How Do You Spell ONE?

Pronunciation: [wˈɒn] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "one" is quite straightforward. It consists of one vowel sound represented by the letter "o" and a consonant sound represented by the letter "n". The vowel sound in "one" is pronounced as the diphthong /oʊ/ which is a combination of the sounds /o/ and /ʊ/. In IPA transcription, "one" is written as /wʌn/ where the symbol /w/ represents the onset sound, /ʌ/ represents the vowel sound, and /n/ represents the coda sound.

ONE Meaning and Definition

  1. One is a numerical value that represents the number that is directly succeeded by zero and directly precedes two. It is the first and smallest positive integer in the number system. It is often used as a counting number or as a reference to an individual unit or entity. As a cardinal number, it denotes a singularity or a unity, implying a distinct and solitary existence. It serves as a fundamental unit or base for calculations and measurements in various fields, such as mathematics, science, and statistics.

    In addition to its numerical meaning, "one" can also function as a pronoun or adjective. As a pronoun, it refers to a single person or thing, emphasizing an individual over others. It can be used to indicate someone in a specific group, context, or position. As an adjective, it describes a single entity, indicating individuality, singularity, or uniqueness in contrast to multiple or different ones.

    Furthermore, "one" can carry symbolic or metaphorical connotations, representing concepts such as unity, wholeness, or harmony. It can denote a sense of agreement, consensus, or alignment among various elements or parties. Moreover, "one" is sometimes used colloquially to imply an outstanding or exceptional quality or characteristic, suggesting superiority or distinction.

  2. • An individual; a single number; opposed to another or other; some or any; different; individual.
    • A single person; a single thing.
    • Used in an indefinite sense, any man; any person, as one's own choice, one may speak; one's self or oneself, I and not another.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Top Common Misspellings for ONE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for ONE

Etymology of ONE

The word "one" has its origins in Old English. It can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic language, where the word was spelled as "ainaz" or "ainiz". This Proto-Germanic term is believed to have come from the Proto-Indo-European root "*oi-no", which meant "one". Over time, "ainaz" transformed into "ān" in Old English, and eventually became "one" as we know it today. The word has remained relatively unchanged in its meaning and pronunciation throughout its history.

Idioms with the word ONE

  • one or two The idiom "one or two" typically refers to a small number of something, often implying a couple or a few. It can be used to describe a limited amount or a small selection of options or choices.
  • with one voice The idiom "with one voice" means when a group of people or a collective express a unanimous opinion or agreement. It refers to a situation where everyone is in complete harmony and agreement on a specific matter or decision.
  • read one rights The idiom "read one's rights" refers to the act of informing or familiarizing someone with their legal rights or the consequences of their actions. It is commonly used in situations where someone is being arrested and the arresting officer recites the Miranda rights to them.
  • speak with one voice The idiom "speak with one voice" means to express a unified or consistent message or opinion as a group. It refers to a situation where multiple individuals or entities are stating the same viewpoint or agenda, indicating a sense of strong agreement and solidarity. This idiom signifies cohesive communication and coordinated efforts toward a common goal.
  • the one The idiom "the one" typically refers to an individual who is considered to be the perfect or ideal romantic partner or soulmate. It suggests that this person is meant to be with someone in a special and unique way.
  • one stop shop The idiom "one stop shop" refers to a business or place that offers a wide variety of products, services, or solutions all in one location, which allows customers to fulfill all their needs or requirements without going to multiple places.
  • under one roof The idiom "under one roof" means having everyone or everything in one place or location. It refers to the concept of gathering or bringing together various people, things, or organizations into a single shared space or arrangement.
  • on/to one side The idiom "on/to one side" means to be excluded or disregarded in a decision or situation, typically due to being considered irrelevant, unimportant, or not participating in the matter at hand. It implies that something or someone is separate from or not involved in a particular event or discussion.
  • cards are stacked against (one) The idiom "cards are stacked against (one)" means that the circumstances or situation are not favorable for someone's success or favorable outcome. It implies that the odds are against someone and they face significant challenges or obstacles.
  • go at one another tooth and nail The idiom "go at one another tooth and nail" means to engage in a fierce or aggressive conflict or struggle, exerting maximum effort and employing every means available to gain an advantage or win the argument/competition. It implies a no-holds-barred mentality, suggesting that the participants are willing to use any measure, even resorting to physical or verbal attacks, to emerge victorious.
  • be able to count somebody/something on (the fingers of) one hand The idiom "be able to count somebody/something on (the fingers of) one hand" means that there is a very small number of people or things being referred to. It implies that the count is so few that it can be done using just one hand, usually with the fingers representing the count.
  • mouse that has but one hole is quickly taken The idiom "mouse that has but one hole is quickly taken" means that someone who has limited options or resources is more vulnerable to harm or danger. It suggests that a person who relies solely on one solution or strategy is more likely to encounter difficulties or setbacks, as opposed to someone who is adaptable and has multiple options to choose from.
  • set one back on heels The idiom "set one back on heels" means to surprise or shock someone to the point where they are momentarily stunned or taken aback. It refers to the physical reaction of someone being forced to step back or lose their balance due to a sudden unexpected event or revelation.
  • before one can say Jack Robinson The idiom "before one can say Jack Robinson" is an expression used to describe something that happens very quickly or suddenly. It implies that an action or event occurs so rapidly that it seems to have happened before one can utter the name "Jack Robinson."
  • gross one out The idiom "gross one out" refers to causing someone to feel disgusted, repulsed, or nauseated due to something unpleasant, disturbing, or offensive. It implies that something is so unpleasant or disturbing that it triggers a strong negative reaction in an individual.
  • it's six of one and half a dozen of the other The idiom "it's six of one and half a dozen of the other" means that two alternatives or choices have essentially the same end result or consequence. It implies that the options are so similar or equally disadvantageous that it doesn't matter which one is chosen.
  • a great one for (doing something) The idiom "a great one for (doing something)" typically means that someone has a strong inclination or tendency to engage in a particular activity or behavior. It suggests that the person is highly enthusiastic or dedicated to doing that specific thing frequently or habitually.
  • stay one jump ahead The idiom "stay one jump ahead" means to anticipate or be prepared for potential challenges or problems in advance, ensuring that one remains in control or ahead of others in a competitive environment. It suggests vigilance, strategic thinking, and proactivity to maintain an advantage.
  • be all one to The idiom "be all one to" means that something is irrelevant or insignificant, as it does not cause any difference or have any impact on a situation or outcome. It implies that various options or choices are equivalent and have the same end result.
  • from/since the year one, at from/since the year dot The idiom "from/since the year one" or "at from/since the year dot" refers to a very long time ago, typically from the beginning or the very early stages of something. It suggests that the event or activity in question has been ongoing for a significantly long time, often since its inception. It can also imply a sense of permanence or continuity.
  • it's a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will do something The idiom "it's a hundred to one that somebody/something will do something" means that the chances or odds of someone or something doing a specific action are extremely high or almost certain. It implies that the occurrence or outcome is highly probable and almost inevitable.
  • lead one to The idiom "lead one to" refers to guiding or directing someone towards a particular outcome, conclusion, or result. It implies influencing or provoking someone to think, believe, or act in a specific way.
  • leave (something) to one side The idiom "leave (something) to one side" means to temporarily set aside or ignore something, usually to focus on more important or pressing matters.
  • it's one thing to do A, it's another to do B The idiom "it's one thing to do A, it's another to do B" means that while doing the first action (A) might be reasonable or acceptable, doing the second action (B) is significantly more challenging or difficult. It highlights a distinction between two actions or situations, implying that they are not equally comparable in terms of complexity, difficulty, or level of achievement.
  • one brick shy of a load The idiom "one brick shy of a load" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence, common sense, or mental capacity. It suggests that the person is missing an essential element (the metaphorical brick) necessary to complete a task or understand a situation fully.
  • One hand for oneself and one for the ship. The idiom "One hand for oneself and one for the ship" commonly means that in a difficult or perilous situation, an individual must take care of themselves while also contributing to the collective effort or greater good. It signifies the notion of balancing self-preservation with teamwork or shared responsibilities. The phrase is often used in maritime or nautical contexts, emphasizing the importance of each person looking out for themselves while still fulfilling their obligations to the group.
  • take one (thing) at a time The idiom "take one (thing) at a time" means to focus on or handle one task, problem, or situation at a time rather than attempting to deal with all of them simultaneously. It emphasizes the importance of prioritizing and not becoming overwhelmed by trying to accomplish or deal with multiple things at once.
  • with one hand tied behind one's back The idiom "with one hand tied behind one's back" is used to indicate that someone is capable of achieving something difficult or impressive with minimal effort or difficulty. It suggests that even though the person has a disadvantage or obstacle, they are still able to perform exceptionally well.
  • puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means to do things in the same ordinary way as everyone else. It emphasizes the idea that someone is not special or exceptional and has to go through the same routine tasks and actions as everyone else. This idiom is often used to remind or humble someone who may tend to feel superior or believe they are above others. It suggests that everyone has their own limitations and is subject to the same basic human experiences.
  • an offer one can't refuse The idiom "an offer one can't refuse" refers to a proposal or proposition that is extremely enticing or appealing, to the extent that it is very difficult or impossible to decline or reject. It implies that the offer is so advantageous, advantageous, or compelling that it would be unwise or detrimental to turn it down.
  • a fast one The idiom "a fast one" is typically used to describe a deceitful or dishonest action or trick. It refers to an attempt to deceive someone in a clever or cunning manner, often with the intention of taking advantage of them or gaining an unfair advantage in a situation.
  • public enemy number one/no. 1 The idiom "public enemy number one/no. 1" refers to an individual or group that is widely regarded as a significant threat or enemy to society. It usually implies that they are seen as the most dangerous or notorious among a range of adversaries. This term is often used to emphasize the notoriety, fear, or concern associated with the person or group being referred to.
  • the one that got away The idiom "the one that got away" refers to a missed opportunity or someone or something that was not pursued or obtained when it could have been, often resulting in regret or nostalgia.
  • on one level...on another level The idiom "on one level...on another level" is used to describe a situation or concept that can be understood in multiple ways or has different interpretations depending on the perspective or depth of analysis. It signifies that something can be seen or experienced from different angles or layers, each revealing a different aspect or meaning.
  • count something on the fingers of one hand The idiom "count something on the fingers of one hand" means that there are very few instances or occurrences of something. It implies that the number being referred to can be easily counted using only a hand's fingers, indicating a small quantity or limited options.
  • go (a person) one better The idiom "go (a person) one better" means to surpass or outdo someone in a particular action or achievement. It implies the act of going beyond what someone else has done, often in an effort to outshine or outperform them.
  • from one day to the next The idiom "from one day to the next" means from one day to another, or from one day to the following day. It refers to something happening or changing unexpectedly, abruptly, or without prior notice. It implies a lack of preparation or anticipation for the change or event.
  • rome was not built in one day The idiom "Rome was not built in one day" means that achieving something significant or substantial takes time, effort, and patience. It implies that complex tasks or achievements require a gradual and continuous approach rather than expecting instant results. This idiom is often used to encourage persistence and discourage impatience when pursuing long-term goals or ambitions.
  • be neither one thing nor the other The idiom "be neither one thing nor the other" means to not fit into or belong to a specific category or description, showing characteristics or qualities that make it difficult to be classified or identified clearly. It refers to something or someone that is ambiguous, uncertain, or undefined in terms of their nature, traits, or characteristics.
  • be one card shy of a (full) deck The idiom "be one card shy of a (full) deck" is used to describe someone who is considered mentally or intellectually lacking. It implies that the person is missing something essential or fundamental, similar to a deck of cards missing one card and therefore not complete or functional.
  • one day The idiom "one day" typically refers to an unspecified time in the future, often suggesting an optimistic or hopeful perspective. It represents the possibility of something desired or anticipated happening at some point in the future, regardless of when exactly that may be.
  • take/lead sb on/to one side The idiomatic expression "take/lead someone on/to one side" means to move or guide someone away from a group, gathering, or public setting in order to have a private conversation or discussion with them. It often implies that the conversation will be confidential or that there is a need for privacy.
  • they're only after one thing The idiom "they're only after one thing" is used to describe someone's intention or motive being solely focused on a particular desire or goal, often of a romantic or sexual nature. It implies that the person is not interested in other aspects of a relationship or establishing a meaningful connection but instead seeks immediate physical satisfaction or personal gain.
  • frighten one out of one's wits The idiom "frighten one out of one's wits" means to scare or startle someone intensely, causing them to lose their composure or mental stability for a brief moment. It implies that the person is overwhelmed with fear or terror, often to the point of being unable to think clearly or rationally.
  • set one on feet The idiom "set one on their feet" refers to providing someone with the necessary support or assistance to help them become independent or self-sufficient. It involves helping someone regain their stability, both financially and emotionally, after a difficult or challenging situation.
  • go from one extreme to the other The idiom "go from one extreme to the other" means to undergo a sudden and drastic change of opinion, behavior, or approach, typically moving from one extreme or extreme end of a spectrum to the opposite extreme. It implies going from one extreme viewpoint, action, or situation to its complete opposite.
  • one of the boys The idiom "one of the boys" refers to someone, usually a woman, who is accepted and treated as an equal by a group of men, typically in a predominantly male environment. This person is seen as being part of the group and is included in activities, conversations, and shared experiences as if they were a male themselves.
  • bite off more than one can chew The idiom "bite off more than one can chew" means to attempt or take on a task or responsibility that is more than one can handle or manage comfortably.
  • not one red cent The idiom "not one red cent" means not even a small amount of money or a single cent. It indicates having no money or being unwilling to spend any money at all.
  • keep one step ahead of The phrase "keep one step ahead of" means to stay ahead or be more prepared than others in order to avoid being outwitted, surprised, or caught off guard. It implies being vigilant, proactive, and always maintaining an advantage in a particular situation.
  • be in a minority of one The idiom "be in a minority of one" refers to a situation where an individual's opinion or viewpoint is completely unique or different from everyone else's. It means to hold a perspective or belief that is not shared by others, making that person the only one with that particular viewpoint or stance.
  • relieve one of duties The idiom "relieve one of duties" means to remove or free someone from their responsibilities or tasks, typically in a professional or official context. It implies the act of taking over or relieving the person of their obligations or duties, allowing them to be unburdened or get a break from their workload.
  • I've only got one pair of hands The idiom "I've only got one pair of hands" can be defined as a statement expressing a feeling of being overwhelmed or unable to accomplish multiple tasks simultaneously. It implies that the person can only do one thing at a time due to limitations of time, resources, or physical capabilities.
  • one (thing) after the other The idiom "one (thing) after the other" refers to a sequence of events or actions happening quickly and in succession. It suggests that multiple things are occurring or being done without pause or interruption, often implying a sense of continuous or relentless movement or progress.
  • judge one on one's own merits The idiom "judge one on one's own merits" means to evaluate or assess someone based on their individual qualities, abilities, or achievements, rather than external factors such as their appearance, social status, or background. It suggests that judgment should be fair and objective, taking into consideration the person's talents and skills rather than making assumptions or generalizations.
  • suck a big one The idiom "suck a big one" is a crude and offensive expression in slang that is used to insult or express extreme contempt towards someone. It is an obscene way of telling someone to perform a highly vulgar act. Please note that this phrase is highly impolite and inappropriate for most settings.
  • one flesh The idiom "one flesh" refers to a state of complete unity and intimate connection between two individuals, typically used in the context of marriage. It suggests that the couple is so closely bonded that they are seen as a single entity, with their thoughts, emotions, and actions intertwined. This expression is often based on religious or spiritual connotations, derived from the biblical reference in Genesis 2:24: "Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh."
  • When one door shuts, another opens The idiom "When one door shuts, another opens" means that when a particular opportunity or possibility is lost or unavailable, another one will appear or become accessible. It suggests that even when faced with setbacks or disappointments, new opportunities and possibilities will arise.
  • the odd man/one out The idiom "the odd man/one out" refers to a person or thing that is different or does not fit in with a group or set. It describes someone who stands out or is noticeably distinct from others due to their unique characteristics, opinions, or behavior. This individual is perceived as not belonging or being out of place in a particular situation or context.
  • one final word The idiom "one final word" refers to a statement, opinion, or piece of advice that someone would like to add before concluding a discussion or completing a task.
  • be of one mind, at be of the same mind The idiom "be of one mind" or "be of the same mind" means that a group of people or individuals agree on something or have the same opinion or perspective about a particular issue or matter. It implies that there is unanimity or unity in their thoughts or decisions.
  • get one right here The idiom "get one right here" typically means to receive deserved or appropriate punishment or retribution for one's actions or behavior. It implies that someone is receiving the consequences or repercussions of their actions in the immediate or current situation.
  • that's one for the (record) book(s) The idiom "that's one for the (record) book(s)" means that something is so noteworthy, unusual, or remarkable that it deserves to be recorded in a record book or remembered for a long time. It typically refers to an exceptional achievement, event, or occurrence that stands out from the ordinary or breaks a record. It emphasizes the significance or magnitude of the accomplishment.
  • it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bunch The idiom "it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bunch" means that a single person or thing with negative actions or behavior can have a detrimental effect on a group or collective, causing everyone else to be perceived negatively or to suffer the consequences.
  • leave one cold The idiom "leave one cold" means that something does not affect, impress, or move someone emotionally. It indicates that an event, action, or situation fails to elicit any strong emotional response or enthusiasm.
  • bust (someone) one The idiom "bust (someone) one" means to forcefully strike or hit someone, generally as a form of punishment or revenge.
  • in (or at) one fell swoop The idiom "in one fell swoop" or "at one fell swoop" means to accomplish something in a single, powerful, or swift action, simultaneously or instantly. It refers to completing a task or resolving a situation swiftly and efficiently, often with unexpected or significant consequences.
  • be one step ahead The idiom "be one step ahead" means to be prepared or have a plan in advance so that you are in a better position or have an advantage over others, especially when it comes to anticipating and dealing with future events or situations. It suggests being proactive and having a foresight that keeps you ahead of others in terms of knowledge, preparation, or actions.
  • buy the big one The idiom "buy the big one" typically refers to experiencing or succumbing to a catastrophic event or tragedy. It implies encountering a significant or devastating outcome, often in a fatal or irreversible manner.
  • put one foot in front of the other The idiom "put one foot in front of the other" means to continue moving forward or progressing, especially in difficult or challenging circumstances. It suggests perseverance and the ability to carry on by taking small, incremental steps.
  • come down on one side of the fence or the other The idiom "come down on one side of the fence or the other" means to make a decision or choose a position in a conflict, issue, or debate. It implies that one should not remain neutral or undecided, but rather take a clear stance or make a definitive choice between two opposing options or perspectives.
  • put all eggs in one basket The idiom "put all eggs in one basket" means to invest or rely on a single thing or plan, making oneself vulnerable to potential loss or failure. It emphasizes the importance of diversification and not concentrating all resources or efforts in a single area.
  • if it’s not one thing, it’s the other The idiom "if it's not one thing, it's the other" means that when one problem or difficulty is resolved, another one immediately presents itself. It suggests that troubles or challenges seem to constantly appear, one after another, without a break or respite. It reflects the idea that life is full of obstacles and issues that must be dealt with continuously.
  • no one should be judge in his own cause The idiom "no one should be judge in his own cause" means that a person should not be allowed to make decisions or judgments regarding a matter in which they have a personal or vested interest. It implies that impartiality and fairness can only be achieved if someone unbiased and neutral takes charge of making decisions or resolving conflicts.
  • not know whether one is coming or going and not know if one is ... The idiom "not know whether one is coming or going and not know if one is..." refers to a state of confusion or disorientation. It suggests that someone is so overwhelmed or perplexed that they are unable to determine their current circumstances or make rational decisions.
  • Don't spend it all in one place The idiom "Don't spend it all in one place" is a lighthearted expression used to advise someone not to spend all of their money or resources in a single location or on a single item. It suggests the importance of budgeting, saving, or diversifying one's expenditure to make the most of the available resources.
  • be of like/one mind The idiom "be of like/one mind" means that two or more people have the same or a similar opinion or viewpoint about something. It suggests that they are in agreement or in harmony with each other on a particular matter.
  • put one at ease The idiom "put one at ease" means to make someone feel comfortable or relaxed, often by removing tension or anxiety from a situation. It refers to the act of creating a sense of ease and tranquility in someone's mind or body.
  • hit two birds with one stone The idiom "hit two birds with one stone" means accomplishing two objectives or solving two problems with a single action or effort. It implies efficiency and effectiveness in achieving multiple aims simultaneously.
  • it's a hundred to one that The idiom "it's a hundred to one that" is often used when expressing a very high probability or likelihood of something happening. It implies that the chances or odds are overwhelmingly in favor of a particular outcome.
  • I only have one pair of hands The idiom "I only have one pair of hands" is used to emphasize that an individual is limited in what they can do or accomplish. It expresses the idea that a person does not possess extraordinary abilities or superhuman capabilities. Essentially, it highlights the need for understanding and patience when someone is unable to fulfill multiple tasks simultaneously.
  • come one, come all The idiom "come one, come all" is an invitation or a call for everyone to participate, join, or attend something. It is commonly used to encourage a wide range of people to come together, often to an event or gathering. Essentially, it means that everyone is welcome and encouraged to take part.
  • fussy as a hen with one chick The idiom "fussy as a hen with one chick" refers to someone who is excessively attentive, overprotective, or excessively concerned about something or someone. It suggests being overly cautious or meticulous in a manner similar to how a hen would be extremely protective and attentive towards its sole chick.
  • one another The idiom "one another" is used to describe a reciprocal or mutual relationship between two or more people or entities. It implies that the action or behavior being mentioned is directed towards another person or group, and is also reciprocated by them. It emphasizes the importance of mutual interaction and cooperation between individuals.
  • one for the books, at turnup for the book(s) The idiom "one for the books" or "turnup for the book(s)" is used to describe an event, situation, or experience that is extraordinary, exceptional, or memorable in some way. It refers to something that is noteworthy and deserving of being recorded in the annals or accounts of history or literature. It implies that the event is so remarkable that it would be included as an interesting anecdote or story in the future.
  • could (do something) with one hand tied behind (one's) back The idiom "could (do something) with one hand tied behind (one's) back" implies that someone is capable of doing a particular task or accomplishing something very easily, without any difficulty or challenge. It emphasizes their great skill, expertise, or confidence in the area mentioned.
  • as one The idiom "as one" typically means acting or functioning together in unison or harmony as a cohesive group or entity. It refers to individuals or elements working collectively towards a shared goal or objective. It implies unity, cooperation, and solidarity.
  • not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other The idiom "not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other" means to have a complete lack of knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or object. It implies a state of confusion or being completely unfamiliar with the specifics or details of something.
  • have going for one The idiom "have going for one" means to possess certain advantages or positive attributes that are beneficial or helpful in a particular situation. It refers to the things or qualities that work in someone's favor and give them an edge or a competitive advantage.
  • be one of the girls The idiom "be one of the girls" refers to a situation where a person, typically male, integrates themselves comfortably and effortlessly into a group of females. It implies that this person is able to relate, understand, and socialize with women in a way that makes them feel like they are part of the group.
  • if one knows what's good for one The idiom "if one knows what's good for one" is a phrase used to imply that someone should act in a certain way or make a specific choice because it is in their best interest or will lead to a beneficial outcome. It conveys the idea that someone should make a wise decision or do what is right for themselves in a given situation.
  • pull the other leg/one (it's got bells on)! The idiom "pull the other leg/one (it's got bells on)!" is an expression used to indicate disbelief or skepticism towards something that someone has said. It is often used sarcastically to suggest that the speaker is not convinced or does not believe what they have been told.
  • feel it beneath (one) (to do sth) The idiom "feel it beneath (one) (to do sth)" means to have a strong sense of personal dignity or self-worth, which prevents someone from doing a certain action or behaving in a particular way. It implies that the person finds the action or behavior morally or ethically beneath them.
  • play one against another The idiom "play one against another" means to manipulate or exploit a situation where two or more individuals or parties are pitted against each other to achieve personal gain. It involves creating conflicts or differences between them to benefit from their disagreements or competition.
  • there's one for (record) the book(s) The idiom "there's one for the book(s)" is used to express astonishment or surprise about a remarkable or extraordinary event or achievement. It implies that the situation or experience is so exceptional or unprecedented that it deserves to be written down in a record or mentioned in the annals of history.
  • one in the eye (for somebody/something) The idiom "one in the eye (for somebody/something)" means to achieve success or gain an advantage over someone or something in a way that is unexpected or causes them harm or embarrassment. It can also refer to an act that serves as a form of retaliation or payback.
  • one of those days The idiom "one of those days" refers to a day when multiple things go wrong or when everything seems to go awry. It implies that the person is experiencing a particularly difficult, unlucky, or frustrating day.
  • take it/things one day at a time The idiom "take it/things one day at a time" means to deal with situations or problems as they come, taking a gradual and patient approach instead of worrying about the future. It encourages focusing on the present moment rather than getting overwhelmed by long-term goals or challenges.
  • one in a million The idiom "one in a million" is used to describe something or someone who is extremely rare, exceptional, or unique. It implies that out of a large number of people or things, there is only one that stands out due to their exceptional qualities, talent, or characteristics.
  • cut one loose The idiom "cut one loose" generally means to release, set free, or let go of someone or something, especially in a figurative sense. It can refer to ending a relationship, friendship, or partnership, or to severing ties with someone or something that is no longer serving a purpose or is causing difficulty or harm.
  • at one time or another The idiom "at one time or another" means at some unspecified or indefinite point in the past, present, or future. It signifies that an action, event, or circumstance has or will occur at some stage in one's life or at different moments for different individuals.
  • if it's not one thing, it's another The idiom "if it's not one thing, it's another" is used to express the notion that there is always a series of problems or issues that arise one after the other, creating an ongoing cycle of difficulties or challenges. It suggests that when one problem is resolved, another one immediately appears, indicating a continual succession of troubles or obstacles.
  • come back to haunt one The idiom "come back to haunt one" is used to describe a situation where a past action, decision, or mistake continues to trouble or affect someone negatively in the present or future. It implies that the consequences or repercussions of the action return, seemingly out of nowhere, to cause trouble or create difficulty for the person involved.
  • as one man The idiom "as one man" means that a group of people are all united or acting in complete agreement on a particular matter or action. It implies that everyone in the group is behaving or thinking in a synchronized manner, as if they were a single entity or person.
  • (one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time The idiom "(one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time" means that everyone, regardless of their status or abilities, is human and must complete tasks or face challenges just like everyone else. It emphasizes equality and the universal nature of basic actions or experiences.
  • at/in one sitting The idiomatic phrase "at/in one sitting" refers to completing a task or consuming something entirely without interruption or breaks. It implies doing something in a continuous period of time or completing it all at once without any intervals or pauses.
  • (all) in one breath The idiom "(all) in one breath" means to complete or utter something without pausing or taking a break. It refers to doing or saying a task or multiple tasks rapidly and continuously.
  • bat one thousand The idiom "bat one thousand" is a baseball term that refers to a player successfully hitting the ball in every at-bat or showing a perfect record of performance or achievement in a particular task or endeavor. It means to have a perfect score or to excel completely without any mistakes or failures.
  • put one on honor "Put one on honor" is an idiom that can be used to describe the act of trusting or relying on someone to act with honesty, integrity, and a sense of duty. It implies placing an individual in a situation where they are expected to behave responsibly and ethically without explicit supervision or monitoring.
  • be/stay one jump ahead To be/stay one jump ahead is an idiomatic expression that means to be ahead of someone or something in a competitive or challenging situation. It implies being more prepared, knowledgeable, or resourceful than others, staying a step ahead to anticipate their moves or actions. The idiom comes from the idea of staying ahead of someone by maintaining a distance of one jump, like in a race or competition.
  • be of one mind The idiom "be of one mind" means that a group of people or individuals all share the same opinion, have a unanimous agreement, or are in complete harmony or agreement on a particular matter or decision. They are all thinking or feeling the same way about something.
  • let's get one thing straight The idiom "let's get one thing straight" means to clarify or establish a particular point or fact, usually to prevent misunderstandings or confusion. It is often used when there is a need to address a misunderstanding or to ensure clear communication before continuing a discussion or argument.
  • Two heads are better than one The idiom "Two heads are better than one" means that it is advantageous to have more than one person working together on a task or problem. It suggests that combining the knowledge, skills, and perspectives of multiple individuals can lead to better outcomes or solutions.
  • more than one can bear The idiom "more than one can bear" means something is too difficult or overwhelming to handle or endure. It suggests a situation or burden is beyond a person's capacity to cope with or tolerate.
  • be one jump ahead The idiom "be one jump ahead" means to be slightly ahead or in advance of someone else, usually in terms of knowledge, actions, or strategies. It suggests being in a position of advantage or staying ahead of others by staying informed, observant, or proactive.
  • That's one for the books The idiom "That's one for the books" is typically used to describe an event or situation that is extraordinary or remarkable, and deserving of being remembered or recorded for future reference. It implies that the event is so unusual or significant that it is noteworthy and could be considered memorable in the annals of history or literature.
  • go back to square one The idiom "go back to square one" means to start again from the beginning or to return to the initial stage of a process or task. It expresses the idea of having to reset or restart something due to a lack of progress, failure, or the need to reevaluate and make a fresh start.
  • put (one) out of (one's) misery The idiom "put (one) out of (one's) misery" means to end someone's suffering or agony, typically by killing or ending their life in a compassionate manner. It is often used figuratively to refer to relieving someone from a difficult or unbearable situation.
  • knock one back The idiom "knock one back" means to drink an alcoholic beverage, usually in a casual or leisurely manner.
  • a quick one The idiom "a quick one" typically refers to having a drink, particularly an alcoholic beverage, quickly or without waiting for a long time.
  • get one up on (someone) The idiom "get one up on (someone)" means to gain an advantage or triumph over someone, usually by succeeding or outsmarting them. It refers to getting the upper hand or having a sense of superiority in a particular situation.
  • one hand washes the other (and both wash the face) The idiom "one hand washes the other (and both wash the face)" is often used to describe a situation where two parties help or support each other in some way for mutual benefit or advantage. It implies a cooperative relationship where each party benefits from assisting the other, and ultimately, both parties reap the rewards. The phrase emphasizes the idea that by working together and helping each other, both parties can achieve greater success or advantage.
  • one heck of a (something or someone) The idiom "one heck of a (something or someone)" is an informal expression used to emphasize the exceptional or extraordinary nature of someone or something. It typically denotes a high degree, intensity, or quality. It is often used to convey admiration, astonishment, or surprise. Example: "She's one heck of a dancer!" means she is an exceptional dancer.
  • don't put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "don't put all your eggs in one basket" means not to rely on a single option or investment, but to diversify and spread out one's resources or efforts to minimize risks. It advises against putting all of one's hopes, efforts, or investments in a single place because if that one thing fails, everything will be lost.
  • one big happy family The idiom "one big happy family" is a phrase used to describe a group of people who are closely connected, cooperative, and harmonious with one another. It implies that the individuals within the group have a strong bond, get along well, and work together in unity, resembling the ideal image of a content and united family.
  • there's one law for the rich and another for the poor The idiom "there's one law for the rich and another for the poor" means that the law is applied differently or unfairly based on a person's wealth or social status. It suggests that individuals with money and influence are treated differently and face less severe consequences or receive preferential treatment compared to those who are less privileged or lack financial resources.
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face, at wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" or "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it" implies that someone is completely oblivious or unaware of a particular thing, even if it is extremely obvious or directly affects them. It suggests a lack of perceptiveness, understanding, or awareness regarding the subject at hand.
  • have just one oar in the water To have just one oar in the water means to be lacking focus or concentration, causing one to be ineffective or inefficient in their actions or decision-making. It suggests that the person is not fully engaged or committed to a task or situation, resulting in a lack of progress or success.
  • be (a) one for (something) The idiom "be (a) one for (something)" implies that someone is inclined or prone to engage in a particular behavior or have a particular characteristic. It suggests that the person is known for exhibiting or showing a strong inclination toward that particular thing or activity.
  • put one through paces The idiom "put one through paces" can be defined as to subject someone to a series of tests, challenges, or tasks in order to evaluate their abilities, skills, or performance. It is often used in situations where one is required to demonstrate their capabilities or undergo a rigorous assessment.
  • (all) rolled into one The idiom "(all) rolled into one" means a combination of multiple qualities, characteristics, or roles combined in a single person or thing. It portrays the idea of various elements or aspects being unified into a singular entity.
  • put behind one To "put behind one" means to leave a particular situation, event, or experience in the past and move forward, letting go of any negative emotions or attachments associated with it. It refers to the act of moving on, leaving something behind and not allowing it to affect one's present or future.
  • all over one The idiom "all over one" typically means to criticize or be excessively harsh towards someone. It refers to being extremely thorough in finding faults or flaws in someone's actions or behavior.
  • better the devil you know than the one you don't know The phrase "better the devil you know than the one you don't know" is an idiom that suggests it is more prudent to deal with a familiar or known situation, even if it is unpleasant or difficult, rather than taking the risk of facing something unknown, which might turn out to be worse. It emphasizes the preference for the familiar over the uncertainty of the unfamiliar.
  • one of a kind The idiom "one of a kind" refers to something that is unique or one-of-a-kind, meaning there is nothing else like it. It implies that the thing or person being referred to is special, distinctive, and cannot be compared to anything or anyone else.
  • have more than one string to fiddle The idiom "have more than one string to fiddle" means to have multiple options, alternatives, or plans in order to achieve a goal or accomplish something. It implies having backup plans or additional resources to rely on when needed. Like a musician who plays different tunes on different strings of a fiddle, having more than one string to fiddle indicates being versatile, adaptable, and prepared in various situations.
  • there’s more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "there's more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple methods or approaches to achieve a particular goal or solve a problem. It emphasizes the idea that there are various alternative ways to accomplish something, implying that one should be open to different possibilities or perspectives.
  • from day one The idiom "from day one" means since the very beginning or from the very start of something. It indicates that something has been present, happening, or true from the initial stages or the earliest point in time.
  • one eye on The idiom "one eye on" typically means to pay partial attention to something while also being preoccupied or distracted by something else. It suggests that one's focus is divided or not fully committed to a particular task or situation.
  • be one of the lads/boys/girls The idiom "be one of the lads/boys/girls" refers to the act of blending in or becoming fully accepted as a member of a particular group, typically composed of people of the same gender. It suggests fitting in with the group's norms, behaviors, activities, and overall camaraderie. It implies being part of the inner circle and sharing a strong sense of camaraderie, friendship, and mutual understanding.
  • set one back on one's feet The idiom "set one back on one's feet" means to help or assist someone in recovering from difficult circumstances or setbacks, such as providing support or aid to someone who is struggling physically, emotionally, or financially to regain stability and independence.
  • have one over (the) eight The idiomatic expression "have one over (the) eight" refers to someone being intoxicated or drunk. It suggests that the person has consumed enough alcohol to impair their judgment or coordination.
  • do (one) one better The idiom "do (one) one better" means to outperform or surpass someone in a particular action, usually in order to show superiority, achieve a better result, or gain an advantage over someone else. It implies going beyond what someone else has done or accomplished.
  • be one over (the) eight The idiom "be one over (the) eight" typically refers to someone being slightly drunk or intoxicated. It suggests that the person has had a bit too much alcohol and may be exhibiting signs of impairment.
  • be a great one for sth The idiom "be a great one for sth" means to be strongly interested in or fond of doing or having something. It refers to someone who has a particular inclination or preference for a specific activity or thing.
  • a hole in one The idiom "a hole in one" refers to a golf shot where the ball is hit directly from the tee into the hole with a single stroke. It is used more generally to describe a remarkable and highly successful achievement.
  • cross a bridge before one comes to it The idiom "cross a bridge before one comes to it" means to worry or plan for potential problems or difficulties that may never actually occur. It refers to the tendency of some people to worry excessively about future events or obstacles that may never actually happen. It suggests that one should focus on solving or addressing problems as they arise, rather than preemptively worrying about them.
  • be one sandwich short of a picnic The idiom "be one sandwich short of a picnic" is used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or mentally unstable. It implies that they are lacking common sense or missing a significant piece of understanding or cognitive ability.
  • behoove one to do sth The idiom "behoove one to do something" means that it is necessary, advisable, or incumbent upon someone to do a certain action. It implies a sense of duty or obligation.
  • a hundred/thousand/million and one things/things to do, etc. The idiom "a hundred/thousand/million and one things/things to do, etc." is used to emphasize that there are an overwhelming number of tasks or responsibilities that need to be attended to. It signifies a large and seemingly endless list of things to be accomplished or considered.
  • every single one The definition of the idiom "every single one" is: each individual or every last person or thing in a group or category.
  • like one possessed The idiom "like one possessed" means to act or behave in an extremely frantic, frenzied, or obsessive manner as if one was under the control of a supernatural force or being. It implies an intense or heightened state of emotion or activity, often disregarding rationality or self-restraint.
  • down in one The idiom "down in one" refers to consuming a drink or liquid in a single gulp or without pausing. It implies quickly drinking the entire contents of a glass or bottle without stopping or sipping.
  • bite the hand that feeds one The idiom "bite the hand that feeds one" means to harm or turn against the person or source of support, help, or nourishment that one relies on or benefits from. It refers to a situation where someone shows ingratitude or hostility towards someone or something that is providing assistance or sustenance to them.
  • it behooves one to do sth The idiom "it behooves one to do something" means that it is one's duty or responsibility to do something or that it is in one's best interest to do so.
  • back to square one The idiom "back to square one" means to return to the beginning or starting point of a process or situation, usually due to a lack of progress or success. It implies that previous efforts or advancements have been rendered void or ineffective, requiring one to start over and reassess their approach.
  • not be able to tell one end (of something) from the other The idiom "not be able to tell one end (of something) from the other" means to be completely unfamiliar or have no knowledge or understanding about something, to the extent that one cannot distinguish or differentiate between any aspect or element of it. It indicates a lack of basic understanding or comprehension of a particular subject or matter.
  • one/sm day The idiom "one/sm day" refers to a hypothetical future period of time that is uncertain or unspecified. It is often used when talking about a desired or anticipated event or accomplishment that may or may not happen. It implies that the event or goal may occur someday, but the specific timing is unknown.
  • one jump ahead The idiom "one jump ahead" is generally used to describe someone who is ahead of others in terms of knowledge, actions, or situations. It indicates that they are anticipating events or staying a step ahead of others. It can imply being resourceful, quick-thinking, and proactive in order to gain an advantage or avoid negative consequences.
  • if one knows what’s good for one The idiom "if one knows what’s good for one" suggests that one should act or make choices in a certain way because it is beneficial or advantageous for them. It implies that someone should understand their own best interests and make decisions accordingly to achieve a positive outcome.
