferred or considered better or more beneficial. It implies making a conscious decision to support or choose one option over others due to personal preference, advantage, or agreement.
  • on the crest of the wave The idiom "on the crest of the wave" means to be experiencing a period of great success, achievement, or popularity. It refers to being at the highest point or peak of a positive trend or situation.
  • land of milk and honey The idiom "land of milk and honey" refers to a place or situation that is abundant in resources, opportunities, and favorable conditions. It implies a place of great prosperity, happiness, and fulfillment, often associated with abundance, wealth, and a promising future.
  • out of character The idiom "out of character" refers to someone behaving or acting in a way that is inconsistent with their usual personality, traits, or behavior. It means not behaving in a manner that is typical, normal, or expected from that particular individual.
  • gouge sth out of sm The idiom "gouge something out of someone" typically means to extract or obtain something from someone through forceful or aggressive means, often by pressuring or manipulating them. It suggests that the person obtaining something is using unfair or excessive tactics to achieve their goal.
  • ninetynine times out of a hundred The idiom "ninety-nine times out of a hundred" means that something is almost always true or occurs in a certain way, with only occasional exceptions. It implies a very high likelihood or probability.
  • put the fear of God into someone The idiom "put the fear of God into someone" means to intimidate, frighten, or terrify someone severely, often in an attempt to make them change their behavior or take a desired action. It implies instilling a deep sense of fear or awe, as if they were confronting divine punishment or wrath.
  • in control of someone or something The idiom "in control of someone or something" refers to the state or quality of having power, authority, or influence over someone or something. It suggests that the person or entity being referenced is able to command or direct actions, decisions, or outcomes in a specific situation.
  • Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. The idiom "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts" means to be cautious of someone who brings a seemingly generous or kind gesture, as it may hide ulterior motives or deceit. It is derived from the story of the Trojan Horse in Greek mythology, where the Greeks used a large wooden horse as a gift to gain entry into the city of Troy, ultimately leading to its downfall. This idiom thus warns against accepting favors or offerings without suspicion or careful consideration.
  • conduct (someone or something) out of (some place) The idiom "conduct (someone or something) out of (some place)" means to guide or lead someone or something out of a particular place in a formal or orderly manner. It implies being responsible for ensuring that the person or object reaches the designated point of departure safely or securely.
  • take the starch out of sm The idiom "take the starch out of someone" means to humiliate, deflate, or overpower someone's confidence or energy. It suggests weakening someone's bravado or self-assurance, leaving them feeling demoralized or deflated.
  • in phase/out of phase The idiom "in phase/out of phase" is typically used to describe the alignment or synchronization of two or more things. It originates from the field of physics and refers to the relationship between two waveforms. "In phase" describes when two or more waves are aligned such that their crests and troughs occur at the same time, resulting in reinforcement or amplification of the waves. It indicates a harmonious or coordinated state. "On the other hand, "out of phase" refers to when waves are not aligned, and their crests and troughs occur at different times, leading to cancellation or interference of the waves. It indicates a lack of coordination or disharmony. This idiom is commonly used metaphorically to describe the alignment or
  • mortification of the flesh The idiom "mortification of the flesh" refers to the act of intentionally inflicting pain, discomfort, or deprivation upon oneself as a form of religious discipline or self-punishment. It commonly involves acts such as fasting, self-flagellation, or other forms of bodily or emotional suffering as a means to achieve spiritual purification or to demonstrate devotion or repentance. It is often associated with certain religious practices or ascetic traditions.
  • the apple of your eye The idiom "the apple of your eye" is used to describe someone or something that is cherished, loved, or regarded as precious and of great importance to you.
  • have a mind of its own The idiom "have a mind of its own" means that something does not behave as expected and seems to have its own independent will or desires. It refers to things or situations that are unpredictable or difficult to control.
  • back someone or something out of something The idiom "back someone or something out of something" means to help or support someone or something in withdrawing from a difficult or challenging situation, position, or commitment. It implies providing assistance for someone or something to safely retreat or disengage from an unfavorable circumstance or a commitment that is no longer desirable or feasible.
  • make mincemeat of sb The idiom "make mincemeat of someone" means to completely defeat or overpower someone. It conveys the idea of easily and swiftly overcoming an opponent, often implying a one-sided or lopsided victory.
  • the shape of things to come The idiom "the shape of things to come" refers to a prediction or a glimpse of what is likely to happen in the future. It implies recognizing the early signs or trends that foreshadow the outcome or direction of a situation or event.
  • you can have too much of a good thing The idiom "you can have too much of a good thing" means that even something enjoyable or beneficial in moderation can become unpleasant or harmful when taken to excess.
  • con (someone) out of (something) The idiom "con (someone) out of (something)" means to trick or deceive someone in order to obtain something valuable from them through deceitful means. It often involves manipulating or misleading the person into giving up something, such as money, possessions, or rights, through dishonest persuasion or manipulation.
  • be full of beans The idiom "be full of beans" means to be full of energy, enthusiasm, or excitement.
  • stay abreast of The idiom "stay abreast of" means to keep oneself informed or up-to-date about the latest developments, news, or information regarding a particular topic or situation. It implies actively staying current and knowledgeable about a subject in order to remain informed and make informed decisions.
  • I'm out of here The idiom "I'm out of here" is typically used to express a strong desire or intention to leave a place or situation immediately. It indicates a person's abrupt departure or disengagement from a particular environment, often suggesting a feeling of dissatisfaction, frustration, or simply wanting to move on to something else.
  • the other side of the tracks "The other side of the tracks" is an idiomatic expression used to describe a place or community that is considered less affluent, disadvantaged, or socially undesirable. It refers to a literal or metaphorical division between two areas, with one side being more privileged, while the other side is often associated with poverty, crime, or lower social status. It suggests a contrast or divide between different socioeconomic backgrounds or living conditions.
  • clear of The idiom "clear of" means to be free from or no longer affected by something negative or harmful. It implies being removed or distant from a particular situation, danger, or problem.
  • a fine state of affairs The idiom "a fine state of affairs" is used to describe a situation or series of events that have turned out to be problematic, chaotic, or undesirable. It implies that the circumstances are far from ideal or satisfactory.
  • flower of the flock The idiom "flower of the flock" refers to the best or most exceptional individuals within a group or community. It implies that they stand out from the rest, like a beautiful flower among a flock of plain ones.
  • get bent out of shape (about/over something) The idiom "get bent out of shape (about/over something)" means to become excessively upset, angry, or worked up about something. It implies an overreaction to a situation or taking offense where it may not be warranted. It can also signify an individual losing their composure or calmness due to a particular issue or event.
  • have had a bellyful of The idiom "have had a bellyful of" is used to express one's frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a situation or someone's behavior, suggesting that one has reached their limit or tolerance for it. It implies that a person has experienced or endured enough of something to the point of feeling overwhelmed or fed up.
  • take the line/path of least resistance The idiom "take the line/path of least resistance" refers to choosing the easiest or most convenient option or course of action, rather than making an effort to overcome obstacles or challenges. It implies avoiding any conflict, difficulty, or resistance in order to progress with minimal effort or resistance.
  • do well out of somebody/something The idiom "do well out of somebody/something" means to benefit or profit greatly from a person or situation. It refers to achieving success, advantage, or financial gain by taking advantage of someone or something.
  • faint of heart The idiom "faint of heart" refers to someone who lacks courage or is easily frightened or disturbed by difficult or dangerous situations. It describes individuals who are timid, sensitive, or lacking in resilience when faced with challenging circumstances or unpleasant experiences.
  • get a charge out of sth The idiom "get a charge out of something" means to derive great excitement, enjoyment, or amusement from something. It implies experiencing a heightened sense of pleasure or satisfaction from a particular activity, event, or situation.
  • as a token of (something) The idiom "as a token of (something)" refers to a gesture or gift given to express or symbolize something specific such as gratitude, affection, appreciation, or friendship. It serves as a representation or manifestation of a particular sentiment or emotion.
  • a bag of bones The idiom "a bag of bones" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely thin, gaunt, or emaciated in appearance. It suggests that the individual or object lacks flesh or muscle, giving the impression of being nothing more than a collection of bones within a bag.
  • out of necessity The idiom "out of necessity" means that something is done or happens because there is no other choice or alternative. It suggests that circumstances or constraints require a particular action or decision to be made in order to meet a crucial need or requirement, often due to a lack of other options.
  • make use of The idiom "make use of" means to utilize or take advantage of something or someone for a specific purpose or in a beneficial way. It implies actively employing or applying something to achieve a desired result.
  • What's that got to do with the price of meat? The idiom "What's that got to do with the price of meat?" is typically used to dismiss or express indifference towards a statement, question, or topic that seems irrelevant or unrelated to the discussion at hand. It conveys the idea that the mentioned subject has no relevance or connection to the current situation or conversation.
  • the genie is out of the bottle The idiom "the genie is out of the bottle" means that a situation or problem that was previously contained or controlled has now been released or unleashed, and it is difficult or impossible to revert back to the previous state. It implies that once unleashed, the consequences or effects cannot be undone, and the situation may potentially become chaotic or unmanageable.
  • blow sth out of the water The idiom "blow something out of the water" means to surpass or outperform something or someone to a great extent, often in a sudden and unexpected way. It can refer to exceeding expectations, achieving much better results, or completely overshadowing a competition or previous record. The phrase is often used to describe a remarkable accomplishment or an exceptional performance that leaves everything else in its wake.
  • inveigle sth out of sm The idiom "inveigle something out of someone" refers to the act of persuading or coaxing someone into giving or revealing something they might be unwilling to share. It implies the use of charm, flattery, or manipulation to achieve one's goal.
  • lose count of The idiom "lose count of" means to be unable to keep track or remember the exact number or quantity of something.
  • be out of sb's league The idiom "be out of someone's league" means that someone or something is considered to be too good, skilled, attractive, or valuable for another person to have a chance of competing or being associated with them. It implies that the person is not on the same level or is not suitable for a potential romantic or social relationship.
  • at the best of times The idiom "at the best of times" is used to describe a situation or condition that is already challenging, difficult, or problematic, even in the most favorable or optimal circumstances. It suggests that the situation is challenging regardless of any favorable factors.
  • discretion is the greater part of valour The idiom "discretion is the greater part of valor" means that it is often wise and courageous to exercise caution and make rational choices instead of impulsive or reckless actions, particularly in difficult or dangerous situations. Taking a step back, assessing the risks, and making well-informed decisions can be a wiser and braver approach than acting rashly or recklessly.
  • get a buzz out of The idiom "get a buzz out of" means to experience excitement, pleasure, or enjoyment from something. It commonly refers to finding a particular activity or situation enjoyable or stimulating.
  • from/on the wrong side of the tracks The idiom "from/on the wrong side of the tracks" refers to someone who comes from a socioeconomically disadvantaged or morally questionable background. It suggests that the person comes from an area with a reputation for poverty, crime, or social decay, often symbolized by a literal division of a town or city by railroad tracks.
