How Do You Spell OUT?

Pronunciation: [ˈa͡ʊt] (IPA)

The word "out" is spelled with the letters O-U-T. In IPA phonetic transcription, the word is represented as /aʊt/. The symbol /a/ represents the tense vowel sound made with an open mouth positioning. The symbol /ʊ/ represents the short vowel sound where the tongue is placed in a more relaxed position. The combination of these two sounds creates the word "out." The spelling of this word is consistent with English phonetic rules and can be easily recognized and pronounced by native speakers.

OUT Meaning and Definition

Out is an adverb that typically signifies the opposite of in or inside. It refers to a position or location that is outside or external to a particular space or area. Out can also be used to describe someone or something moving or going outside or leaving a certain place. It suggests a state of being not enclosed or contained within a boundary or limit. Additionally, out is frequently employed to indicate the removal or extraction of something from a container or enclosed space. It conveys the idea of taking something out or liberating it from confinement.

Out can also function as an adjective, denoting an external or visible position or placement. It implies that something or someone is not hidden or concealed but rather observable or apparent. Moreover, out can describe someone or something that is no longer participating, included, or involved in a particular activity, group, or situation. It suggests exclusion or being excluded from a context or association.

As a preposition, out signifies movement from the inside to the outside of a place or area. It indicates a direction or path leading away from an interior space towards the external environment. Out can also convey a sense of removal or absence from a particular location or situation, emphasizing a state of being apart from or distant.

Furthermore, out can serve as a noun, referring to a state or condition of being outside or away from a certain area or boundary. It can signify the outdoors or the external side of something. In sports, out refers to a situation where a player or team fails to achieve a specific objective or loses a game.

Top Common Misspellings for OUT *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for OUT

  • anout
  • bouty
  • ofte
  • ourth
  • ybut
  • ouset
  • outs
  • fouht
  • ocurt
  • oyur
  • youht
  • ebout
  • sourt
  • qoute
  • tourt
  • ouiet
  • sut
  • ouwl
  • aoubt
  • aouth
  • ocuh
  • asut
  • iput
  • obaut
  • qouet
  • acout
  • oubt
  • youto
  • outch
  • couty
  • ohua
  • arout
  • oitn
  • outhe
  • soute
  • whout
  • qouta
  • ahout
  • lut
  • oufit
  • outin
  • ubout
  • fouty
  • ouyr
  • ouput
  • obut
  • amout
  • oulet
  • ouhgt
  • ost
  • wut
  • coute
  • coaut
  • outor
  • fut
  • outg
  • wrout
  • onur
  • quout
  • outht
  • qiut
  • fourt
  • ybout
  • adout
  • touht
  • aoun
  • qoet
  • obout
  • qouto
  • doute
  • fout
  • ott
  • ouve
  • outpu
  • ogt
  • ouja
  • occut
  • chout
  • souht
  • outit
  • bourt
  • juut
  • wiout
  • aobut
  • ous
  • oiht
  • woute
  • qout
  • offut
  • oute
  • goout
  • souit
  • outif
  • omto
  • wbout
  • oudl
  • qourt
  • qut
  • obt
  • laout
  • outon
  • ougt
  • aouto
  • avout
  • bouht
  • yuot
  • agout
  • itout
  • rouht
  • meout
  • olt
  • outat
  • poiut
  • hourt
  • douht
  • oeht
  • taout
  • ubut
  • ounty
  • ouiz
  • outby
  • outfi
  • dut
  • ouote
  • oup
  • ouze
  • douwt
  • mouht
  • boute
  • inout
  • alout
  • okat
  • our
  • otur
  • douet
  • aount
  • ouji
  • obuot
  • vut
  • houte
  • ioit
  • oue
  • noyt
  • oiur
  • ouir
  • ouor
  • ourv
  • ouur
  • outle
  • ouwn
  • riout
  • aue
  • ajt
  • ooth
  • buo
  • oati
  • oco
  • ocl
  • orp
  • vost
  • outhy
  • cuc
  • cuw
  • kul