  • one for the (record) book(s) The idiom "one for the (record) book(s)" refers to an event or occurrence that is remarkable, extraordinary, significant, or unprecedented enough to be recorded in a historical or memorable way. It implies that the event is notable enough to be documented and remembered for posterity.
  • be one card cards short of a full deck The idiom "be one card short of a full deck" is used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence, common sense, or mental stability. It implies that the person is missing an essential element that would make them fully capable or mentally sound, just like a deck of cards missing one card would be incomplete.
  • know whereof one speaks The idiom "know whereof one speaks" means to possess firsthand knowledge or experience about a particular subject or situation. It implies that the person talking has personal involvement or expertise in the matter, making their statements more credible and reliable.
  • One cannot be in two places at once The idiom "One cannot be in two places at once" means that it is impossible for a person to physically exist or be present in more than one location simultaneously. It is used to convey the idea that one cannot be in two different places or situations at the same time, and therefore, cannot fulfill multiple conflicting commitments or responsibilities simultaneously.
  • pull one over on The idiom "pull one over on" means to deceive or outsmart someone, typically by tricking or manipulating them in some way. It refers to successfully fooling or gaining an advantage over someone through cunning or deceitful means.
  • with one accord The idiom "with one accord" means to act or agree unanimously, or to be in complete harmony or agreement with others.
  • at one with (someone or something) The idiom "at one with (someone or something)" means to have a deep connection, harmony, or understanding with someone or something. It implies being in complete alignment or unity, where there is a sense of oneness and synchronization. It often describes a state of being fully compatible, in tune, or in agreement with someone or something.
  • it's just one of those things The idiom "it's just one of those things" refers to a situation or event that is unfortunate, unexpected, or unexplainable, and thus it is accepted as an unavoidable or inevitable part of life. It implies that there is no specific reason or explanation for the occurrence, and it is simply a part of the unpredictability of existence.
  • ten to one The idiom "ten to one" typically means "very likely" or "almost certain." It implies that a particular outcome or event is highly probable, with the chances heavily favoring it.
  • have one eye on (someone or something) The idiom "have one eye on (someone or something)" means to remain alert or attentive to a person or situation while also focusing on other tasks or activities. It suggests that one's attention is divided, but they are still keeping watch or monitoring someone or something closely.
  • a/one hundred percent The idiom "a/one hundred percent" means to be fully committed, wholeheartedly dedicated, or completely in agreement with a particular thing or idea. It suggests total certainty, assurance, or thoroughness in the given context.
  • at one fell swoop The idiom "at one fell swoop" means achieving or accomplishing something in a single action or instance, often referring to a swift and decisive action that has a significant impact. It suggests that multiple things are done or resolved simultaneously, without delay.
  • day one The phrase "day one" is an idiom used to refer to the beginning or starting point of a particular endeavor, project, or situation. It signifies the first day or the initial stage of something. It can imply the need to be proactive, motivated, and focused from the very beginning in order to achieve success.
  • one day chicken and the next day feathers The idiom "one day chicken and the next day feathers" refers to a sudden and drastic change of fortune or circumstances, usually from a state of abundance or success to one of loss or failure. It suggests the unpredictability and volatility of life, where things can change rapidly and dramatically.
  • more than one can shake a stick at The idiom "more than one can shake a stick at" means having a large number or amount of something, often exceeding what is necessary or expected. It implies an excessive, overwhelming, or abundant quantity.
  • take care of number one The idiom "take care of number one" means to prioritize oneself and one's own needs above others. It implies looking out for oneself and taking actions that are advantageous or beneficial to oneself without considering the impact on others.
  • one too many The idiom "one too many" refers to having reached or gone beyond the acceptable or tolerable limit of something, usually involving excessive consumption of food, drink, or some other indulgence. It suggests that one has exceeded the point of moderation or reasonableness.
  • offer one cannot refuse The idiom "offer one cannot refuse" refers to a proposition or invitation that is so appealing, advantageous, or compelling that it is impossible to turn down or reject. It implies a highly compelling offer that is likely to be accepted due to its immense benefits or consequences of refusal.
  • leave/put something on/to one side The idiom "leave/put something on/to one side" means to postpone or set aside something temporarily. It refers to the act of not dealing with a particular matter or issue at the present moment, instead, considering it at a later time. It implies allowing the matter or issue to remain untouched or unaddressed for the time being, without completely dismissing it.
  • hoist one The idiom "hoist one" typically refers to the act of raising or lifting a drink, especially an alcoholic beverage, in a celebratory or social context. It implies enjoying or toasting with a beverage as a form of celebration or camaraderie.
  • one little bit The idiom "one little bit" means to have even the smallest amount of something. It implies that even the slightest amount would make a significant difference.
  • no one will be any the wiser The idiom "no one will be any the wiser" means that no one will know or find out about something, typically referring to a secret or hidden action. It implies that despite certain events or actions taking place, they will remain unnoticed or undiscovered by others.
  • play one side against the other The idiom "play one side against the other" refers to actively manipulating or exploiting the differences, disagreements, or rivalries between two parties or groups for personal gain or advantage. It involves creating a situation where one side's interests or actions are pitted against the other, often resulting in the person manipulating the situation benefiting from the conflict or tension that arises.
  • one of the old school The idiom "one of the old school" refers to someone who has traditional beliefs, values, or methods that are no longer widely held or practiced. It can imply that the person is conservative, resistant to change, or adheres to outdated ideas or practices. The term is often used to describe someone who has a strong attachment to older customs or ways of doing things.
  • be at one The idiom "be at one" means to be in a state of harmony, unity, or agreement with someone or something. It suggests the absence of conflict or discord, indicating a peaceful and cooperative relationship.
  • be able to count somebody/something on one hand The idiom "be able to count somebody/something on one hand" means to have a very small number of people or things. It implies that the count is so limited that it can be done using only the fingers of one hand.
  • be one in a million The idiom "be one in a million" refers to someone or something that is extremely rare, exceptional, or unique. It signifies that the person or object being described stands out from the rest, separating themselves as truly special.
  • all one The idiom "all one" means that all people or things involved are equal, without any distinction or discrimination. It suggests that everyone is treated fairly and given the same opportunities, privileges, or rights.
  • like one of the family The idiom "like one of the family" refers to treating someone as though they are a member of one's own family or treating someone with the same warmth, care, and familiarity as one would treat a close relative.
  • one over (the) eight The idiom "one over (the) eight" refers to someone who is mentally or emotionally unstable, usually due to excessive drinking or intoxication. It suggests that the person's behavior or thinking is irrational, confused, or impaired.
  • play one off against another/each other/the other The idiom "play one off against another/each other/the other" means to manipulate or exploit two or more people or groups by pitting them against each other for personal gain or advantage. It involves creating or exacerbating conflict, competition, or rivalry between individuals or factions in order to further one's own interests.
  • go one better (than sb/sth) The idiom "go one better (than sb/sth)" means to surpass or exceed someone or something in a certain aspect or achievement. It implies outdoing or going beyond what has been done previously, often in terms of performance, accomplishment, or success.
  • one move ahead The idiom "one move ahead" means to be more prepared or to have an advantage over others by thinking or acting one step ahead in a situation or competition. It suggests having a strategic or tactical advantage in order to anticipate and effectively deal with future events or challenges.
  • with one arm tied behind one's back The idiom "with one arm tied behind one's back" typically means doing something easily or effortlessly, as if it were not a challenge at all. It implies that the task or action can be accomplished easily, even with a handicap or disadvantage. It emphasizes someone's superior skill, ability, or advantage in a particular situation.
  • burn one's bridges in front of (one) The idiom "burn one's bridges in front of (one)" refers to a situation where someone purposely and irreversibly cuts off all possibilities of returning to a previous state or relationship. It denotes an act of deliberate and often reckless action that destroys any chances of going back to a previous situation, losing all potential options for reconciliation or retreat.
  • on the one hand ... on the other hand The expression "on the one hand ... on the other hand" is an idiom used to present two contrasting viewpoints or factors concerning a particular situation or topic. It highlights the existence of multiple perspectives or arguments, suggesting that there are advantages and disadvantages to consider. By stating "on the one hand," the speaker introduces the first viewpoint or side of the argument, and by saying "on the other hand," they present the opposing viewpoint or side. The idiom is commonly used when trying to weigh different options or when discussing a complex issue with both positive and negative aspects.
  • one bad apple spoils the (whole) bunch The idiom "one bad apple spoils the (whole) bunch" means that one person or thing with negative or harmful qualities can have a detrimental effect on an entire group or system, causing them to also become corrupt, tainted, or dysfunctional. This idiom is often used to emphasize the importance of avoiding or removing negative influences to maintain the integrity or quality of a group or situation.
  • the year one The idiom "the year one" typically refers to the beginning or start of something, specifically the first year of a historical era, event, or significant milestone. It can also be used metaphorically to signify a fresh start, a clean slate, or the initiation of a new period or phase in someone's life.
  • in one ear and out the other The idiom "in one ear and out the other" refers to something that is quickly forgotten or not retained in memory. It implies that information or advice heard is not paid attention to or simply disregarded.
  • one swallow doesn't make a summer The idiom "one swallow doesn't make a summer" means that a single positive occurrence or event does not guarantee a successful or favorable outcome. It advises against making hasty conclusions based on limited evidence or isolated incidents.
  • from one moment to the next The idiom "from one moment to the next" refers to something that happens or changes suddenly and without warning or prediction. It implies a minimal or nonexistent transition period between two moments or events.
  • judge a book by its cover, one can't The idiom "don't judge a book by its cover" means that one should not form an opinion or make assumptions based solely on outward appearances. It suggests that one should delve deeper and get to know someone or something before making a judgment or forming an opinion.
  • cut one another's throats The idiom "cut one another's throats" means to engage in fierce competition or conflict in a way that results in harm or ruin for all parties involved. It suggests a situation where individuals or groups are vigorously competing or fighting, often to the point of self-destruction, and causing mutual harm or downfall in the process.
  • a live one The idiom "a live one" typically refers to a person who is thought to be full of energy, enthusiasm, or unpredictability. It can also be used to describe someone who is seen as a promising or interesting individual.
  • pull a fast one (on somebody) The idiom "pull a fast one (on somebody)" refers to deceiving or tricking someone in a cunning and unexpected way, often in order to gain an advantage or achieve a personal objective.
  • have one too many The idiom "have one too many" refers to consuming more alcoholic beverages than one should, resulting in becoming intoxicated or drunk.
  • when one door shuts, another one opens The idiom "when one door shuts, another one opens" means that when a situation or opportunity comes to an end or is closed off, a new and different opportunity arises. It suggests that when one opportunity is lost, there is always another opportunity waiting or presenting itself.
  • in words of one syllable The idiom "in words of one syllable" means to explain or describe something in a simple and straightforward manner, using words that are easy to understand for all audiences. It implies that complex or technical concepts are broken down into shorter and simpler words, making the information more accessible and easily comprehended by everyone.
  • give as good as one gets The idiom "give as good as one gets" means to respond or retaliate in a similar, equal, or sometimes even superior manner to any attack, criticism, or mistreatment received. It implies the ability to stand up for oneself and respond with equal force, whether in words, actions, or other means.
  • kill two birds with one stone The idiom "kill two birds with one stone" means to achieve two objectives or complete two tasks with a single action or effort. This expression reflects the idea of accomplishing multiple things simultaneously, increasing efficiency or saving time.
  • long on one thing and short on another The idiom "long on one thing and short on another" refers to a situation where someone or something has an abundance or excess of one quality or resource, but lacks or is lacking in another. It highlights an imbalance or uneven distribution of attributes or capabilities.
  • One has to draw the line somewhere The idiom "One has to draw the line somewhere" means that there is a limit to how far one is willing to tolerate or accept certain behavior or actions. It suggests that even though someone may be generally accepting or lenient, there comes a point where they need to set boundaries and establish restrictions.
  • bring (one) to one's senses The idiom "bring (one) to one's senses" means to make someone think and behave in a sensible, rational manner, often by helping them realize the foolishness or impracticality of their current beliefs or actions. It involves persuading or causing someone to regain control of their judgment and reasoning abilities.
  • be one thing after the other, at be one thing after another The idiom "be one thing after the other, or be one thing after another" means a series of events or problems that occur in a rapid succession or without break. It refers to a situation where multiple things happen consecutively, often causing inconvenience or difficulty.
  • be one card/several cards short of a full deck The idiom "be one card/several cards short of a full deck" is used to describe someone who is mentally or intellectually deficient, eccentric, or slightly crazy. It suggests that the person is missing important qualities or functions that would make them fully rational or normal.
  • I, you, etc. for one The idiom "I, you, etc. for one" is typically used to express one's personal opinion or preference about something, indicating that the speaker is speaking for themselves but acknowledging that others may have different perspectives. It is often used to emphasize that the speaker's opinion is not necessarily representative of the majority or everyone else involved.
  • lay one on The idiom "lay one on" typically means to deliver a powerful blow or strike someone with force, usually in a physical altercation or fight. It can also refer to expressing one's feelings or emotions in a passionate or intense manner.
  • could count sth on (the fingers of) one hand The idiom "could count something on (the fingers of) one hand" means that the quantity or number of something is very small, so small that it can be easily counted using just the fingers of one hand. It implies that there are very few instances or occurrences of the thing being referred to.
  • wear more than one hat The idiom "wear more than one hat" means to have multiple roles or responsibilities, often referring to a person who takes on different duties or functions in various contexts or positions.
  • one man's loss is another man's gain The idiom "one man's loss is another man's gain" refers to a situation where when someone suffers a loss or is disadvantaged, someone else benefits or profits from that loss. It suggests that in certain circumstances, one person's misfortune can result in another person's advantage.
  • more than one bargained for The idiom "more than one bargained for" means experiencing or receiving something unexpected, often in a negative or challenging way, beyond what was initially anticipated or agreed upon.
  • keep one's wits about (one) To "keep one's wits about (one)" means to remain calm, alert, and mentally sharp or composed, especially in difficult or dangerous situations. It implies staying attentive and being able to think and react quickly and thoughtfully.
  • quit while one is ahead The idiom "quit while one is ahead" means to stop or withdraw from a situation or activity at a point where one is already successful, satisfied, or in a favorable position. It suggests that it is prudent to stop or retire while one's position is advantageous, rather than risking potential losses or setbacks by continuing.
  • one way or the other The idiom "one way or the other" means in any case, regardless of how something is approached or resolved. It implies that there are only two potential outcomes or options, but either way, the situation will be resolved or decided.
  • one of those things The idiom "one of those things" refers to an event or situation that is unfortunate, unavoidable, or beyond one's control. It implies that the circumstance is a result of chance, fate, or simply something that happens occasionally without any specific reason. It suggests that the situation is not particularly remarkable or deserving of excessive attention or concern.
  • leave one to one's own devices The definition of the idiom "leave one to one's own devices" is to allow someone to do things in their own way, without interference or assistance from others.
  • give one The expression "give one" typically refers to providing someone with a hard time or causing them difficulties. It implies bothering or harassing someone intentionally.
  • leave one to fate The idiom "leave one to fate" means to not intervene or take control of a situation, and instead rely on destiny or whatever outcome may naturally occur. It suggests surrendering to the unfolding events without attempting to influence or change them.
  • tie one on The idiom "tie one on" means to get drunk or consume alcohol excessively.
  • one swallow does not make a spring The idiom "one swallow does not make a spring" means that a single positive event or instance does not necessarily indicate a larger trend or a lasting change. Just like the sight of one swallow does not mean the arrival of spring, one isolated occurrence should not be taken as conclusive evidence for a general pattern. It emphasizes the importance of looking at the bigger picture and not jumping to conclusions based on a single observation.
  • so bad one can taste it The idiom "so bad one can taste it" is used to describe a situation or desire that is intensely felt or anticipated, usually in a negative way. It implies that whatever is being referred to is perceived to be very close or imminent, causing a strong sensation or anticipation, often an unpleasant one.
  • do one The idiom "do one" is a slang expression commonly used in informal British English. It is an impolite way of telling someone to leave or to go away. It can also imply a sense of dismissing someone or rejecting their presence.
  • one after the other, at one after another The idiom "one after the other" or "at one after another" means sequentially or in rapid succession, with each item or event following immediately after the previous one. It refers to a series of actions or occurrences that happen in quick order, without any significant interval or interruption between them.
  • harp on one string The idiom "harp on one string" means to constantly or repetitively dwell on or talk about the same topic, issue, or idea without considering or acknowledging other perspectives or subjects.
  • it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bushel The idiom "it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bushel" means that a single negative or corrupt person or thing in a group can have a detrimental influence on the entire group. It suggests that one flawed individual can tarnish the reputation, integrity, or morale of a larger group or community.
  • up one side and down the other The idiom "up one side and down the other" means to thoroughly criticize, scold, or reprimand someone. It implies that the person is being reprimanded from every possible angle or perspective, leaving no room for escape or argument.
  • with one eye on The idiom "with one eye on" means to be vigilant or cautious about someone or something while simultaneously focusing on another person, task, or situation. It implies that one is aware and cautious of a potential threat, danger, or important factor while handling another matter.
  • public enemy number one The idiom "public enemy number one" refers to a person or group that is widely considered as the most dangerous or villainous threat to society or a community. It is often used to emphasize the high level of infamy and notoriety attached to an individual or organization who is seen as a significant public menace.
  • put/leave sth on/to one side The idiom "put/leave something on/to one side" means to set aside or temporarily postpone a matter or task. It suggests placing something away from the immediate attention or consideration and dealing with it at a later time. It can also imply disregarding or not taking something into account when making a decision or judgment.
  • be/stay/keep one jump ahead The idiom "be/stay/keep one jump ahead" means to anticipate or stay ahead of someone else in order to outwit, outmaneuver, or outperform them. It suggests having the advantage of being one step ahead, especially in a competitive or challenging situation.
  • one thing leads to another The idiom "one thing leads to another" refers to a situation where a specific action or event results in a sequence of related actions or events, often implying that the subsequent events occur naturally or unavoidably as a consequence of the initial action.
  • You're a fine one to talk! The idiom "You're a fine one to talk!" is an expression used to point out the hypocrisy or irony of someone who criticizes or points out a problem in another person when they themselves exhibit the same behavior or have the same flaw. It implies that the person making the comment has no right to pass judgment or give advice due to their own questionable actions or qualities.
  • coming or going, not know if one is The idiom "coming or going, not know if one is" is typically used to describe a state of confusion or disorientation. It suggests that someone is so overwhelmed or preoccupied that they don't know whether they are coming or going. It can imply a lack of focus or clarity in one's thoughts or actions.
  • have a good one The idiom "have a good one" is a casual way of saying "have a good day" or "have a good time," typically used when parting ways with someone or wishing them well. It is often used to wish someone a pleasant experience, without specifying what that experience might be.
  • in one fell swoop The idiom "in one fell swoop" means to accomplish something quickly and decisively, often referring to completing multiple tasks or achieving multiple goals at the same time or in a single action. It implies efficiency and the ability to address a situation completely and efficiently.
  • that's a new one on me. The idiom "that's a new one on me" is used to express surprise or astonishment when someone encounters something they have never heard, seen, or experienced before. It often implies that the situation or information is unexpected or unfamiliar to the person.
  • sweep one off feet The idiom "sweep one off their feet" means to completely charm or captivate someone, typically by engaging in romantic gestures, acts of kindness, or impressive displays of affection or admiration. It refers to the feeling of being so overwhelmed by someone's charming qualities or actions that it feels as though one is figuratively lifted off their feet.
  • hurry one on way The idiom "hurry one on way" means to encourage or urge someone to leave quickly or expedite their departure.
  • This one is on The idiom "This one is on" typically means that the speaker will take responsibility for paying for something, usually a drink or a meal, on behalf of everyone present. It implies that the speaker will cover the cost of that particular item or expense.
  • be one of the boys The idiom "be one of the boys" refers to a person, typically a woman, who is comfortable in a predominantly male group and behaves or is treated like a male member within that group. It implies that the person is included and accepted as an equal, disregarding gender differences or stereotypes.
  • pull a fast one (on someone) To "pull a fast one (on someone)" means to deceive or trick someone in a sneaky or deceptive manner.
  • give one credit for The idiom "give one credit for" means to recognize or acknowledge someone's efforts, achievements, or qualities, acknowledging their skills, successes, or contributions. It is often used to commend or appreciate someone for their hard work or accomplishments.
  • the lights are on but no one is at home The idiom "the lights are on but no one is at home" is used to describe someone who is mentally absent or not paying attention, often appearing vacant or unresponsive. It suggests that although a person may physically be present, their mind is elsewhere or not fully engaged.
  • become one flesh The idiom "become one flesh" is a biblical expression that refers to the act of marriage or the union between two individuals. It means to become united or joined in a deep and intimate way, forming a strong and inseparable bond.
  • at one The idiom "at one" typically refers to a state of agreement, harmony, or unity between two or more people or entities. It can also imply being in a state of understanding or being at peace with oneself.
  • be one thing after another The idiom "be one thing after another" means to experience a series of successive problems, difficulties, or negative situations one after the other, without respite or relief. It implies a sense of overwhelming or continuous unfortunate events or challenges occurring without interruption.
  • one for the book The idiom "one for the book" means an extraordinary, remarkable, or memorable event or achievement, often deserving a mention or documented for future reference. It can refer to something that is highly unusual, unexpected, or notable enough to be considered remarkable and noteworthy.
  • land one The idiom "land one" typically means to successfully deliver a punch or strike to someone. It is often used when referring to a physical altercation or a fight.
  • be/go back to square one The idiom "be/go back to square one" means to return to the starting point or the beginning stage of a process or task. It implies that previous efforts or progress have been nullified or undone, requiring one to start over from the very beginning.
  • at one blow The idiom "at one blow" means to accomplish or achieve something in a single or sudden action, without any additional effort or repetition. It refers to a situation where a significant result or outcome is obtained swiftly and efficiently, often implying a sense of efficiency or effectiveness.
  • one to a customer The idiom "one to a customer" typically means that there is a limit of one per person or situation. It implies that only one item, opportunity, or favor is available for each individual, and multiple requests or attempts will be rejected.
  • I owe you (one) The idiom "I owe you (one)" means that someone is grateful to another person for their help or kindness and promises to repay the favor in the future. It can be used to express gratitude and acknowledge a debt of gratitude.
  • give one one's freedom The idiom "give one their freedom" means to release or liberate someone from captivity or oppression. It refers to granting someone autonomy, independence, or the ability to make their own choices and decisions without restrictions or limitations.
  • be one brick short of a (full) load The idiom "be one brick short of a (full) load" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as mentally or intellectually lacking or not fully functional. It implies that the person is missing something essential or crucial, similar to how a load of bricks would be incomplete without one.
  • not one iota The idiom "not one iota" means not even the smallest amount or degree, indicating that something will not change or have any effect. It emphasizes the complete lack of significance or importance.
  • rolled into one The idiom "rolled into one" is used to describe a situation where two or more qualities, aspects, or characteristics are combined in a single person, thing, or concept. It implies that multiple elements can be found or experienced simultaneously or within one entity.
  • someone's only got one pair of hands The idiom "someone's only got one pair of hands" means that a person can only do so much or accomplish a limited amount of tasks simultaneously because they are limited by their own abilities or capacities. It implies that a person cannot be expected to do everything at once or be in multiple places at the same time.
  • carry fire in one hand and water in the other The idiom "carry fire in one hand and water in the other" refers to the act of trying to simultaneously support or pursue two conflicting or contradictory things. It represents a challenging or impossible task that involves attempting to manage two opposite or incompatible duties or commitments.
  • be a great one for something/for doing something The idiom "be a great one for something/for doing something" refers to someone who has a strong inclination or enthusiasm towards a particular activity or behavior. It implies that the individual is known for engaging in or having a deep interest in that specific thing.
  • it behooves one to do something The idiom "it behooves one to do something" means that it is one's duty, responsibility, or obligation to do something. It suggests that there is a moral or social expectation for someone to take action or behave in a certain way.
  • where one is coming from The idiom "where one is coming from" refers to understanding or empathizing with someone's perspective, opinions, or intentions. It implies the need to comprehend the underlying background, experiences, or beliefs that shape a person's thoughts or actions. It often involves recognizing the context or motivations behind someone's statements or behavior.
  • not one (little) bit The phrase "not one (little) bit" is an idiomatic expression used to convey the idea of not even a tiny amount or not at all. It emphasizes the complete absence of something or the lack of impact or influence.
  • six of one, half a dozen of the other The idiom "six of one, half a dozen of the other" is used to express that two choices or options being considered are ultimately equivalent or of equal value. It implies that it makes no meaningful difference which choice is made since the end result will be the same.
  • all in one The idiom "all in one" refers to something that combines or includes everything needed or desired in a single entity or object. It implies that all necessary or desired aspects or functionalities are present in a convenient and comprehensive manner. It is often used to describe a multi-purpose or versatile item or solution.
  • for one thing The idiom "for one thing" is used to introduce one reason or example among several, emphasizing that there are other factors to consider or additional points to be made.
  • the one who/that got away The idiom "the one who/that got away" refers to a person or thing that someone had the opportunity to have but missed or lost, often in reference to a missed romantic or career opportunity. It symbolizes someone or something that was highly valued or desired, but ultimately not obtained or achieved.
  • as best one can The idiom "as best one can" means doing something to the best of one's abilities or capabilities, even if the result may not be perfect. It implies making the most effort or taking the most effective approach possible given the circumstances or limitations.
  • give with one hand and take away with the other The idiom "give with one hand and take away with the other" means to give something to someone or offer them a benefit or advantage, but then promptly take it back or negate it by another action or decision. It implies a contradictory or inconsistent behavior, often leading to disappointment or frustration for the person on the receiving end.
  • put one in place The idiom "put one in place" means to assert authority, establish dominance, or assert control over someone, typically by reprimanding, scolding, or confronting them in a firm or assertive manner.
  • sleep with one eye open The idiom "sleep with one eye open" means to be cautious or vigilant, especially in a situation where potential danger or harm may arise. It implies being alert and ready to respond quickly to any possible threats or problems.
  • on one hand The idiom "on one hand" is used to present an opinion or situation from one perspective or point of view. It implies that there is more than one perspective or conflicting ideas, and it is often followed by the phrase "on the other hand" to present an alternative or contrasting perspective.
  • one and the same The idiom "one and the same" means that two people or things being referred to are in fact identical or indistinguishable from each other. It emphasizes that there is no difference or distinction between them.
  • one way and/or another/the other The idiom "one way and/or another/the other" means that something will happen or be resolved, regardless of the specific method or approach taken. It implies that there are multiple possible paths or solutions to achieve a desired outcome.
  • one sandwich short of a picnic The idiom "one sandwich short of a picnic" is a humorous way of saying that someone is not very intelligent or mentally lacking. It implies that the person is missing something essential or important, just like a picnic without a complete meal.
  • one thing after another The idiom "one thing after another" refers to a series of events or circumstances happening consecutively or in rapid succession, usually in a negative or challenging way. It implies a sense of continuous problems or challenges occurring without respite or a break between them.
  • one step ahead The idiom "one step ahead" refers to being more prepared or taking action in advance in order to stay ahead of others or to anticipate potential issues or challenges.
  • sb could do sth with one arm/hand tied behind their back The idiom "sb could do sth with one arm/hand tied behind their back" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally skilled or proficient in a particular task or activity. It implies that the person is so capable and confident that even if they had a handicap or obstacle, such as having one arm or hand tied behind their back, they would still be able to accomplish the task easily.
  • it’s a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will (not) do something The idiom "it's a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will (not) do something" means that there is a very high or low likelihood of somebody/something performing a certain action or achieving a particular outcome. It is used to express strong confidence or skepticism about the possibility of an event occurring. The phrase "hundred to one" signifies uneven or unequal odds in favor or against a certain outcome.
  • a right one The idiom "a right one" means something or someone that is appropriate or suitable for a particular purpose or situation; the correct choice or option. It is often used to express satisfaction with a decision, selection, or outcome.
  • one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind The idiom "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" refers to a significant action or accomplishment that may seem small or insignificant in the moment, but has far-reaching and profound implications for the progress and advancement of humanity as a whole. It encapsulates the idea that even a seemingly small action can have a monumental impact on society, science, or any other field of human endeavor. The phrase is famously attributed to astronaut Neil Armstrong, who uttered it when he became the first person to set foot on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission in 1969.
  • one of these days The idiom "one of these days" refers to a future event or occurrence that is expected or promised to happen, but lacks a specific date or timeframe. It implies that something will eventually take place, even if the exact timing is uncertain.
  • at one with the world The idiom "at one with the world" refers to a state of harmony, peace, or connection with the surrounding environment or the universe. It suggests a deep sense of calmness, tranquility, and contentment with one's existence and an alignment with the natural world or higher forces.
  • odds are against one The idiom "odds are against one" means that the chances or probability of something happening or being successful are not in favor of a particular person. It implies that there are more obstacles or difficulties than there are favorable factors, making success or a desired outcome unlikely.
  • one of the lads "One of the lads" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone, typically a man, who is seen as being a fully accepted and integrated member of a particular group or social circle, often consisting of friends or colleagues. This person is considered to possess the qualities and characteristics associated with being an equal and contributing member of the group, usually displaying a shared sense of humor, camaraderie, and similar interests. Being "one of the lads" implies a level of acceptance, closeness, and familiarity within the group dynamics.
  • No one is indispensable. The idiom "No one is indispensable" means that no person is so vital or necessary that they cannot be replaced or function without them. It emphasizes the idea that everyone is replaceable, and no individual is irreplaceable or essential in any situation.
  • one man’s meat is another man’s poison The idiom "one man’s meat is another man’s poison" means that what one person enjoys or finds beneficial, another person may dislike or find detrimental. Different people have different preferences and opinions, so what is suitable or desirable for one may be unsuitable or undesirable for another.
  • cry before one is hurt The idiom "cry before one is hurt" means to unnecessarily express fear or concern about a possible negative outcome before the situation actually poses any threat or harm. It implies that the person is overreacting or being overly cautious.
  • (just) one of those days The idiom "(just) one of those days" is used to describe a day that seems to be filled with unfortunate events, mishaps, or a general feeling of everything going wrong. It implies a sense of resignation or acceptance that some days are simply destined to be difficult or challenging.
  • it's a million to one that The idiom "it's a million to one that" means that an event or outcome is extremely unlikely or improbable, as if the chances of it happening are one in a million. It emphasizes the unlikelihood of something occurring.
  • one step forward and two steps back The idiom "one step forward and two steps back" means that progress or advancement is being hindered or negated by simultaneous setbacks or difficulties. It refers to a situation in which for every small amount of progress made, much more is lost or undone, resulting in a net loss in overall achievement.
  • have one foot in the grave The idiom "have one foot in the grave" refers to someone being very old or in poor health, suggesting that they are close to death or in a terminal condition. It is used to describe someone who appears weak, frail, or near the end of their life.
  • know when one is not wanted The idiom "know when one is not wanted" means to be aware of and recognize when one's presence, input, or involvement is not desired or welcomed by others. It implies the ability to perceive the social cues and signals indicating that one should withdraw or disengage from a situation, relationship, or conversation.
  • keep one jump ahead The idiom "keep one jump ahead" means to be constantly prepared or stay ahead of someone or something in terms of knowledge, strategy, or planning. It implies staying one step ahead to avoid being caught off-guard or outmaneuvered.
  • one smart apple The idiom "one smart apple" typically refers to a person who is intelligent, clever, or resourceful. It is used to describe someone who stands out from the rest due to their sharpness or quick thinking.
  • zigged when one should've zagged The idiom "zigged when one should've zagged" refers to a situation where someone made the wrong decision or took the wrong action, leading to unwanted or unfavorable consequences. It implies that the person made a mistake by choosing an ineffective or counterproductive option when a different, more suitable one was available. The phrase often highlights the importance of making the correct choice or taking appropriate action in order to achieve desired outcomes.
  • one fell swoop, in The idiom "one fell swoop" means to accomplish something quickly or all at once. It refers to a single action that achieves multiple objectives simultaneously or completes a task entirely without any delay or interruption.
  • hang one on The idiom "hang one on" typically means to consume a substantial amount of alcoholic beverages, often to the point of becoming intoxicated.
  • do sth with one hand tied behind your back The idiom "do something with one hand tied behind your back" means to perform a task or achieve something effortlessly or without encountering any difficulty. It implies that the person involved possesses significant skills, abilities, or expertise, making the task seem easy, even if there are additional constraints or limitations in place.
  • one foot in the grave The idiom "one foot in the grave" typically refers to someone who is extremely old, ill, or close to death. It suggests that the person's health or circumstances have deteriorated to the point that they are very near the end of their life.
  • what one doesn't know won't hurt one The definition of the idiom "what one doesn't know won't hurt one" is that ignorance can be blissful or beneficial, as one cannot be harmed by something if they are unaware of its existence or details.
  • put all one's eggs in one basket The idiom "put all one's eggs in one basket" means to concentrate all of one's efforts, resources, or hopes in a single strategy, plan, or venture without having a backup plan or diversifying one's options. It suggests that if the single plan fails or goes wrong, one stands to lose everything.
  • play one end against the other The idiom "play one end against the other" refers to the act of manipulating or exploiting two opposing parties or individuals by making their differences work in one's own favor. It involves pitting two sides against each other for personal gain or advantage.
  • have had one too many The idiom "have had one too many" means that someone has consumed too much of a particular substance, typically alcohol, and has reached a point of intoxication or drunkenness. It implies that the person has exceeded their limit or tolerance for that substance.
  • one bad apple spoils the (whole) bushel The idiom "one bad apple spoils the (whole) bushel" means that the presence of a single negative or corrupt element can have a harmful influence on a larger group or community, ultimately leading to the deterioration of the entire group's reputation, integrity, or effectiveness. It highlights the idea that one negative influence can taint the perception or quality of the whole.
  • One man's trash is another man's treasure The idiom "One man's trash is another man's treasure" means that something that one person considers worthless or undesirable may be highly valued and desirable to someone else. It emphasizes that individual opinions and tastes can greatly differ, and what one person may disregard as insignificant or unimportant, another person may perceive as valuable and significant.
  • One of these days is none of these days. The idiom "One of these days is none of these days" means that if something needs to be done, it should be done immediately rather than procrastinating and postponing it for the future. It implies that waiting for the perfect or convenient moment to take action often leads to inaction, as there may never be an ideal opportunity.
  • each and every one The idiom "each and every one" is used to emphasize the inclusion of each individual or item in a group, highlighting that no person or thing is excluded or left out. It signifies the complete and thorough consideration or acknowledgement of every single entity.
  • no one ever went broke underestimating the taste of... The definition for the idiom "no one ever went broke underestimating the taste of..." refers to a sarcastic statement implying that catering to lower standards or appealing to the masses, even if it involves producing low-quality or unrefined products, is a surefire way to achieve financial success. This phrase suggests that people are generally more willing to consume or purchase things that are mediocre or of lesser quality, rather than investing in more sophisticated or refined options.
  • frosty one The idiom "frosty one" refers to an alcoholic beverage, typically a cold beer. It suggests the idea of enjoying a refreshing and cold drink.
  • like a hen with one chick The idiom "like a hen with one chick" refers to someone who is overly protective, anxious, or constantly worried about someone or something that is dear to them. It suggests that the person is extremely cautious and attentive, just like a mother hen carefully watching over and protecting her only chick.
  • and one for luck The idiom "and one for luck" means to do or have an extra thing, usually as a superstitious act, to increase the chances of success or good fortune. It suggests that one more attempt or item is added to already sufficient or adequate numbers for good measure or additional luck.
  • far be it from one to The idiom "far be it from one to" is used to emphasize that someone strongly disagrees with a certain action or idea, suggesting that they would never do or support such a thing. It conveys a sense of distance or superiority regarding the mentioned action or idea.
  • hurry one on one's way The idiom "hurry one on one's way" means to quickly urge or encourage someone to leave or continue their journey without delay.
  • no one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of... The idiom "no one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of..." refers to the notion that there is often financial gain or success in assuming or treating someone as being less intelligent or discerning than they actually are. It suggests that it is a profitable strategy to underestimate people's intelligence or to cater to a lower level of understanding when it comes to appealing to a wider audience or making money.
  • short on one end The idiom "short on one end" typically refers to a situation where someone or something lacks something necessary or is deficient in some way. It implies that there is an imbalance or inadequacy in a particular area or aspect.
  • There's more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "There's more than one way to skin a cat" means that there is more than one method or approach to accomplish a particular task or goal. It highlights the notion that there are various alternative solutions or strategies to achieve a desired outcome.
  • let one rip The idiom "let one rip" is a colloquial and humorous way of describing the act of passing gas, or releasing flatulence.
  • one by one The idiom "one by one" means to do or deal with things individually or separately, in a sequential and orderly manner.
  • stop one dead in tracks The idiom "stop one dead in their tracks" means to suddenly halt or immobilize someone, preventing them from moving or continuing with what they were doing. It refers to a situation or event that causes a person to be completely surprised, stunned, or unable to proceed.
  • if ever I saw one, at if ever there was one The idiom "if ever I saw one" or "if ever there was one" is a phrase used to emphasize that something or someone perfectly exemplifies or embodies a particular characteristic, quality, or description. It implies that there is no better example or more fitting representation of that description than the subject being referred to.
  • one half of the world does not know how the other half lives The idiom "one half of the world does not know how the other half lives" refers to the idea that people from different social or economic backgrounds often have limited understanding or awareness of the circumstances, struggles, or lifestyle of those who are less privileged or belong to a different social class. It highlights the divide and lack of knowledge that exists between different segments of society.
  • at one go The idiom "at one go" refers to completing a task or achieving a goal in a single attempt or without interruption. It means doing something all at once or in one continuous action, without breaks or pauses.
  • behoove one to do The idiom "behoove one to do" means that it is necessary, advantageous, or incumbent upon someone to do something. It suggests that it is in someone's best interest or duty to take a particular action.
  • There's one born every minute. The idiom "There's one born every minute" means that someone is easily deceived or tricked because they are gullible or naïve. It implies that people are constantly being fooled or falling for scams.
  • Run that by me one more time The definition of the idiom "Run that by me one more time" is a request for someone to repeat or explain something because the listener didn't fully understand or wasn't paying attention the first time.
  • land/sock sb one The idiom "land/sock someone one" means to deliver a forceful blow or punch to someone. It implies a strong, powerful strike, usually with the fist, to incapacitate or immobilize the person being hit.