  • get in the swing of things The idiom "get in the swing of things" means to become accustomed to or get comfortable with a new situation, activity, or routine. It refers to getting into a rhythm or flow and adapting to the new environment or circumstances in order to perform effectively or enjoyably.
  • Don't swap horses in the middle of the river. The idiom "Don't swap horses in the middle of the river" means not to change one's course of action or make a major decision or change at a critical or decisive moment. It emphasizes the importance of sticking with a chosen plan or commitment until it is completed, rather than abandoning or changing it halfway through.
  • bend out of shape The idiom "bend out of shape" means to become very angry, upset, or disturbed over a trivial matter. It refers to an exaggerated reaction or overreaction to a minor issue, often leading to unnecessary stress or conflict.
  • be (all) in favour of something/of doing something To be (all) in favor of something/of doing something means to support or approve of a particular idea, proposal, or course of action. It indicates a strong positive opinion or preference for something.
  • beat the (living) daylights out of (someone) The idiom "beat the (living) daylights out of (someone)" means to physically assault or beat someone very severely. It implies a violent and brutal attack that causes extreme harm or injury.
  • a thing of shreds and patches The idiom "a thing of shreds and patches" refers to something that is in a disorganized, patched-together, or haphazard condition. It describes an object, idea, or situation that lacks coherence or unity and appears disjointed or incomplete.
  • state of affairs The idiom "state of affairs" refers to the current situation or condition of certain events, circumstances, or relationships. It is used to describe the existing state or arrangement of things in a particular context, often suggesting that it is problematic, chaotic, or in need of attention.
  • be no ball of fire The idiom "be no ball of fire" means to lack enthusiasm, energy, or exceptional skills in doing something. It refers to someone who is not particularly outstanding or impressive in a specific area or task.
  • a conflict of interest A conflict of interest refers to a situation where an individual or entity has competing personal or professional interests that could potentially influence their judgment or decision-making in an unfair or biased manner. It is a situation in which personal gain or advantage could improperly influence the objective judgment or actions of a person or organization in matters where they have a responsibility or duty to act impartially.
  • one brick short of a (full) load The idiom "one brick short of a (full) load" is a figurative expression used to describe someone who is perceived to be lacking intelligence, understanding, or mental capacity. It implies that the person is missing something essential or necessary, like a brick missing from a load. It suggests that the person is not functioning at their full potential or is mentally deficient in some way.
  • not know (someone) from a bar of soap The idiom "not know (someone) from a bar of soap" means to be completely unfamiliar with or have no knowledge or recognition of someone. It implies that the person being referred to is totally unknown or unrecognized, just like a random bar of soap that holds no significance or familiarity.
  • give a good account of The idiom "give a good account of" means to perform exceptionally well, to make a favorable or impressive showing, or to perform at one's best in a particular situation, often when facing challenges or difficulties. It implies demonstrating one's skills, abilities, or qualities in a manner that exceeds expectations or meets high standards.
  • in charge of (something) The idiom "in charge of (something)" refers to the responsibility or authority a person has over a specific task, duty, or situation. It implies that the person is the one who holds the power, control, or decision-making ability regarding that particular matter.
  • nose out of joint, have one's To have one's nose out of joint means to be irritated, offended, or displeased, typically because one feels slighted, disrespected, or overlooked. It implies feeling upset or resentful due to someone or something causing a blow to one's ego or self-esteem.
  • have a lot of irons in the fire The idiom "have a lot of irons in the fire" means to be involved in or working on multiple tasks, projects, or commitments simultaneously. It implies that a person is busy managing various responsibilities or endeavors.
  • can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear The idiom "can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear" is used to convey the idea that it is impossible to turn something of low quality or poor value into something exceptional or refined. It implies that no matter how much effort or skill is put into it, the end result will still be mediocre or unimpressive.
  • a man of action The idiom "a man of action" refers to an individual who is proactive, decisive, and inclined to take immediate and direct actions rather than relying solely on planning or contemplation. It emphasizes someone who prefers to tackle tasks or challenges actively and energetically.
  • take the liberty of doing sth The idiom "take the liberty of doing something" means to do something without asking for permission or without being explicitly told to do so. It signifies acting independently and making a decision or taking an action without seeking approval.
  • jack of all trades sm The idiom "jack of all trades" refers to a person who has many different skills or abilities, but may not excel in any one particular area. The addition of "sm" is unclear and may not be a common or recognized variation of the idiom.
  • knock the wind out of sm's sails The idiom "knock the wind out of someone's sails" means to completely demoralize or deflate someone, typically by delivering a harsh criticism, devastating news, or a significant setback that undermines their confidence, enthusiasm, or momentum. It refers to the act of removing the air or energy from someone's metaphorical sails, leaving them feeling deflated and discouraged.
  • think a lot of The idiom "think a lot of" means to hold someone or something in high regard, esteem, or importance. It implies having a favorable opinion or strong feelings towards someone or something.
  • run the gauntlet of something/someone The idiom "run the gauntlet of something/someone" means to undergo a series of difficult challenges or obstacles, often faced one after another, in order to achieve a particular objective or reach a desired destination. It can also suggest enduring scrutiny, criticism, or judgment from multiple sources or individuals. The phrase derives from the historical practice of forcing someone to run between two parallel lines of people who would strike them as they passed, usually as punishment or a test of endurance. In a figurative sense, it implies facing a demanding and potentially harmful situation.
  • like one of the family The idiom "like one of the family" is used to describe someone who is treated or regarded in the same way as a close relative. It implies close familiarity, trust, and warmth in the relationship.
  • a heck of a lot of sth The idiom "a heck of a lot of sth" is used to emphasize that there is an extremely large quantity or amount of something. It implies an overwhelming or excessive amount, often used to express astonishment or emphasis.
  • in your, this, etc. neck of the woods The idiom "in your, this, etc. neck of the woods" is used to refer to a specific geographical area or region where the speaker or listener is located or familiar with. It can also be used more broadly to mean a particular vicinity or locality. This phrase emphasizes the idea of a specific location or region, often characterized by similar surroundings or shared experiences.
  • can't see beyond the end of (one's) nose The idiom "can't see beyond the end of one's nose" means to have a limited perspective or to be unable to think about or consider future implications or consequences. It refers to someone who is only focused on immediate situations or their own interests, lacking the ability to look ahead or consider broader aspects of a situation.
  • hotbed of something A hotbed of something refers to a place or area where a particular activity, behavior, or characteristic is abundant, widespread, or intense. It often implies that the said activity or behavior is thriving or flourishing in that specific location.
  • to the best of my recollection The idiom "to the best of my recollection" means to the best of one's memory or ability to remember something accurately. It implies that the person is making an effort to recall information or events as accurately as possible, but acknowledges that there may be some uncertainty or gaps in their memory.
  • complain of sth The idiom "complain of something" refers to expressing dissatisfaction or grievances about a particular issue, situation, or symptom. It denotes stating or expressing feelings of displeasure, discomfort, or annoyance related to something.
  • in the vicinity of sth The idiom "in the vicinity of something" means to be near or close to something, usually without specifying an exact or precise location. It implies that the subject is in the general area or surrounding region of the mentioned object or place.
  • leach out of sth The idiom "leach out of sth" refers to the process by which a substance or quality gradually and consistently drains or seeps out from something, often in a slow and continuous manner. It implies that the substance or quality is being extracted or extracted itself without any additional effort.
  • hold (up) (one's) end of the bargain To "hold (up) (one's) end of the bargain" means to fulfill one's obligations or commitments in an agreement or arrangement. It refers to keeping one's promise or responsibility, often in a mutually agreed exchange or contract. This idiom emphasizes the importance of individuals maintaining their part of a deal or promise.
  • build sth out of sth The idiom "build something out of something" typically means to construct or create something using materials or resources that are available or provided. It often implies creating an object, structure, or idea using existing elements or pieces.
  • in the unlikely event of sth The idiom "in the unlikely event of sth" refers to a scenario or situation that is considered highly improbable or unlikely to occur. It implies that the possibility of that particular event happening is rare or statistically improbable.
  • a labour of Hercules The idiom "a labour of Hercules" refers to a difficult and demanding task that requires great effort, strength, or skill. It originates from the mythological Greek hero Hercules, who was renowned for his twelve labours, which were extremely challenging and often involved fighting mythical creatures or completing impossible tasks. Therefore, something described as a "labour of Hercules" implies an arduous undertaking that requires exceptional ability or a herculean effort to accomplish.
  • there’s no fear of something The idiom "there's no fear of something" is used to express certainty or assurance that a specific event or outcome will not happen or be experienced. It implies that there is no possibility or reason to be worried or concerned about the occurrence of something.
  • the school of hard knocks The idiom "the school of hard knocks" refers to the difficult lessons and experiences learned through real-life hardships, trials, and challenges rather than through formal education or training. It implies that one has acquired knowledge and wisdom through personal adversity and the hardships faced in life.
  • in the business of (doing something) The idiom "in the business of (doing something)" refers to being involved or occupied in a particular activity or field. It suggests that someone or an organization is focused on pursuing or performing a specific task, endeavor, or profession. It implies a sense of expertise, dedication, and commitment to the said activity or field.
  • grow out of (something) The idiom "grow out of (something)" means to reach a stage of development where one no longer has a particular habit, preference, interest, or behavior that they previously had. It implies that a person has matured or moved on from something they used to enjoy or have a strong attachment to.
  • buy a round (of drinks) The idiom "buy a round (of drinks)" refers to the act of purchasing beverages, usually alcoholic, for a group of people. It is often a gesture of generosity or celebration in which a person takes turns paying for everyone's drinks.
  • grapes of wrath The idiom "grapes of wrath" refers to intense anger or fury, often brought about by a sense of injustice or unfair treatment. It has its origins in John Steinbeck's novel titled "The Grapes of Wrath," published in 1939, which depicted the struggles of a fictional family during the Great Depression. The phrase represents the bitterness and indignation felt by the characters in the novel and has since become a metaphorical expression for righteous anger and rebellion against oppression or mistreatment.
  • take a dim view of The idiom "take a dim view of" means to have a negative or disapproving opinion or judgment about something or someone. It implies that the person is not impressed or pleased with the situation or behavior in question.
  • (more than) your fair share of something The idiom "(more than) your fair share of something" refers to receiving or having more than what is considered reasonable or equitable. It suggests an excess or abundance of a particular thing or burden. It can be used to describe someone who has received an unequal or excessive portion of a resource, responsibility, opportunity, or any other circumstance or factor.
  • the nature of the beast The idiom "the nature of the beast" refers to the inherent or essential characteristics or qualities of something or someone, particularly those that are difficult to change or control. It implies that certain behaviors or outcomes are expected or cannot be avoided due to the innate nature of a situation, person, or thing.
  • get (oneself) out of (something) The idiom "get (oneself) out of (something)" means to free oneself from a difficult or undesirable situation, often through effort, negotiation, or finding a solution. It refers to the act of escaping or extricating oneself from a problematic or challenging circumstance.