  • kut
  • diout
  • o it
  • opa
  • ory
  • odte
  • otty
  • oait
  • oate
  • oatt
  • oaud
  • oeta
  • ohat
  • o to
  • ooat
  • ouda
  • oouty
  • eut
  • ouyot
  • ohot
  • ohth
  • oota
  • oita
  • oiud
  • oite
  • oith
  • nkout
  • ooto
  • oudu
  • oyat
  • oath
  • lnt
  • oeto
  • ooot
  • ooti
  • otte
  • ooud
  • oudo
  • oeat
  • oeet
  • oeth
  • oitt
  • oote
  • otet
  • oott
  • oouth
  • outed
  • oyth
  • o-th
  • oato
  • oett
  • oewt
  • nyt
  • outty
  • o'et
  • oaht
  • oaat
  • oadt
  • oaet
  • oawt
  • oa3t
  • oiat
  • 0oat
  • o0at
  • 9oat
  • o9at
  • owat
  • oayt
  • oaty
  • oa6t
  • oat6
  • oa5t
  • oat5
  • o at
  • oa t
  • owth
  • oatu
  • ohit
  • okt
  • ocv
  • odet
  • odout
  • ouh
  • oeit
  • oiit
  • ooit
  • ooet
  • oodt
  • oo5t
  • oo4t
  • oo2t
  • ootd
  • ouc
  • oito
  • o0to
  • o9to
  • oyto
  • o6to
  • o5to
  • otua
  • otud
  • otue
  • otuw
  • otu3
  • ouhht
  • ouyht
  • ouht
  • ouwht
  • ouoht
  • oueht
  • ouat
  • oudt
  • ouet
  • ouwt
  • ou3t
  • put
  • 9ut
  • o8t
  • o7t
  • ou6
  • ou5
  • iout
  • okut
  • 0out
  • o0ut
  • o9ut
  • ohut
  • ojut
  • oujt
  • o8ut
  • ou8t
  • o7ut
  • ou7t
  • ouft
  • outf
  • ou6t
  • out6
  • ou5t
  • out5
  • o5t
  • ou4
  • ouv
  • ouu
  • o ut
  • ou t
  • out i
  • ou to
  • out o
  • out t
  • outae
  • outid
  • outeo
  • outdi
  • outd0
  • outd9
  • outd
  • oudto
  • outod
  • outdo
  • outee
  • outet
  • oute5
  • oute4
  • oute2
  • outho
  • outyo
  • outwo
  • outoo
  • outaw
  • outay
  • outut
  • outde
  • outte
  • out5e
  • out4e
  • out2e
  • outie
  • ouwit
  • outwt
  • outwi
  • oued
  • owud
  • owet
  • owot
  • owdt
  • owht
  • oity
  • oiute
  • 0oet
  • xout
  • robt
  • 5oot
  • 4oot
  • 2oot
  • 5out
  • 4out
  • 2out
  • 5oute
  • 4oute
  • 2oute
  • 3oot
  • ouk
  • 3outh
  • 6oot
  • otot
  • 6out
  • 7outh
  • 6outh
  • 9outh
  • odat
  • odth
  • odty
  • odut
  • ohaut
  • oety
  • ouid
  • oyte
  • ohte
  • outou
  • houto
  • oete
  • oeute
  • oitu
  • oowt
  • oata
  • oatd
  • oatw
  • Oat3
  • Oi.t
  • Oiot
  • omuy
  • ohto
  • otti
  • ott0
  • ott9
  • O4to
  • Otuo
  • oudh
  • oudy
  • oude
  • outow
  • outud
  • outdd
  • outwy
  • outwa
  • outoe
  • outwe
  • owte
  • oyet
  • oiet
  • 5ouet
  • 4ouet
  • 6oat
  • 5oat
  • otat
  • ouite
  • 7oit
  • 6oit
  • oyit
  • o out
  • o9th
  • o0th
  • o5th
  • Ouita
  • 0ott
  • oyot
  • oudet
  • ouad
  • ohyt
  • odue
  • otit
  • o5it
  • o4it
  • O2it
  • ohta
  • o0ta
  • o9ta
  • oyta
  • o6ta
  • o5ta
  • o ta
  • Ohud
  • Ohet
  • oot3
  • oit3
  • oidt
  • outw
  • outad
  • outwd
  • outdw
  • outew
  • outww
  • oltp
  • odwt
  • ocut
  • owta
  • 0odt
  • o0dt
  • 9odt
  • o9dt
  • oedt
  • odyt
  • od6t
  • odt6
  • od5t
  • odt5
  • oddt
  • odtt
  • o dt
  • od t
  • 0oot
  • o0ot
  • 9oot
  • o9ot
  • oo0t
  • oo9t
  • ooyt
  • oo6t
  • oot6
  • oot5
  • o ot
  • oo t
  • ootw
  • o0te
  • o9te
  • o6te
  • o5te
  • o te
  • otht
  • oet0
  • oet1
  • 0oit
  • o0it
  • 9oit
  • o9it
  • oi9t
  • o8it
  • oi8t
  • oiyt
  • oi6t
  • oit6
  • oi5t
  • oit5
  • oTTD
  • odui
  • oAUT
  • oot0
  • oot9
  • o6th
  • otuh
  • otth
  • o0tt
  • 9ott
  • o9tt
  • oytt
  • otyt
  • o6tt
  • ot6t
  • o5tt
  • ot5t
  • ott6
  • ott5
  • ottt
  • o tt
  • ot t
  • oitw
  • o0tw
  • o9tw
  • oytw
  • o6tw
  • o5tw
  • ottw
  • o tw
  • oetw
  • 8odt
  • owuth
  • oautu
  • oauty
  • ouath
  • oauht
  • oAuth
  • Oiuth
  • Oeuth
  • OAuti
  • OEoT
  • owtw
  • otu-t
  • oiwt
  • o9td
  • o8td
  • ouitd
  • oiutd
  • oITD
  • OyTD
  • OhTD
  • otdt
  • oiti
  • o0ti
  • o9ti
  • oyti
  • o6ti
  • o5ti
  • otui
  • o ti
  • o0tu
  • o9tu
  • oytu
  • o6tu
  • o5tu
  • otuy
  • otu8
  • otu7
  • ootu
  • ottu
  • otuu
  • o tu
  • 0oyt
  • o0yt
  • 9oyt