  • hit one where one lives The idiom "hit one where one lives" means to strike or affect someone in a particularly sensitive or personal manner, often by saying something that directly relates to their personal beliefs, experiences, or vulnerabilities. It metaphorically suggests hitting someone at their core or in their emotional or psychological home.
  • one ray of hope The idiom "one ray of hope" refers to a small sign or glimmer of hope in a seemingly bleak or desperate situation. It implies that even a single shred of optimism or a small possibility can provide comfort or inspiration.
  • leave (something) on one side The idiom "leave (something) on one side" means to set aside or ignore something, typically a problem, issue, or task, without addressing or resolving it at that moment. It implies intentionally choosing not to deal with or give attention to a particular matter for the time being.
  • take each day as it comes/take it one day at a time The idiom "take each day as it comes" or "take it one day at a time" means to live or deal with life's challenges on a daily basis, without worrying about the future or past events. It suggests focusing on the present moment and treating each day as a new opportunity, without being overwhelmed by long-term planning or concerns. This approach emphasizes being patient, adaptable, and staying focused on the immediate tasks or goals.
  • number one with a bullet The idiom "number one with a bullet" is a phrase used to describe something or someone that has quickly risen to the top of a list or ranking, often in a competitive or influential context. It implies that the subject has achieved significant success or popularity and is likely to continue growing or maintaining their position. The phrase originated from the Billboard charts, where music singles that had a sudden and substantial increase in popularity would be marked with a bullet symbol to indicate their upward trajectory.
  • drive one out of mind The idiom "drive one out of mind" means to cause extreme annoyance, frustration, or irritation to someone, to the point where they become mentally or emotionally overwhelmed and cannot focus or think clearly.
  • Run that by one more time The idiom "Run that by one more time" means to ask someone to repeat or clarify something that was said because it was not fully understood or needs further clarification.
  • one fine day The idiom "one fine day" means at some unspecified time in the future, usually referring to a day that is pleasant, successful, or full of unexpected happiness or fortune.
  • one step forward, two steps back The idiom "one step forward, two steps back" is used to describe a situation where someone's progress or advancement is hindered by an equal or greater setback or obstacle. It implies a pattern of making small or slow advancements, only to face setbacks or difficulties that erase or surpass the progress made.
  • can count on the fingers of one hand The idiom "can count on the fingers of one hand" means that there are only a few examples or occurrences of something. It implies that the number of instances is so small that they can be easily counted using only the fingers of one hand. It suggests scarcity or rarity.
  • in one breath The idiom "in one breath" means to say or do two contradictory or conflicting things, often in a quick succession, without acknowledging the inconsistency. It implies expressing contradictory statements or actions without acknowledging their opposing nature.
  • as one door closes, another one opens The idiom "as one door closes, another one opens" means that when one opportunity or situation comes to an end or does not work out, another one will soon arise or become available. It suggests that even if something negative happens, there is always the potential for something positive to follow.
  • be one for something/for doing something The idiom "be one for something/for doing something" means to have a strong preference or inclination towards a particular activity, idea, or behavior. It implies that someone enjoys or is skilled at a specific thing or has a natural tendency towards it.
  • have one in the oven The idiom "have one in the oven" typically refers to someone being pregnant. It suggests that the person has a baby developing in their womb, similar to how an item is being baked or cooked in an oven.
  • one in a thousand The idiom "one in a thousand" refers to something or someone who is extremely rare, unique, or exceptional. It implies that out of a large number of people or things, only one stands out or possesses exceptional qualities.
  • meat and drink to one The idiom "meat and drink to one" means something that one thoroughly enjoys or finds deeply satisfying. It refers to an activity, situation, or topic that brings great pleasure and fulfillment to someone.
  • One cannot love and be wise The idiom "One cannot love and be wise" suggests that being in love can sometimes hinder one's ability to think logically and make wise decisions. It implies that emotions and reason often conflict with each other, making it difficult to maintain a balanced and rational perspective in matters involving love or infatuation.
  • throw one out on one’s ear “To throw one out on one’s ear” is an idiomatic expression that means to forcefully remove or expel someone from a place or situation, usually with a sense of indignation or contempt. It implies that the removal is abrupt, forceful, and often without any sympathy or consideration for the person being thrown out. The phrase conveys a strong sense of rejection, humiliation, or dismissal.
  • know one for what one is The idiom "know one for what one is" means to accurately recognize or understand someone's true nature, character, or intentions. It implies actively perceiving and comprehending someone's traits, behavior, or true self without being deceived or misled by their outward appearance or pretense.
  • carry with one The idiom "carry with one" means to mentally or emotionally bear the weight or burden of something. It refers to the act of constantly thinking about or feeling responsible for a person, situation, or problem, often resulting in a heavy emotional or mental load.
  • wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it" is used to describe a person who is completely oblivious or clueless about something, to the point that they would not recognize or understand it even if it is right in front of them or happens directly to them. It emphasizes the person's lack of awareness or knowledge regarding a specific subject or item.
  • two birds with one stone The idiom "two birds with one stone" means accomplishing two objectives or tasks with a single action or effort.
  • tell me another one!, at tell me another! The idiom "tell me another one!" or "tell me another!" is an exclamation used to express disbelief or skepticism about a statement or story being told. It is often said in a sarcastic or mocking manner, indicating that the person does not believe what they are being told and is requesting a more convincing or credible explanation.
  • cut one The idiom "cut one" is a slang expression that refers to the act of passing gas or releasing flatulence. It is often used humorously or euphemistically.
  • get wits about one The idiom "get wits about one" means to become alert, attentive, or composed in a difficult or dangerous situation, usually after a moment of confusion or surprise. It implies regaining presence of mind or mental clarity to deal with the circumstances effectively.
  • nice one! "Nice one!" is an idiom used to express approval or appreciation for something well done or impressive. It is often used sarcastically or humorously in response to a clever or witty remark or action.
  • have more than one string to (one's) bow The idiom "have more than one string to (one's) bow" means to have several options, skills, or abilities that one can rely on or use to achieve a particular goal. It suggests that someone is not limited to just one approach or method and has multiple alternatives available to them.
  • be one of the lads The idiom "be one of the lads" refers to someone, typically a man, who behaves or participates in activities in a way that is accepted or embraced by a group of male friends or acquaintances. It implies that the person is included, accepted, and considered equal among the group, often engaging in shared interests, humor, or behavior.
  • the big one The idiom "the big one" refers to a significant or important event, often implying something of great magnitude, importance, or impact. It can be used to describe various situations or experiences that are considered significant or momentous.
  • land (someone) one The idiom "land (someone) one" generally refers to hitting or striking someone with force. It can also be used more figuratively to indicate that someone or something has a significant impact, usually in a negative sense.
  • have (something) coming to one The idiom "have (something) coming to one" means that someone deserves or should expect a certain consequence or punishment for their actions or behavior. It implies that the person is deserving of the outcome, whether positive or negative, because of their actions or behavior.
  • one man's meat is another man's poison The idiom "one man's meat is another man's poison" means that what one person may find agreeable or suitable, another person may find distasteful or harmful. It emphasizes the subjective nature of preferences, demonstrating that something desired or beneficial for one individual may be undesirable or detrimental for another individual.
  • number one The idiom "number one" typically refers to oneself or the most important or highly regarded individual or thing in a particular context. It can be used to indicate priority, superiority, or self-centeredness.
  • except for one thing The idiom "except for one thing" means that everything mentioned or described is true or applicable, except for a specific exception or detail that is different or does not fit the pattern.
  • pull a fast one The idiom "pull a fast one" means to deceive or trick someone in a clever or cunning manner, typically by misleading or cheating them in a surprising or unexpected way.
  • If two ride on a horse, one must ride behind The idiom "If two ride on a horse, one must ride behind" means that when two people are working together or sharing something, one person must take the lead and the other person must follow or take a subordinate position. It implies that there can only be one person in a position of authority or control at a time.
  • bring sth crashing down (around one) The idiom "bring something crashing down (around one)" refers to the sudden and forceful destruction or collapse of something, such as a plan, a business, or even one's life or reputation. It implies a dramatic and chaotic end to a situation or scenario.
  • one (damned/damn) thing after another The idiom "one (damned/damn) thing after another" is used to express a string of continuous problems, difficulties, or negative events occurring in succession. It implies a sense of exasperation or frustration regarding the relentless occurrence of unfavorable circumstances one has to face.
  • don’t put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "don't put all your eggs in one basket" means that one should not invest or rely too heavily on a single option or resource, as it could lead to a significant loss or failure. It emphasizes the importance of diversifying and spreading risk across multiple alternatives to avoid potential devastation if one option fails.
  • black as one is painted The idiom "black as one is painted" means that someone's reputation or character is widely perceived to be negative, usually due to their dishonesty or immoral behavior. It implies that the person is regarded as deceitful, untrustworthy, or involved in shady, illicit activities.
  • one good turn deserves another The idiom "one good turn deserves another" implies that if someone helps or does a good deed for someone else, it is only fair or right that the person being helped returns the favor or does something good in return. It highlights the idea of reciprocity and the belief that kindness or favors should be repaid.
  • an old one The idiom "an old one" refers to a joke, story, or piece of information that is well-worn, familiar, and has been shared or repeated many times before. It usually implies that the content is outdated or lacking in novelty.
  • be as one, at be at one The idiom "be as one" or "be at one" refers to a state of harmony or unity among individuals or groups. It means to be in complete agreement or understanding with someone or to have a strong sense of connection and cooperation. It suggests being on the same page or sharing the same perspective, goals, or values.
  • go you one better The idiom "go you one better" means to outdo or surpass someone in a particular aspect or achievement. It implies trying to top someone's accomplishment or offering by doing something even more impressive or remarkable.
  • (one's) only got one pair of hands The idiom "(one's) only got one pair of hands" means that a person can only do so much or accomplish a limited amount of tasks at once because they have a finite amount of time, energy, or resources. It implies that one should not be expected to do more than they are capable of doing.
  • on one hand...on the other... The idiom "on one hand...on the other hand..." is used to present opposing or contrasting viewpoints or considerations about a particular topic or situation. It expresses the idea that there are multiple aspects to consider or different perspectives to examine before making a decision or forming an opinion.
  • one brick short of a (full) load The idiom "one brick short of a (full) load" is a figurative expression used to describe someone who is considered mentally or intellectually lacking or not quite mentally stable. It implies that the person is missing an essential component or has a limitation, just like a load that is incomplete or defective due to a missing brick.
  • takes one to know one The idiom "takes one to know one" means that someone is able to identify a particular negative quality or behavior in another person because they themselves possess the same quality or engage in the same behavior. It implies that the person making the observation is not without flaws or shortcomings in the same regard.
  • one hell of a (something or someone) The idiom "one hell of a (something or someone)" is used to emphasize or describe something or someone in an extremely positive or remarkable way. It conveys the idea of being exceptionally impressive, outstanding, or remarkable. It often emphasizes the level of intensity, magnitude, or quality of the thing or person being referred to.
  • price one has to pay The idiom "price one has to pay" refers to the consequences or negative outcome that a person must face as a result of their actions or choices. It often implies that achieving or obtaining something desired requires making sacrifices or enduring difficulties.
  • not if one can help it The idiom "not if one can help it" means making every effort to avoid or prevent something from happening. It indicates a strong preference or determination to avoid a particular situation or outcome.
  • put one over on sb The idiom "put one over on somebody" means to deceive or trick someone in a clever or cunning manner, often to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome. It typically involves manipulating or outsmarting another person to make them believe something that is not true or to take advantage of their naivety.
  • got it in one! The idiom "got it in one!" means that someone has answered or understood something correctly on the first attempt, without any further explanation or clarification needed. It expresses a sense of surprise or admiration for their ability to grasp the concept accurately right away.
  • one for the road The idiom "one for the road" refers to having one more alcoholic drink before leaving a place, typically a bar or restaurant, to continue a journey or head home.
  • do something in/at one sitting The idiom "do something in/at one sitting" means to complete a task or activity without taking a break or stopping. It refers to doing something continuously or without interruption until it is finished, typically referring to tasks that may take a significant amount of time or effort.
  • leave one to one's fate The idiom "leave one to one's fate" means to abandon or let someone face the consequences of their actions or circumstances without intervening or providing assistance. It suggests that no help or support will be offered, and the person must rely solely on their own resources or rely on fate for the outcome.
  • one for the (record) books The idiom "one for the (record) books" refers to a remarkable or extraordinary event or achievement that is worthy of being recorded or remembered. It signifies something that is exceptional, unusual, or unprecedented. It suggests that the event or achievement is significant enough to be included in a historical record or a collection of notable occurrences.
  • make fish of one and flesh of another The idiom "make fish of one and flesh of another" means to treat people unequally or unfairly, often showing favoritism towards one person while disregarding or neglecting another. It suggests a biased or inconsistent treatment of individuals or groups.
  • be one up on (someone or something) The idiom "be one up on (someone or something)" means to have an advantage or be in a superior position compared to someone or something. It implies being ahead, more knowledgeable, or better prepared than others in a competitive or comparative context. It signifies having gained an advantage by being more clever, experienced, or well-informed.
  • could do with one arm tied behind back The idiom "could do with one arm tied behind back" means that someone is exceedingly capable or skilled at something, to the extent that they could still perform effortlessly even when facing extreme challenges or handicaps. It implies a high level of proficiency or expertise in a particular task or activity.
  • at one stroke The idiom "at one stroke" means accomplishing or resolving something in a single action or event, typically one that is swift or decisive.
  • Pull the other one (it's got bells on)! The idiom "Pull the other one (it's got bells on)!" is a sarcastic and dismissive response to someone's statement or claim that is seen as highly unbelievable, absurd, or unlikely. It implies that the speaker is not convinced and feels that the person is either attempting to deceive or manipulate them. The addition of "it's got bells on" emphasizes the complete incredulity or ridiculousness of the statement being made.
  • suck the big one The idiom "suck the big one" is a vulgar expression that is typically used to convey frustration, disappointment, or a sense of being in a difficult or unpleasant situation. It can also be used to describe a feeling of being taken advantage of or being treated unfairly. However, it is important to note that this phrase is highly inappropriate and offensive, and it is advisable to refrain from using it in formal or polite settings.
  • one's work is cut out for one The idiom "one's work is cut out for one" means that someone has a challenging or difficult task ahead of them. It implies that the work or assignment is already clearly defined or predetermined, leaving no room for ambiguity or doubt.
  • go one better (than someone or something) The idiom "go one better (than someone or something)" means to surpass or outdo someone or something in a particular action, achievement, or performance. It refers to doing or accomplishing something to a greater extent or at a higher level than another person or thing.
  • be one card short of a full deck The idiom "be one card short of a full deck" is used to describe someone who is considered foolish, unintelligent, or mentally unstable. It implies that the person is missing a crucial element or is lacking in common sense.
  • be able to count (someone or something) on the fingers of one hand The idiom "be able to count (someone or something) on the fingers of one hand" means that there are very few of that person or thing, to the extent that you can count them using just the fingers on one hand. It implies scarcity or rarity.
  • go in one ear and out the other The idiom "go in one ear and out the other" means that something is heard or said but quickly forgotten or disregarded. It refers to the situation when information or advice is not retained or taken seriously, having no lasting impact on someone's thoughts or actions.
  • take/draw somebody to one side The idiom "take/draw somebody to one side" means to discreetly or privately speak to someone away from others in order to have a confidential conversation or discuss a sensitive matter. It involves physically moving the person to a different location to ensure privacy and confidentiality.
  • in one stroke The idiom "in one stroke" refers to accomplishing or achieving something in a single, decisive action or effort. This expression implies that a task or goal is completed efficiently and effectively, without the need for multiple attempts or steps. It emphasizes the speed and effectiveness with which an action is executed.
  • (just) one of those things The idiom "(just) one of those things" refers to an event or situation that is unfortunate, unexpected, or out of one's control, and is accepted as an inevitable part of life without dwelling on it or trying to change it. It implies that the event or situation is a common occurrence that happens to everyone at some point, and there is no need to overthink or make a big deal out of it.
  • when you've seen one (something), you've seen them all The idiom "when you've seen one (something), you've seen them all" means that once you have seen or experienced one thing of a particular type, there is no need to see or experience more because they are all very similar or repetitive. In other words, there are no significant differences or variations between each instance or example of that thing.
  • be a one The idiom "be a one" typically means to be unique, extraordinary, or exceptional in some way. It suggests that someone or something stands out from the rest and possesses distinct qualities, distinct skills, or a distinct personality. It can also imply being unusual or not conforming to societal norms.
  • frighten one out of wits The idiom "frighten one out of their wits" means to greatly scare or terrify someone to the point where they become extremely afraid or panicked. It implies that the person's fear is so intense that it temporarily suspends their rational thinking or ability to function properly.
  • a hundred/thousand/million and one The idiom "a hundred/thousand/million and one" refers to a very large number or an excessive amount of something. It emphasizes a situation where there are numerous possibilities, choices, or tasks, often to the point of being overwhelming or impossible to achieve.
  • bite the big one The idiom "bite the big one" is a colloquial expression that means to die, fail, or face a significant negative consequence. It is often used informally to emphasize someone's negative outcome or to express frustration or disappointment.
  • one that got away The idiom "one that got away" refers to a missed opportunity or someone that was not pursued or captured. It typically describes a situation where something or someone desirable was not successfully obtained, achieved, or maintained, often leaving a sense of regret or longing.
  • one of those days (or weeks, etc.) The idiom "one of those days (or weeks, etc.)" refers to a period of time, usually a day or week, during which everything seems to go wrong or go contrary to one's expectations. It implies that it is a particularly challenging or frustrating period where multiple unfavorable events occur, causing the individual to feel overwhelmed or exasperated.
  • give one freedom The idiom "give one freedom" refers to granting someone the right or opportunity to act independently, make their own choices, or pursue their own desires without restrictions or limitations. It suggests allowing someone to experience personal autonomy and self-determination.
  • one age with (someone) The idiom "one age with (someone)" means to have a close or deep connection with someone, typically due to a shared interest, experience, or understanding. It implies that two individuals are on the same wavelength or have a similar perspective, making them feel like they belong to the same time or generation despite any age difference.
  • put one at (one's) ease The idiom "put one at (one's) ease" means to make someone feel comfortable, relaxed, or less anxious in a particular situation or environment. It involves creating a sense of ease or calmness in someone's demeanor or state of mind.
  • gets one right here The idiom "gets one right here" generally refers to a person or group experiencing a sense of fulfillment, satisfaction, or gratification in a particular situation. It suggests that they have achieved something they desired or accomplished a task successfully. The expression often conveys a feeling of triumph or accomplishment.
  • every time one turns around The idiom "every time one turns around" means that something happens frequently or constantly, often in a quick succession, without pause or delay. It refers to situations where there are continual occurrences or events happening rapidly, leaving little time for respite or breaks in between.
  • put one on guard The idiom "put one on guard" means to make someone cautious, alert, or wary about a situation or potential threat. It suggests that something has caused a person to be vigilant and to guard against possible risks or dangers.
  • have one eye/half an eye on something The idiom "have one eye/half an eye on something" means to pay partial attention or to be aware of something while also focusing on or being preoccupied with something else. It suggests that one is not giving their complete or undivided attention to a particular matter.
  • have more than one string to one's fiddle The idiom "have more than one string to one's fiddle" means to have a variety of skills, talents, or resources that one can utilize in different situations. It implies that a person is versatile and capable of doing multiple things effectively.
  • it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) barrel The idiom "it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) barrel" means that the negative influence or behavior of one person can have a detrimental effect on the whole group. It suggests that the actions or attitude of a single individual can taint or ruin the entire group's reputation, performance, or morale.
  • talk until one is blue in the face The idiom "talk until one is blue in the face" means to talk for a long time, repeatedly, or passionately without any noticeable effect or result. It implies that no matter how much one speaks or argues, it will not change the outcome or convince the other person. The phrase "blue in the face" suggests that one has exhausted themselves to the point of turning blue, which represents physical or vocal exertion.
  • be in one of your moods The idiom "be in one of your moods" refers to someone being in a particular emotional state or disposition that is characterized by being moody, irritable, or unpredictable in their behavior or attitude. It suggests that the person is experiencing a temporary phase of moodiness or emotional volatility.
  • be one in the eye for sb The idiom "be one in the eye for sb" means to be a setback or a perfect revenge for someone, usually resulting in their embarrassment, disappointment, or loss. It refers to a situation where someone's actions or words have a negative consequence or outcome for the other person, giving them a figurative "poke in the eye," causing them distress or harm in return.
  • at one sitting The idiom "at one sitting" refers to completing a task or consuming something entirely, without taking breaks or interruptions. It implies doing something uninterrupted or in a single continuous session.
  • cross that bridge when one comes to it "Cross that bridge when one comes to it" is an idiom that means to deal with a problem or worry only when it actually happens and not before. It suggests that it is unnecessary to worry or think about future difficulties until they actually occur. It encourages focusing on the present and handling problems as they arise rather than preemptively worrying about potential future issues.
  • lay about one The idiom "lay about one" typically means to relax in a leisurely manner or to engage in activities of leisure or idleness. It implies taking time off work or responsibilities to enjoy oneself freely and without any specific purpose or direction.
  • one and all The idiom "one and all" refers to every individual or every person without exception; it emphasizes inclusivity and the involvement of everyone in a particular situation or event.
  • a nine/one/sevenday wonder The idiom "a nine/day/sevenday wonder" refers to something or someone that gains sudden and short-lived popularity or fame, but then quickly loses the attention or interest of others. It implies that the initial enthusiasm or excitement quickly fades away after a very brief period.
  • on the one hand The idiom "on the one hand" is used to introduce an argument or perspective that presents one side of a situation, often followed by "on the other hand" to present an opposing viewpoint or consideration. It signifies the presentation of one aspect or point of view as a starting point for considering multiple sides of an issue.
  • could (do something) with one arm tied behind (one's) back The idiom "could (do something) with one arm tied behind (one's) back" refers to someone's exceptional ability or skill in accomplishing a task effortlessly. It implies that even under challenging or limiting circumstances, the person would still be able to complete the task with ease.
  • bring (one) out of one's shell The idiom "bring (one) out of one's shell" means to encourage or help someone to become more sociable, outgoing, or confident, especially if they are typically shy or reserved. It implies that a person is withdrawn or introverted and needs assistance to engage with others and be more comfortable in social situations.
  • the odd one out The idiom "the odd one out" refers to a person or thing that is different from the rest or doesn't fit within a particular group or category. It implies that the individual or object stands out due to its uniqueness, contrasting characteristics, or not conforming to established norms or patterns.
  • one jump ahead of someone/something The idiom "one jump ahead of someone/something" means to be slightly ahead or to stay ahead of another person or situation, often through quick thinking, foresight, or being more prepared. It implies being one step ahead in terms of knowledge, action, or strategy.
  • pull a fast one (on sb) The idiom "pull a fast one (on sb)" means to trick or deceive someone cleverly and unexpectedly. It refers to a sneaky or dishonest act performed to gain an advantage over someone or to manipulate a situation.
  • hardly/barely put one foot in front of the other The idiom "hardly/barely put one foot in front of the other" means to struggle or have extreme difficulty in walking or making progress. It often conveys a sense of exhaustion, physical weakness, or emotional distress.
  • as one door closes, another opens The idiom "as one door closes, another opens" means that when a particular opportunity or situation comes to an end or is no longer available, a new opportunity or situation presents itself. It suggests that there will always be new chances or possibilities, even after a disappointment or setback.
  • never had it so good, one The idiom "never had it so good" refers to a situation in which someone is experiencing an exceptionally favorable or prosperous period in their life. It implies that their current circumstances are significantly better than they have ever been before.
  • take to one side The idiom "take to one side" typically means to pull someone aside or privately away from others to have a conversation or discussion with them in a more discreet or private setting. It implies the intention of having a private and possibly serious conversation, away from the presence of others.
  • One has to draw the line smw The idiom "One has to draw the line" means setting a limit or establishing a boundary in a particular situation. It implies taking a stand or taking action to prevent something from going too far or becoming unacceptable.
  • the Evil One The idiom "the Evil One" refers to a person or entity who is typically associated with evil, wickedness, or malevolence. It is often used to describe a notorious or influential figure who is perceived as an embodiment of pure evil or someone who engages in malicious or harmful actions.
  • of one mind (about sm or sth) The idiom "of one mind (about something or someone)" means that a group of individuals or majority of people share the same opinion, belief, or attitude regarding a particular topic or individual. It signifies unity in thoughts or agreement in a group.
  • pull one out of the hat The idiom "pull one out of the hat" means to unexpectedly come up with a solution or idea that resolves a problem or saves a situation, often in a surprising or impressive way. It refers to the imagery of a magician pulling something surprising or impressive out of a hat during a magic trick.
  • fast one The idiom "fast one" typically refers to a deceptive or deceitful act or trick. It can also imply someone trying to pull something over on others, usually in a sneaky or underhanded manner.
  • boldly go where no one has gone before The idiom "boldly go where no one has gone before" is a phrase coined by the television series Star Trek to describe the adventurous spirit of exploring new and uncharted territories or undertaking daring ventures without fear or hesitation. It signifies pushing the boundaries of knowledge, discovery, and innovation by venturing into unexplored realms or pursuing unconventional paths.
  • off to one side The idiom "off to one side" means to be positioned or located away from the center or main focus of something. It suggests being set apart, separate, or isolated from the main action or group.
  • go/be back to square one The idiom "go/be back to square one" means to return to the very beginning or the initial stage of a process or task due to an inability to make progress or achieve the desired outcome. It implies that all previous efforts, work, or progress have been wiped away and one must start over.
  • at/in one go The idiom "at/in one go" refers to doing something entirely or completing a task in a single attempt without interruption or breaks. It indicates doing something all at once or in a single effort without needing to start, stop, or repeat.
  • get (something) in one The idiom "get (something) in one" means to understand or grasp something quickly and easily, often referring to a concept, idea, or piece of information. It implies that the person comprehends the subject matter on their first attempt without any difficulty or confusion.
  • for one The idiom "for one" is used to indicate that the person stating their opinion or point of view does not speak on behalf of others or cannot vouch for a general consensus. It emphasizes the individuality of their perspective and highlights that their opinion may not be representative of a larger group.
  • have one eye on The idiom "have one eye on" means to give partial attention or be mindful of something while also focusing on another task or situation. It implies dividing one's attention between multiple things simultaneously.
  • bust sm one The idiom "bust someone" typically means to catch or apprehend someone in the act of doing something wrong or illegal. It can refer to a situation where someone is caught red-handed or exposed in misconduct, resulting in their arrest or punishment.
  • one hour's sleep before midnight is worth two after The idiom "one hour's sleep before midnight is worth two after" means that getting a good night's sleep, starting before midnight, is more beneficial and restorative than sleeping the same amount of time after midnight. It implies that sleep quality before midnight is higher, and it is often seen as a recommendation to go to bed early in order to wake up feeling more refreshed and energized.
  • one swallow does not a spring make The idiom "one swallow does not a spring make" means that a single positive or indicative event does not necessarily indicate a larger trend or change. It emphasizes the importance of considering multiple instances or pieces of evidence before drawing a conclusive judgment or prediction. The phrase originated from a proverbial saying attributed to Aristotle in his work, "Ethics."
  • (one) only has one pair of hands The idiom "(one) only has one pair of hands" means that a person can only do so much at once, highlighting the limitations of an individual's capacity or ability to accomplish multiple tasks simultaneously.
  • go off on one The idiom "go off on one" refers to someone suddenly becoming very angry, upset, or emotional and expressing their feelings in an excessive or uncontrollable manner. It implies that the person becomes intense, impassioned, or unreasonable while speaking or acting out.
  • one for the books The idiom "one for the books" is used to describe an extraordinary or remarkable event or occurrence that is memorable and significant enough to be recorded in history or remembered for a long time. It typically refers to something that is highly unusual, unexpected, or unprecedented.
  • be one in the eye for The idiom "be one in the eye for" means to be a significant setback or blow to someone. It refers to an action or event that causes embarrassment, disappointment, or defeat for an individual or a group. The phrase suggests that the recipient of the setback may feel as though they have been humiliated or proven wrong.
  • go one better The idiom "go one better" refers to the act of surpassing or outdoing someone or something, seeking to achieve a greater level of excellence or achievement. It implies the desire to go beyond what has already been done or accomplished.
  • a great one for The idiom "a great one for" is used to describe someone who has a particular interest or tendency to do something. It suggests that the person is known for and enjoys engaging in a specific activity or behavior.
  • put one off one's stride To "put one off one's stride" means to disrupt someone's rhythm, confidence, or composure, causing them to lose focus or falter in their performance or progress. It refers to an interruption or distraction that hinders someone from performing at their best or maintaining a steady pace.
  • with one hand behind your back The idiom "with one hand behind your back" means to accomplish a task or achieve success easily or effortlessly, as if it requires minimal effort or skill. It implies that the person is so competent or gifted in a certain area that they can complete a task, solve a problem, or achieve greatness effortlessly, as if they have an advantage or are not fully utilizing their abilities.
  • leave one to own devices The idiom "leave one to own devices" means to allow someone to act or think independently without assistance or intervention. It implies giving someone the freedom and autonomy to handle a situation or task on their own, without interference or guidance.
  • all (one's) eggs in one basket The idiom "all (one's) eggs in one basket" means to place all of one's resources, efforts, or hopes into a single thing, venture, or option. It implies the potential risk or vulnerability associated with relying solely on one possibility, as any failure or loss in that aspect could have significant consequences. Thus, it suggests the importance of diversification and spreading out investments or efforts to minimize potential risks.
  • one brick shy of a (full) load The idiom "one brick shy of a (full) load" means that someone is considered to be not very intelligent or mentally lacking. It suggests that the person is missing a crucial piece or lacking the necessary mental capacity to fully understand or function properly.
  • be able to count (someone or something) on one hand The idiom "be able to count (someone or something) on one hand" means to have only a small number of people or things. It implies that the quantity being referred to is so limited that it can easily be counted using just the fingers of one hand.
  • He puts his pants on one leg at a time The idiom "He puts his pants on one leg at a time" means that someone is an ordinary person just like everyone else, with no special privileges or abilities. It emphasizes the idea that the person being referred to is not superior or extraordinary.
  • in one hell of a hurry The idiom "in one hell of a hurry" means to be in an extreme rush or hurry, often implying a sense of urgency or impatience. It suggests that someone is in such a hurry that it is comparable to being in a state of chaos or extreme agitation.
  • all (the) one The idiom "all (the) one" is typically used to express that something is identical or indistinguishable from something else. It signifies that two or more things are considered the same or equivalent, and there is no difference between them.
  • one in the eye for The idiom "one in the eye for" refers to an action or event that serves as a humiliation or setback for someone. It usually involves someone doing or achieving something that causes embarrassment, disappointment, or inconvenience to another person. It is often used to describe an act of revenge or retaliation that aims to undermine or harm someone's reputation, position, or plans.
  • keep one eye on (someone or something) The idiom "keep one eye on (someone or something)" means to monitor or observe someone or something closely and attentively, typically to ensure their safety, well-being, or progress. It implies being watchful and alert to any changes or developments that may require intervention or action.
  • the odd man out, at the odd one out "The odd man out" or "the odd one out" is an idiom that refers to someone or something that is different from others in a group or does not fit in with the rest of the group. It can describe a person who feels isolated or excluded because they are noticeably different in some way, or it can refer to an object or concept that stands apart from others due to its unique characteristics or qualities.
  • be another/one of life's great mysteries The idiom "be another/one of life's great mysteries" means that something is inexplicable or difficult to understand. It suggests that the topic or situation being referred to is perplexing and lacks a clear or logical explanation, similar to other complex aspects or phenomena of life that remain unexplained.
  • what's coming to one The idiom "what's coming to one" means to receive consequences or outcomes that are deserved based on one's actions or behavior. It implies that someone will eventually face the appropriate retribution, whether it is positive or negative, for their actions or circumstances.
  • knock one over The idiom "knock one over" typically means to impress or astound someone with an extraordinary or remarkable achievement or action. It can also refer to stunning or surprising someone with a remarkable accomplishment or unexpected behavior.
  • sweep one off one's feet The idiom "sweep one off one's feet" means to completely charm or impress someone, often in a romantic or unexpected manner, to the point where they are overwhelmed with admiration or affection.
  • a one in a million chance The idiom "a one in a million chance" refers to an extremely rare or almost impossible occurrence. It implies that the likelihood of a particular event happening is so unusual or improbable that it is akin to winning in a lottery where there are a million possible outcomes.
  • have two strikes against one The idiom "have two strikes against one" means to be at a disadvantage or in a difficult situation due to an accumulation of negative factors or circumstances. It originates from the game of baseball, where a batter gets a strike for each unsuccessful attempt to hit the ball, and after three strikes, they are out. Therefore, having two strikes against someone implies they are closer to failure or defeat. In a figurative sense, it suggests that someone is facing additional challenges or obstacles that make their goals or success more difficult to achieve.
  • look out for number one The idiom "look out for number one" means to prioritize oneself or one's own interests above others. It suggests being self-focused, taking care of oneself, and making decisions that benefit oneself without considering the needs or well-being of others.
  • ill wind that blows no one any good, it's an The idiom "ill wind that blows no one any good" refers to a difficult or unfortunate situation that brings benefits or advantages to someone. It implies that even in unfavorable circumstances, there may be opportunities or blessings for certain individuals.
  • pull the other one (—it’s got bells on) The idiom "pull the other one (—it’s got bells on)" is an expression used to dismiss or express disbelief in what someone has just said. It suggests that the statement or claim being made is highly unlikely or even absurd. The addition of "it's got bells on" emphasizes the incredulity and emphasizes that the listener is not easily fooled.
  • do one better The idiom "do one better" means to outdo or surpass someone in a particular action or achievement, often by taking it to a higher level or accomplishing something greater. It implies trying to go above and beyond what has been previously done.
  • with one hand tied behind back The idiom "with one hand tied behind back" refers to doing something easily or effortlessly, as if it requires little effort or skill. It implies that the person can accomplish a task even under challenging or disadvantaged circumstances. The phrase emphasizes the impressive ability or advantage of an individual in a given situation.
  • one bad apple spoils the (whole) barrel The idiom "one bad apple spoils the (whole) barrel" means that a single negative or corrupt individual can have a detrimental impact on a group or organization, causing others to adopt similar behavior or lose their integrity. The phrase suggests that the negative influence is contagious and can undermine the overall reputation or effectiveness of the entire group.
  • bring one to oneself The idiom "bring one to oneself" typically means to help someone regain their composure or return to a state of self-control after experiencing a strong emotional reaction or disruptive behavior. It suggests assisting someone in calming down, finding inner peace, or regaining their rationality and composure.
  • take up where one left off The idiom "take up where one left off" means to resume an activity or situation from the same point at which it was previously paused or discontinued. It refers to continuing or picking up again without any interruptions or significant changes.
  • get one's wits about one The definition of the idiom "get one's wits about one" is to regain or collect one's mental faculties, composure, or ability to think clearly and react effectively in a situation. It refers to the act of becoming mentally alert, composed, and able to think quickly and intelligently.
  • cross a bridge when one comes to it The idiom "cross a bridge when one comes to it" means to deal with a particular problem or situation when it happens, rather than worrying about it in advance. It suggests not to be overly concerned or anxious about potential future difficulties, but rather to focus on addressing challenges as they arise. The phrase implies a sense of flexibility, adaptability, and the ability to handle problems as they occur rather than causing unnecessary stress by anticipating and worrying about them beforehand.
  • one way or another The idiom "one way or another" means that something will happen or be achieved, regardless of the specific method or path taken. It implies that there are multiple possible ways to accomplish a goal or reach a conclusion.
  • I have only got one pair of hands The idiom "I have only got one pair of hands" means that an individual can only do so much or cope with a limited amount of tasks or responsibilities at a given time. It emphasizes the fact that one person has limitations and cannot perform an excessive amount of work or handle multiple obligations simultaneously.
  • one tough cookie The idiom "one tough cookie" refers to a person who is resilient, brave, and strong-willed, demonstrating great determination and the ability to handle difficult or challenging situations. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is not easily intimidated or defeated.
  • put one through one's paces To "put one through one's paces" means to evaluate or test someone's skills, abilities, or performance in order to see how well they can perform under various conditions or scenarios. It often involves making someone go through a series of tasks or challenges to assess their capabilities and ascertain their strengths and weaknesses. This expression is usually used in contexts such as job interviews, auditions, or training sessions.
  • in one blow The idiom "in one blow" means to accomplish or achieve something significant or complete a task efficiently and effectively with a single action or effort. It refers to doing something in a single decisive act, without the need for additional attempts or actions.
  • of one kind, sort, etc. or another The idiom "of one kind, sort, etc. or another" is used to imply that something can be classified or categorized in a particular way, even if the specific details may vary or are not explicitly stated. It suggests that something falls into a certain category or type, although there may be slight differences within the category.
  • six of one and half a dozen of the other The idiom "six of one and half a dozen of the other" is used to express that two options or choices are essentially the same or have the same outcome, despite appearing different. This phrase suggests that there is no significant distinction between the alternatives and that the result or consequences will be similar regardless of the decision made.
  • there’s one born every minute The idiom "there’s one born every minute" means that people can easily be deceived, fooled, or taken advantage of. It suggests that there are always gullible or naive individuals who are susceptible to being tricked or fooled by dishonest people.
  • slip one over on somebody The idiom "slip one over on somebody" means to deceive or trick someone in a clever or sly manner, usually to gain an advantage or to succeed in a dishonest action without the person being aware of it.
  • in one piece The idiom "in one piece" means to be unharmed or undamaged, typically after a dangerous or difficult situation. It refers to the physical state of someone or something remaining intact without any parts missing or broken. Additionally, it can also be used figuratively to describe a person's emotional or mental state, indicating that they are still stable and unscathed by a challenging experience.
  • be/go off on one The idiom "be/go off on one" means to become extremely angry, agitated, or have an outburst of emotions and expressions in an uncontrolled manner. It refers to someone reacting strongly and passionately, often in an excessive or irrational way.
  • put/lay sth on/to one side The idiom "put/lay something on/to one side" means to set or keep something aside or separate, usually in order to deal with it at a later time or to not be distracted by it. It implies temporarily ignoring or not giving immediate attention to something.
  • one law for the rich and another for the poor The idiom "one law for the rich and another for the poor" refers to the perception or reality that people of different socioeconomic status are treated differently under the law. It implies that those with wealth and influence often receive preferential treatment or leniency when it comes to legal matters, while those who are economically disadvantaged may face harsher consequences or less access to justice.
  • relieve one of one's duties The idiom "relieve one of one's duties" means to remove or take away someone's responsibilities, tasks, or obligations, typically through a formal or official process. It suggests the act of providing temporary or permanent relief from the duties or workload one usually carries out.