  • see the last of The idiom "see the last of" means to witness or experience the final occurrence or departure of someone or something, implying that there will be no more encounters or involvement with that person or thing in the future.
  • knock the stuffing out of sb The idiom "knock the stuffing out of someone" means to defeat, overwhelm, or severely weaken someone, either physically or emotionally. It suggests a powerful or forceful blow that figuratively removes all energy, strength, confidence, or spirit from the person being affected.
  • be out of kilter The idiom "be out of kilter" means to be unbalanced, not functioning properly, or not in the correct order or arrangement. It implies that something is not in the right state or condition.
  • bring sb out of their shell, at come out of your shell The idiom "bring someone out of their shell" or "come out of your shell" refers to a person becoming more open, sociable, or less reserved than before. It implies that someone who was previously shy, introverted, or hesitant in social interactions is now starting to show a more outgoing or confident behavior.
  • front of house The idiom "front of house" typically refers to the public or customer-facing area of a business or establishment, especially in the context of the hospitality industry. It encompasses the areas where customers are served, such as the reception desk, lobby, dining area, or any other space where interactions with customers occur.
  • get (or have) the worst of it The idiom "get (or have) the worst of it" means to be in a disadvantageous or unfavorable position during a conflict or argument. It implies being on the losing side or experiencing more difficulties or hardships compared to others involved in the situation.
  • like, etc. the sound of your own voice The idiom "like the sound of your own voice" is used to describe a person who enjoys hearing themselves speak and often talks excessively or without considering whether others are interested or engaged in the conversation. It implies egotism and a lack of self-awareness or consideration for others' opinions or contributions.
  • burn one's bridges in front of (one) The idiom "burn one's bridges in front of (one)" means to intentionally destroy or sabotage one's own opportunities or options, typically by severing or damaging relationships, making a consequential decision, or taking actions that are irreversible. It conveys a sense of irreversible commitment or a deliberate act of cutting off all future possibilities or chances.
  • get (oneself) out of (somewhere) The idiom "get (oneself) out of (somewhere)" means to physically or mentally remove oneself from a specific location or situation. It refers to the act of leaving a place or extracting oneself from an unwanted or difficult circumstance.
  • by the scruff of somebody's/the neck The idiom "by the scruff of somebody's/the neck" refers to forcefully or firmly grabbing someone by the back of their neck or collar. It is often used metaphorically to indicate taking control or handling a person in a forceful, dominant, or decisive manner.
  • heck of a The idiom "heck of a" is used to emphasize something or someone as being remarkable, impressive, or exceptional. It is usually used in a positive or negative context, depending on the speaker's intention.
  • flush out of sm place The idiom "flush out of (some) place" typically refers to the act of forcing someone or something to leave a specific location or area, often by searching thoroughly or using pressure tactics. It can also imply the act of discovering hidden secrets or information by conducting an extensive investigation or search.
  • be a fully paidup member of sth To be a fully paid-up member of something means to be a member who has paid the necessary fees or dues and is thus entitled to all the privileges and benefits of membership. It signifies complete and active involvement or participation in a particular group, organization, or cause.
  • in front of (one's) nose The idiom "in front of (one's) nose" means something that is very obvious or clearly visible, yet goes unnoticed or overlooked by someone. It refers to situations where a person fails to see or recognize something that is right in front of them, often due to their own inattentiveness or lack of awareness.
  • a reach of the imagination The idiom "a reach of the imagination" is used to express something that is unlikely, exaggerated, or beyond what is reasonable or believable. It implies that the idea or statement being discussed requires a significant stretch of one's imagination to accept or comprehend.
  • sponge sth off of sm or sth To "sponge something off of someone or something" means to take advantage of someone or something by benefiting or profiting from them without providing anything in return. It typically implies an act of mooching or freeloaders who exploit the generosity or resources of others.
  • a piece/slice of the action The idiom "a piece/slice of the action" refers to wanting to be a part of an exciting or lucrative opportunity or event. It implies a desire to be involved in a venture or activity that would bring opportunities for success, profit, or enjoyment.
  • the granddaddy of them all The idiom "the granddaddy of them all" refers to something that is the biggest, most important, or most significant of its kind or category. It is used to emphasize the exceptional or unparalleled nature of something, suggesting that it surpasses all others in terms of size, scale, or importance.
  • in the hope of something The idiom "in the hope of something" refers to doing something with the intention or expectation of a desired outcome or result. It suggests that the speaker or subject is engaging in an action or pursuing a goal with optimism and the belief that their efforts will yield a specific positive outcome.
  • at the end of (one's) fingertips The idiom "at the end of one's fingertips" refers to having quick and easy access to something or possessing complete knowledge or mastery of a subject or skill. It implies that whatever is being referred to is within one's reach and readily available.
  • the fruit of your loins The idiom "the fruit of your loins" refers to someone's biological children or offspring. It is a figurative expression that symbolizes the legacy or descendants that one produces through their reproductive capabilities.
  • know which side of one's bread is buttered The idiom "know which side of one's bread is buttered" means understanding where one's advantages lie, recognizing who holds power or provides benefits, and acting accordingly to cultivate favorable relationships or maintain a favorable position. It implies being aware of one's own interests and being careful not to offend or lose the support of influential people or organizations.
  • at the hands of somebody The idiom "at the hands of somebody" means to be harmed or mistreated by someone, often referring to the negative actions or behaviors exerted upon someone by another person or group. It suggests a sense of suffering, victimization, or ill-treatment suffered from a specific individual or entity.
  • end of the ball game The idiom "end of the ball game" refers to the conclusion or the final outcome of a situation or event, often implying that all possibilities or options have been exhausted, and the matter is settled or resolved.
  • the luck of the devil The idiom "the luck of the devil" refers to exceptionally good or fortuitous luck or fortune that seems almost supernatural. It implies that someone has an uncanny ability to avoid misfortune or to always be lucky in various situations, often despite their own actions or efforts.
  • be wide of the mark The idiom "be wide of the mark" means to be incorrect or inaccurate in one's judgment, assessment, or estimation. It implies that someone is missing or misinterpreting the truth or desired result.
  • devil of a The idiom "devil of a" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely difficult, troublesome, or challenging. It implies that the thing or person being referred to is as troublesome or mischievous as a devil would be.
  • talk out of the back of head The idiom "talk out of the back of one's head" means to speak without thinking, or to say something without having any knowledge or understanding about the topic being discussed. It implies that someone is speaking incoherently or making baseless claims.
  • a meeting of minds The idiom "a meeting of minds" refers to a situation in which two or more individuals or parties have reached a mutual understanding or agreement on a particular topic or issue. It signifies that there is a shared viewpoint, consensus, or harmony of opinions among individuals involved in a discussion or negotiation.
  • snap out of sth The idiom "snap out of something" means to quickly and decisively break out of a negative or unproductive state of mind or behavior, typically by forcefully restoring one's focus, concentration, energy, or motivation. It is used to encourage someone to stop dwelling on a negative situation, overcome a temporary setback, or regain their positive attitude.
  • keep track (of sb/sth) The idiom "keep track (of sb/sth)" means to continuously monitor or stay aware of the activities, movements, or progress of someone or something, usually by maintaining a record or careful observation. It involves maintaining updated information or knowledge about someone or something in order to stay informed or in control.
  • the finer points of The idiom "the finer points of" refers to the delicate, intricate, or subtle aspects or details of something. It implies examining and understanding the nuances or less obvious elements of a subject, activity, or situation.
  • in point of The idiom "in point of" is used to introduce or discuss a specific aspect or category of something. It is commonly used to distinguish or compare different qualities, characteristics, or factors of a subject.
  • a life of its own The idiom "a life of its own" refers to something that starts behaving or developing in a way that is independent, separate, or unpredictable, often beyond the control of those involved. It suggests that the entity or situation has become self-sustaining and self-directed, resembling a living being with its own intentions and actions.
  • pretty kettle of fish The idiom "pretty kettle of fish" means a complicated or difficult situation, typically one that is messy or troublesome. It refers to a predicament or scenario that is complicated to resolve or manage.
  • facts of life The idiom "facts of life" typically refers to the basic or fundamental truths about human existence or the realities of the world. It can also denote the knowledge or understanding of various aspects of life, such as birth, death, relationships, responsibilities, and other fundamental experiences.
  • (I'm) having the time of my life. The idiom "(I'm) having the time of my life" means to be experiencing an extremely enjoyable and memorable time, often to the point of feeling elated or euphoric.
  • a few/couple of steps The idiom "a few/couple of steps" refers to a small distance or a short amount of progress towards a goal or objective. It suggests that there is still more to be done, but it acknowledges a significant advancement or advancement towards achieving something.
  • in the unlikely event of The idiom "in the unlikely event of" is typically used to express a situation or condition that is considered to be highly improbable or not expected to occur. It is often used to indicate that the described event is highly unlikely to happen.
  • at sb's expense, at at the expense of sb The idiom "at someone's expense" or "at the expense of someone" generally means to derive amusement, benefit, or advantage at the cost, detriment, or suffering of another person. It implies that while one person might benefit or be entertained, it comes at the price or disadvantage of someone else. This could refer to mocking, criticizing, or making fun of someone, benefiting from someone's misfortune, or benefiting from someone's generosity or hard work without reciprocation.
  • be wiped off the face of the earth, at disappear off the face of the earth The idiom "be wiped off the face of the earth" or "disappear off the face of the earth" means to completely vanish or cease to exist. It suggests a scenario where someone or something is eradicated or eliminated without leaving any traces behind. This phrase is often used figuratively to describe someone or something disappearing without a trace or becoming totally forgotten or insignificant.
  • get (someone) out of a fix The idiom "get (someone) out of a fix" means to help someone out of a difficult or challenging situation, usually by providing assistance, support, or finding a solution to their problem. It implies rescuing or helping someone in a time of trouble or trouble.
  • one of those things The idiom "one of those things" is used to describe an event or circumstance that is unfortunate, unexpected, or beyond control, which happens occasionally or as a natural part of life. It implies that it is a situation that cannot be changed or avoided, and one must accept it as an inherent part of life.
  • mine a rich seam of sth The idiom "mine a rich seam of sth" means to discover or explore a valuable source or abundance of something, usually referring to information, ideas, or resources that can be utilized or exploited for gain or advantage. It implies the act of digging or extracting valuable content or resources from a specific area or topic.
  • trick of the trade The idiom "trick of the trade" refers to a technique, secret, or skill that is specific to a certain profession or field of expertise. It refers to a clever or effective method that professionals use to accomplish tasks more efficiently or successfully.
  • jump clear of The idiom "jump clear of" means to quickly move away from something dangerous or harmful, usually to avoid injury or damage. It implies a swift and deliberate action to distance oneself from a potentially harmful situation.
  • make a mess/hash of something/of doing something The idiom "make a mess/hash of something/of doing something " refers to the act of doing something poorly or causing a situation to become disorganized, chaotic, or ineffective. It implies that the person involved has screwed up or mishandled something, resulting in confusion or negative consequences.