  • o9yt
  • oyht
  • o7yt
  • oy7t
  • o6yt
  • oy6t
  • oyyt
  • oyty
  • oyt6
  • oy5t
  • oyt5
  • o yt
  • oy t
  • ohtw
  • oot2
  • ouhta
  • owtt
  • OWuTE
  • ouyd
  • oyud
  • o7ot
  • o6ot
  • oy0t
  • oy9t
  • oyuot
  • oeti
  • oot8
  • oot7
  • 4o4t
  • otwt
  • oETD
  • oUFZ
  • oDTI
  • WOUq
  • ouhd
  • o4ta
  • owwt
  • oWTI
  • oetu
  • oduy
  • oduh
  • odu8
  • odu7
  • oduu
  • o0et
  • 9oet
  • o9et
  • o4et
  • oe4t
  • o3et
  • oe3t
  • oeyt
  • oe6t
  • oet6
  • oe5t
  • oet5
  • o et
  • oe t
  • ouo&t
  • o0td
  • O_TD
  • ouwd
  • 0o/t
  • o0/t
  • 9o/t
  • o9/t
  • o/ty
  • o/6t
  • o/t6
  • o/5t
  • o/t5
  • o6td
  • o5td
  • oi2t
  • 0o2t
  • o02t
  • 9o2t
  • o92t
  • o12t
  • o21t
  • ow2t
  • o2wt
  • o32t
  • o23t
  • o2yt
  • o2ty
  • o26t
  • o2t6
  • o25t
  • o2t5
  • o22t
  • o2tt
  • o 2t
  • o2 t
  • 6ott
  • 5ott
  • ohtt
  • oaot
  • od9t
  • od8t
  • oduit
  • odiut
  • ODhT
  • OwIT
  • 0oht
  • o0ht
  • 9oht
  • o9ht
  • ohty
  • oh6t
  • oht6
  • oh5t
  • oht5
  • ooht
  • ohht
  • o ht
  • oh t
  • odtd
  • OuDD
  • 0oud
  • o0ud
  • 9oud
  • o9ud
  • o8ud
  • ou8d
  • o7ud
  • ou7d
  • ouud
  • o ud
  • ou d
  • o8tt
  • o7tt
  • oiutt
  • 0outt
  • o0utt
  • 9outt
  • o9utt
  • oyutt
  • ouytt
  • ohutt
  • ouhtt
  • ouitt
  • o8utt
  • ou8tt
  • o7utt
  • ou7tt
  • outyt
  • ou6tt
  • out6t
  • ou5tt
  • out5t
  • outt6
  • outt5
  • ooutt
  • ouutt
  • outtt
  • OUTu
  • o utt
  • ou tt
  • 0owt
  • o0wt
  • 9owt
  • o9wt
  • o3wt
  • ow3t
  • owyt
  • owty
  • ow6t
  • owt6
  • ow5t
  • owt5
  • o wt
  • ow t
  • oi4t
  • owtd
  • oWTU
  • ohwt
  • 3odt
  • 2odt
  • 3oht
  • 2oht
  • owto
  • eouz
  • equt
  • o0t3
  • o9t3
  • oyt3
  • o6t3
  • o5t3
  • ott3
  • o t3
  • 5oit
  • 4oit
  • 3ott
  • 2ott
  • 4oht
  • 3owt
  • 2owt
  • o2te
  • o05t
  • 0o5t
  • 0o6t
  • o0t7
  • 1o9t
  • 1o5t
  • 1o6t
  • 2o6t
  • 3o9t
  • 3o5t
  • 3o6t
  • 4o9t
  • 4o6t
  • 8o9t
  • o0t5
  • o3t5
  • o35t
  • o4t6
  • o46t
  • o6t9
  • OIt7
  • oit0
  • oit9
  • o0ty
  • o9ty
  • o6ty
  • o5ty
  • o4th
  • ou5d
  • ou4d
  • 4ott
  • oudi
  • odua
  • ou3d
  • oeud
  • odtw
  • oqkt
  • oa0t
  • oa9t
  • ODuTA
  • ohti
  • ott4
  • outlk
  • oDT2
  • oeut
  • owut
  • OuH-T
  • o/4t
  • o/3t
  • oa4t
  • outhd
  • 3out
  • odtu
  • 3oat
  • 2oat
  • oa8t
  • oauit
  • oaiut
  • outi
  • ohtu
  • oht9
  • oht8
  • ouhti
  • ohuti
  • ouiit
  • oiuit
  • oiiut
  • 4oET
  • oduo
  • 4odt
  • 3oit
  • oAT1
  • oT2T
  • oat4
  • oiaut
  • oihut
  • 8oat
  • 8oht
  • 8oit
  • 8oud
  • 8owt
  • oit2
  • oitut
  • oiuat
  • oiudt
  • ouoto
  • oiuta
  • oiuty
  • oat2
  • oduty
  • ohdt
  • oieut
  • oit1
  • oukk
  • outea
  • oEAUT
  • oUOD
  • oUTOA
  • oYT1
  • oUDW
  • oUIT0
  • oUIT1
  • owt1
  • oa1t
  • OAT9
  • OAT0
  • owt3
  • OeT3
  • OAT7
  • OATUt
  • OAUtA
  • odt1
  • odt3
  • ODuD
  • od0t
  • oduet
  • odt0
  • odt4
  • odtut
  • odu1
  • ODUtD
  • oduw
  • oedut
  • OuD2
  • OEt2
  • OuETD
  • OEuTD
  • oet4
  • o4tt
  • o3tt
  • oydt
  • ohu&t
  • ouhat
  • ohuat
  • ohuta
  • oh1t
  • oh2t
  • oh4t
  • oht4
  • oht3
  • ouhte
  • ohute
  • o8&t
  • oui&t
  • oiu&t
  • o8at
  • ouiat
  • ouatu
  • o8dt
  • ouidt
  • oi0t
  • outda
  • o8te
  • oit4
  • oot4
  • oit8
  • oouit
  • OhUIT
  • oot1
  • 0outh
  • o0uth
  • o9uth
  • ooutu
  • ouoth
  • oouht
  • O_UTH
  • OOUTi
  • o1&t
  • o5dt
  • o4dt
  • o5ot
  • o4ot
  • o4tu
  • o1th
  • o6at
  • o5at
  • o6dt
  • o6ht
  • o5ht
  • otuht
  • othut
  • otu1
  • out2
  • oTU2
  • OdU2
  • OTt2
  • OTU6
  • OTU0
  • OTUDt
  • o7at
  • 0ouat
  • o0uat
  • 9ouat
  • o9uat
  • oyuat
  • ouyat
  • o8uat
  • ou8at
  • o7uat
  • ou7at
  • ouwat
  • ouawt
  • ouayt
  • ouaty
  • oua6t
  • ouat6
  • oua5t
  • ouat5
  • oouat
  • ouuat
  • ouaat
  • ouatt
  • o uat
  • ou at
  • oua t