  • be one/another of life's great mysteries The idiom "be one/another of life's great mysteries" means that something or someone is difficult or impossible to understand or explain. It suggests that the subject in question is puzzling, enigmatic, or unclear, similar to the mysteries of life that cannot be fully comprehended.
  • be all (the) one (to someone) The idiom "be all (the) one (to someone)" means to be the most important or significant person in someone's life, to be their ultimate source of love, support, or companionship. It implies a deep and exclusive connection, often reserved for a romantic partner or a close family member or friend.
  • hole in one The idiom "hole in one" refers to the achievement of hitting a golf ball into the hole with just one stroke, typically when teeing off on the first shot of a hole. This term is often used metaphorically to describe a remarkable success or accomplishment achieved effortlessly and flawlessly in any field of endeavor.
  • one after another/the other The idiom "one after another/the other" refers to a series of events or actions that occur consecutively or in rapid succession without any significant breaks or interruptions. It implies that events or activities are happening continuously, with one following immediately after the previous one.
  • one after the other The idiom "one after the other" means to happen or occur in rapid succession, with one thing or person following immediately after another in a consecutive manner. It implies a continuous or uninterrupted sequence of events or actions.
  • at one time The idiom "at one time" refers to a period in the past when something was true or applicable, indicating that it is no longer the case in the present. It highlights a change or transition from a previous situation or state of affairs.
  • like a hen with one chick (or chicken) The idiom "like a hen with one chick (or chicken)" is used to describe someone who is overly protective or possessive of someone or something, often to the point of being smothering or overbearing. It conveys the image of a mother hen attentively caring for and constantly watching over her sole chick, metaphorically representing someone's excessive concern or involvement in a particular situation or relationship.
  • with one hand tied behind your back The idiom "with one hand tied behind your back" means to complete a task or exhibit a skill effortlessly or with great ease, as if facing minimal challenges or obstacles. It implies that the person is exceptionally competent or skilled, even when faced with adverse conditions or limitations.
  • one in the eye for someone The idiom "one in the eye for someone" means to deliver a setback, defeat, or act of revenge to someone in a way that causes embarrassment, disappointment, or frustration. It refers to metaphorically attacking or undermining someone's position, often catching them off guard.
  • one foot in the grave, have The idiom "one foot in the grave" is used to describe someone who is very old, ill, or approaching death. It implies that the person's condition is so severe that they are close to the end of their life.
  • air one out The idiom "air one out" means to express or discuss one's thoughts, feelings, or grievances openly and honestly, usually with the intention of resolving conflicts or clearing misunderstandings. It is often used when referring to resolving issues or disagreements between individuals or groups through open communication.
  • look after number one The idiom "look after number one" refers to the act of prioritizing one's own interests, needs, and welfare above those of others. It implies a self-centered or selfish approach in which individuals take care of themselves first and foremost, often disregarding the well-being of others.
  • if ever there was one The idiom "if ever there was one" is used to emphasize that something or someone perfectly exemplifies or embodies a particular quality or characteristic. It implies that the thing being referred to is the most quintessential or epitome of its kind.
  • It's six of one, half a dozen of another The idiom "It's six of one, half a dozen of another" means that two options or choices are essentially the same or equivalent, even though they may appear to be different or have slight variations. It suggests that there is no significant difference between the two alternatives and they ultimately result in the same outcome.
  • put one on one's guard The idiom "put one on one's guard" means to make someone alert, cautious, or wary by providing them with important information or raising a potential threat or danger. It suggests that the person should be on high alert and ready to protect themselves or take necessary precautions.
  • every last one The idiom "every last one" refers to the entirety or complete group of people or things being referred to. It emphasizes that no one or nothing is excluded or left out.
  • the one about The idiom "the one about" is commonly used to refer to a particular story, joke, or anecdote that someone is about to share or mention. It implies that the speaker is about to refer to a specific incident, often one that has been previously discussed or is well-known among the group or community.
  • know where one is coming from The idiom "know where one is coming from" is used to refer to understanding someone's intentions, motives, background, or perspective on a particular issue or situation. It means to have knowledge or awareness of the factors that have influenced someone's thoughts, beliefs, or actions.
  • you're a fine one to talk!, at look who's talking! The idiom "You're a fine one to talk!" or "Look who's talking!" is used to express irony or hypocrisy. It is typically said to someone who is criticizing or giving advice about something they themselves are guilty of. The idiom implies that the person making the comment has no right or authority to do so because they are equally or more deserving of criticism.
  • keep one in place The idiom "keep one in place" typically refers to the act of maintaining control or authority over someone or something, preventing them from straying or deviating from a desired course of action or behavior. It can also imply the act of ensuring someone remains in a particular position or role without allowing them to move, change, or progress.
  • not as young as one used to be The idiom "not as young as one used to be" refers to the realization or acknowledgment that one is not as physically or mentally capable as they once were, typically due to aging. This phrase is often said humorously or to express a sense of nostalgia or regret about one's diminishing capabilities.
  • do something with one hand behind your back The idiom "do something with one hand behind your back" means to accomplish or perform a task effortlessly or easily, without much effort or difficulty required. It implies that the person doing the task is extremely skilled, competent, or experienced in that particular area.
  • put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "put all your eggs in one basket" means to risk everything by concentrating all your efforts, resources, or attention on a single option or possibility, often disregarding the potential risks or alternatives. It advises against relying solely on one thing or investing too much in a single venture, as it can lead to significant loss or disappointment if that one option fails.
  • be/get/have one up on somebody To "have one up on somebody" is an idiomatic expression that means to have an advantage or be in a better position than someone else, especially in terms of knowledge, skills, or information. It implies being ahead or having the upper hand in a particular situation.
  • one after another The idiom "one after another" means to occur or happen sequentially, with each event or action following immediately after the previous one. It implies a rapid succession or a continuous flow of events or actions happening without interruption.
  • what with one thing and another The idiom "what with one thing and another" means that various unspecified factors or circumstances, often numerous or unexpected, have caused a situation to be complex, difficult, or chaotic. It implies that a combination of different events or issues have contributed to a particular outcome or situation.
  • and one (more) for luck The idiom "and one (more) for luck" is used to express the act of including an extra item or action for good fortune or added chances of success. It suggests that the additional item or action brings an element of luck or a greater likelihood of achieving the desired outcome.
  • be a great one for (doing something) The Idiom "be a great one for (doing something)" means that someone has a strong preference or inclination for frequently engaging in a specific activity or behavior. It implies that the person has a fondness or enthusiasm for that particular action.
  • more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple ways to achieve the same end result or accomplish a task. It suggests that there are various alternative approaches or methods to approach a problem or reach a goal.
  • put one on one's honor The idiom "put one on one's honor" means to trust someone to act ethically, honestly, or responsibly without any formal obligation or supervision. It implies relying on someone's integrity and personal sense of duty to do the right thing.
  • be one of a kind The idiom "be one of a kind" means to be unique or unlike anything or anyone else. It implies that something or someone is extraordinary, distinct, or singular in their characteristics, qualities, or attributes.
  • be one flesh The idiom "be one flesh" refers to being united or closely connected with someone, especially in a marital or intimate relationship. It signifies the strong bond and unity between two individuals, where they share a deep emotional, physical, and spiritual connection.
  • at/in one fell swoop "At/in one fell swoop" is an idiom that refers to doing or achieving something in a single decisive action or with a single effort, typically implying that it happens quickly, effortlessly, or unexpectedly.
  • wouldn't know (something) if (one) fell over one The idiom "wouldn't know (something) if (one) fell over one" is used to describe someone who is so oblivious or ignorant about a particular subject or item that they wouldn't recognize it even if it was right in front of them or happened to directly impact them. It emphasizes their lack of awareness or understanding.
  • have the cards stacked against (one) The idiom "have the cards stacked against (one)" refers to being in a situation where one faces multiple obstacles or disadvantages, making success or winning highly unlikely. It implies that circumstances are unfairly or heavily favoring the opposing party or outcome.
  • one thing and another The idiom "one thing and another" is used to refer to a variety of different things or events that have occurred or must be dealt with, often implying a sense of multiple and unrelated issues or tasks. It conveys a sense of a busy or complicated situation where several matters are happening simultaneously or sequentially.
  • one card shy of a (full) deck The idiom "one card shy of a (full) deck" is used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence, mental capacity, or common sense. It suggests that the person is missing one essential element needed to be considered fully competent or "complete," similar to a deck of cards missing one card.
  • have another/more than one string to your bow The idiom "have another/more than one string to your bow" means to have more than one skill, talent, or option available, in addition to the primary one. It implies being versatile or having multiple abilities or resources to fall back on in different situations.
  • of one mind The idiom "of one mind" refers to a situation where multiple individuals or a group share the same opinion, perspective, or agreement on a particular matter. It implies consensus or unanimity among the involved parties.
  • the last but one The idiom "the last but one" is used to describe the second-to-last item or person in a sequence. It implies that there is only one more item or person remaining after the one being referred to.
  • one thing or person after another The idiom "one thing or person after another" refers to a series or sequence of events, tasks, or individuals occurring successively and without interruption. It suggests a continuous flow or an unending string of occurrences or individuals being encountered or dealt with in rapid succession.
  • It's one thing after another! The idiom "It's one thing after another!" refers to a situation where multiple problems, difficulties, or obstacles arise in succession, without any respite or relief. It implies a sense of overwhelming or never-ending challenges or setbacks.
  • one, two, etc. down, one, two etc. to go. The idiom "one, two, etc. down, one, two, etc. to go" is often used to indicate progress or completion of a task or goal. It is commonly used when counting or keeping track of the number of items or steps that have been accomplished, with the remaining ones yet to be completed or achieved. It expresses a sense of moving forward or making steady progress towards a desired outcome.
  • put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means that someone is no different or special from others, emphasizing their common humanity and normality. It implies that no matter how exceptional or superior someone may appear, they still go through ordinary routines and face the same daily challenges as everyone else. It serves as a reminder of equality and humbles individuals who may be excessively self-important.
  • (all) in one piece The idiom "(all) in one piece" means to be unharmed or undamaged, typically used to describe someone or something that has successfully come through a dangerous or challenging situation without any harm or damage. It can also refer to arriving at a destination without experiencing any accidents or incidents along the way.
  • when one door closes, another opens The idiom "when one door closes, another opens" means that when an opportunity or option ends or becomes unavailable, a new one will soon present itself. It suggests that despite encountering setbacks or disappointments, there are always alternative possibilities or paths to pursue.
  • have something going for one The idiom "have something going for one" means to possess advantageous or positive qualities or circumstances that can contribute to someone's success or favorable outcome in a situation. It implies that the person has specific strengths, opportunities, or attributes that work in their favor and increase their chances of achieving a desired result.
  • (It) takes one to know one. The definition of the idiom "(It) takes one to know one" is that someone can recognize and understand certain characteristics or behaviors in others because they themselves possess or display those same characteristics or behaviors.
  • not know one end (of something) from another The idiom "not know one end (of something) from another" means to have absolutely no knowledge or understanding about something, suggesting a complete lack of familiarity or expertise with that particular subject or matter.
  • cold one The idiom "cold one" typically refers to an ice-cold beer or any other chilled alcoholic beverage.
  • where one lives The idiom "where one lives" refers to the specific location or place where a person resides or calls home.
  • slip one over on The idiom "slip one over on" means to deceive, trick, or outsmart someone, typically by executing a cunning or sneaky action or plan without them realizing it. It implies successfully pulling off a scheme or manipulation without the other person being aware of it.
  • keep one eye on To "keep one eye on" means to continuously monitor or be watchful of someone or something while also focusing on other tasks or activities. It implies being alert and aware of a particular situation or individual without letting it consume all of one's attention.
  • when one is good and ready The idiom "when one is good and ready" is used to express that someone will take an action or do something only when they are fully prepared, ready, or willing to do so. It implies that the person will not be rushed or forced into doing anything before they are mentally or physically prepared.
  • put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means that someone is no different from others and should not be treated or regarded as special or exceptional. It highlights the idea that everyone has the same routine and basic actions in life, emphasizing equality and commonality among individuals.
  • be one age with (someone) The idiom "be one age with (someone)" means to have the same level of maturity or understanding as someone else, typically indicating a close bond or compatibility with the person. It suggests that both individuals are on the same wavelength or share similar perspectives and experiences.
  • We've got a right one here! The phrase "We've got a right one here!" is an idiomatic expression used to sarcastically or humorously imply that a person or situation is unusual or challenging. It suggests that the speaker has encountered someone or something that is difficult to deal with or out of the ordinary.
  • make chalk of one and cheese of the other The idiom "make chalk of one and cheese of the other" typically means to treat two things or people completely differently, with no regard for their similarities or differences. It implies favoritism or unequal treatment towards the two entities, considering one to be of superior value or importance over the other.
  • the next to last, at the last but one The idiom "the next to last" or "at the last but one" refers to the second to last item or occurrence in a series or sequence. It indicates that something comes right before the final item or event in a sequence.
  • one fell swoop The idiom "one fell swoop" means to accomplish or achieve something in a single, decisive action, often used to describe the completion of a task or the occurrence of an event with efficiency or speed. It implies swift and efficient execution of a task without any delay or hesitation.
  • motion sm to one side
  • motion to one side
  • paste sm one
  • One swallow does not make a summer,
  • tell one to face
  • take one at word
  • One moment, please
  • new one on
  • go through one
  • said no one ever
  • have a burr under one's saddle The idiom "have a burr under one's saddle" means to be annoyed or irritated by something. It is often used to describe someone who is feeling restless or agitated due to a minor annoyance or frustration.
  • at (one's) doorstep At (one's) doorstep means very close to someone or something, often in a literal sense, such as being right outside their door or home, or in a figurative sense, such as being an issue or problem that is directly affecting them.
  • get one's knuckles rapped The idiom "get one's knuckles rapped" means to receive a reprimand or punishment for doing something wrong or making a mistake. It often refers to facing consequences for an action that was considered unacceptable or inappropriate.
  • nourish a snake in (one's) bosom To harbor and provide support or comfort to someone who turns out to be untrustworthy, deceitful, or dangerous.
  • not leave (one's) side The definition of the idiom "not leave (one's) side" is to stay close to someone or to remain nearby in order to provide support, comfort, or assistance.
  • cross a/that bridge before (one) comes to it To worry about a problem or situation before it has actually happened, often needlessly.
  • tear (one's) hair out The idiom "tear one's hair out" means to be extremely frustrated, angry, or upset about something. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is feeling overwhelmed or stressed to the point of extreme frustration.
  • in (one's) way The idiom "in (one's) way" means blocking or obstructing someone from moving forward or achieving their goals. It can also refer to being a hindrance or obstacle in someone's path.
  • have enough on (one's) plate To have enough tasks or responsibilities to deal with; to be very busy or overwhelmed with things to do.
  • give (one) a shout To contact or get in touch with someone, usually with a phone call or message.
  • the least (one) could do The least one could do is the minimum amount of effort or action that is considered acceptable or appropriate in a given situation. It implies that the person could do more or give more, but is only doing the bare minimum.
  • keep (one's) finger on the pulse To keep one's finger on the pulse means to stay informed and up-to-date with the latest developments or trends in a particular field or situation. It suggests being actively involved and aware of current information or changes.
  • one-day wonder One-day wonder is an idiom used to describe something or someone that achieves great success or popularity but only for a very short period of time. It refers to something that is quickly forgotten or fades away soon after becoming successful.
  • bee in one's bonnet If someone has a "bee in their bonnet," it means they are preoccupied or obsessed with a particular idea or topic. This idiom is often used to describe someone who is repeatedly talking about or fixated on something.
  • suit one's actions to one's words To suit one's actions to one's words means to behave in a way that is consistent with what one has said or promised. It involves following through on one's words with corresponding actions.
  • broaden (one's) horizons To broaden one's horizons means to expand one's knowledge, experience, or perspective by learning about new things or engaging in different activities. It is about opening oneself up to new ideas and possibilities beyond what one is accustomed to.
  • have (someone) under (one's) wing To have someone under one's wing means to take care of, protect, or mentor someone, providing guidance and support. It implies responsibility and caring for someone's well-being.
  • be (right) up (one's) arse This idiom means to be extremely close or overly attentive to someone, often to the point of being annoying or intrusive. It implies being excessively familiar or intrusive in someone's personal space or affairs.
  • leave a bad taste in (one's) mouth To leave a negative or unpleasant impression or feeling.
  • drive (one) to drink The idiom "drive (one) to drink" means to cause someone to become so frustrated, annoyed, or stressed that they feel compelled to turn to alcohol as a coping mechanism.
  • melt in one's mouth To describe food that is so tender, juicy, or delicious that it breaks apart easily and feels extremely smooth when eaten, often implying that it is very enjoyable and satisfying.
  • hold one's end of the bargain up To fulfill one's part of a deal or agreement; to do what one agreed or promised to do.
  • learn (one's) lesson To learn from a mistake or failure and not repeat it in the future.
  • nose out of joint, have one's To have one's nose out of joint means to feel irritated, offended, or upset, often because one's feelings or pride have been hurt.
  • be laughing on the other side of (one's) face To experience a different, often less favorable, outcome than originally expected; to become disappointed or embarrassed after feeling confident or victorious.
  • be frightened of (one's) (own) shadow To be easily scared or startled, often used to describe someone who is overly anxious or easily frightened.
  • have (a) method to (one's) madness This idiom means that there may be a specific reason or purpose behind someone's seemingly strange or irrational behavior. It suggests that the person's actions, though unconventional or chaotic, are not without purpose or logic.
  • the least (one) can do The least one can do is the minimum amount of effort or action that is necessary or expected in a given situation.
  • change (one's) ways To change one's behavior or habits in order to improve or avoid negative consequences.
  • have (one's) day in court To have one's day in court means to have the opportunity to present one's case or argument in a court of law and to receive a fair hearing or trial. It can also refer to having the chance to defend oneself or to seek justice or redress for a perceived wrong.
  • claw (one's) way back from (something) The definition of the idiom "claw (one's) way back from (something)" is to struggle and fight hard in order to recover from a difficult situation or setback.
  • pay (one's) last respects To attend a funeral or visitation of someone who has died in order to show respect and say goodbye.
  • stretch one's money To make money last longer by being careful with how it is spent; to manage finances frugally.
  • tongue hangs out, one's The idiom "tongue hangs out, one's" means to be very eager, enthusiastic, or excited about something. It can also suggest being exhausted or worn out from physical exertion.
  • button (one's) lip The idiom "button one's lip" means to stop talking or to keep silent.
  • cut one's eyeteeth The idiom "cut one's eyeteeth" means to gain experience or knowledge, especially in a particular field or area of expertise. It often refers to someone who has acquired valuable skills or expertise through hands-on experience or time spent in a particular profession.
  • one, etc. in a million The idiom "one in a million" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely rare or exceptional, standing out from the rest of its kind. It implies that the person or thing being described is unique and special, with only a very small chance of finding something similar.
  • have (someone) wrapped around (one's) (little) finger To have complete control or influence over someone, usually in a manipulative or cunning manner.
  • set (one) apart (from someone) To distinguish one from others; to make one unique or different.
  • off one's nut To be "off one's nut" means to be crazy, insane, or mentally unstable.
  • stick in (one's) craw To be difficult to accept or tolerate; to be deeply offensive or objectionable.
  • *black mark beside one's name A negative mark or stain on one's reputation or record, typically due to a mistake, misdeed, or failure.
  • under one's arm The idiom "under one's arm" typically means to carry or hold something closely and securely against one's side with the arm. It can also be used to refer to someone having control or possession over something or someone.
  • in (one's) glad rags The idiom "in (one's) glad rags" means to be dressed in one's finest or most stylish clothing for a special occasion.
  • with (one's) tongue in (one's) cheek The idiom "with (one's) tongue in (one's) cheek" means to say something insincerely or jokingly, often with a hidden meaning or sarcasm.
  • knock (one's) head against a/the wall The idiom "knock (one's) head against a/the wall" means to continue to try to do something that is impossible or unlikely to succeed, resulting in frustration or lack of progress.
  • scratch one's head To be confused or puzzled and think hard about something in order to understand or find a solution.
  • all over (one's) face The idiom "all over (one's) face" means that something is very obvious or easy to see based on a person's facial expressions or demeanor. It may indicate that someone is showing their true feelings, emotions, or intentions despite trying to conceal them.
  • cut (one) dead To completely ignore someone, refuse to acknowledge them, or treat them as though they do not exist.
  • get (one's) mitts on (something) To obtain or acquire something, usually by taking possession of it in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • one-man band A "one-man band" is a person who does multiple tasks or roles by themselves, usually in a situation where multiple people are typically involved. It can also refer to a person who is very skilled and talented at handling multiple responsibilities or projects simultaneously.
  • put (one's) hand into (one's) pocket To spend money or make a financial contribution, usually willingly or generously.
  • meet one's Waterloo To meet one's Waterloo means to face a final, decisive defeat or setback after a period of success or struggle. This idiom is derived from the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, where Napoleon Bonaparte suffered a crushing defeat, leading to his ultimate downfall and end of his reign.
  • drive (one) to despair To cause someone to feel extremely discouraged, hopeless, or overwhelmed.
  • follow (one) to the ends of the Earth The idiom "follow (one) to the ends of the Earth" means to be loyal and devoted to someone to an extreme degree, willing to go to great lengths or distances for their sake. It implies unwavering support and commitment regardless of challenges or obstacles.
  • twist (someone) around (one's) (little) finger To control or manipulate someone easily, often by using charm, persuasion, or emotional manipulation.
  • (one's) hands are clean If someone's hands are clean, it means they are not guilty of any wrongdoing or have not done anything morally wrong or illegal. It usually implies that the person is innocent or free from blame.
  • eyes in the back of one's head, have To have a keen sense of awareness or perception, as if one can see or sense what is happening behind them.
  • flea in one's ear To have a flea in one's ear is to have a feeling or suspicion that something is wrong or that someone is trying to deceive or trick you. It can also mean to have an uncomfortable or nagging feeling about something.
  • get into one's stride To "get into one's stride" means to reach a comfortable and efficient pace or rhythm in performing a task or activity. It refers to finding one's momentum or groove after initially starting something.
  • hand in (one's) dinner pail The idiomatic expression "hand in (one's) dinner pail" means to die or to pass away. It is often used as a euphemism for death, implying that the person has finished their final meal and is now leaving this world.
  • knock (one) for a loop To shock, surprise, or overwhelm someone with unexpected news, information, or events; to leave someone feeling dazed or disoriented.
  • bless (one's) lucky star(s) To show gratitude or give thanks for a stroke of good luck or fortune.
  • lead (one) up the garden path To deceive or mislead someone, often by coaxing or manipulating them into a false sense of security or understanding.
  • stand on (one's)/its own To be self-sufficient or independent, not relying on others for support or validation.
  • be up to (one's) ears in (something) To be extremely busy or deeply involved in something.
  • cut (one's) wisdom teeth To gain experience or maturity; to reach a level of understanding or sophistication.
  • have to eat (one's) words To have to admit that one was wrong or mistaken about something and retract what one has said.
  • set (one's) heart at rest To set one's heart at rest means to reassure oneself or another person and alleviate any fears or concerns. It is to calm someone down or put their mind at ease.
  • be off (one's) guard To be off one's guard means to be unprepared or unaware, making oneself vulnerable to danger or harm. It refers to a lack of vigilance or readiness to deal with a potential threat or challenge.
  • do one's damnedest (or damndest) To do one's damnedest (or damndest) means to put forth one's greatest effort or to try one's very best to accomplish something.
  • hair of the dog (that bit one) The expression "hair of the dog (that bit one)" refers to the act of drinking more alcohol as a way to cure a hangover. The phrase comes from the belief that the best cure for a hangover is to have a small amount of the same alcoholic beverage that caused the hangover in the first place.
  • break up with (one) To end a romantic relationship with someone.
  • raise one's voice against sm or sth To speak out against or protest something or someone loudly or forcefully.
  • save (one's) blushes To prevent someone from feeling embarrassed or ashamed.
  • work (one's) butt off To work extremely hard; to exert a great amount of effort and energy.
  • be rubbing (one's) hands (with glee) To be very happy or excited about something that is likely to happen.
  • one's mind went blank When someone's mind goes blank, it means that they suddenly cannot think of anything or cannot remember something that they were previously thinking about. It is a state of mental blocking or temporary memory loss.
  • hold one's ground To hold one's ground means to maintain a firm position or stance in the face of opposition or difficulty, without backing down.
  • cross paths with (one) To meet or encounter someone either by chance or unexpectedly.
  • be scratching (one's) head To be confused or puzzled about something; to be unable to understand or figure something out.
  • count (one's) blessings To appreciate and be grateful for the good things one has in life, rather than focusing on what one lacks.
  • give (one) a bell To give someone a call or phone them.
  • set one's sights on To aim or focus one's goals, ambitions, or desires on a specific target or objective.
  • be past the/(one's) sell-by date To be past the/(one's) sell-by date means to be considered too old, outdated, or no longer useful or relevant. It can refer to both objects and people who are no longer in demand or considered valuable.
  • to the best of one's ability To the best of one's ability means to do something as well as one can, using all of their skill and knowledge to achieve the best possible result.
  • be a huckleberry over (one's) persimmon To be better than or superior to someone or something.
  • (one's) heart bleeds for (someone) The idiom "(one's) heart bleeds for (someone)" means to feel great sympathy, grief, or pity for someone who is suffering or going through a hard time.
  • smack one's lips To smack one's lips means to make a noise with one's mouth by opening and closing the lips quickly, often as a sign of enjoyment or anticipation, especially when tasting or smelling something delicious. It can also indicate satisfaction or pleasure. This idiom is often used to describe someone who is visibly enjoying or appreciating something.
  • extend one's sympathy (to someone) To show compassion or understanding towards someone who is experiencing hardship or suffering.
  • give (one) furiously to think The idiom "give (one) furiously to think" means to prompt someone to think deeply or intensely about something. It implies causing someone to ponder or contemplate something with great intensity and seriousness.
  • have (someone) under (one's) thumb To have complete control or power over someone; to have someone completely submissive or obedient.
  • pick one's way To pick one's way means to carefully navigate through a difficult or complicated situation with caution and deliberation.
  • have (someone) eating out of (one's) hand To have someone completely under one's control or influence, typically through charm or manipulation.
  • be (not) (one's) style The idiom "be (not) (one's) style" means to be (not) something that is typical or characteristic of someone's tastes, preferences, or behavior.
  • put (one's) skates on To act quickly or with great speed, often in response to a challenging situation.
  • pull in one's horns To pull in one's horns means to restrain oneself, to become more cautious or less aggressive in order to avoid conflict or trouble. It can also mean to become more modest or less boastful.
  • bow to (one's) demands To submit or yield to someone's requests or demands, usually out of fear or respect for their authority or power.
  • give (one) a mouthful To give someone a mouthful means to scold, criticize, or rebuke someone angrily and forcefully.
  • ring one's chimes To excite or impress someone; to have a profound or lasting impact on someone.
  • at (one's) own game To defeat or outperform someone in a competition or situation that they are typically skilled at or known for.
  • get (one's) fingers burned To experience negative consequences as a result of one's actions or decisions, often in a financial or emotional sense.
  • be (one's) baby To be someone's baby means to be someone's special or favorite person, to be treated with love, affection, and care as though one were a baby.
  • rest on one's laurels To rest on one's laurels means to be satisfied with past accomplishments and not make further efforts to achieve more success or recognition.
  • out of (one's) box The idiom "out of (one's) box" refers to being outside of a normal or expected state of mind or behavior. It can also mean thinking creatively or innovatively.
  • dictate to (one) To give orders or commands to someone in a forceful or controlling manner.
  • overplay (one's) hand To overplay one's hand means to take unnecessary or excessive risks or to be overly aggressive in a situation, resulting in negative consequences or failure.
  • on one's hands To be directly responsible or accountable for something.
  • foul one's nest To foul one's nest means to bring disgrace or embarrassment upon oneself or one's own family or community through one's own actions or behaviors. It is often used to describe someone who harms their own reputation or relationships by acting in a selfish, irresponsible, or dishonest manner.
  • draw (oneself) up to (one's) full height The idiom "draw (oneself) up to (one's) full height" means to stand up straight and tall, usually in a proud or confident manner. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone asserting their authority or superiority in a situation.
  • have (something) hanging over (one's) head To have a looming or imminent problem, threat, or burden that is causing worry or anxiety.
  • cavil at (one) To cavil at someone means to make petty or unnecessary objections or criticisms about them. It refers to finding fault with someone for minor or trivial reasons.
  • take (one) aback To surprise or shock someone, usually by saying or doing something unexpected.
  • chew the/(one's) cud To "chew the/(one's) cud" is an idiomatic expression that means to ponder or reflect on something deeply and thoughtfully. It can also refer to going back over a topic repeatedly in one's mind. It often implies a sense of introspection or contemplation. The phrase is derived from the behavior of cows, who chew their cud (partially digested food) in a slow and deliberate manner.
  • woman after (one's) own heart This idiom is used to describe a woman who shares the same beliefs, values, interests, or qualities as the person speaking. It suggests that the person sees the woman as being very similar to themselves and therefore ideal or perfect for them.
  • one's days are numbered This idiom means that someone's time is limited or that they will not live or survive for much longer.
  • know which side one's bread is buttered on To know and understand where one's best interests lie; to know who or what is most likely to benefit oneself.
  • bite (one's) head off The idiom "bite (one's) head off" means to respond angrily or rudely to someone, often without provocation.
  • nickel and dime (one) To nickel and dime someone means to charge them small amounts of money repeatedly for unnecessary or minor things, rather than charging a larger amount at once. It can also refer to treating someone cheaply or unfairly in small ways.
  • have (one's) fingers burned To suffer harm or negative consequences as a result of a risky or foolish action.
  • feast (one's) eyes To feast one's eyes means to look at something with great enjoyment or pleasure, often because it is beautiful, attractive, or impressive.
  • put (something) into (one's) head To put (something) into (one's) head means to introduce an idea or belief into someone's mind, often in a forceful or persistent manner.
  • (one's) two cents' worth "(one's) two cents' worth" is an idiomatic expression that means one's opinion or perspective on a particular matter. It is often used to downplay the value of one's input or to acknowledge that the opinion being expressed may not be highly regarded by others.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it This idiom means that someone is responsible for their actions or decisions and must accept the consequences, whether they are positive or negative. It suggests that once a choice has been made, one must accept the outcomes and not try to avoid or change them.
  • give (one) the eye To give someone the eye means to look at them in a way that conveys interest or attraction, often subtly or flirtatiously. It can also mean to give someone a suggestive or meaningful glance.
  • go to bat for (one) To actively support or defend someone; to advocate on behalf of someone.
  • be on (its/one's) last legs The idiom "be on (its/one's) last legs" means to be in a very poor or weak condition, approaching the point of failure or collapse. It can refer to a person, animal, object, or situation that is close to breaking down or ending.
  • burn one's bridges (behind one) The idiom "burn one's bridges (behind one)" means to do something that makes it impossible to return to a previous situation or relationship, usually by damaging or destroying one's reputation or credibility. It refers to making a decision that closes off all possibilities for retreat or reconciliation.
  • be (one's) man/woman To be loyal and supportive to someone, often carrying out tasks or representing their interests.
  • strengthen (one's) hand To strengthen one's hand means to increase one's power, influence, or ability to succeed in a particular situation or endeavor. It can also refer to improving one's position or negotiating leverage.
  • turn (over) in one's grave The idiom "turn (over) in one's grave" refers to the idea that a deceased person would be upset, shocked, or disappointed if they were able to see or hear about something that is happening in the present. It is often used to emphasize how strongly the deceased person's beliefs or values are being violated or ignored.
  • be (well) on the/(one's) way to/towards (something) To be making good progress towards achieving a goal or reaching a destination.
  • die in one's boots To "die in one's boots" means to die while still active or maintaining a strong, resilient attitude or spirit. It can also refer to dying while still fulfilling one's duties or responsibilities.
  • cut one's teeth on To gain initial experience or acquire fundamental skills in a particular area by starting at a basic or entry level position.
  • one's second wind To have a renewed energy or strength after initially feeling tired or exhausted.
  • nail (one's) colors to the mast To nail one's colors to the mast means to make clear one's beliefs or intentions in a public way and to firmly commit to them, regardless of the risks or consequences.
  • run in the/(one's) family The expression "run in the/(one's) family" means that a certain trait, characteristic, behavior, or condition is common among family members and passed down through generations.
  • lead (one) on To tease or deceive someone by giving them false hope or expectations.
  • know one's ABCs To know the basics or fundamentals of a subject.
  • reveal (one's) (true) colors To reveal one's true nature or character, especially when it is negative or unpleasant.
  • give (one's) right arm The idiom "give (one's) right arm" is used to express a willingness to sacrifice or give up something extremely valuable or important in order to obtain or achieve something else. It can also convey extreme desire or longing for something.
  • beat into one's head The idiom "beat into one's head" means to repeatedly teach or emphasize a particular point or piece of information until it is fully understood or remembered by someone.
  • talk through one's hat To talk through one's hat means to talk or speak about something without having accurate knowledge or understanding about the topic, often making baseless or false claims. It implies that the person is speaking nonsense or making things up.
  • off one's game To be "off one's game" means to not be performing as well as usual or as expected, especially in a competitive or challenging situation. It refers to a decrease in skill, focus, or performance.
  • be looking (one) in the face The idiom "be looking (one) in the face" means to confront or come face-to-face with a difficult or challenging situation, problem, or decision.
  • get (one's)/the knife into (someone) To harbor a deep-seated grudge or resentment towards someone and to actively seek opportunities to criticize, harm, or betray that person.
  • get off (one's) high horse The idiom "get off (one's) high horse" means to stop acting as though one is superior or better than others, and to become more humble and down-to-earth.
  • be hanging on by (one's) fingertips The idiom "be hanging on by (one's) fingertips" means to be barely managing or surviving in a difficult situation, often with little hope or support. It implies that the person is barely holding on and may lose their grip at any moment.
  • break one's ass "Break one's ass" is an idiom that means to work very hard or put in a lot of effort to accomplish something. It can also refer to pushing oneself to the limit physically or mentally in order to achieve a goal.
  • hold one's liquor To be able to drink alcohol without becoming drunk or losing control.
  • bring (one) up short To cause someone to stop or pause suddenly, often by surprising or confronting them with something unexpected or challenging.
  • slide into (one's)/the DMs To "slide into (one's)/the DMs" refers to the act of sending a private message to someone on social media in a smooth and casual manner, often with the intentions of starting a conversation or flirting with them.
  • wipe (one's) slate clean The idiom "wipe (one's) slate clean" means to start fresh or start over without any lingering mistakes, errors, or problems from the past. It refers to clearing away any previous transgressions or difficulties so one can begin again without any negative impact.
  • be the making of (one) The idiom "be the making of (one)" means that something or someone has had a significant positive impact on someone's life or future success. It refers to an experience or opportunity that greatly benefits a person and helps them achieve their goals or reach their potential.
  • the/(one's) last gasp The idiom "the/(one's) last gasp" refers to the final effort or struggle made by someone, typically before facing defeat or death. It suggests a desperate attempt to achieve something against all odds or to prolong one's existence.
  • put one's best foot forward To make a good effort and do one's best in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • shove it/something up (one's) ass This idiom is a vulgar and offensive way to express anger, frustration, or disbelief towards someone or something. It implies forcefully pushing something into someone's rectum as an act of disrespect or dismissal.
  • hide one's face in shame The idiom "hide one's face in shame" means to feel embarrassed or humiliated about something one has said or done, causing them to want to conceal or cover their face to avoid being seen.
  • enshrine someone in one's heart To enshrine someone in one's heart means to hold someone in a revered or cherished place within one's emotions or memories. It signifies a deep and lasting affection or admiration for that person.
  • put one's hand to the plow The idiom "put one's hand to the plow" means to start working on a task diligently and with dedication, often with a focus on achieving a specific goal or outcome. It is derived from the agricultural practice of using a plow to cultivate the land, emphasizing the commitment and effort required to achieve success.
  • in (one's) trust In (one's) trust means to be under someone's care, responsibility, or protection. It implies that someone is relying on another person to take care of something for them.
  • take (one's) eye off the ball To fail to pay attention or be vigilant; to become distracted or lose focus on something important.
  • one's heart is in mouth If someone's heart is in their mouth, they are feeling very nervous, frightened, or anxious. This expression is often used to describe a situation or experience that causes extreme emotional distress or fear.
  • bring (one) home The idiom "bring (one) home" means to help someone achieve or succeed in something, or to guide someone safely back to a familiar place or situation. It can also refer to delivering someone to their home.
  • set (one's) teeth on edge To greatly annoy or irritate someone.
  • give (one) to understand To give someone to understand means to communicate a certain idea or message carefully and indirectly, often without stating it explicitly.
  • discuss (someone or something) with (one) To talk or have a conversation with someone about a particular person or topic.
  • send chills down (one's) spine To send chills down one's spine means to cause a feeling of fear, anxiety, or excitement in someone. It is usually used to describe something that is eerie, creepy, or incredibly impressive.
  • out the goodness of (one's) heart To do something without expecting anything in return; to do something out of kindness or generosity.
  • make (one's) bones The idiom "make (one's) bones" typically means to establish one's reputation or credibility in a particular field, especially through hard work, loyalty, or proving oneself to others. It can also refer to gaining experience or knowledge that is essential for future success.
  • bite (one's) nails The idiom "bite (one's) nails" means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or worried about something. It often involves intense feelings of anticipation or fear of something upcoming or uncertain.
  • *ants in one's pants Feeling restless, fidgety, or unable to sit still; experiencing a strong urge to move or be active.
  • light (one's) fire To spark excitement, passion, or enthusiasm in someone; to inspire or motivate someone.
  • sign (one's) life away The idiom "sign (one's) life away" means to sign a contract or agreement that gives away control or ownership of something to another person or entity, often with serious or lasting consequences.
  • set one's house in order To organize or tidy up one's affairs or personal matters; to prepare oneself for a future event or situation.
  • here/there (one) goes again The idiom "here/there one goes again" is used to express frustration or exasperation when someone repeats a behavior, often something negative or undesirable. It may imply a sense of déjà vu or inevitability in the person's actions.
  • one's heart is in the right place The idiom "one's heart is in the right place" means that someone has good intentions or is well-meaning, even if their actions may not always have the desired outcome. It implies that the person's motives are pure and come from a place of kindness and goodwill.
  • run one's head against a brick wall To repeatedly attempt something or pursue a goal with great effort but achieving no progress or success.