  • take charge (of sm or sth) "Take charge (of sm or sth)" means to assume control or responsibility for someone or something. It refers to the act of stepping up and leading a situation or task, often involving making decisions and taking actions in order to effectively manage or oversee the given circumstances.
  • call of nature The idiom "call of nature" refers to the physiological urge to urinate or defecate. It is often used to indicate the need to use the restroom or answer nature's call.
  • little/nothing short of sth The idiom "little/nothing short of something" is used to emphasize that something is very close to being or achieving a particular quality, often indicating that it is almost as impressive or extreme as the thing being compared. It implies that there is very little difference between the actual thing and the exaggerated statement being made.
  • make (one's)/the hair stand up on the back of (one's) neck The idiom "make (one's)/the hair stand up on the back of (one's) neck" refers to an eerie or chilling experience that causes a person's hair to rise in response to fear, anxiety, or intense emotions. It implies a sense of heightened alertness or discomfort that triggers a physical reaction.
  • wailing and gnashing of teeth The idiom "wailing and gnashing of teeth" refers to extreme anguish, despair, or distress, often accompanied by loud cries or expressions of pain and frustration. It suggests a state of great suffering or anguish that is typically associated with deep regret, grief, or frustration. The phrase originates from biblical texts, particularly in descriptions of hell or the consequences of one's actions.
  • fling sth off of oneself The idiom "fling something off of oneself" means to forcefully remove or get rid of something that is impeding or bothering you. It often refers to a sudden and vigorous action taken to discard something, whether physically or metaphorically.
  • give (one) a dose of (one's) own medicine The idiom "give (one) a dose of (one's) own medicine" means to treat someone in the same negative or unfair manner that they have treated others. It refers to the idea of subjecting someone to the same unpleasant experience or action that they have previously inflicted upon someone else.
  • get a kick out of (someone or something) The idiom "get a kick out of (someone or something)" means to derive amusement, pleasure, or enjoyment from someone or something. It expresses finding something or someone amusing, exciting, or entertaining. The phrase implies that it brings joy or a sense of excitement to the person using the idiom.
  • age of consent The idiom "age of consent" refers to the minimum age at which an individual is legally considered competent to give informed consent to engage in sexual activities or relationships. It typically denotes the age at which an individual is deemed capable of understanding and agreeing to the potential consequences involved in such actions, and can vary between different jurisdictions and countries.
  • go out of one's way The idiom "go out of one's way" means to make an extra effort or exert additional energy to accomplish something or assist someone. It implies going beyond what is expected or required, often involving inconvenience or inconvenience for oneself.
  • for want of a better word The idiom "for want of a better word" is used when someone is searching for or trying to describe something but struggles to find a more suitable or precise word for it. It acknowledges the speaker's inability to find a more appropriate term in that moment.
  • a bag/box of tricks The idiom "a bag/box of tricks" refers to a collection of skills, abilities, or resources that someone possesses. It implies that the person has a variety of effective and clever methods or techniques to achieve their goals or solve problems.
  • under (the) cover of something The idiom "under (the) cover of something" typically means to do something secretly, hidden, or concealed by using as a pretext or a disguise. It suggests that someone is engaging in an activity while taking advantage of or using the mask of a particular situation, event, or circumstance. It implies a degree of covert or deceptive behavior.
  • in the light of sth The idiom "in the light of something" means considering or taking into account a particular fact or event. It refers to examining a situation or making a decision based on new information or a different perspective that has been presented.
  • all of sth The idiom "all of something" means the complete or entire amount or extent of that particular thing. It emphasizes that every part or aspect of the thing being referred to is included or considered.
  • the tail end of something The idiom "the tail end of something" refers to the final or last part of something. It typically implies that the event, process, or period being referred to is nearing its completion or coming to an end. It can also suggest that the remaining portion is usually smaller or less significant compared to what has already passed.
  • in place of sm or sth The idiom "in place of someone or something" refers to replacing or substituting someone or something with another person or thing. It implies that the replacement is seen as a suitable or equivalent alternative in a particular context or situation.
  • diddle (someone) out of (something) To diddle someone out of something means to deceive or cheat them out of what is rightfully theirs, usually by using dishonest or cunning tactics. It implies manipulating or tricking someone in order to gain an advantage or take something away from them unjustly.
  • take something with a pinch of salt The idiom "take something with a pinch of salt" means to not believe something completely or to have doubts about its accuracy or truthfulness. It suggests that one should be skeptical and cautious about accepting the information or statement at face value.
  • run someone or something out of something The idiom "run someone or something out of something" means to force someone or something to leave or be removed from a particular place or situation. It implies an action of driving away, expelling, or pushing out.
  • a matter of hours, minutes, etc. The idiom "a matter of hours, minutes, etc." refers to a very short amount of time, typically implying that something will happen very soon or in a brief period. It emphasizes the immediate or imminent nature of an event or action.
  • come within an inch of doing something The idiom "come within an inch of doing something" means to come extremely close to doing something, often implying that the action almost happened or was narrowly avoided.
  • jump out of skin The idiom "jump out of skin" refers to being extremely startled, surprised, or frightened by something. It describes a feeling of being so startled that it feels as though one's whole body is jumping or twitching involuntarily.
  • body of water The idiom "body of water" refers to any significant and large expanse of water, such as a lake, river, ocean, sea, pond, or any other water basin of a considerable size. It denotes a coherent and sizable mass of water that is distinct and separate from the surrounding land or other water bodies.
  • come up/out smelling like roses, at come up/out smelling of roses The idiom "come up/out smelling like roses" or "come up/out smelling of roses" means to emerge from a difficult or potentially embarrassing situation looking good or successful. It suggests that despite facing challenges or scrutiny, one manages to avoid any harm or negative consequences, and comes out with an intact reputation or positive outcome.
  • the father of sth The idiom "the father of something" refers to the person who is considered to be the creator, originator, or pioneer of a specific idea, concept, or invention. It suggests that this person played a crucial role in the development or establishment of that particular thing.
  • invasion of (someone's) privacy The idiom "invasion of someone's privacy" refers to the act of intruding upon or violating someone's personal space, boundaries, or rights to privacy. It generally implies an unwelcome and unauthorized intrusion into someone's personal affairs, secrets, or private life, which may cause discomfort, embarrassment, or infringement of personal freedoms.
  • make a day/night/week of it The idiom "make a day/night/week of it" means to extend or lengthen the duration of an event or activity in order to fully enjoy or make the most out of it. It implies dedicating more time and effort to ensure a richer and more enjoyable experience.
  • be out of your brain The idiom "be out of your brain" typically means to be behaving in a crazy, irrational, or mentally unstable manner. It implies that someone's actions or thoughts are beyond reason or comprehension.
  • full of the joys of spring The idiom "full of the joys of spring" means to be extremely happy, joyful, and full of enthusiasm. It reflects the energy and optimism associated with the arrival of spring, a season associated with renewal, growth, and blossoming.
  • speak highly of sm or sth The idiom "speak highly of someone or something" means to express admiration, praise, or a positive opinion about a person or something. It indicates that the person or thing being discussed has a good reputation or is regarded in a positive light.
  • be (all) part of life's rich pageant The idiom "be (all) part of life's rich pageant" means accepting and embracing all aspects and experiences of life, even the challenging or unpleasant ones, as they contribute to the beauty and diversity of life's grand spectacle or performance. It suggests that life is a complex and rich tapestry that includes both positive and negative elements, and by fully participating and appreciating each part, one can truly engage with the magnificence of existence.
  • get the feel of something/of doing something The idiom "get the feel of something/of doing something" typically means to become acquainted with or gain experience in something, particularly an unfamiliar task or situation, in order to understand and navigate it more effectively. It refers to understanding the nuances, dynamics, or techniques involved in a particular activity or situation through firsthand experience.
  • all of something The idiom "all of something" means the entirety or whole of something. It refers to having or consuming the complete amount or quantity of a particular thing.
  • be in the throes of sth/doing sth The idiom "be in the throes of sth/doing sth" refers to a state or condition of experiencing something intense, often difficult or challenging. It implies being deeply involved or immersed in a particular activity, emotion, or situation. The phrase suggests that the person is actively engaged or overwhelmed by the circumstances, typically with a sense of struggle or strong emotions.
  • empty of The idiom "empty of" refers to a state or condition of lacking something, being void or devoid of it. It implies an absence or emptiness of a particular thing or quality.
  • the crest of a/the wave The idiom "the crest of a/the wave" refers to being at the peak or highest point of success, popularity, or a particular trend or phenomenon. It suggests being in a moment of maximum achievement or influence before a decline or decrease inevitably follows. It can also represent a state of being on top of things or ahead of the game.
  • cannot make head or tail of something The idiom "cannot make head or tail of something" means to be completely unable to understand or comprehend something because it is confusing, unclear, or disorganized. It implies a state of confusion or lack of understanding, similar to being unable to determine the beginning (head) or the end (tail) of something.
  • in front of (someone or something) The idiom "in front of (someone or something)" commonly refers to the position or location where someone or something is visible or easily noticed by another person or in a particular situation. It can also imply being present or performing in front of an audience or a specific person. Additionally, it can suggest being exposed or made vulnerable to judgment, criticism, or scrutiny.
  • stand (in) back of sm or sth The idiom "stand (in) back of someone or something" means to support, defend, or endorse someone or something, especially during a difficult situation or when facing criticism or opposition. It implies providing assistance, loyalty, or encouragement to help someone or something succeed or overcome obstacles.
  • oceans of The idiom "oceans of" means a very large or abundant amount of something. It is often used to emphasize the vast quantity or extent of a particular thing or experience.
  • rout sm or sth out of sm place The idiom "rout someone or something out of someplace" means to forcefully remove or drive out someone or something from a particular location, often with great effort or determination. It suggests a vigorous and thorough expulsion or eviction.
  • exorcise (something) out of (someone) The idiom "exorcise (something) out of (someone)" refers to the act of removing or cleansing a strong or negative emotion, belief, thought, or behavior from someone. It is often used metaphorically, likening the process to a religious exorcism where a supernatural entity is expelled from a person. In this idiom, it signifies ridding someone of a detrimental or burdensome element that is holding them back or causing distress.
  • susceptible of The idiom "susceptible of" means that something is capable of, or can be easily subjected to, a particular action or condition. It implies that the subject has the potential to undergo or experience something.
  • give somebody the benefit of the doubt The idiom "give somebody the benefit of the doubt" means to believe or trust someone's statement or action without proof or complete evidence, especially when there is doubt or uncertainty. It involves assuming the best intentions or giving someone the chance to prove their innocence instead of immediately assuming guilt or wrongdoing.
  • take care of sb/sth The idiom "take care of" means to ensure the well-being, safety, or proper management of someone or something. It implies assuming responsibility, looking after, or attentively managing the welfare of another person or thing.