  • oud0
  • o8ta
  • o7ta
  • 0outa
  • o0uta
  • 9outa
  • o9uta
  • oyuta
  • ouyta
  • o8uta
  • ou8ta
  • o7uta
  • ou7ta
  • outya
  • ou6ta
  • out6a
  • ou5ta
  • out5a
  • oouta
  • ouuta
  • outaa
  • o uta
  • ou ta
  • out a
  • o7td
  • ou6d
  • 0outd
  • o0utd
  • 9outd
  • o9utd
  • oyutd
  • ouytd
  • ohutd
  • ouhtd
  • o8utd
  • ou8td
  • o7utd
  • ou7td
  • outyd
  • ou6td
  • out6d
  • ou5td
  • out5d
  • ooutd
  • ouutd
  • outtd
  • o utd
  • ou td
  • out d
  • o8ti
  • o7ti
  • out9
  • out8
  • oiuti
  • 0outi
  • o0uti
  • 9outi
  • o9uti
  • oyuti
  • ouyti
  • ouiti
  • o8uti
  • ou8ti
  • o7uti
  • ou7ti
  • outyi
  • ou6ti
  • out6i
  • ou5ti
  • out5i
  • outui
  • outiu
  • outoi
  • outio
  • out9i
  • outi9
  • out8i
  • outi8
  • ouuti
  • outti
  • outii
  • o uti
  • ou ti
  • outih
  • out0
  • out4
  • o8tw
  • o7tw
  • out3
  • oiutw
  • 0outw
  • o0utw
  • 9outw
  • o9utw
  • oyutw
  • ouytw
  • ohutw
  • ouhtw
  • ouitw
  • o8utw
  • ou8tw
  • o7utw
  • ou7tw
  • outyw
  • ou6tw
  • out6w
  • ou5tw
  • out5w
  • out3w
  • outw3
  • out2w
  • outw2
  • ooutw
  • ouutw
  • outtw
  • o utw
  • ou tw
  • out w
  • Ou2TE
  • ow4t
  • o3td
  • o2td
  • o3tu
  • o2tu
  • owt8
  • owt7
  • oywt
  • 4oat
  • 5oet
  • 5oht
  • 6oht
  • 6owt
  • 5owt
  • zouh
  • o6-t
  • o6et
  • o2et
  • o16t
  • 5-out
  • 4-out
  • O-1t
  • 2oYT
  • ouhit
  • outhi
  • 0outy
  • otuta
  • ou4ta
  • oudta
  • out4a
  • outua
  • out4d
  • out3d
  • out5o
  • out4o
  • out2o
  • outey
  • od't
  • ou it
  • outei
  • outdu
  • outd8
  • oudti
  • outdy
  • outdh
  • 6o t
  • 5o t
  • 4o t
  • 8out
  • 8-out
  • hoaut
  • Ozuw
  • ountz
  • onqut
  • Couto
  • outvt
  • oduto
  • OWUW
  • huout
  • outzy
  • OUNAT
  • Momut

Etymology of OUT

The word "out" originated from the Old English word "ūt", which can be traced back to Proto-Germanic roots. In Old English, it was spelled as "ūt" or "ūte", and it had similar meanings to its current usage, including "outside", "away", or "forth". The Proto-Germanic root is "ūt", which meant "out" or "up" and is also related to the Old Saxon word "ūt" and the Old High German word "ūz". This root can be traced further back to the Proto-Indo-European root "*ud", meaning "up" or "out". The word has maintained its basic meaning throughout its evolution in various Germanic languages, including English.

Idioms with the word OUT

  • ride (out) the storm The idiom "ride (out) the storm" means to endure or patiently wait through a difficult or tumultuous situation, with the hope or expectation that things will eventually improve or return to normal. It signifies staying strong and resilient in the face of adversity, without giving up or being overwhelmed by the challenges.
  • truth will out The idiom "truth will out" means that the truth or true nature of something or someone will eventually be revealed or become known, even if it is initially concealed or hidden.
  • rent sth (out) (to sm) The idiom "rent sth (out) (to sm)" means to allow someone else to use or occupy a property, land, or object in exchange for a regular payment or fee.
  • ride out The idiom "ride out" typically means to endure or survive a challenging or difficult situation, usually by staying calm and patient until it passes.
  • ride sth out The idiom "ride sth out" typically means to endure or survive a difficult or challenging situation without giving up or succumbing to it. It refers to staying strong or resilient until the problem or obstacle passes or resolves itself.
  • ring out The idiom "ring out" typically refers to a sound, specifically the loud and clear sound produced by a bell or other similar object when struck or rung. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of making a strong and unmistakable statement or announcement.