  • be banging (one's) head against a brick wall The idiom "be banging (one's) head against a brick wall" means to persistently or fruitlessly try to accomplish something that is impossible or unlikely to succeed, resulting in frustration and futility.
  • in (one's) hair To be in (one's) hair means to constantly bother or annoy someone by being present or demanding attention. It can also refer to someone being in a challenging or complicated situation.
  • have (something) to (one's) credit To have achieved or accomplished something noteworthy or positive.
  • not give (one) the time of day To not show any interest or give any attention to someone; to ignore or disregard someone completely.
  • bring (something) to (one's) attention "Bring (something) to (one's) attention" means to make someone aware of something, typically in order to inform them or draw their focus to a specific issue or matter.
  • cast (one's) net wider To cast one's net wider means to expand one's options, opportunities, or reach in order to have a greater chance of success. It is often used to encourage someone to explore new possibilities or consider different perspectives in order to achieve their goals.
  • ants in the/(one's) pants The idiom "ants in the/(one's) pants" refers to a feeling of restlessness, agitation, or nervousness, making it difficult for someone to sit still or stay calm. The expression suggests a sense of discomfort or unease that causes a person to fidget or move around constantly.
  • knock (some) sense into (one) To physically or metaphorically make someone understand or realize something important or sensible.
  • twiddle one's thumbs To twiddle one's thumbs means to be inactive or bored, doing nothing of importance. It refers to the act of idly moving one's thumbs around each other while waiting or having nothing else to do.
  • before (one's) time "Before (one's) time" means something that happened or existed before one was born or before one became involved or interested in a particular subject or activity.
  • a/one hundred per cent The idiom "a/one hundred per cent" means completely or entirely, to the fullest extent possible. It is used to emphasize that something is being done or achieved to the highest degree.
  • put (one's) (own) house in order To organize or improve one's personal or professional affairs; to get one's own life straightened out.
  • come to (one's) feet The idiom "come to (one's) feet" means to stand up or rise from a sitting or lying position. It can also refer to receiving recognition or support from others.
  • be off (one's) trolley To be behaving in a crazy or irrational manner; to be acting strangely or illogically.
  • have (someone) turned round (one's) (little) finger To have control and influence over someone to the extent that they will do anything you ask or desire.
  • have (something) to (one's) name To have something or some amount as one's personal possession or ownership.
  • not have (one's) heart in (something) To not feel interested or enthusiastic about something; to lack passion or commitment for a particular task or activity.
  • give someone a piece of one's mind To give someone a piece of one's mind means to express one's thoughts or feelings very forcefully and angrily to someone who has done something to upset or annoy you.
  • a shadow of (one's) former self The idiom "a shadow of (one's) former self" refers to someone who is not as strong, healthy, successful, or happy as they once were. It suggests a noticeable decline or deterioration from a previous state of being.
  • carry (one's) weight To "carry one's weight" means to fulfill one's responsibilities, contribute their fair share, or do their part in a group or task. It implies that the person is capable and reliable in their role.
  • bring sm or sth under one's control To bring something or someone under one's control means to gain authority or dominance over them, often through strategic or forceful means. It implies being able to dictate or influence the actions or decisions of the person or thing in question.
  • bored out of (one's) brains The idiom "bored out of (one's) brains" is used to describe a state of extreme boredom or lack of interest in something, to the point where one feels mentally exhausted or overwhelmed by the monotony of their surroundings or activities.
  • throw in one's hand To give up or quit; to withdraw from a situation or activity.
  • throw (one) to the dogs To throw (someone) to the dogs means to sacrifice or abandon someone, often to a difficult or dangerous situation, without any concern for their well-being.
  • open (up) one's kimono The idiom "open (up) one's kimono" refers to the act of revealing or disclosing one's inner thoughts, feelings, or information that is typically kept private or confidential. It can also refer to being transparent or honest in one's communication with others.
  • evacuate one's bowels To empty one's bowels; to defecate.
  • be dead on (one's) feet The idiom "be dead on (one's) feet" means to be extremely tired or exhausted. It describes a person who is so worn out that they can barely continue standing or moving.
  • put one's house in order To put one's house in order means to organize or fix one's personal or professional affairs and make sure everything is in proper place and working well.
  • couldn't (do something) to save (one's) life The phrase "couldn't (do something) to save (one's) life" is used to emphasize that someone is unable to do a particular task or activity no matter how hard they try. It implies extreme difficulty or improbability of success.
  • give (one) running shoes The idiom "give (one) running shoes" means to encourage or motivate someone to take action or make progress towards a goal. It implies urging or inspiring someone to start moving forward or to begin pursuing a particular objective.
  • have lead in (one's) pants The idiom "have lead in (one's) pants" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is slow, sluggish, or lacking in energy and enthusiasm. It suggests that the person feels weighted down or burdened by something, like having heavy lead in their pants that is slowing them down.
  • a mystery to (one) If something is "a mystery to (one)," it means that the person does not understand or cannot figure out something. It is perplexing or puzzling to them.
  • one's money's worth Getting good value for the amount of money one has paid.
  • the sword of Damocles hangs over (one's) (head) The idiom "the sword of Damocles hangs over (one's) (head)" refers to a situation where someone is facing a looming threat or danger that could strike at any moment, causing anxiety or fear. The phrase is derived from the story of Damocles, a courtier in ancient Greece who was invited to sit on a throne with a sword suspended above him by a single hair, symbolizing the constant danger and uncertainty faced by those in positions of power.
  • the love of (one's) life "The love of (one's) life" refers to a person who is considered the most important and significant romantic partner or soulmate in someone's life; the one person they love above all others.
  • win (one's) heart To win someone's heart means to gain their love, affection, or approval through one's actions, behavior, or words.
  • give (someone) the back of (one's) hand To treat someone rudely or dismissively, sometimes by literally striking them with the back of one's hand, but often used metaphorically to mean to reject or disregard someone.
  • pop (one's) cherry The phrase "pop (one's) cherry" is a slang term that refers to someone losing their virginity or experiencing something for the first time. It is often used in a casual or humorous manner to describe the initiation of someone into a new experience or activity.
  • be at (one's) disposal To be available or ready to assist someone whenever they need help or assistance.
  • shift one's ground To change one's opinion, stance, or position on a certain issue or topic.
  • cut (one's) comb The idiom "cut (one's) comb" means to humiliate or undermine someone's pride or self-esteem. It implies reducing someone's arrogance or overconfidence by bringing them down a notch.
  • get sm weight off one's feet This idiom means to lighten one's load, either physically or metaphorically, by removing some of the responsibilities or burdens that one is carrying. It can refer to alleviating stress, reducing workloads, or simplifying one's life.
  • cut (one's) water off To stop giving someone something they need, such as financial support or assistance.
  • in (one's) hour of need The idiom "in (one's) hour of need" refers to a time of difficulty or crisis when one requires assistance, support, or relief. It suggests a time when someone is vulnerable and in need of help or comfort from others.
  • screw (one) around To deceive, manipulate, or mistreat someone for one's own benefit.
  • could (do something) with (one's) eyes closed The idiom "could (do something) with (one's) eyes closed" means that someone is very skilled or knowledgeable at a particular task and can perform it effortlessly and without needing to pay much attention or focus.
  • get (one's) eye in To become accustomed or familiar with something, especially a skill or activity, through practice or exposure.
  • (one's) old stomping ground "One's old stomping ground" is an idiom that refers to a place where one used to spend a lot of time or visit frequently, especially in the past. It often carries a sense of nostalgia and familiarity.
  • have (one's) hand out To have one's hand out means to expect or ask for help, support, or money from others, often in a demanding or entitled manner.
  • keep an/(one's) ear to the ground To be attentive or listen carefully in order to become aware of any information or trends.
  • pique (one's) (emotion) To arouse or provoke a specific emotion in someone, typically one of anger, irritation, or annoyance.
  • do one's bit To do one's bit means to do one's fair share or part of a task or contribute in a helpful or cooperative manner.
  • go above and beyond one's duty The idiom "go above and beyond one's duty" means to exceed expectations or do more than what is required or expected in a particular task or responsibility. It refers to putting in extra effort or going the extra mile to fulfill one's obligations.
  • with (one's) eyes (wide) open To be fully aware and informed about a situation, decision, or consequence before proceeding.
  • tip one's hand To reveal one's true intentions or reveal information prematurely, often unintentionally, that gives an advantage to another party.
  • throw (one's) weight about To assert one's authority or influence in an overbearing or aggressive manner.
  • carry one's (own) weight To carry one's (own) weight means to fulfill one's share of responsibility or work, to contribute fairly and equally to a group or task.
  • come into (one's) head To suddenly have a thought or idea; to occur or come to mind.
  • catch (one) cold To become infected with a cold virus; to catch a cold.
  • foist (something) (up)on (one) To foist something upon someone is to impose or force something unwanted or unsolicited upon them. It is typically used in situations where something is being offered or presented to someone in a deceitful or manipulative way.
  • get (or have) one's shit together To have one's shit together means to have one's life, affairs, or emotions in order and under control. It implies being organized, responsible, and fully prepared for whatever challenges may arise.
  • be licking (one's) lips To be eagerly anticipating or looking forward to something with great excitement or enthusiasm.
  • give (one) (one's) dues To give someone the acknowledgment or recognition that they deserve; to treat someone fairly or justly by acknowledging their efforts or contributions.
  • none of (one's) beeswax The idiom "none of (one's) beeswax" means that something is none of someone's business or concern. It is used to politely tell someone that their involvement or interest is not welcome or needed in a particular situation.
  • wag one's chin To talk at length or gossip incessantly.
  • apprise (one) of To inform someone about something or provide them with information about a particular subject or situation.
  • keep (one's) eye(s) peeled (for something or someone) To be vigilant and attentive in looking for something or someone in order to notice it/them as soon as it/they appear.
  • catch one off To catch someone off guard or unprepared.
  • keep (one) dangling To keep someone waiting or uncertain, often by teasing or withholding information or assistance.
  • albatross around (one's) neck The idiom "albatross around (one's) neck" refers to a burdensome or troublesome situation or problem that one must deal with or carry, often for a long period of time. It is derived from the poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, in which an albatross is metaphorically described as a burden or curse that a person must bear.
  • one's next of kin "One's next of kin" refers to a person's closest living relatives, typically immediate family members such as parents, siblings, children, or spouse. These are the individuals who would be first in line to inherit the person's estate or make decisions on their behalf in the event of their death or incapacity.
  • keep (one's) feet To remain grounded or maintain composure; to stay focused and not get carried away by emotions or distractions.
  • work (one's) backside off To work extremely hard or diligently.
  • trim one's sails To trim one's sails means to adjust one's behavior or actions in order to adapt to new circumstances or make oneself more acceptable to others, especially in a competitive situation.
  • have time on (one's) hands To have free time or be idle, with nothing specific to do.
  • one's goose is cooked One's goose is cooked is an idiom that means someone is in serious trouble or their situation is hopeless. It implies that the person is doomed or facing a negative outcome.
  • close in on (one) To approach or move towards someone with the intention of catching or apprehending them; to corner or trap someone.
  • flat on one's ass The idiom "flat on one's ass" means to be in a state of complete failure, defeat, or humiliation. It refers to someone who has fallen down or been knocked down to the ground, usually metaphorically.
  • be open with (one) To be honest and forthcoming in communication with someone, sharing thoughts, feelings, or information openly and candidly.
  • get (one's) panties in a twist To unnecessarily become overly worried, anxious, or upset about something; to get worked up or agitated over a minor issue.
  • hold one's head high To hold one's head high means to feel confident, proud, or dignified, especially in the face of adversity or criticism. It signifies a sense of self-respect and self-assurance.
  • freeze sm or sth in one's memory To freeze something in one's memory means to remember it forever, to have a clear and vivid recollection of a particular moment, person, or thing. It suggests that the memory is so strong that it is as if it has been frozen in time and will never be forgotten.
  • be down on (one's) luck The idiom "be down on (one's) luck" means to be experiencing a period of bad luck or misfortune.
  • one-hit wonder A one-hit wonder is a person or group that achieves great success or popularity with only one song, film or successful venture, but is unable to repeat that success or sustain their career in the long term.
  • a sword of Damocles hangs over (one's) head This idiom means that someone is living in constant fear or anxiety because of a looming threat or danger that could strike at any moment. It refers to a tale from ancient Greek mythology in which Damocles, a courtier of the King, is forced to sit under a sword suspended by a single hair, symbolizing the constant fear of impending doom.
  • trouble one's head with To "trouble one's head with" means to worry or bother oneself with something that may not be worth the time or effort. It can also refer to becoming overly concerned or preoccupied with a problem or issue.
  • feed one's face To eat a large amount of food in a greedy or uncontrolled manner.
  • put on one's thinking cap To put on one's thinking cap means to focus, concentrate, and use one's intelligence or creativity to solve a problem or come up with new ideas.
  • elbow (one) out To force someone out of the way or out of a position, often using physical or metaphorical elbowing.
  • blow (one's) own trumpet To boast about one's own abilities or achievements; to brag or self-promote.
  • pawn (something) off (on one) (as something else) To pawn off (something) on one (as something else) means to deceive or trick someone into accepting or believing something that is not true or of lesser value.
  • raise (one's) hand against (someone) To physically harm or attack someone.
  • stay (one's) hand To refrain from taking action or avoiding doing something, especially something related to using force or making a decision.
  • sign one's own death warrant To do something that will lead to one's own downfall or inevitable failure.
  • get (one's) fix (of something) To get an adequate amount of something that one craves or desires.
  • give (something) (one's) all To give something one's all means to put forth maximum effort or energy into doing something. It suggests giving one's best effort, concentration, and dedication towards achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • to (one's) liking The idiom "to (one's) liking" means in a way that satisfies or pleases someone's preferences or tastes. It refers to something being done or designed exactly as one desires or prefers.
  • bring a lump to (one's) throat The idiom "bring a lump to (one's) throat" means to make someone feel emotional, usually causing them to choke up or become teary-eyed. It is often used to describe something touching or sentimental that evokes strong feelings.
  • lift (one's) elbow The idiom "lift (one's) elbow" means to drink alcohol. It is often used as a euphemism for drinking or getting drunk.
  • for (one's) life The idiom "for (one's) life" means acting or doing something with all of one's efforts, energy, or determination. It is often used to convey a sense of urgency or intensity in a situation.
  • list as long as (one's) arm When something has a list as long as one's arm, it means that it is a very long list with many items or tasks that need to be completed.
  • when (one's) ship comes home The idiom "when (one's) ship comes home" refers to a time in the future when a person's luck or success may change or improve. It can also refer to an important turning point or moment of fulfillment in one's life.
  • do (one's) best To make the maximum effort possible; to try as hard as one can.
  • on (one's) honour The phrase "on (one's) honour" means that someone is responsible for acting honestly and truthfully, based on their sense of integrity and moral principles. It is often used to emphasize that a person's word or promise is sincere and should be trusted.
  • give (one) head To give someone head is a slang term meaning to perform oral sex on them.
  • rack one's brains To rack one's brains means to think very hard in order to remember or solve something difficult.
  • be down to (one) To be solely one's responsibility or decision; to be up to one to handle or decide.
  • in one's second childhood In one's second childhood is an idiom used to describe someone who is behaving childishly or childlike, especially as they grow older. It suggests a regression to a more carefree and immature state similar to childhood.
  • go into (one's) shell To retreat or withdraw from social interactions, becoming introverted or reserved.
  • be on (one's) high horse To be behaving arrogantly, condescendingly, or self-righteously.
  • on (one's) home turf "On (one's) home turf" means in a familiar or comfortable environment, typically one's own territory or area of expertise. It refers to a situation in which someone is on familiar or home ground, giving them an advantage or sense of confidence compared to others who are not as familiar with the environment or situation.
  • burn one's bridges To "burn one's bridges" means to take a decisive and irreversible action that makes it impossible to go back to the way things were before. It often involves cutting off all ties and relationships with a particular situation or person.
  • chide (one) for (something) To scold or rebuke someone for something they have done wrong or for a mistake they have made.
  • move (one's) body The idiom "move (one's) body" means to physically exert oneself by engaging in physical activity or exercise, typically to improve health or fitness.
  • get one's own back To get one's own back means to take revenge or retaliate against someone who has wronged you.
  • sit on one's hands To refrain from taking action or intervening in a situation, usually out of indecision, apathy, or reluctance to get involved.
  • keep out of the/(one's) way To avoid interfering or getting in the path of someone or something; to stay aside or out of someone's path.
  • base one's opinion on sth To base one's opinion on something means to form or make a judgment or view about something based on the information, evidence, or facts available.
  • don't ask (one) The idiom "don't ask (one)" is used to suggest that it is better not to question someone about a particular topic or situation, as the answer may be embarrassing, sensitive, or inappropriate. It is a way of indicating that the person does not want to discuss or disclose something.
  • have (someone) in (one's) corner Having someone in one's corner means having someone's support, assistance, or advocacy. It implies that the person is on your side or fighting for you in a particular situation.
  • kick up one's heels To relax and have a good time, often by engaging in activities that are enjoyable and carefree.
  • die with one's boots on To die while still actively engaged in one's work or duties.
  • get one's ticket punched To get one's ticket punched means to face the consequences or receive punishment for one's actions or behavior. It is often used when someone is caught or held accountable for doing something wrong or unethical.
  • cool (one's) jets To calm down, relax, or become less excited or agitated.
  • by one's wits The idiom "by one's wits" means to rely on one's intelligence, cleverness, and resourcefulness to handle a difficult situation or problem.
  • bring (one) to book To bring someone to book means to hold them accountable for their actions, to bring them to justice or to make them explain and face the consequences of what they have done.
  • have many strings to (one's) bow The idiom "have many strings to (one's) bow" means to have multiple skills, abilities, or resources that one can use to achieve success or accomplish goals. It implies being well-prepared and versatile in various areas.
  • (one) won't (do something) again in a hurry The idiom "(one) won't (do something) again in a hurry" means that someone will not repeat a particular action quickly or willingly due to a negative or unpleasant experience associated with it.
  • couldn't act (one's) way out of a paper bag This idiomatic expression is used to describe someone who is a very poor actor or performer. It implies that the person lacks even the basic skills needed to perform well, and compares their ability to act to being so bad that they couldn't even successfully perform a simple task like getting out of a paper bag.
  • chew one's cud The idiom "chew one's cud" means to think carefully over something; to ponder or meditate on a particular issue or problem. It is derived from the behavior of cows, who chew their cud (regurgitated food) slowly and thoughtfully.
  • give one one’s pounds To give one what they deserve or what is owed to them.
  • see (one) for what (one) (really) is To see someone for who they truly are means to have a clear understanding and perception of that person's true character, motives, and intentions, often revealing their true nature or personality, instead of being deceived or misled by their facade or appearance.
  • stand on one's own feet To be independent and able to support oneself without needing help from others.
  • (one's) heart skips a beat When someone's heart skips a beat, it means they become suddenly excited, anxious, frightened, or nervous. It can also refer to experiencing a brief moment of surprise or intense emotion.
  • make one's excuses To make one's excuses means to provide a reason or explanation for why one cannot do something, attend an event, or fulfill a commitment.
  • talk out of both sides of (one's) mouth The idiom "talk out of both sides of (one's) mouth" refers to a situation in which someone says contradictory or two-faced things, often to different people or in different situations, in order to deceive or manipulate others. It means being insincere, dishonest, or trying to have it both ways.
  • live by one's wits "Live by one's wits" means to rely on cleverness, resourcefulness, and quick thinking to survive or succeed in difficult or challenging situations.
  • bring (one's) arse to an anchor The idiom "bring (one's) arse to an anchor" means to come to a stop, be still, or remain in one place. It is often used in a humorous or informal way to encourage someone to sit down or relax.
  • have ants in the/(one's) pants To have ants in one's pants means to be restless or unable to sit still; to be fidgety or anxious.
  • bring (one) up on charges To formally accuse someone of a crime or wrongdoing and initiate legal proceedings against them.
  • keep (one) on the edge of (one's) seat To keep someone in a state of suspense, excitement, or anticipation, typically by creating or prolonging a feeling of tension or uncertainty.
  • not touch a hair on (one's) head The idiom "not touch a hair on (one's) head" means to not harm or bother someone in any way, to protect someone from harm or danger.
  • give (one) beans To give someone beans means to scold, reprimand or speak harshly to them. It is often used in a playful or teasing manner.
  • be on (one's) side To support or be in favor of someone; to be on their team or advocate for their position.
  • try one's wings (out) To try one's wings (out) means to attempt or practice something new in order to test or develop one's abilities or skills. It can also refer to gaining experience or confidence in a new situation.
  • take off (one's) hat (to someone or something) To show admiration, respect, or appreciation for someone or something.
  • have (or get) one's ducks in a row To have or get one's ducks in a row means to be well organized and prepared, particularly in terms of having everything in order and properly arranged. It implies being ready for something or having all necessary details or items sorted and aligned correctly.
  • accompany (one) with To go along or be with someone in order to provide company or support.
  • come knocking at (one's) door The idiom "come knocking at (one's) door" means to approach or request something from someone, often in a persistent or demanding manner. It can also refer to facing the consequences or repercussions of a previous action or decision.
  • have it on (one's) toes To keep someone alert, cautious, and prepared for any situation.
  • beat (one) to within an inch of (one's) life To severely beat someone or attack them violently, to the point where they are near death or very close to dying.
  • in (one's) stocking(ed) feet The idiom "in (one's) stocking(ed) feet" typically refers to being barefoot or only wearing socks, without any shoes or slippers on.
  • get (one's) brain in gear To start thinking clearly and intelligently; to focus and begin working effectively.
  • cross one's heart To promise or swear that something is true; to make a sincere and solemn pledge.
  • have (one's) ducks in a row To have all necessary things organized or arranged in a neat and efficient manner; to be well-prepared and organized.
  • drive (one) back on (something) The idiom "drive (one) back on (something)" means to force someone to rely on a particular course of action or decision, often against their will or better judgment.
  • at the top of the/(one's) agenda The top item or priority on a list of things to be discussed or dealt with.
  • what (one) is driving at The idiom "what (one) is driving at" means to understand or interpret what someone is trying to communicate or imply.
  • in one's heart of hearts The phrase "in one's heart of hearts" means in one's deepest feelings or truest thoughts. It refers to a person's innermost desires, beliefs, or emotions.
  • rattle one's saber The idiom "rattle one's saber" means to make threatening gestures or statements in order to intimidate others, typically with the implied threat of using force or taking aggressive action.
  • mind (one's) own business To mind one's own business means to focus on one's own affairs and avoid interfering in the affairs of others. It implies staying out of situations that do not concern you and avoiding unnecessary involvement in other people's lives or issues.
  • live up to (one's)/its reputation The idiom "live up to (one's)/its reputation" means to meet or exceed the expectations or reputation that someone or something has built up over time. It implies that the person or thing in question is as good as people say they are.
  • to (or at) the top of one's bent To the maximum extent of one's abilities or capacity; to the highest degree of effort or capability.
  • bat (one's) eyelashes To bat one's eyelashes means to blink or flutter one's eyelids in a flirtatious or coquettish manner, often to show interest or attract someone's attention.
  • be as good as one's word To be as good as one's word means to fulfill one's promises or commitments and to act with honesty and integrity. It is to be reliable and trustworthy in keeping one's word.
  • give (one) the works To give someone the works means to give someone a thorough or comprehensive treatment, often involving special attention or extra effort. It can also imply treating someone in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • bail (one) out of jail To bail (one) out of jail means to provide the money or other resources necessary to secure someone's release from jail while they await trial or resolution of their legal situation.
  • have straws in (one's) hair The idiom "have straws in (one's) hair" typically means to appear wild, disheveled, or eccentric in appearance or behavior. It suggests someone who is carefree or unconcerned with their appearance.
  • wing (one's)/its way To move swiftly or effortlessly in a particular direction, often used to describe the movement of something through the air.
  • wipe the/that grin off (one's) face To wipe the grin off one's face means to make someone stop looking pleased, often because they have done something wrong or irritating.
  • at (one's) pleasure "At (one's) pleasure" means according to one's own desire or preference. It suggests that one has the freedom to do something whenever they choose, without any restrictions or limitations.
  • base one's opinion on something To base one's opinion on something means to form or establish one's belief or judgment on a particular factor, reasoning, or information. It involves using a specific source or piece of evidence as the foundation for one's viewpoint or perspective on a matter.
  • see one's way to The idiom "see one's way to" means to be able to find a way or solution to something, usually in a practical or financial sense. It can also refer to being willing or able to do something, often in terms of overcoming obstacles or challenges.
  • deny (one)self To deny oneself means to restrain or refuse oneself something that is wanted or desired, often for moral, ethical, or practical reasons.
  • (one's) heart leaps The idiom "(one's) heart leaps" means to feel sudden excitement, joy, or happiness. It describes a strong emotional response characterized by a sudden rush of positive feelings or sensations.
  • dip (one's) toe in the water To dip one's toe in the water means to cautiously or tentatively try something new or experience something unfamiliar before fully committing to it or getting involved. It can also refer to testing the waters or trying something out in a small way before making a bigger decision or commitment.
  • be afraid of (one's) (own) shadow To be excessively timid, easily frightened, or excessively cautious.
  • for (one's) liking The idiom "for (one's) liking" means not to one's taste or preference; not as much or as good as one would prefer. It is often used to express dissatisfaction or disappointment with something that is not to one's satisfaction.
  • keep one's nose to the grindstone To keep one's nose to the grindstone means to work hard and diligently without taking breaks or becoming distracted.
  • bring (one) over To persuade or convince someone to join or participate in something.
  • all by one's lonesm The idiom "all by one's lonesome" means being alone or by oneself, without anyone else around. It usually implies a sense of solitude or loneliness.
  • teach one's grandmother to suck eggs The idiom "teach one's grandmother to suck eggs" means trying to give advice or information to someone who is already knowledgeable or experienced in that subject. It implies giving unnecessary instructions to someone who is already well versed in the topic at hand.
  • feather in one's cap, a An achievement or honor that one can be proud of; a notable accomplishment or accolade that adds to one's reputation or success.
  • show (one) the door To show someone the door means to ask them to leave or to dismiss them from a place or situation.
  • like the sound of (one's) own voice The idiom "like the sound of one's own voice" means to enjoy talking and hearing oneself talk, often excessively or with no regard for others' thoughts or opinions. It suggests a person who is self-absorbed and overly focused on their own words.
  • be dragging (one's) feet To be deliberately slow or hesitant in taking action or making a decision.
  • at the end of one's rope The idiom "at the end of one's rope" means to be in a state of extreme frustration, exhaustion, or despair; to have reached the limits of one's patience or resources.
  • put hairs on (one's) chest To make someone stronger, more resilient, or more manly.
  • pin back (one's) ears This idiom means to listen carefully or attentively. It implies that one is focusing on what is being said or paying close attention. It can also mean to make an effort to understand or comprehend something fully.
  • shoot one's cuffs "Shoot one's cuffs" is an idiom that refers to a person adjusting their shirt cuffs, typically to appear neat and dignified. It can also imply showing off or drawing attention to one's clothing or style.
  • set the/(one's) clock(s) ahead To set the clock(s) ahead means to adjust the time on a clock or watch to show a later time than the actual time in order to create the illusion of being late or to avoid being late. This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe the act of preparing for future events or changes earlier than necessary.
  • only have eyes for (one) The idiom "only have eyes for (one)" means to be romantically interested or exclusively focused on a particular person. It suggests that the person is completely enamored and attentive to that individual, often to the exclusion of others.
  • *out of one's element To be out of one's element means to be in a situation or environment that is unfamiliar or uncomfortable for someone, causing them to feel awkward or unable to perform at their best.
  • be on (one's) good behavior To act in a manner that is socially acceptable and well-behaved, often done to avoid causing trouble or offense.
  • bust (one's) To expend all of one's resources or energy; to put in a lot of effort.
  • jump (one's) bones To be highly sexually attracted to someone and eager to engage in sexual activity with them.
  • get (one's) hooks into (someone or something) To establish a strong influence or control over someone or something.
  • end (one's) life To end one's life means to commit suicide or to cause one's own death deliberately.
  • follow up with (one) To continue or pursue a course of action or communication with someone in order to get more information or progress further in a task or relationship.
  • get (one's) Dutch up To become angry, annoyed, or upset.
  • get (one's) skates on To hurry up or move quickly.
  • cancel (one's) Christmas To ruin one's plans or put an end to one's hopes or expectations.
  • doesn't have a (certain kind of) bone in (one's) body The idiom "doesn't have a (certain kind of) bone in (one's) body" means that someone completely lacks a specific trait or characteristic. It suggests that the person is entirely devoid of a particular quality or attribute.
  • be (one's) spiritual home "Be (one's) spiritual home" is an idiom used to describe a place or community that feels deeply meaningful and connected to a person on a spiritual level. It is a place where one feels a sense of belonging, peace, and fulfillment, often reflecting their values and beliefs.
  • slip through (one's) fingers To fail to secure or keep hold of something or someone that is within one's grasp or control.
  • in front of (one's) very eyes The idiom "in front of one's very eyes" means something happening or occurring right before one's eyes or in plain sight. It is used to emphasize that something is visible or happening directly in front of someone without them realizing it immediately.
  • breathe (one's) last (breath) The idiom "breathe (one's) last (breath)" means to die or to take one's final breath before passing away.
  • when (or if, etc.) one's ship comes in (or home) This idiom means when someone achieves success, becomes wealthy, or meets their own good fortune.
  • look as though (one) has seen a ghost To appear frightened, shocked, or horrified, as if one has just encountered something extremely unsettling or scary.
  • absolve (one) of To absolve one of something means to free or clear them from blame, guilt, responsibility, or obligation.
  • string to (one's) bow The idiom "string to (one's) bow" refers to having an additional skill, talent, or resource that one can use to their advantage or benefit in a particular situation. It can also refer to having multiple options or strategies available to achieve a desired outcome.
  • acknowledge (one) to be right To accept or admit that someone is correct or has a valid point.
  • strike (one's) fancy If something strikes someone's fancy, it appeals to them or captures their interest.
  • suit (one) down to the ground The idiom "suit (one) down to the ground" means to be perfect for someone or to be exactly right for their preferences or needs. It implies a perfect fit or suitability.
  • a bit beyond (one's) ken The idiom "a bit beyond (one's) ken" means something that is too complex or difficult for someone to understand or grasp fully. It refers to a subject or concept that is beyond one's comprehension or expertise.
  • off one's chest, get The idiom "off one's chest, get" means to unburden oneself by sharing one's thoughts, feelings, or secrets with someone else; to reveal something that has been weighing heavily on one's mind.
  • have the ear of (one) The idiom "have the ear of (one)" means to have the attention, influence, or trust of someone in a position of power or authority, often in order to persuade or manipulate them.
  • hear (one) out To listen to someone's explanation or argument without interrupting or judging them.
  • get one's jollies To get pleasure or amusement from something; to experience enjoyment or satisfaction.
  • have a bone to pick with (one) When someone has a bone to pick with someone else, it means they have a grievance or complaint that they want to discuss or resolve with that person.
  • take a load off (one's feet) To sit down and rest, typically after standing or walking for a long period of time.
  • little bird told one, a The idiom "a little bird told one" means that a person has received information through a secret or unknown source.
  • meet (one's) gaze To make eye contact with someone and maintain it, usually in a confident or confrontational manner.
  • pour out one's heart The idiom "pour out one's heart" means to speak or express one's innermost feelings or emotions openly and candidly. It often involves sharing personal thoughts, struggles, or experiences in a sincere and heartfelt manner.
  • caught with (one's) hand in the cookie jar The idiom "caught with (one's) hand in the cookie jar" refers to being caught in the act of doing something wrong or engaging in dishonest behavior. It is usually used to describe someone who has been caught red-handed while committing a misdeed or illegal act.
  • seen one, seen them all This idiom means that once you have experienced or seen something, similar things are uninteresting or unremarkable because they are all the same. This phrase is often used to express boredom or disinterest in something that is repetitive or redundant.
  • put (one) to bed To put (one) to bed means to assist someone in preparing for and going to bed, or to finish a task or project for the day.
  • sprain one's ankle To sprain one's ankle means to injure or damage the ligaments around the ankle joint by twisting it suddenly or awkwardly.
  • do (one) a power of good To have a positive and beneficial effect on someone.
  • run one's eye over To quickly look over or briefly scan something.
  • move one's bowels To defecate or have a bowel movement; to pass waste from the body through the rectum.
  • give (one) the old heave-ho To give someone the old heave-ho means to dismiss or get rid of them, typically in a hasty or unceremonious manner.
  • be no skin off (one's) nose To be of no consequence or importance to someone; to not be bothered or affected by something.
  • eat (one) alive To completely defeat or overwhelm someone, either physically or emotionally.
  • the laugh is on (one) This idiom means that someone has become the object of ridicule or a joke, often because they have made a mistake or been deceived. It suggests that others are laughing at their expense.
  • have (one's) head read To have one's head read means to have someone examine or analyze one's thoughts, motives, or actions in order to better understand their behavior or decision-making process.
  • do (one's) utmost To do everything possible or make the greatest effort.
  • (one) ain't particular The idiom "(one) ain't particular" means that someone is not very picky or selective about something; they are not fussy or particular about their choices or preferences.
  • go (one's) separate ways To go in different directions or pursue different paths, usually after a disagreement or the end of a relationship.
  • come back to bite (one) To have negative consequences or repercussions in the future as a result of actions taken in the past.
  • watch one's step To be cautious and attentive to avoid making a mistake or getting into trouble.
  • set one's cap for To actively pursue or try to attract the romantic interest of someone, typically with the goal of forming a serious relationship or getting them to marry you.
  • let down (one's) hair To relax and be more informal or uninhibited; to be more relaxed or less serious about something
  • quit while one's ahead To quit while one's ahead means to stop an activity at a point when one is in a winning or advantageous position, in order to avoid potential loss or failure.
  • blow (one's) socks off To impress or amaze someone greatly; to be extremely exciting or impressive.
  • at (one's) fingertips The idiom "at (one's) fingertips" means readily available or easily accessible, as if within reach of one's fingers. It refers to having something close by and easily accessible for immediate use or reference.
  • one's eyes are bigger than one's stomach This idiom refers to someone who takes more food than they can actually eat, typically due to overestimating their appetite. It can also be used more generally to describe someone who takes on more than they can handle or manage.
  • dead on one's feet Exhausted or extremely tired; to be so tired that one feels as if they can barely stand or keep moving.
  • keep one's eyes open To remain watchful, vigilant, and alert in order to be aware of any potential dangers, opportunities, or changes.
  • be square (with one) To be square (with one) means to be honest, fair, or on good terms with someone. It can also mean to be in agreement with someone or on the same page.
  • be at (one's) service To be willing and available to help or assist someone as needed.
  • put (one's) hand to the plough To commit oneself to a task, project, or obligation with determination and dedication, often despite difficulties or obstacles.
  • at (one's) own peril The phrase "at (one's) own peril" means that doing something risky or dangerous could result in negative consequences solely on the responsibility of the person taking the risk.
  • fight (one's) corner To defend oneself or advocate strongly for one's own interests or beliefs, often in a challenging situation or against opposition.
  • have a card up (one's) sleeve To have a secret plan or piece of information that one can use to their advantage in a situation.
  • fluff one's lines To "fluff one's lines" means to forget or make mistakes while reciting something, such as lines in a play or script. It is often used in the context of performing arts or public speaking.
  • get (one) nowhere The idiom "get (one) nowhere" means to make no progress, achieve no result, or have no success in a particular situation or goal.
  • do one good To "do one good" means to benefit or help someone in a positive way. It can refer to actions that improve someone's situation, bring them joy, or provide them with what they need.
  • throw (one's) weight behind (someone or something) To actively support or endorse someone or something, often by using one's influence or power in a particular situation.
  • in the hollow of (one's) hand To hold or control someone or something completely; to have power or influence over someone or something.
  • can't take (one's) eyes off (of) (someone or something) To be unable to stop looking at someone or something because they are very interesting, attractive, or captivating.
  • no skin off (one's) back This idiom means that something does not affect or bother someone at all. It implies that a person is unaffected by a situation or experience.
  • cat got one's tongue The idiom "cat got one's tongue" is used to describe someone who is unusually quiet or unable to speak, typically due to shyness, embarrassment, or being at a loss for words.
  • grab (one) by the throat To grab someone by the throat means to confront or intimidate someone forcefully or aggressively.
  • if (one) can help it If (one) can help it is an idiom that means if it is possible to avoid or prevent something.
  • have got it in (one) The idiom "have got it in (one)" means to understand or grasp something easily and quickly. It can also refer to achieving success or completing a task on the first attempt.
  • not know (one is) born The idiom "not know (one is) born" means to be extremely ignorant or naive about something, usually in a sarcastic or humorous way. It suggests that the person is so unaware or clueless that they don't even know the basic facts or information about a topic.
  • (one's) number comes up The idiom "(one's) number comes up" means that someone's turn or opportunity has arrived, often referring to a situation where one's fate or luck changes unexpectedly. It can also refer to someone being chosen or selected for something.
  • soak one's face To soak one's face means to wash or cleanse one's face thoroughly and refreshingly. It can also refer to indulging in self-care or pampering oneself, such as with a facial treatment or skincare routine.
  • base (one's) opinion on To form or develop one's judgement or viewpoint based on a particular idea, belief, or piece of information.
  • hammer (something) into (one's) thick skull The idiom "hammer (something) into (one's) thick skull" means to repeatedly and forcefully try to make someone understand or remember something by explaining it in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • lead (one) to believe To cause someone to think or believe something, often by giving them information that suggests a certain conclusion.
  • cast (one's) lot with (someone or something) The idiom "cast (one's) lot with (someone or something)" means to make a choice or decision to align oneself with a particular person, group, or cause. It involves committing to or supporting that person, group, or cause fully.
  • take one's cue from someone To take one's cue from someone means to follow or imitate someone's actions, behavior, or decisions, often to guide one's own actions or behavior accordingly.
  • know sm or sth like the palm of one's hand To know someone or something like the palm of one's hand means to be very familiar with that person or thing, knowing every detail and aspect of them.
  • up to (one's) neck To be very deeply involved or embroiled in a situation or issue.
  • turn (someone) around (one's) (little) finger To have complete control or influence over someone, often in a manipulative or seductive way.
  • hold one's breath To wait eagerly and with great anticipation for something to happen.
  • make (one) feel small To make someone feel insignificant or unimportant.
  • man after (one's) own heart A person who is very similar to oneself in thoughts, attitudes, or preferences; someone who shares one's values or beliefs.