  • take account of sm or sth The idiom "take account of someone or something" means to consider or acknowledge someone or something as a relevant factor or aspect when making a decision or forming an opinion. It implies not ignoring or omitting someone or something, but rather giving due consideration to their presence or influence.
  • in your hour of need The idiom "in your hour of need" refers to a particular time or moment when someone requires assistance, support, or help the most, especially during a difficult or challenging situation or when one is in desperate circumstances.
  • sick to death of (something) The idiom "sick to death of (something)" means to be extremely tired, bored, or annoyed by something. It suggests a complete and overwhelming dislike or frustration towards a particular thing or situation.
  • the best of a bad bunch/lot The idiom "the best of a bad bunch/lot" is used to describe a situation where there is a selection of options available, but none of them are particularly good. In such cases, "the best of a bad bunch/lot" refers to the option that is considered the least undesirable or the most acceptable among the available choices, even though it may not be ideal.
  • chisel (one) out of (something) The idiom "chisel (one) out of (something)" means to obtain something from someone through cunning, manipulation, or persuasion, often involving deceit or trickery. It can also imply coercing someone into giving up something unwillingly or reluctantly. This idiom is often used when referring to extracting money or favors from someone by unscrupulous means.
  • make much of The idiom "make much of" refers to giving significant attention, importance, or significance to someone or something, often by showing great enthusiasm, admiration, or value towards them.
  • just one's cup of tea The idiom "just one's cup of tea" means something that is perfectly suited to one's preferences, tastes, or interests.
  • a man of his word The idiom "a man of his word" refers to someone who is known for keeping their promises and following through on their commitments. It implies that this person's actions align with their spoken or written agreements, demonstrating honesty, integrity, and reliability.
  • not amount to a hill of beans The idiom "not amount to a hill of beans" means that something or someone is insignificant, worthless, or of very little value. It implies that the situation or person being referred to lacks importance or significance, similar to a hill of beans having little value compared to something more substantial.
  • be in a class of your, its, etc. own The idiom "be in a class of your, its, etc. own" refers to being exceptional, unique, or unrivaled in a certain category or field. It suggests that someone or something stands out from others and possesses exceptional qualities or abilities that set them apart in a way that no other can match.
  • stand in awe (of sm or sth) The idiom "stand in awe (of someone or something)" means to feel deep respect, admiration, or reverence towards someone or something due to their impressive or inspiring qualities. It denotes being overwhelmed or recognizing the greatness, beauty, or power of someone or something.
  • keep you on the edge of your seat The idiom "keep you on the edge of your seat" means to keep a person extremely engaged, interested, or excited, typically by creating a sense of suspense, tension, or anticipation. It refers to a situation or event that is so captivating or thrilling that it holds your attention intensely, as if you were sitting at the edge of your seat.
  • by order of The idiom "by order of" refers to something being done or commanded according to the instructions, authority, or directive of someone in a position of power or authority. It signifies that the action or decision has been mandated by someone with the necessary authority.
  • out of luck The idiom "out of luck" is used to describe a situation where someone has no chance of success or good fortune. It means that the person is devoid of luck or unlucky in a particular situation.
  • throw (oneself) on/at the mercy of (someone) The idiom "throw (oneself) on/at the mercy of (someone)" means to completely rely on someone's kindness, compassion, or benevolence, typically when one is in a vulnerable or desperate situation and has no other options or resources available. It involves surrendering oneself to another person's control or judgment, hoping for their sympathy, understanding, or forgiveness.
  • woman of ill repute The idiom "woman of ill repute" refers to a woman who is regarded as morally disreputable or whose character and behavior are considered negative or immoral by society. It typically implies that she is involved in activities that are socially frowned upon, such as prostitution, promiscuity, or engaging in illicit behavior.
  • of a kind The idiom "of a kind" refers to something or someone that is unique, remarkable, or distinct from others in a particular category or group. It suggests that the object or person being referred to possesses qualities, characteristics, or attributes that set them apart from the rest and make them one of a kind.
  • in the region of (some amount) The idiom "in the region of (some amount)" means approximately or roughly a specific amount or number. It implies that the exact figure is not known but falls within a close proximity or ballpark.
  • of little/no avail The idiom "of little/no avail" means that something has little or no effectiveness or usefulness in achieving a desired result or outcome. It indicates that an effort or action is futile, ineffective, or unhelpful.
  • eat sb out of house and home The idiom "eat someone out of house and home" means to consume so much food that it completely depletes the resources of the person or household supplying it. It implies that the person eating is excessively and continuously eating without limits, causing a significant financial burden or strain on the provider.
  • fasttalk sm out of sth The idiom "fast talk someone out of something" means to use persuasive or convincing language quickly and effectively to manipulate or deceive someone into giving up or relinquishing something, usually against their better judgment or will. It implies the ability to use slick or clever talk to achieve a desired outcome, often at the expense of another person.
  • of your own free will The idiom "of your own free will" refers to doing something willingly and without any external force or influence. It means making a decision or taking an action entirely based on one's personal choice or volition.
  • get into the swing of it/things The idiom "get into the swing of it/things" means to become accustomed to or to adjust to a specific task, routine, or situation. It implies getting comfortable and finding one's rhythm or pace in order to perform effectively or enjoyably.
  • be the light of life The idiom "be the light of life" typically means to be a source of hope, inspiration, or joy in someone's life. It suggests bringing positive energy, happiness, or guidance to others.
  • on the crest of a wave The idiom "on the crest of a wave" refers to being in a highly successful or positive period, experiencing a run of good fortune or popularity. It suggests being at the peak of one's achievements or influence, with everything going well and feeling extremely confident and optimistic.
  • a point of honour The idiom "a point of honour" refers to a principle or value that is deemed important or necessary to uphold in order to maintain one's integrity, reputation, or sense of dignity. It suggests an ethical or moral obligation to act or behave in a specific way in order to preserve one's honor or pride.
  • lose sight of somebody/something The idiom "lose sight of somebody/something" means to forget about or no longer pay attention to someone or something. It can also refer to losing track of someone or something physically, not being able to see them anymore.
  • the rules of the game The idiom "the rules of the game" refers to the established guidelines or principles that dictate how something should be done or how a situation should be handled. It can be applied to various contexts, including sports, work, relationships, or social interactions, indicating the expectations and norms that need to be followed for fair play and success.
  • remind sm of sm or sth The idiom "remind someone of someone or something" means to cause someone to recall or bring to their attention a person, thing, or event that is similar or related to the one being mentioned or encountered.
  • the end of the line The end of the line refers to the final or last possible option or outcome of a situation, often suggesting that there are no further opportunities or alternatives available. It can also refer to reaching a point where one can no longer proceed or continue.
  • take hold of sm or sth The idiom "take hold of someone or something" means to grasp or seize someone or something firmly. It can imply physically holding onto an object or person, but it can also mean to firmly understand or gain control of a situation, concept, or idea.
  • wrench sth out of sth The idiom "wrench something out of something" refers to forcefully extracting or obtaining something from a person or situation, usually by using persuasive or intense efforts. It implies that the action of retrieving something requires significant force, determination, or effort.
  • be a slave of (something) The idiom "be a slave of (something)" is used to describe a situation where someone is excessively or completely controlled or dominated by something, often a habit, addiction, or an oppressive authority. It implies that the person's actions or choices are severely limited, and they have little or no freedom to act independently. It emphasizes a lack of autonomy or agency in the given context.
  • crowd (someone or something) out of (something) The idiom "crowd (someone or something) out of (something)" means to force or push someone or something out of a particular place or situation by overwhelming them with numbers or intensity. It typically refers to a situation where there is limited space, attention, or opportunity, and the overwhelming presence or influence of others prevents the involvement or inclusion of certain individuals or things.
  • of benefit (to sm) The idiom "of benefit (to someone)" means something that is advantageous or helpful to someone. It refers to anything that provides a gain or advantage in terms of value, usefulness, or improvement to a particular individual or group.
  • lie at the bottom of (something) The idiom "lie at the bottom of (something)" typically means that something is the underlying reason, explanation, or cause for a particular situation or problem. It implies that this hidden or unacknowledged factor is the root or basis of a certain issue.
  • make light of The idiom "make light of" means to treat something as unimportant or not serious, often by minimizing or downplaying its significance or severity. It refers to not giving proper attention or consideration to a situation or issue.
  • took the words right out of my mouth The idiom "took the words right out of my mouth" is used to express that someone has said exactly what the speaker was just about to say. It implies that the other person anticipated the speaker's thoughts or feelings accurately, leaving them with nothing more to add.
  • fish out of The correct idiom is "fish out of water," which means to feel uncomfortable or out of place in a specific situation or environment. It refers to someone who is unfamiliar or unaccustomed to their surroundings, similar to a fish being taken out of its natural habitat.
  • think better of The idiom "think better of" means to reconsider a decision or course of action and ultimately choose not to do it, usually due to realizing that it is unwise or impractical.
  • be of one mind, at be of the same mind The idiom "be of one mind" or "be of the same mind" refers to a situation where two or more people agree on a particular issue or have the same opinion and perspective. It signifies a sense of harmony, unity, and consensus among individuals regarding a specific topic or decision.
  • make a monkey (out) of To "make a monkey (out) of someone" means to make them look foolish, silly, or absurd, typically by tricking or deceiving them. It implies humiliating or ridiculing someone by taking advantage of their gullibility or naivety.
  • be the spice of life The idiom "be the spice of life" means that variety and diversity make life more interesting and enjoyable. It suggests that experiencing different things, meeting different people, or engaging in various activities adds excitement and joy to one's life.
  • dig (someone or oneself) out of a hole The idiom "dig (someone or oneself) out of a hole" refers to the act of helping someone or oneself out of a difficult or challenging situation. It implies offering assistance, support, or finding a solution to overcome problems or obstacles. The phrase is often used metaphorically, like fixing a mistake, resolving a predicament, or improving a difficult situation.
  • out of hock The idiom "out of hock" means that someone is no longer in debt or has cleared their financial obligations. It refers to being freed from a situation of owing money or having something of value held as collateral.
  • make an issue (out) of The idiom "make an issue (out) of" means to overly emphasize or make a big deal about something that may not necessarily be significant or important. It refers to the act of giving excessive attention or concern to a particular matter, often leading to unnecessary conflict or disagreement.
  • in the heat of sth The idiom "in the heat of something" refers to a situation or moment when emotions are running high, often causing impulsive or hasty actions or decisions. It implies that one is acting without careful consideration or rational thinking due to being influenced by intense feelings or circumstances.
  • armpit of the world The idiom "armpit of the world" is often used to describe a place or location that is considered extremely undesirable or unpleasant. It implies that the place is dirty, unpleasant, or disconnected from civilization.
  • school of thought The idiom "school of thought" refers to a particular way of thinking or a specific group of people who share a common viewpoint, philosophy, or belief system in a particular field or discipline. It represents a distinct perspective or approach that influences how individuals perceive and analyze various concepts, theories, or issues related to that field.
  • a bone of contention The idiom "a bone of contention" refers to a subject or matter that causes disagreement or conflict between two or more people or parties. It symbolizes something that people argue or fight about continuously, creating tension and strife.