  • sell out The idiom "sell out" typically refers to a situation where a person compromises their integrity, principles, or values in order to gain personal profit or success, often by betraying their beliefs and, in turn, disappointing or deceiving others. It can also refer to when someone in the entertainment industry or a public figure abandons their authenticity or artistic vision in exchange for commercial success or mainstream appeal.
  • sell sth out The idiom "sell something out" refers to the act of selling all of a particular item or tickets for an event, typically resulting in no more being available for purchase. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation where someone betrays or compromises their principles or values for personal gain.
  • sell sm out The idiom "sell sm out" generally means betraying someone's trust or loyalty by revealing sensitive or confidential information about them, often for personal gain or to avoid negative consequences for oneself. It can also denote the act of exposing someone's secrets or undermining their reputation.
  • roar sth out The idiom "roar sth out" typically means to say or shout something loudly, forcefully, and with intensity or anger. It implies speaking with a strong, booming voice that demands attention or makes a powerful statement.
  • roll out The idiom "roll out" means to introduce or launch something, typically a new product or service, on a large scale or to a wider audience. It refers to the process of making something available to the public or a specific target market.
  • roll sth out The idiom "roll sth out" refers to the process of introducing, launching, or implementing something on a large scale. It is commonly used in the business or technology world to describe the gradual or widespread deployment of a new product, service, or initiative. It implies a systematic and controlled release of something to the public or target audience.
  • root sth out The idiom "root something out" means to search thoroughly and eliminate or eradicate something from its source or hiding place. It often refers to finding and removing a problem, habit, or undesirable element completely and forcefully.
  • rot out The idiom "rot out" means to become spoiled, decayed, or infested due to neglect or lack of care. It can also refer to something that is old-fashioned, outdated, or no longer relevant.
  • schiz(z) out The idiom "schiz(z) out" typically means to behave erratically or to have an extreme emotional or mental reaction, sometimes characterized by confusion, panic, or paranoia. It is often used informally to describe a state of being overwhelmed or experiencing intense stress.
  • rub out The idiom "rub out" refers to the act of eliminating, erasing, or getting rid of someone or something, typically by violent or forceful means. It is often used to convey the idea of an intentional and deliberate act, such as killing or eradicating someone or something.
  • rub sb out The idiom "rub sb out" is a slang term that originated in the criminal underworld. It means to intentionally and unlawfully cause someone's death, typically through violent means or planned assassination.
  • rub sth out The idiom "rub sth out" typically means to erase or eliminate something, especially written or drawn marks, by rubbing or erasing them with an eraser or a similar object. It can also represent the act of removing or eliminating a memory, mistake, or negative event from one's mind.
  • turn out The idiom "turn out" has multiple definitions, depending on the context in which it is used. 1. To attend or appear at an event or gathering: This can refer to a person's physical presence or participation in an occasion. For example, "Many people turned out for the concert last night." 2. To result in something happening or becoming a certain way: This signifies the outcome or end result of a situation or event. For instance, "The meeting turned out to be a success." 3. To produce or provide a particular outcome: This indicates the consequence or realization of a process or action. For example, "Her efforts in studying turned out to be fruitful." 4. To empty or clean out an area, often with
  • turn sth out The idiom "turn something out" has a couple of possible definitions: 1. To produce, manufacture, or create something, often in large quantities or for a specific purpose. Example: The factory can turn out thousands of cars every day. 2. To result in a particular way; to happen or unfold in a certain manner. Example: The situation turned out better than we expected. 3. To present or display a particular appearance or outcome. Example: The event turned out to be a huge success. 4. To evict or force someone to leave a place. Example: The landlord turned out the tenants for not paying rent.
  • turn sm out The idiom "turn someone out" typically means to force or drive someone out of a place, often with an emphasis on a forceful or abrupt manner. It can refer to physically ejecting someone from a premises or removing them forcefully from a position of power or authority.
  • run out The idiom "run out" has multiple meanings: 1. To use up or exhaust a supply of something: This can refer to physically depleting a resource, such as running out of water or running out of food. It can also relate to using up a non-physical resource, like running out of time or running out of money. 2. To leave or exit a place hastily or quickly: For example, if someone says, "I have to run out," it means they need to leave promptly or temporarily. 3. To become unavailable or be completely used up: This can describe a situation where something is no longer available, like when a product runs out of stock or when a certain item runs out of production. 4. To
  • rust out The idiom "rust out" refers to the gradual decline or deterioration of skills, abilities, or knowledge due to lack of use or practice. It suggests that if something is not regularly maintained or exercised, it will become progressively less effective or efficient.
  • sack out The idiom "sack out" refers to the act of sleeping or going to bed in a tired or exhausted state. It is derived from the image of someone collapsing onto a sack or mattress to rest.
  • sing out The idiom "sing out" means to speak or express oneself with confidence, clarity, or enthusiasm, often in a loud or bold manner. It can also refer to singing or vocalizing with strength or conviction.
  • sing sth out The idiom "sing something out" typically refers to singing something loudly, boldly, or in an expressive manner. It is often used in a figurative sense to denote making one's voice heard or proclaiming something forcefully.
  • sit out The idiom "sit out" means to choose not to participate in an activity or situation, often as a way to avoid potential problems or conflicts. It can also refer to waiting or remaining patiently until the specified activity or situation is over.
  • scarf out The idiom "scarf out" means to eat excessively or indulge in food to an excessive extent. It implies voracious or unrestrained eating.
  • scrape sth out The idiom "scrape something out" means to remove or extract something by scraping or scratching. It typically refers to the action of using a tool or one's fingernails to remove a substance or object from a surface or container.