  • speak one's piece To speak one's piece means to express one's opinions or thoughts openly and frankly, often in a forceful or assertive manner. It implies speaking one's mind without holding back or being reserved.
  • find it in one's heart To have the ability to forgive or show compassion or kindness towards someone; to make a decision or take an action based on a feeling of generosity or kindness.
  • live beyond (one's) means To live beyond one's means means to spend more money than one can afford, usually resulting in financial difficulty or debt.
  • fly (one's) freak flag To openly display or boldly show one's true colors, beliefs, or individuality; to express oneself without fear of judgment or criticism.
  • show one's (true) colors To "show one's (true) colors" means to reveal one's true character or intentions, especially when they are negative or deceitful. It refers to displaying one's true self or personality, often in a revealing or unexpected way.
  • give (one) the sack To dismiss or fire someone from their job; to terminate someone's employment.
  • let (someone or something) slip through (one's) fingers To fail to seize or capitalize on an opportunity; to let something valuable or advantageous go to waste or be lost.
  • a crick in (one's) back A crick in one's back refers to a sudden and painful stiffness or spasm in the muscles of the back, usually resulting in limited movement and discomfort.
  • drag (one's) heels To drag one's heels means to be slow or reluctant in doing something or making a decision, often delaying progress or causing a delay in a project or plan.
  • (one) can scarcely believe (one's) eyes The idiom "(one) can scarcely believe (one's) eyes" means that someone is finding it difficult to believe what they are seeing, either because it is incredibly surprising, unusual, or shocking.
  • no flies on (one) The idiom "no flies on (one)" means that a person is clever, alert, and quick to understand or act. It implies that the person is sharp and should not be underestimated.
  • reveal (one's) hand To reveal one's hand means to disclose one's true intentions, plans, or motives, often at a crucial moment or after concealing them. It originates from card games, where players would reveal their cards, or "hand," to show their strategy or bluff.
  • be close to (one's) heart To be important or precious to someone; something that is deeply cherished or valued.
  • have (one's) knife into (someone) To have a strong dislike or resentment towards someone and to behave in a hostile or critical manner towards them.
  • pay (one) back To take revenge or retaliate against someone who has wronged you; to repay a debt or favor.
  • have eyes bigger than (one's) belly To have eyes bigger than one's belly means to take more food or resources than one can actually consume or use, often out of greed or overestimation of one's own capacity. It can also refer to having unrealistic expectations or desires.
  • out of one's mind The idiom "out of one's mind" means to be insane, crazy, or not thinking clearly. It can also refer to someone who is acting in a wild or irrational manner.
  • lie through (one's) teeth To lie through one's teeth means to tell a blatant or purposeful falsehood with great confidence and without any shame or guilt.
  • fling (one's) bonnet over the windmill To take a risk or engage in a daring or adventurous activity.
  • see (one's) way (clear) to (doing something) To be willing and able to do something, often after having initially been unsure or reluctant.
  • in a class of (one's)/its own The phrase "in a class of (one's)/its own" is used to describe someone or something that stands out from all others because of exceptional qualities or characteristics. It implies that the person or thing is truly unique and incomparable to anything else.
  • letters after (one's) name The idiom "letters after (one's) name" refers to academic or professional qualifications, certifications, or titles that come after a person's name, indicating their expertise or level of education in a particular field.
  • roof over one's head, a A "roof over one's head" refers to having a home or shelter. It signifies having a place to live and be protected from the elements.
  • eyes in the back of (one's) head The idiom "eyes in the back of (one's) head" is used to describe someone who seems to have an uncanny ability to be aware of what is happening around them, even without directly seeing or hearing it. It implies that the person is highly alert and perceptive, able to detect things that others might not notice.
  • snap one's fingers at To snap one's fingers at means to show disregard or disrespect towards someone or something; to dismiss or ignore someone or something with ease.
  • look (one) in the eye(s) To meet someone's gaze directly, especially as a way of showing confidence, assertiveness, or honesty.
  • one-eyed pants mouse One-eyed pants mouse is a humorous and nonsensical term used to refer to something that is imaginary, fictitious or nonsensical. It is often used in a playful or sarcastic manner to describe something that is absurd or unbelievable.
  • twist around one's finger To easily control or manipulate someone, typically through charm or influence.
  • be in one's right mind To be mentally sound and capable of thinking and behaving in a rational manner; to be of sound mental health.
  • show (someone) the back of (one's) hand To show disrespect or scorn towards someone by ignoring, dismissing, or belittling them.
  • deal (one) into (something) To involve or include someone in a particular activity or situation.
  • a/one step ahead To be one step ahead means to anticipate or plan for events or situations before they happen, giving oneself an advantage or edge in a particular situation.
  • get (one's) hands on (someone) To come into possession of or obtain someone, typically in a forceful or physical manner.
  • wear (one's particular profession's) hat To "wear (one's particular profession's) hat" means to act or behave in accordance with one's professional role or duties. This can refer to adopting a specific mindset or attitude in relation to one's job or responsibilities.
  • a/one false move A false move refers to a mistake or error in judgment that could have serious consequences. The idiom "a/one false move" is often used to warn against making a mistake or poor decision that could result in disastrous outcomes. It emphasizes the importance of being cautious and thoughtful in one's actions.
  • set one's teeth To set one's teeth means to clench one's teeth together tightly in a way that signifies determination, anger, or resolve. It can also refer to mentally preparing oneself for a difficult or challenging situation.
  • take (one) at (one's) word To believe what someone has said without questioning or doubting them.
  • cast (one's) eyes down To look down or avoid making eye contact, usually out of guilt, shame, or embarrassment.
  • fling (one's) cap over the windmill To take a risk or make a bold move; to do something daring or unconventional.
  • blow (one's) cover To reveal one's true identity or intentions, often unintentionally, thereby ruining a disguise or secret plan.
  • beam in one's own eye The idiom "beam in one's own eye" refers to being unaware of or ignoring one's own faults or shortcomings while being quick to point out or criticize the faults of others. It is often used to highlight the hypocrisy of judging others without first examining one's own behavior or actions.
  • (in) up to (one's) eye(ball)s being extremely busy or overwhelmed with something
  • stand on one's own (two) feet To be self-reliant and independent, especially financially or in terms of making decisions.
  • get into (one's) head To understand or comprehend something deeply or to become fixated on a certain idea or thought.
  • hold one's nose To reluctantly tolerate or endure something unpleasant.
  • shop till (one) drops To shop continuously and enthusiastically until one can no longer physically continue.
  • play one's cards well To handle a situation, take advantage of an opportunity, or achieve success by making the best choices and decisions.
  • at (one's) suggestion "At (one's) suggestion" means that something was proposed or recommended by someone. It indicates that a particular idea or course of action was brought up or advised by a specific individual.
  • communicate with (one) To exchange information or ideas with someone through speaking, writing, or other means in order to convey a message or establish a connection.
  • (one) can't beat that The idiom "(one) can't beat that" means that something is so good or impressive that it cannot be surpassed or improved upon. It is often used to express admiration or satisfaction with something that is seen as the best or most desirable option.
  • roll (over) in (one's) grave The idiom "roll (over) in (one's) grave" refers to a hypothetical scenario in which a deceased person would be so shocked, outraged, or disappointed by a current event or action that they would figuratively "roll over" in their grave. It is often used to express the idea that the person's principles or values are being violated or disregarded.
  • figment of one's imagination A figment of one's imagination is something that exists only in one's mind and is not based in reality.
  • give (one) a turn To surprise or shock someone by doing something unexpected or out of character.
  • make (one's) hair curl To cause someone to feel extremely shocked, scared, or disgusted.
  • in one's opinion "In one's opinion" is an expression used to indicate that the statement being made is based on the speaker's personal belief or viewpoint. It is often used to emphasize subjectivity or personal perspective in a given situation.
  • (just/right) up (one's) street "(Just/right) up (one's) street" is an informal idiom that means something is perfectly suited to someone's interests, skills, or preferences. It can also refer to something that is very convenient or easily accessible for someone.
  • hitch one's wagon to a star The idiom "hitch one's wagon to a star" means to set high goals or aspirations and align oneself with someone or something that is successful or influential in order to achieve those goals. It encourages aiming for greatness and associating with those who can help elevate one's status or achievements.
  • get one's back up To become angry or defensive, especially when feeling threatened or challenged.
  • be conspicuous by (one's) absence The idiom "be conspicuous by (one's) absence" means to be noticeable or glaringly absent from a situation or event, causing one to be missed or conspicuous in their absence. It refers to someone who should have been present but is not, drawing attention to their absence.
  • have (one's) pick of (something) To have the option of choosing from a variety of things, typically the best or most desirable ones.
  • talk to hear one's own voice The idiom "talk to hear one's own voice" refers to someone who enjoys talking for the sake of speaking and hearing themselves rather than engaging in meaningful or productive conversation with others. It suggests self-absorption and a lack of interest or consideration for others in the conversation.
  • wrap (someone) around (one's) (little) finger To have complete control or influence over someone, typically through manipulation or persuasion.
  • put up one's dukes "Put up one's dukes" is an idiom that means to assume a defensive or fighting stance, typically with the fists raised in preparation for a physical confrontation or as a way to defend oneself.
  • (one) can't win for losing The idiom "(one) can't win for losing" is used to describe a situation where a person is unable to succeed or come out on top, no matter what they do. It typically suggests that the individual in question is constantly facing challenges or setbacks that prevent them from achieving their goals or being successful.
  • knit one's brow The idiom "knit one's brow" means to furrow one's brow or to frown in concentration, worry, or confusion. It refers to the physical act of drawing one's eyebrows together in a tight or tense manner.
  • put one's dibs on sth To put one's dibs on something means to claim ownership or a right to something before anyone else can. It is a way of asserting a prior claim or stake in something.
  • know where (one) stands To have a clear understanding of one's position, status, or relationship in a situation; to be aware of how one is viewed or perceived by others.
  • get off (one's) backside To start taking action or making an effort to do something; to stop being lazy or idle.
  • take one's chances To take one's chances means to accept a situation or opportunity as it comes, without worrying about the risks or uncertainties involved. It can also mean to be willing to accept whatever outcome may result from one's decisions or actions.
  • capture (one's) imagination To engage or captivate someone's creativity, curiosity, or interest.
  • chisel (one) out of (something) To deceive or cheat someone out of something, typically money or possessions.
  • make (one's) day The idiom "make (one's) day" means to make someone extremely happy or to greatly improve their mood. It refers to doing something that brings joy, satisfaction, or excitement to someone.
  • jump out of (one's) skin To be extremely startled, surprised, or afraid.
  • the fullness of (one's) heart The idiom "the fullness of one's heart" refers to a feeling of deep emotion or overwhelming love and affection that one is experiencing. It signifies a strong sense of happiness, contentment, or gratitude that one feels towards something or someone.
  • drop (one) a note To send a brief written message or communication to someone; to write a short letter or message to someone.
  • bother one's (pretty little) head about sm or sth The idiom "bother one's (pretty little) head about sm or sth" means to worry or concern oneself with something that is not worth the time or energy to think about. It implies that the person is overthinking or stressing about something insignificant or unimportant.
  • show (one's) butt The idiom "show (one's) butt" means to behave rudely, inappropriately, or in a disruptive manner. It can also refer to displaying one's worst qualities or acting in an embarrassing way.
  • easy as one-two-three The idiom "easy as one-two-three" refers to something that is extremely simple or effortless to do, often implying that it can be completed in a quick and straightforward manner.
  • swear on (one's) mother's grave The idiom "swear on (one's) mother's grave" means to make a solemn oath or promise, invoking the memory of one's deceased mother as a way to emphasize the sincerity and seriousness of the statement being made.
  • a load off (one's) mind The idiom "a load off (one's) mind" is used to describe a feeling of relief or lightness after a worry or burden has been resolved or removed.
  • not believe (one's) eyes To be shocked or amazed by something one sees, often because it is unexpected or unbelievable.
  • know which side of one's bread is buttered To understand where one's best interests lie and to act accordingly; to be aware of who holds power or influence over oneself and to act in a way that benefits them.
  • just one's cup of tea "Just one's cup of tea" is an idiom that means something that is to someone's liking or preferences. It refers to something that is enjoyable or appealing to a specific person.
  • straws in (one's) hair The idiom "straws in (one's) hair" refers to a person who appears to be mentally unstable or disheveled, often as a result of stress, confusion, or other emotional turmoil. It suggests a lack of composure or control over one's thoughts or actions.
  • couldn't find (one's) way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't find (one's) way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who is extremely incompetent or lacking in basic skills or abilities. It implies that the person is so inept that they would struggle to even complete a simple task, such as finding their way out of a paper bag.
  • kill (one)self To work very hard or put in a great deal of effort.
  • make one's hair stand on end The idiom "make one's hair stand on end" means to make someone feel very frightened or scared.
  • kick (one) upstairs The idiom "kick (one) upstairs" refers to the act of promoting or moving someone to a higher position or level within an organization, often as a means of removing them from their current role or responsibilities. This can sometimes be done as a way of rewarding or giving recognition to someone without necessarily providing them with additional power or influence.
  • away from (one's) desk The idiom "away from one's desk" typically refers to someone who is not at their usual place of work or not available for immediate communication because they are not in their designated workspace.
  • beyond (one's) means "Beyond (one's) means" means spending or living beyond one's financial capabilities or resources. It refers to actions or expenses that are too costly for someone's income or budget.
  • acquaint (one) with To acquaint (one) with someone or something is to make them familiar with or introduce them to that person or thing. It means to give someone knowledge or experience of someone or something, often in a formal or official way.
  • be in contact with (one) To be in communication or regularly interacting with someone.
  • put (one's) hands up The idiom "put (one's) hands up" means to raise one's hands in surrender or submission, often in response to a demand or threat.
  • the ball is in (one's) court The phrase "the ball is in (one's) court" means that it is now someone's responsibility to make a decision or take action in a particular situation. It suggests that it is up to that person to make the next move or take the next step.
  • at the summit of (one's) success "At the summit of (one's) success" means to be at the peak or highest point of one's achievements or accomplishments. It signifies reaching a level of success or recognition that is considered the pinnacle of one's career or life.
  • go about (one's) business To go about one's business means to proceed with one's normal activities or tasks in a determined and focused manner, often despite distractions or interruptions.
  • make something of (one's) life To make something of one's life means to achieve success, fulfillment, and a sense of purpose in one's personal and professional endeavors. It often implies setting and accomplishing meaningful goals, making positive contributions to society, and living a life that is meaningful and rewarding.
  • be a thorn in (one's) flesh To be a constant source of annoyance or frustration to someone; to be a persistent problem or difficulty for someone.
  • go back on one's word To "go back on one's word" means to break a promise or fail to keep a commitment that was previously made.
  • try (one's) fortune To try one's fortune means to take a risk or attempt to achieve success, often in a new or unfamiliar endeavor. It involves trying one's luck or testing one's abilities in pursuing a goal or opportunity.
  • chip on one's shoulder To have a chip on one's shoulder means to be easily offended or to always be ready to start a fight or argument. It can also refer to someone who is carrying a grudge or is easily irritated.
  • go in fear of (one's) life The idiom "go in fear of (one's) life" means to live in constant fear for one's safety or wellbeing. It implies feeling threatened or endangered to the point where one is constantly afraid for their life.
  • expose (one)self To expose oneself means to reveal or display private or confidential information or actions, often inadvertently or unintentionally. It can also refer to revealing one's true feelings, intentions, or motives.
  • meet one's match To meet one's match means to encounter someone or something that is equal in skill, ability, or strength, making it difficult to outperform or defeat them.
  • watch one's back To "watch one's back" means to be cautious and vigilant, especially in a situation where one may be in danger or facing potential threats from others. It implies being aware of one's surroundings and taking necessary precautions to protect oneself from harm or betrayal.
  • drive (one) batty The idiom "drive (one) batty" means to make someone extremely annoyed, frustrated, or crazy. It implies that someone's actions or behavior are causing irritation or agitation in another person.
  • short-change (one) To give someone less money, time, or attention than they deserve or are owed.
  • be up (one's) ass To be excessively close or clingy to someone; to be constantly hovering or monitoring someone's actions.
  • God help (one) The idiom "God help (one)" is a phrase used to express a strong feeling of sympathy or concern for someone who is in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies a sense of helplessness and the need for divine intervention or support.
  • catch on with (one) To become understood or accepted by someone; to gain popularity or approval from someone.
  • (one's) face fits This idiom means that someone is accepted or liked by a particular group or organization because they have the right qualities or attributes that are favored by that group. It implies that the person's appearance, characteristics, or personality are in line with what is preferred or expected in that particular environment.
  • beat (one) hollow To easily defeat someone in a competition or contest by a large margin.
  • clip (one's) wings To restrict someone's freedom or ability to act independently, usually by imposing rules or limitations.
  • place one's trust in sm or sth To place one's trust in someone or something means to rely on them or it with confidence and faith. It implies believing in the dependability, honesty, or ability of the person or thing in question.
  • shake (one's) hand The idiom "shake (one's) hand" means to greet or acknowledge someone by grasping their hand and moving it up and down. It is a common gesture of friendship, agreement, or respect.
  • get (one's) shirt out To become very angry or upset.
  • be putty in (one's) hands To be easily influenced or controlled by someone; to be willing to do whatever someone wants.
  • shoot off one's mouth The idiom "shoot off one's mouth" means to speak impulsively or without thinking, often saying things that are inappropriate or offensive. It can also mean to speak boastfully or exaggerate one's accomplishments.
  • make (one's) beard The idiom "make (one's) beard" means to make someone look foolish or to embarrass someone. It implies making a person seem ineffectual or weak.
  • allow (one) up The idiom "allow (one) up" means to let someone stand or rise from a sitting or lying position. It can also refer to giving someone permission to move to a higher position or level.
  • fold (up) (one's) tent The idiom "fold (up) (one's) tent" means to leave a place or situation, especially after a failure or setback, as if packing up and moving on. It can also refer to giving up on a particular endeavor or goal.
  • do (one) a/the world of good To have a very positive effect on someone; to improve someone's physical, emotional, or mental well-being.
  • get ahold of (one) to contact or reach someone
  • keep one's distance (from someone or something) To keep one's distance (from someone or something) means to stay away or maintain a safe or appropriate distance from that person or thing, often for safety, personal space, or emotional boundaries.
  • take the law into (one's) own hands To take the law into one's own hands is to act as a judge, jury, and executioner without legal authority. It refers to a person taking justice or revenge into their own hands rather than relying on the legal system.
  • beat one's breast To express sorrow, regret, or guilt, especially in a public or dramatic way. It is often used to describe someone who is openly showcasing their emotions of remorse or self-blame.
  • follow one's heart To follow one's heart means to act in accordance with one's own feelings, desires, or instincts rather than logic or reason.
  • call (one) to attention To cause someone to become alert and pay close attention; to make someone focus on something or someone.
  • catch (one's) eye To attract someone's attention or interest.
  • play (one's) hunch To act on one's intuition or gut feeling without concrete evidence or logical reasoning.
  • have (one's) share of (something) To have as much of something as is expected or deserved.
  • one's (butter and) egg money "One's (butter and) egg money" refers to the extra or disposable income earned from a side job, hobby, or small business endeavor that is separate from one's main source of income. This money is typically used for personal pleasures or luxuries rather than essential expenses.
  • cross (one's) path To meet or encounter someone by chance.
  • rivet one's gaze on sm or sth To rivet one's gaze on someone or something means to look at that person or thing intently and with great focus. It implies a sense of fixation or concentration on the object of one's attention.
  • harm a hair on (one's) head To harm a hair on (one's) head means to injure or cause harm to someone, even in the slightest way. It can also refer to threatening or causing potential harm to someone in any way.
  • put (one's) ass on the line To put one's ass on the line means to take a risk or put oneself in a dangerous or vulnerable position in order to achieve something. It implies putting oneself at stake or in harm's way for the sake of a desired outcome.
  • put the fear of God in (one) To make someone feel fear or awe by using threats or intimidation.
  • flat on one's back The idiom "flat on one's back" refers to being lying down on one's back in a horizontal position, usually as a result of being ill, injured, or exhausted. It can also figuratively mean being in a helpless or incapacitated state.
  • give (one) the glad hand To give someone an overly warm or cheerful greeting, often for the purpose of impressing them or making them feel welcomed.
  • as far as (one) knows As far as one knows means based on the information or knowledge currently available to someone. It is used to indicate that the following statement is only true to the best of the speaker's knowledge.
  • draw (one's) last breath The idiom "draw (one's) last breath" means to take one's final breath and die; to cease living.
  • one's ears are red If someone's ears are red, it means they are embarrassed, ashamed, or feeling self-conscious.
  • be set in (one's) ways The idiom "be set in (one's) ways" means to be firmly attached to one's habits, beliefs, or routines and resistant to change or new ideas.
  • back of (one's) hand To know something extremely well; to be very familiar with something; to know something like the back of one's hand.
  • able to (do something) with (one's) eyes closed The idiom "able to (do something) with (one's) eyes closed" means that someone is very skilled or knowledgeable at doing a particular task, to the point where they could do it effortlessly, easily, and without even needing to pay attention or focus.
  • telegraph one's punches To telegraph one's punches means to unintentionally reveal one's intentions or plans, making them easy to anticipate or counter. The phrase comes from boxing, where telegraphing a punch involves giving visual cues or signals to an opponent before throwing the punch, thereby reducing its effectiveness. In a broader sense, it can refer to being predictable or transparent in one's actions or behavior.
  • have money burning a hole in (one's) pocket The idiom "have money burning a hole in (one's) pocket" refers to the situation where someone feels compelled to spend money quickly because they have extra money that they are eager to use or are excited to spend.
  • inch one's way along sth To make slow or gradual progress along something, often struggling or moving with great effort.
  • nourish a viper in (one's) bosom To knowingly provide support or aid to someone who will eventually betray or harm you.
  • put one's back into it To put one's back into it means to exert a lot of effort or energy into doing something. It implies working hard and giving it one's all in order to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • hang one's hat (up) (somewhere) To put or establish one's residence or temporary lodging in a particular place.
  • bored out of (one's) mind The idiom "bored out of (one's) mind" means feeling extremely bored or uninterested to the point of being mentally unstimulated or frustrated.
  • pull (something) out of (one's) ass The idiom "pull (something) out of (one's) ass" means to come up with or produce something without any prior planning or effort, often in a hasty or improvised manner. It implies that the idea or solution is not well thought out or legitimate.
  • have (sth) stick in one's craw The idiom "have (something) stick in one's craw" means to feel extremely irritated, upset, or offended by something. It refers to a feeling of being unable to forget or ignore something that has upset or bothered you.
  • off (one's) gourd The idiom "off (one's) gourd" means to be very confused, crazy, or insane. It is often used to describe someone who is behaving in a bizarre or irrational manner.
  • chum up to (one) To become friendly or ingratiating with someone in order to gain favor or advantage.
  • lick one's chops The idiom "lick one's chops" means to anticipate something with great pleasure or excitement, usually referring to a future opportunity or advantage. It can also mean to show or express eagerness or anticipation for something desirable.
  • be off (one's) nut To be off one's nut means to be crazy or insane.
  • have (one's) head (stuck) up (one's) arse This idiom is a vulgar expression used to describe someone who is arrogant, self-absorbed, ignorant, or oblivious to what is happening around them. It suggests that the person is so focused on themselves or their own opinions that they are unaware of or indifferent to reality.
  • whatever floats (one's) boat Whatever makes someone happy or satisfied; whatever works best for someone; whatever brings someone joy or contentment.
  • not for the life of (one) The idiom “not for the life of (one)” means that no matter what, under no circumstances, or no matter how much effort is exerted or how much pressure is applied, a person is unwilling or unable to do a certain thing or accomplish a certain task.
  • in (one's) midst The idiom "in (one's) midst" means something that is happening or existing within a certain group or population. It refers to being surrounded by people or things, usually in a tangible or physical sense.
  • keep (one's) cards close to (one's) vest To keep one's cards close to one's vest means to keep one's thoughts, intentions, or plans secret or hidden from others. It comes from the game of poker, where players hold their cards close to their chest to prevent opponents from seeing them.
  • get a/(one's) second breath To "get a/(one's) second breath" means to recover after physical exertion or stress, to regain energy or composure.
  • yell one's head off The idiom "yell one's head off" means to shout or scream very loudly or vigorously.
  • make something with (one's) own fair hand(s) To create or craft something with one's own skill, effort, and labor.
  • never darken (one's) door again The idiom "never darken (one's) door again" is used to convey a strong feeling of anger or dislike towards someone, telling them that they are not welcome to come back or visit again. It usually implies a final and permanent rejection of the person.
  • (one's) head on a plate/platter The idiom "(one's) head on a plate/platter" refers to someone being in a situation where they are in danger of being severely punished or humiliated. It is often used to describe a person who is at risk of losing their job, reputation, or social status.
  • heart in it, have one's To be fully committed or emotionally invested in something.
  • give (one) the shaft To treat someone unfairly or with disrespect; to cheat or deceive someone.
  • feel one's oats To feel one's oats means to feel energetic, confident, and strong, especially in a way that shows a lack of respect for others. It typically describes someone who is feeling bold, assertive, and ready to take on challenges.
  • a black mark beside (one's) name "a black mark beside one's name" is an expression used to describe a negative mark or stain on someone's reputation or character. It implies that the person has done something wrong or undesirable that will negatively affect how they are perceived by others.
  • have (something) in (one's) hands To have control or possession of something.
  • have (one's) name written all over it If something "has (one's) name written all over it," it means that it is perfectly suited for that person or that person is the ideal candidate for it.
  • one's nextdoor neighbor The phrase "one's nextdoor neighbor" is used to refer to someone who is very close or nearby in proximity, either physically or figuratively. It implies someone who is in close and regular contact with another person, typically due to living or working in close proximity to them.
  • not rest on (one's) laurels The idiom "not rest on (one's) laurels" means to not become complacent or satisfied with past accomplishments or successes, but to continue striving for improvement and success in the future.
  • know where (one) is going To have a clear direction or goal in mind, to be confident in one's decisions and actions.
  • in a class by (one)self The idiom "in a class by (one)self" means to be exceptional or unique, standing out from others in a particular category or group. It describes someone or something that is unrivaled or unmatched in a particular way.
  • on one's own The idiom "on one's own" means to be independent or self-sufficient, without the help or support of others.
  • have a lump in (one's) throat To have a lump in one's throat means to have a tight or constricted feeling in the throat, often due to strong emotions such as sadness, nostalgia, or anxiety.
  • extend one's sympathy (to sm) To offer one's condolences or support to someone who is experiencing hardship or grief.
  • roof over (one's) head Having a roof over one's head means having a stable and secure place to live or shelter. It refers to having a home or residence that provides protection from the elements and a sense of security.
  • can't see farther than the end of (one's) nose This idiom means that someone is not able to see or understand things that are not immediately obvious or in front of them. It implies a lack of insight, awareness, or foresight.
  • get (one's) knickers in a knot This idiom means to become very upset, agitated, or annoyed about something.
  • under one's wing To be under one's wing means to be under someone's protection, care, or guidance.
  • a feather in (one's) cap The idiom "a feather in (one's) cap" means an accomplishment or achievement that brings pride or honor to a person. It is something that adds to their reputation or success.
  • bird in (one's) bosom The idiom "bird in (one's) bosom" typically refers to a secret or something that is kept private and close to one's heart. It can also imply a sense of comfort, protection, or closeness.
  • assist (one) at To help or support someone during a specific event or situation.
  • fall all over (one) The idiom "fall all over (one)" means to show a lot of affection or enthusiasm towards someone. It can also mean to be extremely impressed or pleased by someone.
  • free, white, and twenty-one The idiom "free, white, and twenty-one" is often used to describe someone who is at a stage in life when they are considered to be independent and have reached the age of majority. It can also refer to someone who is carefree and living their life to the fullest without any constraints or responsibilities.
  • be (not) (one's) type To say that someone is (not) one's type means that they are (not) the kind of person that one finds attractive or compatible with. It can refer to physical appearance, personality, interests, or any other qualities that one looks for in a potential partner.
  • think the sun shines out (of) (one's) arse To think very highly of oneself; to believe that one is superior to others.
  • vent one's spleen To express one's anger, frustration, or resentment, often in a vehement or aggressive manner.
  • do (one's) business To do (one's) business means to urinate or defecate. It is a discreet or polite way of referring to these bodily functions.
  • have (one's) heart set on (something) To have one's heart set on something means to be determined or strongly desiring to achieve or acquire a particular goal or desire.
  • live off (of) (one's) (own) hump To support oneself through one's own efforts, resources, or hard work; to be self-sufficient and self-reliant.
  • for the life of (one) The phrase "for the life of (one)" is an idiom that means no matter how hard one tries or how much effort is put forth, something is still difficult or impossible to accomplish or understand.
  • assert (one)self To behave confidently and forcefully in order to make one's opinions and desires known and respected by others, often in a competitive or confrontational situation.
  • throw up (one's) hands in despair To express frustration, hopelessness, or a sense of giving up on a situation or problem.
  • around (one's) ears The idiom "around (one's) ears" typically means that something is surrounding or closing in on someone, often in a threatening or overwhelming way. It can also refer to something coming crashing down upon someone.
  • lead with one's chin To "lead with one's chin" means to knowingly put oneself in a vulnerable or risky position, often by being overly confident or confrontational. It refers to leaving oneself open to criticism, attack, or failure by taking an unnecessarily bold or aggressive stance.
  • do (one's) homework The idiom "do (one's) homework" means to thoroughly research and prepare for something, such as a task, project, or assignment. It also implies being knowledgeable and well-prepared in a certain subject or topic.
  • do one's thing To do whatever makes one happy or content; to engage in activities that one enjoys or feels passionate about.
  • stop (one) cold To halt someone abruptly or completely, often by surprising, shocking, or astonishing them.
  • beat one's head against the wall The idiom "beat one's head against the wall" means to continue to try to do something that is hopeless or impossible, despite repeated failures or setbacks. It often implies that the individual is stubbornly persisting in a fruitless endeavor.
  • feel (one's) legs The idiom "feel (one's) legs" means to test or assess one's physical abilities or strength, usually after a period of inactivity, injury, or numbness. It can also refer to regaining confidence or control in a situation.
  • get more than (one) bargained for To receive something unexpected or undesired in addition to what was initially expected or asked for.
  • hang one's head To look down in shame or embarrassment, typically with one's head lowered.
  • burst (up)on (one) To come suddenly and unexpectedly to someone's attention or presence.
  • redeem (one)self To redeem oneself means to take action to improve one's reputation or behavior after having done something that was considered wrong or bad. It involves making amends or proving oneself worthy or deserving of forgiveness or respect.
  • on (one's) good side If someone is on someone's good side, it means that they have gained favor or approval from that person. This usually results in a positive relationship or treatment from them.
  • set back on one's heels To surprise, shock, or shock someone into a state of uncertainty, hesitancy, or unpreparedness.
  • bother one's (pretty little) head about someone or something To worry or concern oneself unnecessarily about someone or something.
  • have (one's) name on it If something has someone's name on it, it is intended or destined for that person. It suggests that the person in question is destined to receive or obtain that particular thing.
  • ants in one's pants, have The idiom "ants in one's pants, have" is used to describe a feeling of restlessness or agitation, often due to excitement or nervousness. It typically implies a strong desire to get up and move around, as if someone has ants crawling in their pants.
  • bring (one) up for (something) to mention someone as a possible candidate for a particular role, responsibility, or task
  • serve (one) right "Serve (one) right" is an idiom that means to receive the appropriate consequence or punishment for one's actions, typically something negative that the person brought upon themselves.
  • put the roses in (one's) cheeks To put the roses in one's cheeks means to make someone look healthy, happy, and full of life, typically by being kind, loving, or generous towards them. It can also refer to the act of blushing or having a rosy complexion due to feeling embarrassed or shy.
  • kill (one) with kindness To overwhelm or harm someone with excessive kindness or generosity, often with the intention of irritating or annoying them.
  • lay (one's) life on the line To put oneself in a dangerous or life-threatening situation in order to help or protect someone else.
  • had one's fill To have had enough of something or to be satisfied or satiated.
  • meet (one's) end To die or to come to an end, typically in a tragic or untimely manner.
  • Up to (one's) neck in alligators The idiom "up to (one's) neck in alligators" means to be extremely busy, overwhelmed, or deeply involved in a difficult or challenging situation. It is often used to describe someone who is facing numerous problems or obstacles at once. The phrase is derived from the idea that when you are busy dealing with alligators, it is easy to forget that the initial objective was to drain the swamp.
  • marry one's way out of sth The idiom "marry one's way out of sth" means to use marriage as a means to escape or alleviate a difficult situation, usually a financial or social problem. It implies that by marrying someone who is wealthy or influential, one can improve their own circumstances or status.
  • get (one's) claws out To become aggressive or ready to attack, usually in a verbal or figurative sense.
  • claw (one's) way To struggle or fight fiercely and determinedly to achieve or succeed in something, often against obstacles or difficulties.
  • get a load off (one's) feet The idiom "get a load off (one's) feet" means to sit down and relax, especially after standing or walking for a long period of time. It implies taking a break and resting in order to relieve physical exhaustion or discomfort.
  • the bane of (one's) life The bane of one's life refers to something that causes constant annoyance, frustration, or difficulty for someone. It is often used to describe a person, situation, or thing that consistently brings negative consequences or challenges to someone's life.
  • point the finger at (one) To blame or accuse someone for something.
  • be etched on (one's) mind To be firmly fixed or deeply ingrained in one's memory or consciousness; to be remembered vividly or permanently.
  • get one's ass in gear To start working or moving more quickly and efficiently; to make progress or improve one's performance.
  • see (one) about (something) To attend to or take care of a particular task or issue for someone.
  • off the top of one's head To say something without much thought or preparation; to give an answer or suggestion based on one's immediate knowledge or opinion rather than careful consideration or research.
  • send (one) on a guilt trip To make someone feel guilty or remorseful about something they have done or failed to do by saying things that are intended to make them feel bad.
  • leave (one's) mark To leave one's mark means to have a lasting or significant impact or influence on something or someone. It often refers to making a memorable impression or leaving a lasting legacy.
  • Can I speak to (one)? The idiom "Can I speak to (one)?" is a polite way of asking to talk to someone on the phone or in person. It is often used when making a phone call or when trying to get in touch with a specific person.
  • be in (one's) debt The idiom "be in (one's) debt" means to owe someone a debt of gratitude or a favor for something they have done for you. It suggests a feeling of obligation to show gratitude or repay a kindness in the future.
  • speak for (one)self To express one's own opinions or feelings rather than assuming or claiming to represent those of others.
  • about (one's) business The definition of the idiom "about (one's) business" is to focus on one's tasks, responsibilities, or goals without being distracted by others or outside influences. It can also mean to be engaged in one's work or activities with seriousness and dedication.
  • (one's) face is like thunder The idiom "(one's) face is like thunder" is used to describe someone who looks extremely angry or upset. It suggests that the person's facial expression is dark, stormy, and full of hostility or displeasure.
  • give (one) what's coming (to one) To give someone what they deserve, typically punishment or consequences for their actions.
  • a blot on one's escutcheon The idiom "a blot on one's escutcheon" refers to something that brings shame or dishonor to a person or family's reputation or honor. It is often used to describe a stain or blemish on one's character or achievements. The term "escutcheon" refers to a shield or emblem bearing a coat of arms, symbolizing a person's family or heritage.
  • pound one's ear To "pound one's ear" is a colloquial expression that means to sleep or take a nap, especially when done in a relaxed or leisurely manner.
  • in over (one's) head Being involved in a situation that is too difficult or complicated for one to handle.
  • carry (something) with (one) To keep or have something on one's person; to have something with oneself at all times.
  • keep (someone) under (one's) thumb The idiom "keep (someone) under (one's) thumb" means to have control or power over someone, typically in a way that limits their freedom or independence.
  • need (something) (about) as much as (one) needs a hole in the head This idiom is used to express that someone does not need or want a particular thing at all. It implies that having another hole in the head would be unnecessary and unwanted.
  • clean up one's act To improve one's behavior or habits; to make positive changes in one's life, particularly by avoiding bad or destructive behavior.
  • have (someone's) blood on (one's) head To have responsibility for someone's injury or death.
  • be on (one's) ass The idiom "be on (one's) ass" means to be in a difficult or troubling situation, often one in which the person is struggling or facing significant challenges. It can also refer to being in a state of extreme fatigue or exhaustion.
  • catch (one) red-handed The idiom "catch (one) red-handed" means to discover someone in the act of doing something wrong or illegal.
  • miss one's guess To predict incorrectly; to be mistaken in one's assumption or estimation.
  • be (one) too many for someone The idiom "be (one) too many for someone" means to be too much or too overwhelming for someone to handle or deal with. It suggests that the person or situation is more than what the other person can handle or cope with.
  • give (one) the heebie-jeebies To give someone the heebie-jeebies means to cause a feeling of unease, anxiety, or nervousness in them.
  • live by/on (one's) wits To live by/on one's wits means to rely on one's intelligence, resourcefulness, and cleverness to survive or succeed in difficult or challenging situations.
  • have one's moments To have one's moments means to have periods of time during which one excels or shows exceptional qualities, despite having inconsistency or shortcomings at other times.
  • one's heart is set on If someone's heart is set on something, it means that they are very determined or eager to achieve or obtain a particular goal or desire.
  • hold (someone) in the palm of (one's) hand To have complete control or influence over someone, often in a manipulative or manipulative way.
  • see (one's) name in lights To see one's name in lights means to achieve fame and recognition, especially as a performer or entertainer. It refers to having one's name displayed prominently on a marquee or billboard, symbolizing success and public acknowledgment of one's talents.
  • put (one's) mind at ease To "put (one's) mind at ease" means to help someone feel less worried or anxious about something by providing reassurance or information that alleviates their concerns. It is to give someone peace of mind and reduce their feelings of stress or anxiety.
  • burn (one) out of (something) The idiom "burn (one) out of (something)" means to force someone to leave a place or position through persistent pressure or harassment.
  • broach (one's) claret The idiom "broach (one's) claret" means to draw blood, usually by violence or injury. It is often used to describe a physical altercation or aggression that results in someone bleeding.
  • give (something) to (one) on a plate To give something to someone on a plate means to provide them with an opportunity or advantage without any effort on their part.
  • to (one's) face "To (one's) face" means directly to a person, typically in a confrontational or blunt manner, rather than behind their back.
  • wait one's turn To wait patiently until it is one's opportunity or chance to do something or participate in an activity, especially when others are also waiting their turn.
  • for all (one) is worth To do something with maximum effort or enthusiasm.