  • get (or be) shot of The idiom "get (or be) shot of" means to dispose of or get rid of someone or something, often with the intention of ending or avoiding a burdensome or undesirable situation or relationship. It implies a strong desire to distance oneself from someone or something.
  • tower of strength The idiom "tower of strength" refers to someone who is exceptionally strong and supportive, serving as a reliable source of support and stability during difficult times or challenging circumstances.
  • fling sm or sth out of sth The idiom "fling something or someone out of something" means to forcefully or abruptly remove or expel something or someone from a particular place or situation. It implies a quick and often aggressive action of pushing or throwing someone or something out.
  • err on the side of something The idiom "err on the side of something" means to choose or decide in favor of a particular option if there is any doubt or uncertainty. It suggests taking a cautious or conservative approach, often prioritizing safety, over making a potentially risky or questionable decision.
  • what became, has become, will become of somebody/something? The idiom "what became, has become, will become of somebody/something?" refers to a question about the current or future state, situation, or fate of a person or thing. It is often used to express concern, curiosity, or uncertainty about what will happen to someone or something.
  • fall afoul of sb/sth The idiom "fall afoul of someone/something" means to come into conflict or disagreement with someone or something, often resulting in negative consequences or harm. It can refer to violating rules, laws, or norms, or simply experiencing a clash of interests or opinions.
  • beat the hell out of The idiom "beat the hell out of" means to forcefully and aggressively defeat someone or something, physically or figuratively. It implies a thorough and overpowering victory, often involving excessive force or effort.
  • in the midst of sth The idiom "in the midst of something" means being in the middle or midst of a particular situation, event, or activity. It signifies being actively engaged or involved in something at a particular moment in time.
  • neck of the woods The idiom "neck of the woods" refers to a specific area or region, typically a rural or remote location. It is often used to describe one's immediate vicinity or the general area where someone lives or is located.
  • center of attention The idiom "center of attention" refers to someone or something that is being focused on or given the most attention in a certain situation or gathering. It describes a person or object that is receiving the most interest or is the main focus of other people's attention.
  • be/go out of your mind The idiom "be/go out of your mind" refers to a state of extreme mental agitation, confusion, or insanity. It denotes a situation where someone is unable to think clearly or rationally due to overwhelming emotions, stress, or madness.
  • a baptism of/by fire The idiom "a baptism of/by fire" refers to a situation or experience where someone is thrown into a challenging or difficult task or environment without much preparation or prior knowledge. It often implies a trial by intense, sometimes overwhelming, circumstances that force an individual to learn quickly, adapt, and gain experience.
  • get the feel of (something) The idiom "get the feel of (something)" means to become familiar with or accustomed to something, usually by experiencing it or practicing it. It refers to understanding or getting a sense of how something works, feels, or operates.
  • on the strength of The idiom "on the strength of" refers to relying or acting upon something, usually a positive factor or circumstance, in order to gain an advantage or achieve success. It implies using a particular feature, resource, or situation as a basis for making decisions, taking action, or having confidence in a certain outcome.
  • shake the foundations of The idiom "shake the foundations of" means to disrupt or challenge the core principles, beliefs, or systems upon which something is built. It implies causing significant changes or causing doubts and uncertainties about established institutions or foundations.
  • no end of something The idiom "no end of something" means a very large or indefinite amount of something, often used to emphasize the extent or quantity of a particular thing or situation. It implies that there is an abundance or never-ending supply of that thing.
  • make a day of doing The idiom "make a day of doing" means dedicating an entire day to a particular activity or set of activities. It implies spending a significant amount of time or effort on something enjoyable or purposeful, often involving planned or organized events or tasks. It suggests maximizing the experience and making the most out of the day by fully engaging in the chosen activity.
  • do something out of turn The idiom "do something out of turn" refers to the act of doing or saying something that is inappropriate or untimely, typically going against the expected sequence or order of events. It implies acting in a way that is improper or impolite, disregarding the proper protocol or waiting for one's turn.
  • a/the creature of somebody The idiom "a/the creature of somebody" refers to a person who is under the complete control, influence, or dominion of another individual or entity. It implies that the person is entirely subservient and obedient to the wishes, desires, or commands of the person they are associated with. This idiom often conveys a sense of dependency, lack of autonomy, and being directed or influenced in all decisions and actions.
  • pair of hands The idiom "pair of hands" refers to a person who is willing and able to assist in various tasks or activities. It emphasizes someone's capability and availability to lend their physical help or expertise in completing tasks.
  • none of one's business The idiom "none of one's business" means something that is not the concern or responsibility of the person mentioned. It refers to matters or information that are private, personal, or unrelated to the individual, indicating that they have no right or need to know or be involved in those particular matters.
  • make a day of it The idiom "make a day of it" means to spend a full day engaging in a particular activity or event, typically for enjoyment or exploration. It implies dedicating an entire day to an experience or endeavor, often with the intent of making it more special or significant.
  • of the kind The idiom "of the kind" is used to describe something that belongs to a particular type or category. It suggests that the thing being referred to shares characteristics or qualities with other similar things or belongs to the same group. It indicates that something is typical, similar, or in accordance with a certain kind or type.
  • think of the children The idiom "think of the children" usually means to consider the welfare, well-being, or best interests of the children in a given situation. It is often used as a plea or admonition to prioritize the safety, innocence, or moral upbringing of children when making decisions or discussing sensitive topics.
  • sword of Damocles The idiom "sword of Damocles" refers to an imminent danger or threat that hangs over someone's head. It originates from a Greek myth in which a sword was suspended by a single thread above Damocles, a courtier in the court of Dionysius II of Syracuse. This served as a constant reminder of the vulnerability and precariousness of his position. Hence, the phrase "sword of Damocles" is used metaphorically to depict any situation that causes a person to live in fear or anxiety due to a potential disaster or calamity.
  • get something out of one's system The idiom "get something out of one's system" refers to the act of doing or experiencing something in order to satisfy a strong desire or urge, often to the point where one no longer feels the need to do it again. It implies the idea of getting rid of an impulse or obsession by indulging in it thoroughly and thereby releasing it.
  • have a high opinion of (someone or something) The idiom "have a high opinion of (someone or something)" refers to the act of regarding or esteeming someone or something in a positive and favorable manner. It implies having a positive judgment about their qualities, abilities, or merits.
  • could count sth on (the fingers of) one hand The idiom "could count something on (the fingers of) one hand" means that the quantity being referred to is very small or limited. It suggests that there are very few or hardly any instances of the thing being described.
  • see the back of The idiom "see the back of" means to be glad or relieved when someone or something leaves or departs. It is often used to express a sense of relief that a troublesome or undesirable person or situation is finally gone.
  • give sb a piece of your mind The idiom "give sb a piece of your mind" means to express one's disapproval or anger towards someone, often in a forceful and blunt manner. It implies speaking honestly and directly, without holding back any thoughts or feelings.
  • make any sense (out) of (something) The idiom "make any sense (out) of (something)" means to understand or comprehend something, especially when it is confusing or unclear. It implies trying to find meaning or logic in a particular situation or information.
  • by virtue of The idiom "by virtue of" is used to indicate that something is achieved or obtained due to a particular quality, attribute, or circumstance. It suggests that a certain result or advantage is attained as a consequence of possessing a specific characteristic, position, or situation.
  • shades of grey The idiom "shades of grey" refers to a situation or concept that is not black or white, but rather contains various elements, opinions, or possibilities that are neither completely good nor completely bad. It suggests that there are multiple perspectives or interpretations to consider, reflecting the complexity and ambiguity of the topic at hand.
  • throw an amount of light on To "throw an amount of light on" means to provide clarification, insight, or understanding on a particular subject or issue. It implies shedding light on something, making it more comprehensible or revealing new information.
  • in course of something The idiom "in course of something" refers to the ongoing progress or development of a particular event, process, or situation. It implies that an action, change, or outcome is currently happening or unfolding.
  • one half of the world does not know how the other half lives The idiom "one half of the world does not know how the other half lives" means that many people remain unaware or oblivious to the living conditions, struggles, or circumstances faced by others in different social or economic situations. It highlights the lack of understanding or awareness between different social classes, cultures, or communities and suggests that people often live in their own isolated bubbles without truly understanding or empathizing with the experiences of others.
  • not be out of the wood/woods The idiom "not be out of the wood/woods" means that someone or something is not yet free from difficulties, challenges, or danger. It implies that while progress has been made or a problem has been partially solved, there are still potential risks or hurdles to overcome before reaching complete safety or success. The phrase alludes to the idea of being lost or in danger in a forest and highlights the ongoing uncertainty or potential threats that remain.
  • possession is nine points/tenths/parts of the law The idiom "possession is nine points/tenths/parts of the law" means that in most situations, whoever physically possesses or controls an object or property is considered to have a stronger legal claim to it. This saying implies that although legal ownership or rights can exist, the person who currently has the object in their possession is in a more advantageous position when it comes to resolving disputes or asserting their claim.
  • flake off (of) sth The idiom "flake off (of) something" refers to the action of breaking or peeling away in small, thin pieces. It often implies the detachment or separation of something from a larger object or surface. Additionally, it can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who abandons or withdraws from a commitment or responsibility without providing a valid reason.
  • be snatched from the jaws of death The idiom "be snatched from the jaws of death" means to be saved from a dangerous or life-threatening situation at the last possible moment. It implies being rescued from imminent danger or narrowly escaping death or severe harm.
  • friend of Bill W. The idiom "friend of Bill W." is a discreet way to identify oneself as a member of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or someone who is familiar with the principles and practices of AA. The term refers to Bill Wilson, one of the co-founders of AA, who is commonly known as Bill W. Using this phrase allows individuals to acknowledge their association with AA without explicitly mentioning their personal struggles with alcoholism or recovery.
  • go out of business The idiom "go out of business" refers to the situation when a company or establishment ceases its operations or shuts down permanently due to various reasons, such as financial difficulties, declining sales, bankruptcy, or inability to compete in the market.
  • make mention of The idiom "make mention of" means to briefly refer to something or someone in speech or writing. It involves acknowledging or bringing up a particular topic or individual without going into great detail about it.
  • rule someone or something with a rod of iron The idiom "rule someone or something with a rod of iron" means to govern or control someone or something with strict discipline, authority, and an unwavering hand. It implies a leadership style that is harsh, uncompromising, and intolerant of any form of disobedience or deviation from established rules.
  • at the top of the/(one's) agenda The idiom "at the top of the/(one's) agenda" refers to something that is considered the highest priority or most important item on a list of tasks or objectives. It signifies that the particular matter needs immediate attention or is the primary focus of discussion or action.
  • get out of Dodge The idiom "get out of Dodge" means to leave or escape from a situation quickly, often to avoid trouble or danger. It originated from the characterizes the classic Western television series Gunsmoke, where the town of Dodge City, Kansas, was portrayed as a dangerous and lawless place.