  • scream sth out The idiom "scream something out" is an expression used to describe an act of shouting or screaming something loudly and forcefully. It implies expressing intense emotions, urgency, or frustration.
  • see out The idiom "see out" means to remain with or accompany someone until the end of an event, process, or period of time. It implies staying until a particular task or duty is completed, especially in relation to seeing someone off or ensuring the completion of an event or responsibility.
  • send out The idiom "send out" typically means to dispatch or distribute something to different recipients or locations. It can be used in a literal sense, such as sending out packages or letters, or in a figurative sense, such as disseminating information or spreading a message.
  • send sb out The idiom "send sb out" typically means to assign or delegate someone to go out on a specific task or mission. It implies instructing or dispatching an individual to take action or accomplish a particular objective.
  • serve out The idiom "serve out" typically means to complete or finish a period of a specific task, duty, or punishment. It often refers to fulfilling a commitment or serving the entirety of a specified term.
  • set out The idiom "set out" typically means to begin a journey, task, or endeavor, often with a specific goal or intention in mind. It can also refer to laying out a plan or strategy before starting something.
  • shoot out The idiom "shoot out" refers to a situation where a conflict or disagreement is resolved through a heated and intense confrontation, often involving a verbal or physical exchange, typically to determine a winner or a resolution to the issue at hand.
  • shut out The idiom "shut out" is defined as the act of excluding or denying access to someone or something. It can refer to keeping someone out of a place, group, or situation, or not allowing something to be considered or taken into account.
  • shut sb out The idiom "shut sb out" means to exclude or bar someone from a situation, activity, or group. It refers to deliberately keeping someone out or denying them access to something. It can also indicate isolating or distancing oneself from someone emotionally or socially.
  • sign out The idiom "sign out" typically refers to the action of logging out or discontinuing a session or activity on a computer, software application, or online platform. It is commonly used in the context of technology or online communication systems.
  • sit sth out The idiom "sit sth out" means to refrain from participating or getting involved in a particular activity or event, usually in order to avoid or prevent negative consequences or discomfort.
  • skip (out) The idiom "skip (out)" refers to the act of leaving or absconding from a particular place without proper permission or without completing a task. It is often used when someone intentionally avoids or evades a responsibility or obligation.
  • sleep out The idiom "sleep out" refers to spending the night outdoors or away from one's usual place of residence. It typically suggests sleeping in a tent, camping, or finding temporary accommodations outside of one's home.
  • slip out The idiom "slip out" means to leave or escape a place quietly or secretly, often without being noticed or detected. It can also refer to making a quick exit or departure from a conversation or situation.
  • smoke sb out The definition of the idiom "smoke someone out" is to force someone or something out of a hiding place, typically by using smoke or other means to make their location more visible or uncomfortable. This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe the act of uncovering or exposing someone's hidden motives or intentions.
  • snarl sth out To "snarl something out" means to say something angrily, aggressively, or with a lot of hostility. It often implies speaking in a harsh or growling manner, resembling the sound of a snarl. This idiom is usually used to describe words or phrases that are spoken in a way that conveys irritation, anger, or frustration.
  • sold out The idiom "sold out" refers to a situation where all available items or tickets for a particular event, product, or service have been purchased and are no longer available for sale.
  • sort sth out The idiom "sort something out" means to organize, arrange or resolve a problem, issue, or situation. It implies taking the necessary steps or actions to bring order or clarity to something.
  • sound sb out The idiom "sound sb out" means to discreetly or indirectly find out someone's opinion, thoughts, or intentions on a particular matter or issue, usually by engaging them in conversation and asking probing questions. It involves seeking information or assessing someone's mindset without being too direct or explicit.
  • sound sth out The definition of the idiom "sound sth out" is to inquire or explore someone's thoughts, feelings, or opinions on a particular matter in a careful or diplomatic manner, often done to gauge a reaction or gather information.
  • sound sm out The idiom "sound someone out" means to discreetly gauge someone's opinions, thoughts, or intentions by indirectly asking them questions or making casual conversation to gather information or test their reaction to certain ideas or suggestions. It involves subtly probing someone in order to assess their perspective or determine their level of interest or willingness in a particular matter.
  • space out The idiom "space out" means to become inattentive, absent-minded, or to lose focus on what is happening around you.
  • space sm out The idiom "space someone out" means to cause someone to feel confused, disoriented, or uneasy, often by talking about strange or unconventional topics or behaving in an unusual manner.
  • speak out The idiom "speak out" means to express one's opinion or thoughts openly and confidently, especially on a topic that others may avoid or be hesitant about addressing. It implies speaking up courageously and without fear of potential consequences or backlash.
  • spell sth out The idiom "spell something out" means to explain or describe something in a clear and detailed manner, often emphasizing every aspect or step involved. It implies providing explicit and comprehensive information to ensure complete understanding.
  • spew sth out The idiom "spew sth out" means to forcefully and uncontrollably expel or emit something in a rapid and excessive manner. It often implies that the content being released is unpleasant, excessive, or overwhelming.
  • spin out The idiom "spin out" means to lose control or become uncontrollable, typically in a negative or chaotic manner. It refers to a situation or event that quickly spirals out of control, often leading to undesirable consequences.
  • spin sth out To "spin something out" means to prolong or extend something, often unnecessarily or in an elaborate manner. It is a phrase used to describe the act of making something last longer or using more time than necessary or optimum. This could refer to a conversation, a story, a project, or any situation where someone unnecessarily stretches or drags out the duration or details.