  • plight one's troth to sm To plight one's troth to someone means to pledge one's faithfulness or loyalty to that person. It is a formal or solemn vow to be committed or loyal to someone.
  • keep (one) on the hop To keep someone busy or on a tight schedule, often in a way that prevents them from having much free time or rest.
  • launch (one's lunch) A colloquial expression used to describe the act of vomiting or throwing up, typically due to feeling nauseous or ill.
  • lead (one) to the altar To lead someone to the altar means to marry them or encourage them to get married.
  • have a one-track mind To have a one-track mind means to be preoccupied with one particular thing or idea, often to the exclusion of all others. It describes someone who is focused or fixated on a single topic or goal and is unable or unwilling to consider or think about anything else.
  • leave a sour taste in (one's) mouth To leave a sour taste in one's mouth means to cause feelings of disappointment, resentment, or displeasure. It refers to a negative experience that lingers and affects one's perception or memory of a person, situation, or event.
  • chill (one's) action To stop or calm down a person's aggressive or confrontational behavior.
  • buy (one's) way in(to) (something) The idiom "buy (one's) way in(to) (something)" means to gain access or entry to a place or group by paying money or offering a bribe rather than earning or deserving it through merit.
  • beat (one) to the punch To do or achieve something before another person can.
  • at (one's) elbow The phrase "at (one's) elbow" means to be very close to someone or something, usually physically. It can also mean to be readily available for assistance or support.
  • put one's feet up To relax or take a break; to elevate one's feet and rest.
  • put the/(one's) clock(s) back To adjust the time on a clock to an earlier hour, typically done when Daylight Saving Time ends in the fall. This idiom can also refer to going back to a previous state or situation.
  • go off (one's) rocker To go off one's rocker means to become mentally unstable or insane.
  • not hold (one's) liquor Not being able to handle alcohol well; becoming drunk or intoxicated easily.
  • have (someone) twisted around (one's) (little) finger To have complete control or influence over someone; to manipulate someone easily or effortlessly.
  • not float (one's) boat "Not float (one's) boat" means that something does not interest or excite someone, or that they do not enjoy or derive satisfaction from it.
  • on (one's) behalf "On (one's) behalf" means to act or speak for someone else, typically in a representative or advocate capacity. It expresses the idea of doing something on someone else's behalf or in their interest.
  • come knocking on (one's) door The phrase "come knocking on (one's) door" means to seek help, assistance, or an opportunity from someone. It implies approaching someone when in need or looking for support.
  • keep (one's) eye(s) open (for something or someone) To be watchful or alert in order to notice something or someone that one is looking for or expecting.
  • be born with a silver spoon in (one's) mouth To be born into a wealthy or privileged family.
  • fill (one's) hand To "fill (one's) hand" means to take up a challenge or confrontation bravely and confidently. It originates from the Western movie trope of holding a gun in one's hand, symbolizing readiness to fight or face danger.
  • cut of one's jib The idiom "cut of one's jib" refers to a person's appearance, demeanor, or behavior that conveys information about their character, personality, or intentions. It can also refer to one's overall impression or outward appearance.
  • laugh (one's) head off To laugh one's head off means to laugh very loudly and uncontrollably.
  • get (one's) teeth into (something) To become fully engaged or involved in something, to work on something with enthusiasm and determination.
  • handle to (one's) name Having the ability or skill to manage or deal with a situation or task.
  • give (one) the fig To show disdain or contempt for someone; to disregard or ignore someone's feelings or opinions.
  • clap (one) in(to) To cheer or applaud someone enthusiastically as they enter a room or take the stage.
  • give (one) Hail Columbia The idiom "give (one) Hail Columbia" means to scold or reprimand someone severely or angrily. It originates from the patriotic American song "Hail Columbia" which was used to express national pride and loyalty.
  • off one's head The idiom "off one's head" means to be acting irrationally or illogically, often due to extreme emotions or mental disturbance. It can also refer to being intoxicated or under the influence of drugs.
  • knock one's head (up) against a brick wall The idiom "knock one's head (up) against a brick wall" means to try repeatedly and unsuccessfully to accomplish something or to solve a problem that seems impossible to resolve. This phrase conveys a sense of frustration and futility in the face of obstacles that seem insurmountable.
  • show (one's) (true) colours To reveal one's true intentions, beliefs, or character, especially when they are negative or unpleasant.
  • burn one's fingers To "burn one's fingers" means to suffer a loss or get into trouble as a result of taking a risk or being involved in something that turns out to be harmful or dangerous.
  • give (one) a pasting To defeat or overwhelm someone in a competition or conflict.
  • laugh out of the other side of one's mouth To suddenly stop laughing or feeling happy and start feeling disappointed, angry, or sad.
  • have a mind of (one's)/its own To have a mind of one's/its own means to act or behave independently without being easily influenced or controlled by others. This idiom is often used to describe things or situations that have a tendency to act or operate in a way that is unexpected or contrary to what is expected.
  • give it to (one) To confront or scold someone; to tell someone off or criticize them.
  • be all in (one's/the) mind The idiom "be all in (one's/the) mind" means to exist only in one's imagination or perception, rather than being an actual or real situation. It suggests that something may not be physically happening or true, but is only being perceived or believed to be true by one's thoughts or feelings.
  • against (one's) will If something is done or happens against one's will, it means that it is done or happens without one's consent or desire, often against their wishes.
  • bet (one's) shirt on (something) To bet one's shirt on something means to risk everything one owns or possesses on a particular outcome or decision. It implies putting all of one's resources or assets at stake in the hopes of achieving success or a desired result.
  • (one) doesn't miss a trick The idiom "(one) doesn't miss a trick" means that someone is very observant and attentive to everything that is happening around them, and does not overlook or fail to notice any important detail or opportunity.
  • give (one) a dirty look To give someone a disapproving or angry look, usually involving a facial expression that conveys strong negative emotions, such as contempt or disdain.
  • a (or one) hell of a — This idiom is used to emphasize that something is very impressive, extreme, or significant. It is often used to describe something as difficult, challenging, remarkable, or intense.
  • be on (one's) shoulder To be constantly nagging or pressuring someone to do something, often in a critical or annoying way.
  • give (one) a hand To give someone a hand means to offer help or assistance to them. It can also refer to applauding someone for their efforts or achievements.
  • it's (one's) funeral "It's (one's) funeral" is an idiomatic expression used to suggest that a person's actions or decisions will have negative consequences or result in their own downfall. It implies that the person is making a grave mistake and will ultimately be responsible for the outcome.
  • blow one's stack The idiom "blow one's stack" means to become very angry or lose one's temper.
  • hold a gun to (one's) head To put pressure on someone or threaten someone in order to force them to do something.
  • regain one's composure To regain one's composure means to regain control over one's emotions or behavior after a period of agitation, confusion, or distress. It involves calming down and returning to a state of calmness or self-control.
  • on (one's) bill The idiom "on (one's) bill" means to be the responsibility or fault of someone; done by someone's own choice or action.
  • at one's wits' end The idiom "at one's wits' end" means to be extremely frustrated, puzzled, or distressed, and feel as though one has no more ideas or solutions to a problem.
  • on (one's) Jack The idiom "on (one's) Jack" means to be alone or by oneself. It is typically used in British and Australian English.
  • wrap one's car around sth The idiom "wrap one's car around sth" means to crash or wrap a car around an object or obstacle, causing significant damage to the vehicle. It is used figuratively to describe a serious car accident or collision.
  • the joke's on (one) The idiom "the joke's on (one)" means that someone has been tricked or made a fool of, often when they thought they were being clever or funny.
  • bare (one's) heart To reveal one's innermost thoughts, feelings, or emotions to someone else.
  • (one's) own worst enemy The phrase "(one's) own worst enemy" refers to a person who continually acts in ways that harm themselves or work against their own interests. This idiomatic expression suggests that the individual's thoughts, actions, or decisions are the primary cause of their problems or setbacks.
  • shake the dust from one's feet To shake the dust from one's feet means to leave a place or situation, especially in a dramatic or final manner, often as an expression of disapproval or rejection. It is often used in a figurative sense to signify ending a relationship or connection with someone or something and moving on from it.
  • have a word in (one's) ear To have a private conversation or discreetly communicate a message to someone in a subtle or indirect way.
  • take (one's) life in (one's) (own) hands To take one's life in one's own hands is to take full responsibility for one's actions or decisions, especially in a risky or dangerous situation. It often implies taking a courageous or bold approach to handling a potentially life-changing situation.
  • take one's hat off to To show admiration or respect for someone's achievements or qualities.
  • work one's fingers to the bone To work extremely hard and tirelessly, often to the point of exhaustion.
  • have nothing between the/(one's) ears To have nothing between the/(one's) ears means to be thoughtless, stupid, or lacking intelligence. It suggests that the person's head is empty or lacking in brains.
  • give (one) the shits To irritate or annoy someone greatly.
  • feel (something) in (one's) bones To have a strong intuition or instinct about something, usually without being able to explain why.
  • with one's eyes open To be aware of all the facts and potential consequences of a situation or decision.
  • beat (one's) head against a/the wall To engage in a futile or frustrating effort; to try to accomplish something that is impossible or very difficult.
  • grind (one's) teeth To grind one's teeth means to clench or grind one's teeth together, often due to anger, frustration, or anxiety. It can also refer to coping with a difficult or stressful situation.
  • bust one's tail To work extremely hard; to put forth a lot of effort.
  • pin (one's) heart to (one's) sleeve To wear one's emotions openly and show vulnerability.
  • assure (one) of To assure one of something means to guarantee or promise them that a certain outcome or situation will happen or be provided for them.
  • stuff (one's) face To eat a large amount of food quickly and greedily.
  • spread one's wings To spread one's wings is to try new things, gain new experiences, or take on new challenges, often in order to become more independent and develop one's abilities. It can also refer to breaking free from limitations or constraints.
  • millstone around (one's) neck A burden or hindrance that prevents someone from achieving their goals or living their life freely.
  • ask (one) over To invite someone to one's home or a social event.
  • set (one's) (own) house in order To organize and manage one's personal affairs and responsibilities efficiently and effectively.
  • give (one) a fair crack of the whip To give someone a fair opportunity to prove themselves or succeed; to treat someone fairly and give them a chance to do something.
  • not know if (one) is coming or going The idiom "not know if (one) is coming or going" means to be extremely confused or disoriented, often due to being overwhelmed or having too much going on. It can also refer to feeling unsure about one's current situation or direction in life.
  • cut (one) off without a penny To cut someone off without a penny means to completely disinherit someone, leaving them with no inheritance or financial support.
  • off (one's) face The idiom "off (one's) face" is used to describe someone who is highly intoxicated or under the influence of drugs to the point where they are acting in a reckless or out-of-control manner.
  • (one's/the) best bet The most sensible or likely course of action; the wisest choice.
  • curry favor with (one) To seek to gain favor, approval, or advantage from someone through flattery or other means.
  • get (one's) (own) house in order To "get one's (own) house in order" means to organize and take care of one's personal life or affairs before trying to deal with or judge the life or affairs of others. It can also refer to resolving any personal issues or problems before attempting to help or advise others.
  • take (one) down memory lane To take someone down memory lane means to remind or prompt someone of past memories or events, often in a nostalgic or sentimental way. It can involve recounting stories, looking at old photos, or visiting places that hold special memories for the person.
  • be written all over (one's) face If something is written all over someone's face, it means that their feelings or thoughts are clearly revealed by their expressions or demeanor.
  • give (one) food for thought To provide someone with something to think about or consider carefully; to present ideas or information that require reflection and consideration.
  • hold one's peace To hold one's peace means to remain silent or not speak out, especially in a situation where one's opinion or input may be controversial or unwanted.
  • courage of one's convictions, have the To have the courage of one's convictions means to have the confidence and determination to stand up for what one believes to be right, even in the face of opposition or adversity. It is the ability to stay true to one's beliefs and principles, regardless of the consequences.
  • bury one's head in the sand To ignore or refuse to acknowledge a problem or difficult situation; to pretend that a problem does not exist.
  • under one's breath The idiom "under one's breath" means to speak quietly or mutter something in a way that is difficult for others to hear.
  • tread on (one's) heels To be closely following or pursuing someone or something, especially with the intent of catching or overtaking them.
  • a bad taste in (one's)/the mouth The idiom "a bad taste in (one's)/the mouth" refers to feeling disappointed, disgusted, or unsatisfied with something, typically a situation or experience. It can also refer to feeling uneasy or unpleasant about a person or their behavior.
  • give (one) (the) what for To give someone a severe scolding or reprimand; to punish or reprimand someone sternly.
  • make it one's business To take a strong interest in or become involved in something, often beyond what is expected or necessary.
  • know (one's) way around To be skilled or familiar with a particular situation, environment, or subject; to have experience and expertise in navigating or understanding something.
  • be in (one's) pocket To have control or influence over someone, usually used in a negative or manipulative context.
  • give (one) both barrels To confront or criticize someone with full force, energy, or intensity.
  • under one's hat To keep something under one's hat means to keep something a secret or to keep information to oneself. It implies discretion and confidentiality.
  • keep (something) up (one's) sleeve To keep something up one's sleeve means to keep a secret or a plan hidden or reserved for future use.
  • push (one's) buttons To push someone's buttons means to deliberately try to provoke or upset them by saying or doing something that you know will annoy them.
  • be on (one's) Pat Malone The idiom "be on (one's) Pat Malone" means to be alone, having no one to help or support you. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is left to fend for themselves without any assistance.
  • keep one's finger on the pulse of sth To keep one's finger on the pulse of something means to stay updated and informed about the latest developments or changes in a particular situation or area of interest. It involves being actively aware of current trends, events, or ideas in order to understand and respond effectively.
  • have one's rathers To have one's rathers means to have a preference or choice in a particular matter. It often indicates a personal liking or inclination towards one option over another.
  • a flea in (one's) ear If someone has a flea in their ear, it means they have a persistent feeling of annoyance, agitation, or discontent, often caused by something or someone. It can also refer to receiving a hint, warning, or suggestion that prompts action or change in behavior.
  • get (one's) butt (somewhere) To move quickly or hurry to a specific place.
  • (one) won't eat (someone) The phrase "(one) won't eat (someone)" means that someone is not easily overpowered, intimidated, or defeated by someone else. It suggests that the person is strong-willed, resilient, and not easily influenced or controlled by others.
  • keep (one) busy To keep someone occupied or engaged in activities in order to prevent them from being bored or idle.
  • put (one's) hand in (one's) pocket To put (one's) hand in (one's) pocket means to contribute money or resources, especially in a generous or charitable way.
  • can't (do something) to save (one's) life The idiom "can't (do something) to save (one's) life" means that someone is completely unable to do a particular thing, regardless of how urgently or critically it is needed. It implies a total lack of ability or skill in that area.
  • dose of one's own medicine When someone receives a dose of their own medicine, they are experiencing the same negative treatment or criticism that they have given to others. It involves facing the consequences of one's own actions or words.
  • be (one's) middle name To say that something is "one's middle name" means that it is characteristic of or synonymous with that person. It suggests that the person frequently exhibits the characteristic or behavior in question.
  • push (one's) weight around To assert one's authority or dominance in a forceful or intimidating manner.
  • send (one) (a)round the bend To cause someone to become irritated, annoyed, or frustrated.
  • scare out of one's wits To frighten someone extremely; to cause someone to become terrified.
  • remember sm in one's will To leave an inheritance or bequest to someone in their will.
  • a shiver went up (one's) spine The idiom "a shiver went up (one's) spine" means to suddenly feel frightened, anxious, or excited to the point of experiencing a physical reaction, such as a shiver or chill running up one's back.
  • bring (something) to (one's) aid To offer or provide assistance or support for someone in a time of need or difficulty.
  • (one) could use (something) The expression "(one) could use (something)" means that someone would benefit from having or using something. It suggests a desire or need for something that would be useful or helpful in a particular situation.
  • argue (one) into To persuade or convince someone to do something through argument or debate.
  • heart goes out to, one's To feel sympathy or compassion for someone who is going through a difficult or challenging situation.
  • on one's own time The idiom "on one's own time" refers to doing something outside of working hours or independently, without being paid for it or without it being required or expected as part of one's job responsibilities.
  • leave (one's) options open To delay making a decision or commitment in order to keep all possibilities available for the future.
  • hang up (one's) spurs To retire or resign from a job or position; to give up a role or responsibility.
  • beat one's gums To talk a lot without saying anything important or useful; to speak at length without making any progress or achieving anything.
  • in (one's) good books The idiom "in (one's) good books" means to be in someone's favor or to be regarded positively by someone.
  • put in (one's) two cents' worth To offer one's opinion or perspective on a particular topic, often unsolicited or unnecessary.
  • land on (one's) feet To land on one's feet means to quickly and successfully recover from a difficult or challenging situation. It implies being able to navigate adversity successfully and come out in a positive position.
  • work (one's) guts out To work extremely hard or exhaustively.
  • be speaking out of both sides of (one's) mouth The idiom "be speaking out of both sides of one's mouth" means to say contradictory or inconsistent things in an attempt to please different people or avoid taking a definitive stance on an issue.
  • make (one's) toes curl To make someone feel intense discomfort, embarrassment, or disgust.
  • give (one) a tinkle To give someone a call, usually referring to a telephone call.
  • one's way The idiom "one's way" refers to a person's particular method or manner of doing something, or the path or route they take to accomplish a goal. It can also mean achieving success or reaching a destination according to one's own preferences or desires.
  • drag (one) over the coals To severely reprimand or criticize someone for something they have done wrong.
  • keep (one) on (one's) toes To keep someone alert, attentive, and ready to respond quickly to any changes or challenges.
  • knock (one's) socks off To impress or amaze someone greatly; to exceed expectations.
  • laugh in (one's) face To openly mock or ridicule someone while they are expressing a serious concern or emotion.
  • look (one's) best To look as attractive, stylish, or well-groomed as one possibly can.
  • one's egg money "One's egg money" refers to a small amount of money set aside or saved for a specific purpose, typically something small or leisurely in nature. It may imply the money is earned incidentally or from a side job or gig.
  • go with (one's) gut To "go with (one's) gut" means to trust one's intuition or instinct when making a decision, rather than relying solely on logic or reasoning.
  • (one's) cake is dough The idiom "(one's) cake is dough" means that someone has something that is not yet fully developed or realized, or that their situation is not as good as it seems. It suggests that what someone has is not as valuable or beneficial as they believe.
  • till (one) (is) blue in the face The phrase "till (one) (is) blue in the face" means to continue doing something tirelessly or with great effort, even if it seems pointless or ineffective.
  • eat (one's) fill To eat until one is satisfied or full; to eat as much as one wants.
  • cover (one's) ass To take actions in order to protect oneself from potential blame or criticism; to engage in self-preservation tactics.
  • hold one's own To hold one's own means to maintain one's position or status, especially in a difficult or challenging situation, without being overwhelmed or defeated. It can also refer to being able to compete or keep up with others in a particular situation.
  • carry (one) (somewhere) To transport or accompany someone to a specific destination.
  • hate (one's) guts To hate someone intensely; to have a strong and profound dislike for someone.
  • have the sun in (one's) eyes To be facing a situation where one is dazzled or blinded by the sun's glare, usually hindering visibility. This phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is confused or disoriented in a particular situation.
  • cut no ice with (one) The idiom "cut no ice with (one)" means that something does not have any influence or impact on a person, or does not make any impression on them.
  • have a good head on (one's) shoulders To have good judgment, common sense, and the ability to make wise decisions.
  • put one's shoulder to the wheel To put one's shoulder to the wheel means to contribute hard work, effort, and dedication to a task or project. It often implies working diligently and tirelessly towards a goal.
  • set one's (own) price To set one's (own) price means to determine or establish the amount of money or compensation one is willing to accept for something, typically based on one's own evaluation of its worth or value.
  • drown (one's) sorrows To cope with grief, disappointment, or other negative emotions by consuming alcohol or drugs.
  • get (one's) thinking cap on The idiom "get (one's) thinking cap on" means to start using one's brain and thinking creatively or critically in order to solve a problem or come up with ideas. It implies actively engaging one's mind and focusing on finding solutions or making decisions.
  • (a) method to (one's) madness A way to explain or make sense of someone's unconventional or seemingly irrational behavior.
  • put one's nose to the grindstone To work hard and diligently; to concentrate on tasks and responsibilities without getting distracted.
  • bring (one) up sharply To abruptly or suddenly call someone's attention to a mistake, error, or inappropriate behavior, often in a stern or forceful manner.
  • cry on (one's) shoulder To seek comfort or support from someone by sharing one's emotions and problems with them.
  • leave (one) (out) in the cold To neglect or exclude someone, leaving them feeling isolated or abandoned.
  • stake (one's) claim The phrase "stake (one's) claim" means to assert one's right to something, usually a piece of land or property, by making it known publicly or officially. It can also refer to asserting one's ownership or control over something in a more general sense.
  • build (one's) hopes on (someone or something) To base one's expectations or optimism on a particular person or thing, often leading to disappointment if they do not meet one's expectations.
  • need (something) like (one) needs a hole in the head To not need or want something at all, to strongly dislike or not want something.
  • break one's stride To interrupt or disturb someone's progress or rhythm, often causing them to lose momentum or focus.
  • split one's sides "Split one's sides" is an idiom that means to laugh uncontrollably or very hard.
  • cut (one's) teeth on (something) To gain initial experience or expertise in a particular skill or area through practice and exposure.
  • bring (one) low To cause one to be humbled or brought to a lower position or status.
  • by the skin of one's teeth Barely or narrowly; just barely; scarcely; by a very narrow margin.
  • hang up (one's) fiddle The idiom "hang up (one's) fiddle" means to retire or stop pursuing a particular career, hobby, or activity. It implies giving up or abandoning something that one has been doing for a long time.
  • the more (one thing happens), the more (another thing happens) This idiom refers to a causal relationship between two things, where the increase or occurrence of one thing leads to a corresponding increase or occurrence of another thing. In other words, as one event or action happens more frequently or intensively, the other event or action also becomes more frequent or intense.
  • egg on one's face If someone has egg on their face, they are embarrassed because of a mistake they have made or because of something foolish that they have done.
  • set one's face against To strongly oppose or resist something; to refuse to support or accept something.
  • catch (one) on the hop To catch someone on the hop means to surprise or catch someone off guard by doing something unexpectedly or suddenly.
  • put (one's) butt on the line The idiom "put (one's) butt on the line" means to put oneself in a risky or dangerous situation in order to achieve a particular goal or protect something important. It implies taking a personal risk or making a sacrifice for the benefit of others or a certain cause.
  • be out of (one's) tree To be behaving in a crazy or irrational manner.
  • break (one) of (something) To cause one to stop a bad habit or behavior.
  • get (one's) claws into (someone) The definition of the idiom "get (one's) claws into (someone)" is to establish a strong emotional or manipulative hold over someone, often in a negative or controlling way.
  • give (one's) two pennies (worth) To give one's opinion or input on a particular topic or situation, often without being asked.
  • be at (one's) wit's end To be at one's wit's end means to be extremely frustrated, confused, or at a loss for how to proceed in a difficult situation.
  • pin one's faith on sm or sth To place all of one's trust or belief in someone or something, relying on them completely.
  • price on one's head The idiom "price on one's head" refers to a situation where someone is wanted or targeted, often for harm or punishment, with a reward offered for capturing or killing them.
  • with (one's) own fair hands The idiom "with (one's) own fair hands" means to personally do something without any help or assistance from others. It emphasizes that the action is accomplished solely by the efforts of the individual themselves.
  • place to call (one's) own A place to call one's own is a home, property, or space that belongs to someone and is considered their personal domain or refuge. It is a place where one can feel comfortable, secure, and truly at home.
  • before (one) could blink The idiom "before (one) could blink" means something happened very quickly or unexpectedly, usually catching someone off guard.
  • smooth (one's) ruffled feathers To smooth one's ruffled feathers means to calm someone down, especially after they have become upset or angry. It refers to soothing someone's emotions or resolving a conflict to restore harmony.
  • not have a penny to (one's) name To not have any money or possessions.
  • knock one's knees together To be very frightened or nervous, especially when speaking in public or facing a difficult situation.
  • get (one's) meaning To express oneself clearly and have others understand one's intended message or point.
  • get (one's) The idiom "get (one's)" means to receive or achieve something that one has been working towards or hoping for, often referring to a desired outcome, reward, or opportunity.
  • do (one or oneself) proud To do someone or oneself proud means to perform in a way that brings honor or satisfaction to oneself or someone else. It can also mean to do something exceptionally well or admirable.
  • hold (one's) cards close to (one's) chest To keep one's plans, intentions, or true feelings secret or hidden from others; to not reveal one's true thoughts or intentions.
  • take (one's) cherry The idiom "take (one's) cherry" is a slang term referring to the act of deflowering or having sex with a virgin for the first time.
  • set (one's) sights high To aim for ambitious goals or targets; to have high aspirations or expectations.
  • set (one) up for life To ensure that someone has everything they need for the rest of their life, usually financially.
  • fall short of one's goal(s) To not achieve one's intended objective or reach the desired outcome.
  • be near to (one's) heart The idiom "be near to (one's) heart" means something that is important or cherished by someone. It refers to something that holds a special place in one's emotions or affections.
  • apprentice (one) to To assign or place someone under the supervision or guidance of someone more experienced to learn a skill or trade.
  • mend one's ways To change one's behavior for the better; to start behaving in a more responsible or acceptable manner.
  • at (one's) knee The phrase "at (one's) knee" typically refers to someone who is in close proximity to and under the guidance or influence of another person, usually someone who is older or more experienced. It can also imply being under someone's authority, protection, or care.
  • to (one's) knowledge To the best of one's understanding or awareness; based on the information or perception one currently has.
  • do (one's) duty To fulfill one's responsibilities or obligations.
  • get (one's) claws into To "get (one's) claws into" someone means to be able to manipulate, control, or influence them in a strong or forceful way. It often implies gaining a strong hold or influence over someone.
  • blow (one's) brains out The idiom "blow (one's) brains out" means to commit suicide by shooting oneself in the head.
  • take the bit in one's mouth To take the bit in one's mouth means to take control and act independently without being held back by others or external influences. Similar to the phrase "seize the reins", it often refers to a person asserting their own will and making decisions on their own terms.
  • under one's (very) nose The idiom "under one's (very) nose" means something that is in plain sight or very close to someone but they are unaware of it.
  • beyond one's depth The idiom "beyond one's depth" means to be in a situation that is too difficult or challenging for one to handle. It can also refer to being out of one's comfort zone or lacking the necessary skills or knowledge to cope with a particular situation.
  • skeleton in (one's) closet The idiom "skeleton in (one's) closet" refers to a shameful or embarrassing secret from a person's past that they try to keep hidden or private.
  • able to do sth with one's eyes closed The idiom "able to do something with one's eyes closed" means to be extremely proficient or skilled at something, to the point where it can be done easily and without much effort or concentration.
  • dip (one's) toe into (something) To dip one's toe into something means to cautiously or tentatively become involved in or try something new or unfamiliar. It implies taking a small, cautious step into a new situation or experience.
  • give one's right arm (for someone or something) To be willing to make a great sacrifice in order to have or keep someone or something.
  • ace up (one's) sleeve The idiom "ace up (one's) sleeve" means having a secret advantage or trick that can be used to gain an advantage over others in a competitive situation.
  • be a huckleberry above (one's) persimmon The idiom "be a huckleberry above (one's) persimmon" means to be just a little bit better or more skilled than someone else in a particular task or situation. It implies a slight advantage or superiority over another individual.
  • stick (one's) head above the parapet To "stick (one's) head above the parapet" means to take a risk or draw attention to oneself by speaking out, expressing an opinion, or taking action that may attract criticism or opposition. It can also refer to being brave or standing out in a challenging or dangerous situation.
  • move the/(one's) clock(s) back "Move the/(one's) clock(s) back" is an idiomatic expression that refers to setting the time on a clock to go back by one hour, typically in the fall when daylight saving time ends. It can also be used metaphorically to mean going back in time or undoing something that has been done.
  • work one's tail off To work very hard or diligently.
  • get one's feet wet The idiom "get one's feet wet" means to start or try something new or unfamiliar, usually implying a gradual or cautious approach. It can also refer to gaining initial experience or familiarity with a new situation.
  • gang up on (one) The definition of the idiom "gang up on (one)" is to join together and act as a group against someone, usually to criticize, bully, or attack them.
  • show one's face To appear or make an appearance, especially when one has been avoiding others or staying away.
  • nose in the air, have one's To have one's nose in the air means to act or behave in a haughty or arrogant manner; to be proud or snobbish.
  • all in (one's) mind The idiom "all in (one's) mind" means that something is not real or tangible, but exists only in the imagination or perception of a person. It can also refer to mental depression or confusion.
  • celebrate (one) for (something) To acknowledge and honor someone for a certain achievement or quality.
  • to one's name This idiom refers to something that a person possesses or owns. It could be money, possessions, reputation, or simply things that are associated with that person.
  • rock (one) back on (one's) heels To surprise or astound someone; to cause someone to become unexpectedly unsure, confused, or off-balance.
  • with egg on (one's) face If someone has egg on their face, it means they are embarrassed or humiliated because of a mistake or blunder they have made.
  • toss one's cookies To vomit or throw up.
  • check (one's) bags through (to) (some place) To check one's bags through to some place means to have one's luggage sent directly to a final destination without needing to retrieve and recheck it during a layover or stopover. This is often done at airports when traveling to multiple destinations with connecting flights.
  • have (one) in stitches To have someone in stitches means to make them laugh uncontrollably or to entertain them greatly with one's humor or antics.
  • be (sitting) on (one's) tail To be inactive or not take action; to be lazy or procrastinate.
  • read (one) like a book To understand someone very well, including their thoughts, feelings, and intentions, often without them saying a word.
  • raise one's voice (to sm) To speak with a louder tone or volume in order to show anger, frustration, or assertiveness towards someone.
  • take one's own life "To take one's own life" means to commit suicide by intentionally ending one's own existence.
  • (one's) eyes are popping out of (one's) head The idiom "(one's) eyes are popping out of (one's) head" is used to describe a person's expression of surprise, shock, or intense interest. It suggests that the person's eyes are wide open and bulging in response to something they have seen or heard.
  • be down on (one) like a ton of bricks The idiom "be down on (one) like a ton of bricks" means to criticize or punish someone harshly and severely.
  • back in (one's) box The idiom "back in (one's) box" means to return to a place of submission or a more modest position after experiencing a period of success, confidence, or arrogance. It implies being put in one's place or being humbled.
  • be (as) easy as one-two-three The idiom "be (as) easy as one-two-three" means that something is very easy or simple to do. It implies that a task can be completed quickly and without much effort.
  • air one's belly There is no established idiom "air one's belly." It may be an incorrect or uncommon phrase.
  • have something at one's fingertips To have something readily available or easily accessible, often referring to information or resources that can be quickly accessed or utilized.
  • on (one's) beam-ends The idiom "on (one's) beam-ends" means to be completely broke, financially ruined, or out of money. It can also refer to being in a dire situation or facing total collapse or failure.
  • ruffle (one's) feathers To "ruffle (one's) feathers" means to annoy or irritate someone, causing them to become agitated or upset. It can also refer to causing someone to feel threatened or challenged.
  • knock (one) for six To completely surprise or overwhelm someone; to shock or amaze someone.
  • give (one) an even break To give someone a fair chance or an equal opportunity.
  • ahead of one's time Ahead of one's time means being innovative, unconventional, or visionary in a way that is not yet understood or appreciated by the majority of people.
  • turn (someone) round (one's) (little) finger To have someone completely under one's control or influence; to manipulate or persuade someone easily and effectively.
  • give (one) a rough time To give someone a rough time means to treat them harshly or cause them difficulties or problems. It can also mean to criticize, tease, or hassle someone.
  • give (one) the willies To make someone feel nervous, frightened, or uncomfortable.
  • bust (one's) ass To work extremely hard; to exert oneself physically or mentally to the fullest extent.
  • under (one's) feet The idiom "under (one's) feet" typically means being in someone's way or hindering their actions or progress. It can also refer to feeling overwhelmed or suffocated by someone's presence or actions.
  • cast one's lot with To decide to join or align oneself with a particular group, cause, or decision.
  • bring the roses to (one's) cheeks If something "brings the roses to one's cheeks," it means that it causes someone to blush or become flushed, usually due to embarrassment, shyness, or pleasure.
  • make one's way To "make one's way" means to progress or move forward, especially in a determined or successful manner. It can also refer to navigating through a difficult situation or challenging environment.
  • have (something) coming out of (one's) ears To have an excessive or overwhelming amount of something.
  • find (one's/its) way to successfully navigate a path or route to a destination or goal
  • let (one) off easy To go easy on someone, to not punish or scold someone as severely as they deserve.
  • hitch (one's) wagon to (someone or something) The idiom "hitch one's wagon to someone or something" means to align oneself with a person or cause in order to benefit from their success or popularity. It can also refer to attaching oneself to a particular idea, project, or organization in order to gain advantages or achieve one's goals.
  • pad (one's)/the accounts To pad one's/the accounts means to falsify or inflate financial records for personal gain or to create a misleading impression of wealth or success.
  • clutch (one's)/the pearls The phrase "clutch (one's)/the pearls" is an expression used to describe someone reacting with exaggerated shock, outrage, or surprise in response to something shocking or scandalous that has been said or done. It is often used humorously or sarcastically to convey a sense of melodrama or over-the-top reaction. This idiom is derived from the image of clutching one's pearls in a moment of extreme distress or shock.
  • have (a) skeleton(s) in (one's)/the closet To have (a) skeleton(s) in (one's)/the closet means to have a secret or embarrassing fact or issue from the past that one wishes to keep hidden or confidential.
  • get one's ducks in a row To get one's ducks in a row means to get organized or prepared; to ensure that everything is in order and ready for a particular task or situation.
  • scare the hell out of (one) To cause extreme fear or anxiety in someone.
  • put (someone or something) out of (one's) head To stop thinking about someone or something; to forget about or dismiss someone or something from one's thoughts or mind.
  • too hot for (one) The idiom "too hot for (one)" means to be too overwhelming, challenging, or dangerous for someone to handle or cope with.
  • down on one's luck The phrase "down on one's luck" is used to describe someone who is experiencing a period of misfortune or bad luck. This person is often facing challenges or difficulties in various aspects of their life.
  • rush (one) off (one's) feet To overwhelm or keep someone extremely busy or occupied with many tasks or responsibilities.
  • what was (one) smoking The idiom "what was (one) smoking" is used to express disbelief or confusion about someone's actions, choices, or statements. It implies that the person's decision or behavior is so nonsensical or illogical that it seems as if they must have been under the influence of drugs.
  • take the weight off (one's) legs This idiom means to sit down and rest for a short period of time, typically used when someone is tired or needs a break. It refers to physically relieving oneself from the weight and strain of standing or walking by sitting down.
  • flex one's muscles To show off one's strength or power, often in a boastful or intimidating manner.
  • close (one's) eyes to (something) To ignore or pretend not to notice something, usually something unpleasant or wrong.
  • be talking through (one's) hat To be talking through one's hat means to be speaking without knowledge or understanding of the subject, or to be making something up or exaggerating.
  • scare the life out of (one) The idiom "scare the life out of (one)" means to terrify or frighten someone very deeply. It implies that the fear is so intense that it feels as though it has caused a loss of vitality or life force in the person who is scared.
  • four-one-one The idiom "four-one-one" is slang for information or knowledge about a person, situation, or topic. It is often used when someone is seeking advice, details, or clarification about something.
  • earn (one's) wings To earn (one's) wings means to gain experience, skills, or qualifications that allow one to take on new responsibilities or rise to a higher level in a specific role or job. It is often used in reference to achieving a higher rank or position, especially in a military context.
  • one's level best To make the greatest effort or try as hard as one possibly can.
  • heart in one's mouth, have one's To have one's heart in one's mouth means to be extremely nervous, scared, or anxious.
  • have taken leave of (one's) senses The idiom "have taken leave of (one's) senses" means to behave irrationally or crazily, to act in a manner that lacks sound judgment or reason.
  • receive the fright of (one's) life To experience an intense or extreme sense of fear or fright.
  • hang up (one's) fiddle when (one) comes home The idiom "hang up (one's) fiddle when (one) comes home" means to retire or give up a particular skill, talent, profession, or interest when returning to one's own home or community. It implies that once someone is back in their familiar surroundings, they no longer feel the need to continue with certain activities or pursuits.
  • send (one) away with a flea in (one's) ear To dismiss or send someone away in a scolding or disgruntled manner.
  • be on (one's) mettle To be on one's mettle means to be ready to prove oneself, especially when faced with a challenge or difficult situation. It implies being at one's best or performing to the best of one's abilities in order to succeed or show one's worth.
  • strike fear into (one) To cause someone to feel extreme fear or terror.
  • stick to one's ribs To "stick to one's ribs" is an idiom that means a meal or food that is satisfying and filling. It typically refers to hearty and substantial food that provides sustained energy and satisfaction.
  • (one's) day in court The opportunity for someone to present their case or argument in a formal setting, such as a courtroom, in order to seek justice or resolution.
  • butterflies in (one's) stomach Feeling nervous or anxious; experiencing a fluttery or queasy feeling in one's stomach.
  • give (one) the bird The idiom "give (one) the bird" is a slang expression that means to make a rude or offensive gesture, typically by extending one's middle finger to someone as a sign of contempt or dismissal.
  • make (one's) move To take action or make a decision in a situation in order to achieve a desired outcome or goal.
  • give (one) the slip To give someone the slip means to escape or evade them, typically by using stealth, cunning, or agility.
  • be on (one's) case To be constantly criticizing, monitoring, or nagging someone.
  • pour (one's) heart out (to someone) To pour one's heart out to someone means to reveal one's deepest feelings, thoughts, or emotions to someone in a very open and honest way. It often involves sharing personal or intimate details with someone.
  • drop (one) a line To "drop (one) a line" means to send a brief message or note to someone, typically to inquire about their well-being or to stay in touch. It can refer to writing a letter, sending an email, or simply reaching out with a quick text message.
  • frighten the life out of (one) To frighten or scare someone very much.
  • have (one's) back to the wall To have one's back to the wall means to be in a difficult situation with no way to escape or retreat, and facing extreme pressure or danger.
  • pay one's dues To pay one's dues means to work hard, gain experience, or make sacrifices in order to earn a position, respect, or success in a particular field or organization. It often involves overcoming challenges, setbacks, or difficult circumstances in order to achieve one's goals.
  • give (one) full rein To give someone full rein means to allow them complete freedom or control in a situation. It is often used to describe giving someone the authority or power to make decisions or take action without restriction.