  • have somebody in the palm of your hand The idiom "have somebody in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone. It suggests that the person in control has the power to manipulate or direct the actions and decisions of the other person, as if they were holding them in the palm of their hand.
  • accuse (one) of The idiom "accuse (one) of" means to state or believe that someone is guilty of a particular crime, wrongdoing, or offense. It involves blaming or charging someone with an accusation, sometimes supported by evidence or suspicion.
  • the love of life The idiom "the love of life" refers to a person's deep appreciation and strong affection for existence and living. It embodies a zest for life, enthusiasm, and a positive outlook that encompasses a strong desire to make the most of one's time on Earth. It implies an appreciation for both the big and small joys, a refusal to be disheartened by challenges, and an overall high regard for the value and preciousness of life.
  • toss sm or sth out of sth The idiom "toss someone or something out of something" means to forcefully remove or expel someone or something from a place or situation. It implies a swift and decisive act of removing someone or something undesirable or unwanted.
  • cock of the walk The idiom "cock of the walk" is used to describe someone who is extremely self-assured, dominant, or assertive in a situation. It refers to a person who struts or walks with confidence, as a rooster does in a farmyard, asserting their dominance over others.
  • on pain of death The idiom "on pain of death" is commonly used to indicate that someone will face severe consequences or punishment, often including the possibility of losing their life, if they fail to comply with a particular demand or instruction. It emphasizes the seriousness and gravity of the consequences that the person will face if they do not adhere to the given requirement.
  • stop short of The idiom "stop short of" means to refrain from doing something or to abstain from going to a certain extent or point. It signifies stopping or preventing oneself from taking a particular action, typically at the last moment before reaching a specified limit or boundary.
  • the flower of something The idiom "the flower of something" typically refers to the most excellent, ideal, or prime example of something. It represents the peak or pinnacle of a particular quality or characteristic.
  • by virtue of sth The idiom "by virtue of something" means because of or due to a particular quality, advantage, or circumstance. It suggests that something is happening or granted purely as a result of specific qualities or factors.
  • thrash sth out of sm The idiom "thrash something out of someone" means to extract information or details from someone through a thorough and intense discussion or argument. It refers to a situation where people engage in a heated debate or conversation to reach a resolution or obtain clear understanding or knowledge on a particular matter.
  • close as two coats of paint The idiom "close as two coats of paint" refers to something that is extremely similar or nearly identical. It implies that the two entities being compared are so alike that they closely resemble each other, just like two layers of paint.
  • get on the wrong side of the law The idiom "get on the wrong side of the law" means to engage in illegal activities or behave in a way that is against the law, resulting in potential legal consequences or trouble with law enforcement.
  • beyond a/the shadow of a doubt The idiom "beyond a/the shadow of a doubt" means to be completely and unquestionably certain about something. It implies that there is no room for doubt or uncertainty.
  • What's the good of? The idiom "What's the good of?" is used to express doubt or skepticism about the usefulness or value of something. It denotes questioning the purpose, benefit, or point of a particular action, situation, or object.
  • end of one's rope, at the The idiom "end of one's rope, at the" typically means to reach a point of extreme frustration, exhaustion, or desperation where one feels they can no longer cope with a situation or continue in the same way. It refers to being at the limits of one's patience, resources, or emotional endurance.
  • live in a world of (one's) own The idiom "live in a world of (one's) own" refers to someone who has a tendency to be disconnected from reality or to have their own unique and individual perspective. This person often ignores or pays little attention to what is happening around them and instead lives in their own thoughts or imagination.
  • coming out of (one's) ears The idiom "coming out of (one's) ears" typically means having an excessive or overwhelming amount of something. It implies that the amount is more than one can handle or deal with.
  • under the banner of sth The idiom "under the banner of something" refers to being united or supported by a particular cause, organization, or ideology. It implies standing together in support of a common objective or working towards a shared goal.
  • one card shy of a (full) deck The idiom "one card shy of a (full) deck" is used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence, common sense, or mental stability. It suggests that the person is missing an essential element or quality, comparing their mental capacities to a deck of cards that requires all its cards to be complete.
  • be a game of two halves The idiom "be a game of two halves" is often used in reference to a competitive situation or activity, particularly in sports. It means that there are distinct and contrasting periods or phases in the game, each with its own characteristics, strategies, or outcomes. It suggests that the game is unpredictable or dynamic, and things can significantly change from one half to another.
  • blink of an eye The idiom "blink of an eye" is used to emphasize that something happens or occurs very quickly or in an extremely short amount of time.
  • not the half of The idiom "not the half of" is used to express that what is being described or mentioned is only a small part or fraction of a larger whole or entirety. It implies that there is a great deal more that is not being revealed or told.
  • age out (of sth) The idiom "age out (of sth)" refers to the process of reaching the maximum age limit or becoming too old to participate or be eligible for something, often a program, organization, or activity. It implies that a person has grown too old to continue being a part of or engaging in a particular thing due to age restrictions.
  • give somebody/get/have the run of something The idiom "give somebody/get/have the run of something" means to have unrestricted access or control over a place or resource. It suggests being allowed to move freely and use or enjoy something without limitations or restrictions.
  • be glad, etc. to see the back of somebody/something The idiom "be glad, etc. to see the back of somebody/something" means to feel relieved or pleased when someone or something leaves or goes away, usually because they have been causing trouble or inconvenience. It implies a sense of joy or satisfaction upon their departure.
  • be in the land of the living The idiom "be in the land of the living" means to be alive, conscious, and actively participating in the world around you, especially after a period of unconsciousness, sleep, or isolation. It implies that someone has returned or awoken to their usual state of being present and engaged with life.
  • under a cloud (of suspicion) The idiom "under a cloud (of suspicion)" means to be in a state of suspicion or disapproval, typically due to potentially engaging in illegal or dishonest activities. It suggests that the person or entity in question is being doubted or questioned, often leading to negative consequences or a tarnished reputation.
  • out of the way The idiom "out of the way" means that something or someone has been moved or completed, removing any obstacles, distractions, or hindrances. It implies that the particular thing or person is no longer in the path or vicinity, allowing other tasks or activities to proceed smoothly.
  • full of life The idiom "full of life" means that someone or something is energetic, vibrant, lively, and exudes enthusiasm. It is used to describe individuals who possess a zest for life and are lively in their actions and demeanor, often exhibiting a positive and vivacious energy.
  • be another/a different kettle of fish The idiom "be another/a different kettle of fish" means to be something completely different or unrelated to the topic or situation being discussed. It is often used to emphasize that a particular matter is distinct or separate from the current subject.
  • give sb a new lease of life The idiom "give someone a new lease of life" means to provide or restore someone with a renewed sense of energy, enthusiasm, or purpose in life. It can refer to a situation where someone's circumstances or outlook have improved significantly, revitalizing their existence or state of being.
  • by/from the look of it/things The idiom "by/from the look of it/things" is used to express an assumption or judgment based on external appearances or observable evidence. It suggests forming an opinion or conclusion about something based on a quick visual assessment or initial impression.
  • in the hip pocket of (someone) The idiom "in the hip pocket of (someone)" refers to being under the control or influence of someone, typically in a subservient position or being manipulated. It implies that the person is easily manipulated or swayed by someone else's actions or requests.
  • out of hours The idiom "out of hours" refers to activities or situations that occur outside of normal working hours, generally referring to times when businesses or services are closed or inactive.
  • see the colour of sb's money The idiom "see the color of someone's money" means to ensure or confirm that someone has the funds or resources necessary to pay for something before engaging in a transaction or making a commitment. It implies the need to see tangible evidence of a person's financial capacity or readiness to fulfill their payment obligations.
  • live off smell of an oily rag The idiom "live off the smell of an oily rag" is used to describe a person who is living very frugally or on a minimal amount of resources. It implies that the person is barely surviving or managing to get by with limited means, similar to living off the scent or fumes of an oily rag, which is meager and insufficient.
  • cure something of something The idiom "cure something of something" means to relieve or eliminate a negative quality, habit, or ailment in someone or something. It refers to finding a solution or remedy to improve or resolve a particular problem or issue.
  • a sense of occasion The idiom "a sense of occasion" refers to the ability to recognize and appreciate special or significant moments, events, or situations. It is the understanding that certain circumstances warrant a more formal or celebratory approach, and the awareness to behave or act accordingly in such instances.
  • lady of easy virtue The idiom "lady of easy virtue" refers to a euphemistic way of describing a person, typically a woman, who is considered to have a loose or promiscuous attitude towards sexual relationships. It implies that the person is more readily available for sexual encounters or is lacking in moral restraint regarding sexual behavior.
  • by the nape of the neck The idiom "by the nape of the neck" refers to grabbing or holding someone firmly by the back of their neck, usually as a means of control, discipline, or ensuring compliance. It implies a strong or forceful grip on someone's neck in a literal or figurative sense.
  • stagger out (of sm place) The idiom "stagger out (of sm place)" means to leave a location in an unsteady or unstable manner, often due to physical exhaustion, intoxication, or disorientation. It implies that the person is having difficulty maintaining balance or coordination while exiting the place.
  • the cut and thrust of sth The idiom "the cut and thrust of something" refers to the competitive and intense nature of a particular activity or situation. It typically implies a situation where participants engage in vigorous arguments, debates, or confrontations in order to gain an advantage or succeed. The term "cut and thrust" originally comes from the world of fencing, where it describes the rapid back-and-forth movement of the sword during a duel. Metaphorically, the idiom captures the dynamic and challenging nature of a competitive environment.
  • ins and outs (of sth) The idiom "ins and outs (of sth)" refers to the detailed or specific aspects, intricacies, or inner workings of something. It denotes a comprehensive understanding of how something functions, including all the various components, details, and processes involved. It can also refer to knowing all the relevant information or being well-versed in the subject matter.
  • make an honest woman of sm The idiom "make an honest woman of someone" is used to describe the act of marrying a woman, especially when the couple has been cohabiting or engaged in a long-term relationship. It implies that by getting married, the person is considered respectable and honorable in society's eyes.
  • in quest of sm or sth The idiom "in quest of sm or sth" means actively seeking or searching for someone or something. It implies a determined pursuit of a person, object, or goal. It suggests a strong desire and effort to find or achieve the desired outcome.
  • inveigle something out of someone The idiom "inveigle something out of someone" means to use persuasion, trickery, or charming tactics in order to obtain something from someone, often against their will or better judgement. It implies coaxing or manipulating someone into giving or revealing something, typically information, money, or possessions.
  • claw your way back, into something, out of something, to something, etc. The idiom "claw your way back, into something, out of something, to something, etc." means to achieve or regain something through great effort, determination, and struggle, especially when faced with adversity or difficult situations. It implies that the person had to fight and endure hardships to reach their desired position or outcome. The phrase often suggests a relentless and tenacious pursuit of success or improvement, even in the face of obstacles or setbacks.
  • Don’t make a federal case out of it! The idiom "Don't make a federal case out of it!" means to not overreact or make something seem more important or serious than it actually is. It suggests that one should not turn a minor issue into a major one, as if it were being handled by the highest level of authority in the government.