  • spout sth out The idiom "spout sth out" means to speak rapidly or without thinking, often in an impulsive or impetuous manner. It refers to the act of expressing something quickly and forcefully without much consideration or reflection.
  • spread out The idiom "spread out" typically refers to the act of extending or widening something over a larger area or space. It can also describe the act of dispersing people or things widely apart from each other.
  • spread sth out The definition of the idiom "spread something out" is to distribute or arrange something over a larger area or a longer period of time. It can refer to physically extending or placing objects apart from each other, as well as extending the duration or timing of an activity or event.
  • spurt sth out The idiom "spurt sth out" means to say or express something suddenly, forcefully, or in a rapid manner. It usually implies a lack of control or impulsiveness in one's speech or expression.
  • sputter out The idiom "sputter out" refers to the action of losing power, momentum, or effectiveness gradually and eventually coming to an end. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts to describe something losing intensity or failing to reach its intended outcome.
  • sputter sth out The idiom "sputter sth out" means to speak or utter something in a hesitant, stuttering, or fragmented manner. It refers to the act of struggling to articulate words or thoughts, often due to nervousness, lack of confidence, or difficulty finding the right words.
  • stamp sth out The idiom "stamp something out" refers to taking strong actions to eliminate or extinguish something negative or undesirable, often something harmful or dangerous. It conveys the idea of forcefully eradicating a problem or eliminating it completely.
  • stamp sm out The idiom "stamp (something) out" is typically used to mean eradicating or eliminating something, usually referring to a particular negative behavior, problem, or situation. It suggests forcefully and decisively putting an end to something, much like extinguishing a fire by stamping on it.
  • stand out The idiom "stand out" means to be easily noticeable or to distinguish oneself from others because of one's exceptional qualities, abilities, or appearance.
  • start out The idiom "start out" means to begin a particular activity, journey, or process. It refers to the initial stage or the first step taken towards a goal or destination.
  • step out The idiom "step out" has several possible definitions: 1. To leave a place briefly or temporarily, often for a short period of time. Example: "I need to step out for a moment to make a phone call." 2. To take a break or pause from a current activity or situation. Example: "I'm feeling overwhelmed; I think I need to step out of this project for a while." 3. To become more confident or assertive, often by taking risks or venturing into new territory. Example: "She decided it was time to step out of her comfort zone and try something completely different." 4. To accompany someone, often as a partner in a social setting or event. Example: "He asked her
  • play out The idiom "play out" refers to the process of something happening or developing naturally, usually over a period of time, without any particular intervention or control. It can also imply the completion or resolution of a situation or event.
  • straight out The idiom "straight out" typically means to be honest, direct, or blunt with someone, without any hesitation or avoidance of the truth. It implies forthrightness and transparency in communication or actions.
  • stretch out The idiom "stretch out" typically means to extend or elongate something physically or metaphorically. It can also refer to prolonging or expanding an activity or situation.
  • strike out The idiom "strike out" typically means to fail or be unsuccessful in an endeavor, often after multiple attempts or efforts. It can also refer to being unable to achieve a desired goal or result. The phrase is commonly used in sports, particularly baseball, where it refers to a batter failing to hit the ball and being called out by the umpire.
  • price sth out The idiom "price sth out" refers to the act of determining or calculating the cost or value of something, especially in a way that makes it too expensive or unaffordable for someone.
  • suss sm out The idiom "suss someone out" means to observe someone carefully in order to form an opinion or gather information about their true intentions, motives, or character. It refers to the act of analyzing someone's behavior, speech, or actions to gain insights into their true nature or to uncover any hidden aspects.
  • swab sth out The idiom "swab sth out" refers to the act of cleaning or wiping something thoroughly, typically using a swab or cloth. It is often used metaphorically to imply the complete removal or elimination of something, such as a problem, uncertainty, or doubt, from a particular situation or context.
  • sweat sth out To "sweat something out" is an idiom that means to endure a period of uncertainty, anxiety, or difficulty while awaiting the outcome of something. It suggests that during this period, one may experience intense stress, worry, or anticipation. Similar to how sweating is a physical response to stress, "sweating something out" refers to the emotional or psychological strain felt during an uncertain or challenging situation until it is resolved.
  • swell out The idiom "swell out" means to enlarge or expand in size, volume, or prominence. It can refer to physical objects or abstract ideas.
  • switch sth out The idiom "switch something out" refers to replacing or exchanging one thing for another, typically in a situation where there are alternatives or options available. It implies the act of taking out or removing something and substituting it with a different item.
  • talk out The idiom "talk out" means to discuss or resolve a problem or issue through conversation. It involves openly communicating and expressing one's thoughts, feelings, and perspectives in order to find a solution or reach a mutual understanding.
  • rat out The idiom "rat out" means to inform or betray someone, typically by revealing their wrongdoing or secret to an authority figure or person of higher authority in order to avoid getting in trouble oneself.
  • tap out The idiom "tap out" generally means to surrender or give up in a physical or mental sense. It originates from the practice of tapping on someone or something as a sign of submission or defeat, often seen in combat sports.
  • tap sth out The idiomatic expression "tap sth out" generally means to communicate or convey a message or information by tapping on a surface. It can refer to tapping Morse code, using a rhythmic tapping sequence, or any other form of communication through tapping.