  • on one's deathbed The phrase "on one's deathbed" is used to describe someone who is very ill and likely close to death. This person may be in a state of extreme weakness or nearing the end of their life.
  • toss one's hat into the ring To toss one's hat into the ring means to officially announce one's candidacy or intention to compete for a position or opportunity, especially in a public manner. It is often used in the context of political campaigns or job applications.
  • with (one's) bare hands The idiom "with (one's) bare hands" means to accomplish something using one's physical strength or abilities without the aid of tools or help from others.
  • not open one's mouth To not speak or provide information, to keep silent or quiet.
  • air (one's) opinion To express one's thoughts, beliefs, or feelings openly and confidently, often in a public or formal setting.
  • air one's dirty linen in public To "air one's dirty linen in public" means to discuss private or embarrassing matters in a public setting, rather than keeping them private or only sharing with those directly involved.
  • catch (one) dead to rights To catch someone dead to rights means to catch someone in the act of doing something wrong or illegal, with clear and indisputable evidence of their guilt.
  • be tied to (one's) mother's apron strings The idiom "be tied to (one's) mother's apron strings" means to be overly dependent on one's mother for guidance, support, or approval, often to the detriment of one's independence or ability to make decisions on one's own.
  • hang on by (one's) fingernails To barely manage to survive or hold on to a situation, often in a desperate or difficult manner.
  • prick (one's) ears up To prick one's ears up means to become very attentive and interested in something, usually in response to hearing or sensing something unusual or intriguing.
  • know (one's) beans To understand or have knowledge about a particular subject or topic.
  • do a/(one's) bit To do one's bit means to contribute or do one's share of work or effort towards a common goal or cause. It implies a sense of responsibility and willingness to help.
  • put (one) through the hoops To subject someone to a series of challenges or obstacles, often as a way of testing their capabilities or resolve.
  • lay down (one's) arms To stop fighting or resisting; to surrender or give up weapons.
  • apple of one's eye The phrase "apple of one's eye" refers to someone or something that is cherished, loved, or considered to be extremely special and valuable to a person. It is often used to describe a person's favorite or most beloved individual.
  • coerce (one) into (something) To force or compel someone to do something against their will.
  • let (one) know To inform or notify someone about something.
  • have (someone) wound around (one's) (little) finger To have someone wound around one's little finger means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually due to manipulation or charm. It implies that the person will do anything for the one who has them under their control.
  • commend (one) to (someone or something) To recommend or entrust someone to the care or guidance of someone else.
  • flea in one's ear, a The phrase "a flea in one's ear" is an idiom that refers to a nagging or persistent feeling or thought that someone cannot easily get rid of. It can also be used to describe a feeling of unease or discomfort.
  • accommodate (one) with To provide or give someone what they need or want; to fulfill the wishes or demands of someone.
  • set in one's ways "Set in one's ways" means to be resistant to change or stubborn in one's habits, beliefs, or routines.
  • not mince (one's) words To speak frankly and directly without trying to soften the impact of one's words.
  • pay one's debt (to society) To fulfill one's obligations or responsibilities to society, often by serving a punishment or contributing positively to the community after committing a crime or wrongdoing.
  • addict (one) to To cause or make someone become dependent on or addicted to a substance, activity, or behavior.
  • not know what hit (one) The idiom "not know what hit (one)" means to be caught completely unaware or unexpectedly by something, often resulting in confusion or shock.
  • have one's mind in the gutter The idiom "have one's mind in the gutter" means to have vulgar or inappropriate thoughts or ideas. It suggests that someone is focused on or preoccupied with risqué or indecent matters.
  • halt (someone or something) (dead) in its/(one's) tracks To stop someone or something immediately and completely.
  • be beyond (one) If something is "beyond (one)," it means that it is too difficult or too complex for someone to understand or comprehend. It implies that the person lacks the knowledge, skills, or intelligence to grasp or deal with the situation or challenge.
  • be up to (one's) chin in (something) The idiom "be up to one's chin in something" means to be heavily involved or overwhelmed by a particular situation, often a difficult or undesirable one. It implies being deeply immersed or consumed by something to the point of being unable to handle or cope with it effectively.
  • have (one's) tail up To have one's tail up means to be in a state of excitement, enthusiasm, readiness, or confidence. It is often used to describe someone who is feeling positive and eager to take on challenges or opportunities.
  • give (one) the all-clear To declare that it is safe for someone to proceed with a certain course of action, or that there is no longer any cause for concern or alarm.
  • give the shirt off one's back To give something extremely valuable or important to help someone in need, often at great personal sacrifice.
  • call (one) on the carpet To reprimand or confront someone about their actions or behavior, especially in a formal or authoritative manner.
  • can't see one's hand in front of one's face This idiom means that it is very dark, making it impossible to see even a short distance in front of oneself. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation where something is very unclear or confusing.
  • chuck (one) under the chin The idiom "chuck (one) under the chin" means to pat, stroke, or touch someone's chin affectionately or in a playful manner.
  • elbow (one's) way to the top To aggressively and assertively maneuver or force one's way to a position of power, success, or prominence, often disregarding the needs or feelings of others.
  • air (one's) dirty laundry in public To discuss personal or private matters openly and publicly, especially ones that are embarrassing or scandalous.
  • need (one's) head tested To suggest or believe that someone is behaving irrationally or foolishly and should have their mental state evaluated.
  • clean (up) one's plate To clean (up) one's plate means to eat all of the food that has been served on one's plate, without leaving any behind. It can also refer to finishing a task or completing a job thoroughly and completely.
  • grit one's teeth To set one's teeth tightly together, typically as an expression of determination, anger, or pain.
  • have had its/(one's) day The idiom "have had its/(one's) day" means that something is no longer as popular, relevant, or successful as it once was. It suggests that the time of peak performance or influence has passed.
  • for all (one) cares The phrase "for all (one) cares" is used to convey indifference or lack of concern about a particular situation or outcome. It can indicate that someone does not care about the outcome or does not have a strong opinion one way or the other.
  • cut (one) a check To pay someone a specified amount of money, typically owed as payment for goods or services rendered.
  • be news to (one) The idiom "be news to (one)" means to be a surprise or something unexpected for someone.
  • turn one's hand to To try doing something new or different.
  • get (one's) panties in a knot To "get one's panties in a knot" means to become overly upset, anxious, or worried about something that is not worth that level of emotional reaction. It implies that the person is getting unnecessarily worked up about a situation.
  • in (one's) corner The idiom "in (one's) corner" means to support or be on someone's side, to be in favor of someone, or to give someone assistance or encouragement. It comes from the image of a boxing match where a boxer's supporters or handlers stand in their corner of the ring to provide support and guidance.
  • get up on one's hind legs To get up on one's hind legs means to assert oneself or stand up for oneself in a confident and assertive manner. It is often used to describe someone who is ready to defend themselves or fight for their beliefs.
  • meet one's Maker To die or pass away; to meet God or face judgment after death.
  • take a/(one's) cue from (someone or something) To take a cue from someone or something means to observe or follow someone's lead or example. It can refer to using another person's actions or words as guidance for one's own behavior or decisions.
  • fold one's tent To fold one's tent means to pack up and leave a place, especially when it is time to move on or to give up on a situation. It suggests the idea of leaving a temporary shelter or home to continue on a journey or to abandon a current course of action.
  • have sth at one's fingertips To have something at one's fingertips means to have easy access to something or to have knowledge or information readily available.
  • never in (one's) wildest dreams The idiom "never in (one's) wildest dreams" means something that is completely unexpected or unimaginable. It refers to a situation that is far beyond what one could have ever imagined or hoped for.
  • at (one's) beck and call If someone is said to be "at (one's) beck and call," it means that they are constantly available and ready to do whatever the other person asks or demands. It implies a high level of readiness and availability to assist or serve someone at any moment.
  • lay (one's) hands on (someone or something) To come into possession of or find someone or something, especially with great effort or determination.
  • (one) will kill (someone) This idiom is typically used to express extreme anger or frustration with someone, suggesting that the speaker is so angry that they could potentially harm or "kill" the person in question. It is not meant to be taken literally, but rather as a way to convey strong emotion or annoyance.
  • one's sunset years The idiom "one's sunset years" refers to the final years of a person's life when they are typically retired and slowing down, often associated with the metaphorical image of the sun setting at the end of the day.
  • get (one) where (one) lives To get where one lives means to deeply offend or hurt someone emotionally or mentally by saying or doing something. It implies hitting someone on a very personal level.
  • to one's mind To one's mind means according to one's opinion or judgement; in one's own personal view or perspective.
  • buck (one's) ideas up To improve one's attitude or behavior by making an effort to be more positive, enthusiastic, or efficient.
  • according to one's lights According to one's lights means to act according to one's own understanding or knowledge. It typically implies doing something based on what one believes is right or best, even if it may not be in line with established norms or conventions.
  • to one's credit To one's credit means that someone has accomplished or done something positive or impressive. It is often used to acknowledge someone's good qualities or actions.
  • with one's tail between one's legs The idiom "with one's tail between one's legs" means to feel ashamed, embarrassed, or defeated after a particular situation or confrontation. It is often used to describe someone who is feeling humiliated or dejected.
  • in (one's) behalf "In (one's) behalf" means in support or on behalf of someone else. It is often used to describe actions taken by one person on behalf of another to assist them or show support.
  • keep (one) on the edge of (one's) chair To keep one in a state of excitement, anticipation, or suspense, often by maintaining a sense of uncertainty or by withholding important information.
  • with (one's) hand in the cookie jar The idiom "with (one's) hand in the cookie jar" means to be caught in the act of doing something dishonest or stealing. It implies being caught red-handed while committing an unethical or illegal act.
  • air one's grievances To publicly express one's complaints or grievances.
  • eat (one's) young The idiom "eat (one's) young" is a metaphorical expression that means to betray or harm one's own family, friends, or colleagues for personal gain or advantage. It can also refer to a situation in which an individual or organization sacrifices the well-being or success of younger or less experienced members for their own benefit.
  • march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum To act independently, unconventionally, or in a way that is unique to oneself, regardless of the expectations or opinions of others.
  • have (something) up (one's) sleeve To have a secret plan, idea, or strategy that is being kept hidden or saved for later use.
  • have (someone's) blood on one's hands To have blood on one's hands means to be responsible for someone's death or to have caused harm or suffering to someone.
  • give (one) a rocket To reprimand or scold someone sternly or angrily; to give someone a harsh criticism or warning.
  • feel one's gorge rise To feel sick or disgusted.
  • set one's mind on To be determined or focused on achieving a particular goal or desire.
  • hang over (one's) head To be a source of worry, guilt, or anxiety that affects someone's daily life.
  • get (one's) breath back To recover from exertion or fatigue; to regain one's composure or strength.
  • music to (one's) ears Something that is very pleasing or welcome to someone; something that someone is pleased to hear.
  • sob (one's) heart out To cry or weep intensely and for a long period of time, typically due to overwhelming sadness or grief.
  • hang out with (one) To spend time with someone in a social or casual way; to relax and enjoy each other's company.
  • shoot (one) a dirty look To look at someone in a disapproving or angered manner, often used as a non-verbal way to communicate dissatisfaction or frustration.
  • drag (one's) To move slowly and reluctantly, often due to tiredness or lack of motivation.
  • soften one's stance (on sm or sth) To become more flexible or lenient in one's opinion or position on a particular issue or topic.
  • a serpent in (one's) bosom The idiom "a serpent in (one's) bosom" refers to someone who is a traitor or betrayer, someone who is close to you but ultimately causes harm or betrayal.
  • bluff (one's) way into (something) To deceive or trick one's way into a situation or opportunity by using false or misleading information.
  • put out (the/one's) feelers To "put out (the/one's) feelers" means to cautiously or discreetly inquire about or probe for information or opportunities. It often involves making subtle or indirect attempts to gather information or make initial contacts.
  • cut (one) off at the pass To cut someone off at the pass means to intercept or thwart someone's plans or actions before they can be carried out.
  • not let the grass grow under one's feet The idiom "not let the grass grow under one's feet" means to act quickly and not waste time; to keep active and productive. It implies not being idle and making the most of opportunities.
  • get what (one) deserves To receive an outcome or consequence that is fair or just, often based on one's actions or behavior.
  • out of (one's) hands The phrase "out of (one's) hands" means that a situation or decision is no longer under one's control or influence.
  • (one) will murder (someone) To do something very well or to achieve great success in a particular task.
  • leave (one) to stew in (one's) own juice(s) To leave someone to stew in their own juices means to leave them alone to deal with the consequences of their actions or to let them face the difficulties they have caused for themselves. It implies that the person should be left to solve their own problems without interference or help from others.
  • cast in (one's) teeth To cast in one's teeth means to constantly remind someone of their mistakes or faults in a critical or accusatory way.
  • if the spirit moves (one) If the spirit moves someone, it means that they feel inspired or motivated to do something. It suggests that someone is acting in accordance with their emotions or beliefs, rather than rational thought.
  • send (one) back To return someone to a previous place or position, usually forcefully or against their will.
  • out of (one's) hair The idiom "out of (one's) hair" means to no longer be a source of concern, annoyance, or responsibility for someone. It implies that someone or something has been removed from one's life or attention.
  • with (one's) guns blazing To go into a situation aggressively or forcefully, often while displaying a great deal of energy and determination.
  • gird up one's loins To prepare oneself mentally or physically for something difficult or challenging. Originating from the act of gathering up one's long robes and securing them with a belt in order to facilitate movement or work.
  • have (one's) money's worth To receive full value or enjoyment for the amount of money spent.
  • wild horses couldn't drag (one) away (from something) The idiom "wild horses couldn't drag (one) away (from something)" means that someone is so determined or reluctant to leave a particular situation, location, or activity that not even the most extreme measures could persuade them to do so.
  • bark is worse than one's bite, one's This idiom means that someone may seem aggressive or intimidating, but their actions are not as harmful or severe as they appear.
  • beard (one) in (one's) den The idiom "beard (one) in (one's) den" means to confront or challenge someone in their own territory or domain. It implies facing someone in a place where they feel comfortable or confident.
  • at the end of one's tether The idiom "at the end of one's tether" means to be extremely tired, stressed, or at the limit of one's patience or emotional endurance.
  • quake in (one's) boots The idiom "quake in one's boots" means to feel very afraid or frightened. It signifies a state of extreme fear or anxiety.
  • in one's pocket The idiom "in one's pocket" means to have someone under one's control or influence, usually through bribery or manipulation. It can also refer to having someone's loyalty or support.
  • air one's paunch To "air one's paunch" means to show off one's wealth or success in a boastful or ostentatious way. It is often used to describe someone who flaunts their material possessions or achievements in a way that is seen as vulgar or excessive.
  • hold one's end up To fulfill one's responsibilities or obligations in a satisfactory manner; to do one's share of the work or effort.
  • the fright of (one's) life "The fright of (one's) life" is an idiomatic expression used to describe an experience that is extremely terrifying or shocking, causing intense fear or panic.
  • the apple of (one's) eye The phrase "the apple of (one's) eye" is an idiom that refers to someone or something that is greatly cherished, loved, or favored above all others. It is often used to describe a person who is especially dear or special to someone.
  • cudgel (one's) brains To strain or make a great effort to think or remember something.
  • try (one's) level best To make the greatest possible effort; to put forth one's best effort or try as hard as one can.
  • the/(one's) last breath The idiom "the/(one's) last breath" refers to the final moments of life, or the very end of a struggle or effort. It can also refer to the point at which someone is physically unable to continue due to exhaustion or injury.
  • with (one's) eye on With (one's) eye on means to have a strong desire or intention to achieve or obtain something. It can also refer to being focused on or paying attention to something specific.
  • come to (one's) assistance To come to someone's assistance means to provide help or support in a time of need or difficulty.
  • put one's hands on (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "put one's hands on (someone or something)" means to physically find, locate, or obtain someone or something that was previously missing, lost, or difficult to find. It can also refer to locating or apprehending a person or animal.
  • not know if (one) is afoot or on horseback To be confused or disoriented about a situation or one's current state.
  • cut (one's) teeth in (something) To gain experience or expertise in a particular field or activity by starting at a young age or through challenging situations.
  • be in (one's) altitudes To be in (one's) altitudes means to be feeling high-spirited, excited, or very happy.
  • in the back of (one's) mind The idiom "in the back of (one's) mind" means to be thinking about something or aware of something, even if not the primary focus of one's thoughts. It refers to a subconscious thought or idea that is always present, though not always at the forefront of one's consciousness.
  • on one's mettle The idiom "on one's mettle" means to be ready to face a challenge, to be determined to do one's best, or to be ready to prove one's abilities. It typically refers to being in a situation that requires courage, skill, or determination.
  • clean (one's) plate (up) To finish all the food on one's plate, often as a sign of politeness or being appreciative of the meal.
  • (one's) paths cross The idiom "(one's) paths cross" refers to when two people happen to meet or encounter each other by chance or coincidence. It signifies the coming together of two individuals who may have been on different courses or trajectories, but have now intersected in some way.
  • set (one's) heart on (something) The idiom "set one's heart on (something)" means to have a strong desire or determination to achieve or obtain something.
  • be in advance of (one's) time To be ahead of one's time means to have ideas or beliefs that are more progressive or innovative than what is currently accepted or mainstream. It often refers to someone who is considered ahead of their contemporaries in their thinking, ideas, or actions.
  • pissed out of (one's) head To be extremely drunk or intoxicated.
  • raise (one's) game To raise one's game means to increase one's level of performance or effort in order to achieve better results. It often implies pushing oneself beyond one's usual limits and striving to improve in a particular area.
  • wind (someone) around (one's) (little) finger If someone has wound another person around their little finger, it means that person has complete control over the other person and can easily manipulate them to get what they want.
  • make (one's) flesh crawl To make someone feel extremely uncomfortable or disgusted.
  • ride (one's) coattails To ride one's coattails means to achieve success or gain an advantage by associating oneself with someone more successful or influential. It implies that the person is using someone else's reputation, fame, or success to further their own interests.
  • give (one) the once-over To give someone or something a quick and thorough examination or assessment, usually to determine their overall condition or quality.
  • have (one) on the run To have someone at a disadvantage or in a state of retreat, typically in a competitive situation.
  • when one's ship comes in The idiom "when one's ship comes in" refers to a point in time when one's luck or fortunes changes for the better and they receive a long-awaited opportunity or success.
  • tied to one's mother's apron strings Being overly dependent on one's mother or overly influenced by her opinions and decisions, often to the detriment of one's personal independence or autonomy.
  • hang up one's spikes The idiom "hang up one's spikes" refers to the act of retiring or quitting from a particular activity, especially sports or a career that involves physical activity. The expression comes from athletes hanging up their cleats or spikes (shoes with spikes or cleats used in sports like track and field) when they decide to stop competing or playing.
  • pin one's hopes on To pin one's hopes on means to rely or depend heavily on something or someone in hopes of achieving a desired outcome.
  • have one's heart in one's mouth To have one's heart in one's mouth means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or frightened. It describes a feeling of intense emotions or anticipation.
  • get back at (one) To seek revenge or retaliate against someone for a perceived wrong or injustice.
  • nurse a viper in (one's) bosom To nurse a viper in one's bosom means to support or be kind to someone who turns out to be treacherous or harmful, usually resulting in betrayal or harm. It refers to trusting and caring for someone who ultimately proves to be dangerous or untrustworthy.
  • doesn't/wouldn't know (one's) arse from (one's) elbow This idiom is used as an insult to imply that someone is incompetent, clueless, or incapable of making basic distinctions or decisions. It suggests that the person is so confused or disoriented that they cannot even distinguish between two body parts that are typically easy to identify.
  • legend in one's own (life)time The idiom "legend in one's own (life)time" refers to a person who is widely known and admired for their accomplishments or talents while still alive. It conveys the idea that the individual's reputation or legacy is already established during their lifetime, rather than after their death.
  • go out of (one's) mind To become extremely confused, anxious, or mentally unstable; to lose control of one's thoughts or emotions.
  • ear to the ground, have one's To have one's ear to the ground means to be constantly listening for information or news, especially concerning a specific situation or topic. It implies being alert and attentive to developments and being well-informed about what is happening.
  • frighten the hell out of (one) To cause extreme fear or terror in someone.
  • (one) could be forgiven for (doing something) The idiom "one could be forgiven for (doing something)" means that someone's actions or behavior are understandable or excusable given the circumstances.
  • put (one's) affairs in order To organize one's personal, financial, or legal matters in a systematic and efficient manner.
  • catch (one) later Catch (one) later is a casual way of saying goodbye with the intention of meeting or seeing the person again at a later time.
  • be shaking in (one's) boots To be very frightened or anxious about something.
  • part company (with one) To separate or go separate ways from someone or something.
  • pop one's cork To lose one's temper or become very angry.
  • let one The idiom "let one" typically refers to breaking wind or passing gas. It is a colloquial and humorous way of talking about flatulence.
  • give (one) carte blanche The idiom "give (one) carte blanche" means to give someone complete freedom and authority to do whatever they want or make decisions without any limits or restrictions.
  • shadow of one's self The idiom "shadow of one's self" refers to feeling or appearing less energetic, lively, or healthy than usual. It conveys a sense of being diminished or weakened in some way.
  • be on (one's) (own) head To bear full responsibility for something; to be solely responsible for the consequences of one's actions or decisions.
  • have a spring in (one's) step To have a spring in one's step means to walk energetically and with an attitude of liveliness or enthusiasm. It is often used to describe someone who is feeling happy, optimistic, or full of energy.
  • advise (one) of To inform or give guidance to someone on a particular matter or issue.
  • be run off (one's) feet The idiom "be run off (one's) feet" means to be extremely busy and overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities, so much so that one feels exhausted or unable to keep up with everything.
  • be wringing (one's) hands To be wringing one's hands means to show extreme worry, distress, or anxiety about a situation. It often implies feeling helpless or uncertain about how to resolve a problem.
  • all (one's) life is worth The idiom "all one's life is worth" means the value or importance of one's entire existence or life. It refers to the worth or significance of someone's life as a whole.
  • marry above (one's) station To marry above one's station means to marry someone of a higher social class or social status than oneself. It can also refer to marrying someone perceived to be of higher social, economic, or intellectual standing.
  • One's bark is worse than one's bite. This idiom means that someone's words or threats are more severe or intimidating than their actions or intentions. It suggests that someone may talk tough or act aggressively, but they are not actually as dangerous or harmful as they appear.
  • be holding (one's) breath To be eagerly waiting or anticipating something, often with anxiety or impatience.
  • chance (one's) arm to take a risk or make an attempt at something, especially when the likelihood of success is uncertain
  • be (one's) own worst enemy To act or behave in a way that hinders one's own progress or success; to be the cause of one's own problems or failures.
  • give (one) the low-down To give someone the low-down means to provide them with all the necessary information or details about a particular situation or topic.
  • brick in (one's) hat The idiom "brick in one's hat" refers to feeling shame or embarrassment, often due to a mistake or failure.
  • whisper sweet nothings in (one's) ear To whisper sweet nothings in someone's ear means to say words of love, endearment, or affection quietly and softly to them. It is often used to describe romantic gestures or expressions of affection in a gentle and intimate way.
  • bare hands, with one's Without weapons or tools; using only one's own physical strength or abilities.
  • sell (one's) birthright for a mess of pottage The idiom "sell (one's) birthright for a mess of pottage" means to give up something of great value or importance for something of little or no value. It is often used to describe someone who makes a foolish or shortsighted decision in exchange for immediate gratification or temporary gain. The phrase is derived from the biblical story of Esau, who sold his birthright as the firstborn son for a bowl of stew, or "pottage."
  • admit (one) to To allow someone to enter or join a particular place or organization.
  • Can I tell (one) who's calling? This idiom is asking for permission to reveal to someone the identity of the person who is calling them on the phone.
  • count with (one) To rely on or trust someone to keep their word or fulfill their promise.
  • call (one) names To insult or criticize someone by using offensive or derogatory language.
  • in one's interest In one's interest means something that is beneficial or advantageous to someone; something that is likely to benefit a person in some way.
  • one's folks "One's folks" is a casual way of referring to one's parents or family members. It can also be used to refer to one's ancestors or relatives in a more general sense.
  • keep (one's) nose out of (something) The idiom "keep (one's) nose out of (something)" means to not interfere or involve oneself in a situation that does not concern or involve them. It implies that the person should mind their own business and avoid meddling in the affairs of others.
  • do (one's) share To do one's share means to contribute or participate in a task or responsibility along with others, usually in a fair and equitable way.
  • keep one's cool To remain calm and composed, especially in a stressful or difficult situation.
  • (one) can't believe (one's) ears The idiom "(one) can't believe (one's) ears" means that one is amazed or shocked by what they have heard and finds it difficult to believe.
  • get (something) under (one's) belt To gain experience or knowledge in a particular task or activity.
  • on one's uppers Being in a state of financial hardship or poverty; having little or no money.
  • at one's door The idiom "at one's door" refers to something that is the responsibility or fault of a particular person or organization. It can also imply that something is physically located close to or in the possession of someone.
  • pop (one's) bubble To burst someone's bubble means to expose someone to the harsh reality of a situation, usually resulting in disappointment or disillusionment.
  • be at the end of (one's) rope To be at the end of one's rope means to be at a point of extreme frustration, stress or exhaustion where one feels they can no longer cope or handle a situation.
  • have a/(one's) foot in the door Having a foot in the door means having established a initial connection or opportunity that could lead to further involvement or success. It refers to being in a favorable position to pursue further opportunities or advancements.
  • waste one's breath To waste one's breath means to speak or argue in vain, as the other person is not listening or will not change their mind.
  • bring (one) back to reality To bring someone back to reality means to help someone face and accept the truth or facts of a situation, especially when they have been lost in their thoughts, daydreams, or illusions. It involves reminding someone of what is real and practical.
  • do (one's) darnedest To try one's hardest; to put forth one's best effort.
  • have (one's) wicked way with (someone) To do whatever one pleases with someone, often in a forceful or improper manner.
  • (one's) ass is on the line This idiom means that someone is in a situation where they are at risk of facing serious consequences or being held accountable for something. It typically implies that the person is in a precarious or risky situation.
  • set (one's) back up To make someone angry, upset, or defensive.
  • twist sm around one's little finger To have someone completely under one's control or influence; to easily manipulate or persuade someone to do what one wants.
  • put one's mind to To focus one's attention, effort, and determination on achieving a specific goal or task.
  • be chasing (one's) (own) tail The idiom "be chasing (one's) (own) tail" means to be engaging in a futile or pointless activity that leads nowhere or accomplishes nothing. It is often used to describe someone who is overly busy or preoccupied but not making any progress or achieving any meaningful results.
  • beyond one's ken The idiom "beyond one's ken" means something that is beyond one's understanding or capability to comprehend. It refers to something that is too complex, difficult, or mysterious for someone to grasp or comprehend.
  • put (one's) back into (something) To put one's back into something means to exert a lot of effort or energy into a task or activity. It implies working hard and giving one's full commitment to achieving a goal or completing a project.
  • give (one) a bad time To give someone a hard time or hassle, usually in a teasing or mocking manner.
  • stake one's reputation on sm or sth To stake one's reputation on something means to risk one's good name, credibility, or standing in a particular field or community by being confident in the success or outcome of a particular situation or decision.
  • burst (one's) bubble To burst someone's bubble means to destroy their illusions, destroy their hopes or bring bad news. It is used to describe the act of shattering someone's belief in something positive or exciting.
  • a one-day wonder The idiom "a one-day wonder" refers to something or someone that enjoys success or gains attention for a very brief period of time, typically only lasting for a day or a short period before being forgotten or overshadowed by something else.
  • raise (one's) hackles To raise someone's hackles means to make them angry, annoyed, or agitated. It is usually used to describe a situation or action that causes someone to become defensive or feel threatened.
  • rise to (one's) full height To rise to one's full height means to stand up straight and tall, often in a proud or confident manner. It can also mean to show one's true abilities or potential.
  • off one's trolley The idiom "off one's trolley" means to be acting irrationally or behaving in a crazy or foolish manner. It can also refer to being mentally unstable or out of control.
  • spin in one's grave The idiom "spin in one's grave" is used to describe someone who would be extremely upset, angry, or disappointed if they were able to see or hear about something happening now, especially something that goes against their beliefs, principles, or values. It implies that the person's reaction to the current situation would be so strong that it would cause them to physically spin in their grave.
  • get one's ears pinned back To have a talking-to or be reprimanded sternly or forcefully.
  • be on (one's) pat To be on one's own or completely alone; to be by oneself without any companions or assistance.
  • give (one) the pip To annoy or irritate someone.
  • afflict (one) with To cause someone to suffer from a particular problem, illness, or difficulty.
  • *up to one's neck (in something) To be deeply involved or overwhelmed in something; to be heavily burdened with tasks, responsibilities, or problems.
  • feed (one) a line To provide someone with something to say, especially a prepared or rehearsed statement, in order to deceive or manipulate them.
  • give (one) a ring To give someone a ring means to call them on the phone. It is a casual way to ask someone to contact you or for you to contact them.
  • give (one) (one's) marching orders To dismiss or order someone to leave a place or situation, typically in a forceful or abrupt manner.
  • lose one's head To lose one's head means to become very angry or upset, often leading to irrational behavior or loss of control. It can also refer to losing one's composure or ability to think clearly in a stressful situation.
  • have (one's) beady eye on (someone or something) To watch or monitor someone or something closely and with suspicion or scrutiny.
  • the last thing (one) needs The least desired or most undesirable thing in a given situation or context.
  • be on (one's) back To continually criticize, nag, or hassle someone in a persistent or annoying manner.
  • give (one) a hammering To give someone a thorough beating or defeat; to heavily criticize or rebuke someone.
  • lower (one's) guard To become less vigilant or cautious; to relax one's state of readiness or defenses.
  • show (one) around To give someone a guided tour or explanation of a place or thing.
  • at the end of (one's) fingertips The idiom "at the end of (one's) fingertips" means that something is easily reached, accessible, or available to someone. It typically refers to having knowledge, resources, or skills readily available and easy to use.
  • make it (one's) business to (do something) To take a personal interest and responsibility in doing something; to make an effort to do something.
  • top (one)self To "top (one)self" means to surpass one's previous efforts or achievements in a particular task or activity, usually by performing exceptionally well.
  • give (one's) notice To formally inform someone, typically an employer, that one is resigning from their current position or job.
  • off one's chump The idiom "off one's chump" means to be crazy, irrational, or behaving in a foolish or nonsensical manner.
  • take (one's) life To end one's own life; to commit suicide
  • jump in (one's) skin To suddenly react with fear, surprise, or startled movement.
  • take matters into (one's) own hands To take control and responsibility for dealing with a problem or situation oneself, rather than relying on others to resolve it.
  • shadow of (one's) former self The idiom "shadow of (one's) former self" is used to describe someone who is not as healthy, successful, or strong as they were in the past. It suggests that the person's current state is a mere resemblance or reflection of their previous self.
  • spring to one's feet To quickly stand up or rise from a sitting or lying position.
  • have bats in one's belfry The idiom "have bats in one's belfry" means to be eccentric or crazy, or to have strange or irrational thoughts or ideas.
  • keep one's eye(s) out To be on the lookout for something or to keep watch for something.
  • no better than (one) should be The idiom "no better than (one) should be" is used to indicate that someone is behaving in a way that is appropriate or acceptable for them, often implying that they are behaving poorly or in an immoral manner. It suggests that the person is meeting the minimum or expected standards of behavior.
  • bare (one's) teeth To show aggression or hostility; to act in a threatening or unfriendly manner.
  • march to (one's) own beat The phrase "march to (one's) own beat" means to behave or act according to one's own beliefs, values, or opinions, regardless of what others may do or think. It is about being independent and not conforming to societal expectations or norms.
  • put (one) back on (one's) heels To surprise or shock someone, causing them to become momentarily confused or off balance.
  • push (one) over the edge To push someone over the edge means to cause someone to become extremely upset, angry, or stressed to the point of losing control or composure.
  • bore (one) stiff To bore someone stiff means to bore or tire someone to the point of extreme annoyance or frustration.
  • take the law into one's hands To take the law into one's hands means to seek justice or revenge by one's own actions instead of going through the proper legal channels.
  • (one's) game To have the skills, abilities, or expertise needed to be successful or competitive in a particular area or field.
  • one-horse town A "one-horse town" is a small, unexciting, and unimportant place with very few inhabitants and little activity.
  • send (one) round the twist To cause someone to become extremely annoyed, frustrated, or angry; to provoke someone to lose their temper or composure.
  • put (one's) head in the lion's mouth To put one's head in the lion's mouth means to put oneself in a dangerous or risky situation. It can also mean to intentionally place oneself in harm's way or in a position where one is likely to face consequences.
  • have eyes bigger than (one's) stomach To have eyes bigger than one's stomach means to take or ask for more food or drink than one is able to consume. It generally refers to someone who is overestimating their capacity or appetite.
  • cover (one's) tracks (up) To conceal or hide evidence of one's actions or intentions in order to avoid detection or criticism.
  • put one's face on To put on makeup or to get ready for a public appearance.
  • be half the (something) (one) used to be This idiom means that a person or thing is no longer as good, skilled, or successful as they used to be in the past. It implies a decline in performance or ability compared to how they were previously.
  • bless (one's) cotton socks "Bless (one's) cotton socks" is an expression used to show appreciation, admiration, or affection for someone. It is typically used in a lighthearted or humorous way to acknowledge someone's positive qualities or actions.
  • (one's) last gasp The final act or effort in a series of actions or events; the very end or conclusion of something.
  • pound (something) into (one's) head To pound something into one's head means to repeatedly state or emphasize something in order to ensure that the person fully understands or remembers it. It can also refer to making a strong impression or impact on someone's mind.
  • cream (one's) jeans " Cream (one's) jeans" is a slang phrase used to describe someone being overly excited or thrilled about something.
  • thumb one's nose at sm or sth To show disrespect or defiance towards someone or something, often in a mocking or playful manner.
  • the courage of one's convictions The courage of one's convictions refers to having the bravery and determination to stand up for what one believes is right or true, even in the face of opposition or adversity. It involves sticking to one's principles and beliefs, regardless of the consequences.
  • carry a rope in (one's) pocket To be prepared for any situation or to have a contingency plan.
  • get (one's) hands on (something) To obtain or acquire something, usually through some effort or difficulty.
  • on (one's) own account "On (one's) own account" typically means doing something for oneself or independently, without help or guidance from others.
  • A-one "A-one" is an idiom that means top quality or rank, excellent or first-rate.
  • of one's life The idiom "of one's life" is used to emphasize that something is the best, most memorable, most important, or most significant experience or achievement in a person's life. It can refer to a moment, event, opportunity, or accomplishment that is considered the pinnacle or peak of one's lifetime.
  • toss (one's) name in the hat To toss one's name in the hat means to submit one's candidacy or offer to be considered for a position or opportunity. It is often used to express interest in participating in something or to throw one's hat in the ring for a chance or opportunity.
  • get the fright of (one's) life To experience an extreme or intense feeling of fear or shock.
  • knock (one) off (their) feet To impress, astonish, or overwhelm someone.
  • cut (one's) teeth To gain experience or knowledge in a particular area by starting with easier or less challenging tasks and gradually progressing to more difficult ones.
  • the last thing (one) wants The last thing (one) wants is something that a person definitely does not want to happen or encounter. It refers to something that is undesirable or the least desirable option for someone in a given situation.
  • get (one) down To cause someone to feel sad, discouraged, or disheartened.
  • give (one) a dose of (one's) own medicine To give someone a dose of their own medicine means to treat them the same way they have been treating others, often in a negative or unpleasant manner. It implies that the person should experience the same kind of behavior or treatment that they have been giving to others.
  • have one's day To have one's day means to experience success, fame, or recognition after a period of struggle or obscurity.
  • take one's ease To relax or rest in a comfortable and leisurely manner.
  • bare (one's) soul To reveal one's innermost thoughts and feelings, to share or confess one's deepest emotions or secrets.
  • be out of (one's) hair To be out of someone's hair means to no longer be bothering or annoying them. It could also mean to no longer be in someone's way or keeping them occupied.
  • declare an/(one's) interest "Declare an/(one's) interest" means to make known any personal or financial involvement that could potentially create a conflict of interest in a particular situation. It is often used in formal settings, such as meetings or discussions, to ensure transparency and honesty.
  • do (one's) block To become extremely angry or lose one's temper.
  • crook one's elbow To bend one's elbow, typically in order to drink alcohol.
  • in (one's) eye(s) This idiom means that something is apparent or obvious to someone, or is easily seen or understood by them.
  • see the color of (one's) money To see the color of someone's money means to receive payment or proof of their financial ability before agreeing to a transaction or deal. It is a way of ensuring that the person has the necessary funds or resources to follow through on their promises.
  • leave (something) in (one's)/its wake To leave (something) in (one's)/its wake means to leave a trail of destruction, damage, or consequences behind you or something as you move forward.
  • have a/(one's) finger in every pie To have a finger in every pie means to be involved in many different activities or projects, often to a meddling or intrusive extent. This idiom suggests that the person is spreading themselves too thin or interfering in matters that are not their concern.
  • soil (one's) hands To soil one's hands means to become involved in something immoral or unsavory. It can also refer to getting one's hands dirty by doing physical labor or manual work.
  • give pause to (one) To cause someone to stop and think carefully about something, usually because it is surprising, unexpected, or unsettling.
  • have (one's) wits about (one) To be alert, attentive, and ready to think quickly and clearly in a particular situation.
  • keep people straight (in one's mind) To keep people straight in one's mind means to accurately remember and differentiate between various individuals, their roles, and their relationships with each other. It involves being able to keep track of the identities and characteristics of different people in order to maintain clarity and understanding in social interactions.
  • feel (one) up The idiom "feel (one) up" means to touch or grope someone in a sexual or inappropriate way.
  • be engraved on (one's) heart To be permanently etched or deeply imprinted in one's emotions or memory; to be something that one cannot forget or erase.
  • bring to one's knees To bring someone to their knees means to defeat or overpower them, often causing them to submit or give up.
  • open (one's) eyes to (someone or something) To become aware of or acknowledge someone or something that was previously unnoticed or ignored.
  • show one's colors To show one's true self or true allegiances, especially in a challenging or adversarial situation.
  • shit (one)self To be extremely frightened or surprised.
  • out on one's ear The idiom "out on one's ear" means to be expelled or ejected from a situation or place, typically with little warning or consideration. It can also refer to being fired or dismissed from a job.
  • see (one) in the flesh To see someone in person rather than just hearing about or imagining them.
  • have one's ass in a sling The idiom "have one's ass in a sling" means to be in a difficult or precarious situation; to be in trouble or facing a problem that is difficu