  • Possession is ninetenths of the law. The idiom "Possession is nine-tenths of the law" is a legal principle that suggests that ownership or control over something is often acknowledged and protected by the law simply because of physical possession or occupancy. In other words, if someone is in possession of an item or property, they are presumed to be the rightful owner in the absence of clear evidence otherwise.
  • give (one) a fair crack of the whip The idiom "give (one) a fair crack of the whip" means to give someone a fair opportunity or chance to do something, compete, or succeed. It implies allowing someone an equal and unbiased chance to prove their abilities or demonstrate their skills. The phrase is commonly used in contexts related to competitions, job interviews, or any situation where fairness and equal opportunities are emphasized.
  • a beast of burden The idiom "a beast of burden" refers to a person or thing that is utilized primarily for heavy labor, often without complaint or rest. It denotes someone or something that is constantly relied upon to carry out difficult or arduous tasks.
  • sow a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind) The idiom "sow a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind)" means to plant or introduce uncertainty, suspicion, or skepticism in someone's thoughts or beliefs about something. It refers to the act of causing someone to question or have doubts about a particular idea, person, or situation.
  • nail in the coffin of The idiom "nail in the coffin of" refers to an action or event that ultimately causes the downfall or failure of something or someone. It symbolizes the final, decisive act that brings about an irreversible outcome or brings an end to a particular situation or opportunity.
  • in the swim of things The idiom "in the swim of things" means actively participating or involved in a particular activity, group, or situation. It describes being fully engaged and knowledgeable about what is happening and being an integral part of the ongoing events or trends. This expression often suggests familiarity, competence, and being up-to-date within the context it is used.
  • be in/out of luck The idiom "be in/out of luck" means to be fortunate or unfortunate, to have favorable or unfavorable circumstances or outcomes. "Being in luck" refers to having good fortune, favorable situations, or positive results, while "being out of luck" implies the opposite, being unlucky or experiencing unfavorable circumstances or outcomes.
  • piece of ass The idiom "piece of ass" is colloquial and vulgar slang, typically used to refer to someone, usually a woman, in a highly objectifying and disrespectful manner, emphasizing only their sexual desirability or availability. It is important to note that this expression is offensive and demeaning, and its use is strongly discouraged.
  • be the soul of discretion The idiom "be the soul of discretion" means to be extremely careful and secretive about keeping information confidential. It refers to a person who is very trustworthy and reliable when it comes to keeping secrets or sensitive information confidential.
  • show of hands The idiom "show of hands" refers to a method of determining a vote or polling opinions by asking people in a group to raise their hands to indicate their preference or agreement.
  • can of worms The idiom "a can of worms" refers to a situation or issue that is complex, complicated, or difficult to resolve. It suggests that opening up or delving into the matter will result in a multitude of other related and problematic issues, much like opening a can of worms leads to the release of many worms.
  • ride a wave of sth The idiom "ride a wave of something" refers to taking advantage of a favorable or popular trend or situation, often to achieve success or gain some kind of benefit. It implies being carried along by the momentum or excitement of something positive.
  • show (someone) a clean pair of heels The idiom "show (someone) a clean pair of heels" means to outrun or outpace someone, leaving them behind at a high speed. It is often used to describe someone who runs quickly, skillfully, or effortlessly, especially in a race or competition.
  • at the hand of The idiom "at the hand of" is used to describe an action or event that is caused or inflicted by someone or something. It implies that someone is responsible for a particular outcome, often in a negative or harmful sense.
  • see the colour of someone's money The idiom "see the colour of someone's money" means to verify or determine the profitability or financial status of someone before getting involved in business dealings or transactions with them. It suggests the need to assess someone's financial capability or credibility before engaging in any financial agreement or partnership.
  • to the ends of the earth The idiom "to the ends of the earth" means to go to great lengths or go to any extreme in order to achieve or accomplish something. It refers to a willingness to go to the furthest extent or the utmost limit to accomplish a goal or to express strong devotion, commitment, or determination.
  • on the part of sb/on sb's part The idiom "on the part of someone" or "on someone's part" refers to the actions, behavior, or attitude exhibited by a particular individual. It indicates that a specific person is responsible for a particular action, statement, or feeling. It suggests that the mentioned individual is involved or accountable for a certain occurrence or decision.
  • it is a matter of (doing something) The idiom "it is a matter of (doing something)" can be defined as referring to a situation or issue that can be resolved or achieved through the specific action or task mentioned. It implies that the action in question is crucial, essential, or necessary to accomplish a certain goal or outcome.
  • spit in the eye of The idiom "spit in the eye of" means to deliberately and defiantly show disrespect, contempt, or defiance toward someone or something. It refers to an act or statement that is intentionally provocative or offensive, challenging the authority or expectations of others.
  • leave out of The idiom "leave out of" means intentionally excluding someone or something from a group, activity, or information.
  • be one card shy of a (full) deck The idiom "be one card shy of a (full) deck" is used to describe someone who is not mentally or intellectually capable or may be lacking common sense. It suggests that the person is missing something crucial or essential, likening them to a deck of playing cards with one card missing, rendering it incomplete.
  • nearly jump out of your skin The idiom "nearly jump out of your skin" means to be extremely startled or frightened, causing one to react with a sudden, involuntary physical or emotional response. It conveys a feeling of being so shocked or surprised that it feels as if one's body is momentarily disconnected from oneself.
  • groan under the weight of (something) The idiom "groan under the weight of (something)" means to be heavily burdened or overwhelmed by a particular responsibility, obligation, or hardship. It implies that the weight or pressure of the situation is so great that it causes pain, discomfort, or strain, similar to the sound of a groan.
  • do someone or something a power of good The idiom "do someone or something a power of good" is typically used to express that someone or something has a significant positive impact on someone's well-being or situation. It implies that the particular action or influence is highly beneficial and brings about a notable improvement or positive change.
  • be dying of something The idiom "be dying of something" means to experience extreme, severe, or intense symptoms, often related to a disease or illness. It can also be used figuratively to express an overwhelming desire or need for something.
  • pack of lies The idiom "pack of lies" refers to a collection or series of falsehoods or untruths. It implies that someone is deliberately and consistently lying about something, often in order to deceive or mislead others.
  • walk of life The idiom "walk of life" refers to the various occupations, professions, or social positions that people belong to, indicating the diverse range of individuals in society. It describes the wide spectrum of people's backgrounds, careers, or social standings, highlighting the diversity and richness of human experiences and lifestyles.
  • fit/write sth on the back of a postage stamp The idiom "fit/write something on the back of a postage stamp" means that the content or information being discussed is minimal, concise, or lacking in depth. It refers to the limited space available on the back of a postage stamp, implying that only a small amount of information can be accommodated within that space. It can be used to convey the notion that there is little substance or complexity in what is being discussed.
  • out of house and home The idiom "out of house and home" means to have all of one's possessions taken away, usually due to financial troubles or a disastrous event. It implies being left with nothing and becoming homeless or destitute.
  • take the mickey out of The idiom "take the mickey out of" means to tease, mock, or ridicule someone in a light-hearted or playful manner. It involves making fun of someone or their actions in a friendly or humorous way.
  • to the best of ability The idiom "to the best of ability" means to do something with the maximum effort, skill, or capacity that one possesses. It implies giving one's utmost effort or performing to the best of one's capabilities under a given situation or circumstances.
  • file out (of sth) The idiom "file out (of sth)" means to leave or exit a place or situation orderly and in a single file manner. It typically implies a sense of organization and discipline in the process of departure.
  • at/in the back of your mind The idiom "at/in the back of your mind" refers to thoughts or ideas that are present in one's subconscious, although not necessarily at the forefront of their conscious thinking. It suggests that these thoughts or ideas are lingering or persistently stored in the person's mind, even if they are not actively thinking about them.
  • be of service (to sb) The idiom "be of service (to sb)" means to provide assistance or help to someone. It refers to willingly offering one's help or being available to support others in their needs or tasks.
  • hair of the dog that bit you The idiom "hair of the dog that bit you" refers to the concept of curing a hangover or illness by consuming more of the substance that caused it, especially alcohol. It suggests that a small amount of the same substance can alleviate the symptoms temporarily.
  • make a — fist of The idiom "make a — fist of" means to perform or attempt something in a clumsy, unsuccessful, or unskillful manner. It implies the inability to handle a task effectively or to achieve the desired outcome.
  • wash sm out of sth The idiom "wash (someone or something) out of something" means to completely remove or eliminate someone or something from a particular place, situation, or memory. It often refers to getting rid of negative feelings, memories, or influences associated with a person or event.
  • put the fear of God in someone The idiom "put the fear of God in someone" means to intimidate or frighten someone severely, usually with the intention of making them behave or obey out of fear or respect. It derives from the belief in a higher power's ability to instill fear or discipline in individuals.
  • can't make head or/nor tail of something The idiom "can't make head or/nor tail of something" means to be unable to understand or comprehend something, usually due to its complexity or confusion. It implies that the information or situation is so unclear that it is difficult to make any sense out of it.
  • have the best of To "have the best of" means to be in a more advantageous or favorable position compared to others or a particular situation. It implies having an upper hand or enjoying the most favorable outcome in a given scenario.
  • get (the hell) out of Dodge The idiom "get (the hell) out of Dodge" refers to the act of leaving a dangerous or undesirable situation as quickly as possible. It originates from the fictional character Marshal Matt Dillon in the popular Western television series "Gunsmoke," where Dodge City, Kansas, was portrayed as a lawless and violent town. The phrase is now used metaphorically to convey the urgency and necessity to escape from a threatening or unpleasant circumstance.
  • have someone eating out of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, typically due to one's charm, persuasive abilities, or power of manipulation. It suggests that the person is so easily swayed or influenced that they will unquestioningly do whatever the speaker wants or desires.
  • figure of fun The idiom "figure of fun" refers to a person who is made fun of, ridiculed, or laughed at by others. It typically describes someone who becomes the object of amusement or jokes due to their peculiar behavior, appearance, or characteristics.
  • get up on the wrong side of (the) bed The idiom "get up on the wrong side of (the) bed" means to wake up in a grumpy or irritable mood, typically resulting in a person being in a generally bad or foul mood throughout the day.
  • be scared of (one's) (own) shadow The idiom "be scared of (one's) (own) shadow" means to be excessively fearful, jumpy, or easily intimidated by even the smallest or least threatening things. It implies being in a state of paranoia or extreme apprehensiveness, where a person is constantly on edge and afraid of their own shadow, which is typically harmless and innocuous.
  • of the same kind The idiom "of the same kind" means that two or more things share similar characteristics, qualities, or attributes. It indicates that the things being compared belong to the same category or group, often implying that they are similar or comparable in nature.
  • a battle of nerves The idiom "a battle of nerves" refers to a situation or contest where mental strength and resilience are tested, with each participant trying to remain calm and composed while facing pressure or adversity.
  • labour of love