  • out The idiom "out" can have multiple definitions depending on the context. Here are a few common definitions: 1. To be publicly revealed or made known: - Example: "The scandalous news is finally out." - Meaning: The information that was previously hidden or secret is now known to everyone. 2. To be eliminated or knocked out of a competition: - Example: "The team was out of the tournament after losing the match." - Meaning: The team or individual is no longer participating in the competition because they lost or were defeated. 3. To be outside or outdoors: - Example: "Let's go out and enjoy the sunny weather." - Meaning: To be outside of a particular place or indoors
  • tear out The idiom "tear out" typically means to remove something quickly and forcefully, as if tearing it away from its original position. It is often used to describe the act of pulling or extracting something with great force and determination.
  • tease out sth The idiomatic expression "tease out something" means to carefully extract or uncover information, details, or hidden meanings by gently or persistently questioning, investigating, or analyzing. It involves unraveling or pulling apart a complex matter or problem to reveal its essential components or underlying truth.
  • tease sth out The idiom "tease something out" means to carefully and persistently draw out information, details, or hidden meaning from someone or something. It involves skillfully uncovering or extracting what is not readily apparent or obvious, often by asking probing questions or engaging in a gradual process of discovery.
  • test sth out The idiom "test sth out" means to try or experiment with something in order to determine its functionality, effectiveness, or suitability, usually before fully committing to it or making a final decision. It involves examining or experiencing something to evaluate its performance or characteristics.
  • thaw out The idiom "thaw out" means to warm up or recover from cold, stiffness, or numbness, either physically or metaphorically.
  • thin out The idiom "thin out" means to become less dense, crowded, or numerous, often by removing or reducing the number of people, objects, or things in a specific area. It can also refer to a reduction in strength, intensity, or volume.
  • thin sth out The idiom "thin something out" refers to the act of reducing or decreasing the thickness, density, or quantity of something. It can be used in various contexts, including physical objects, resources, information, or even crowds. The main idea behind "thin something out" is to make something less thick, dense, crowded, or abundant in order to achieve a desired outcome or improve the situation.
  • think sth out The idiom "think sth out" means to carefully consider or plan something thoroughly before taking any action. It refers to the process of analyzing a situation, weighing all the options, and coming up with a well-thought-out solution or decision.
  • thrash sth out The idiom "thrash sth out" means to discuss or debate something thoroughly and intensely in order to reach a resolution or decision. It implies a vigorous and exhaustive exchange of ideas or opinions to resolve a problem, disagreement, or find a solution.
  • try out The idiom "try out" means to test or experiment with something in order to determine its effectiveness, quality, or suitability. It can also refer to participating in a selection process or audition for a particular role or position.
  • thrust out The definition of the idiom "thrust out" is to forcefully or abruptly extend or push something outwards, usually referring to a part of the body or an object. It can also indicate forcefully expelling someone or something from a place or position.
  • thunder sth out The idiom "thunder something out" means to speak or announce something in a loud and forceful manner. It suggests conveying a message with great conviction and authority, often to the point of being overwhelming or dominating the conversation.
  • time out The idiom "time out" refers to a break or pause taken from an activity or situation in order to relax, reflect, or address a problem or conflict. It can involve temporarily stepping away from a task or conversation to regain composure, reassess a situation, or seek resolution.
  • tire you out The idiom "tire you out" means to exhaust someone physically or mentally, causing them to feel extremely tired or fatigued.
  • tire out The idiom "tire out" means to exhaust someone physically or mentally, making them extremely tired or fatigued.
  • pound sth out The idiom "pound sth out" typically means to work on or produce something with great determination, intensity, or speed, often using force or repeated effort. It can refer to writing, typing, creating music, or any other task requiring physical or mental exertion.
  • tough out The idiom "tough out" means to endure or persevere through a difficult or challenging situation or experience without giving up or losing hope. It often implies staying strong and resilient despite adversity or hardship.
  • trot sth out The idiom "trot sth out" refers to presenting or showcasing something, such as an idea, argument, or object, especially repeatedly or as a routine. It usually suggests that the thing being presented lacks freshness, originality, or relevance, as if it is being displayed excessively or without thoughtful consideration.
  • punch out The idiom "punch out" can have multiple meanings depending on the context: 1. To punch or strike someone with force: This definition is often used in the context of a physical altercation or a boxing match. It implies throwing a powerful punch at someone to knock them out or incapacitate them. 2. To clock out or end one's work shift: This meaning is commonly used in the context of employment. "Punching out" refers to using a time clock or similar device to record the end of one's working hours for the day. 3. To leave or exit abruptly: In a more general sense, "punching out" can mean to leave a place or situation hastily. It suggests a quick and often unexpected departure
  • punch sm out The idiom "punch sm out" typically means to physically strike or knock someone out with a forceful blow, often delivered with a fist. It generally refers to a violent act of defeating or overpowering someone in a fight or conflict.
  • push out The idiom "push out" refers to forcing someone away or removing them from a position, place, or situation. It can also mean to produce or release something, often in large quantities or quickly.
  • tune out The idiom "tune out" means to ignore or mentally disconnect from one's surroundings or from someone's message or information. It can refer to deliberately avoiding paying attention or becoming disinterested and unresponsive.
  • type sth out The idiom "type something out" means to write or enter information on a keyboard, typically using a computer or typewriter, in order to create a document or record. It involves reproducing text or data by typing it manually.
  • vacuum sth out The idiom "vacuum something out" means to remove unwanted or dirty material from a container or space using a vacuum cleaner. It is often used in the context of cleaning or tidying up, specifically referring to the act of using a vacuum cleaner to eliminate dust, dirt, or debris from an area.
  • puff out The idiom "puff out" means to become swollen, inflated, or enlarged, typically in a sudden or exaggerated manner.
  • puff sth out The idiom "puff sth out" typically means to forcefully exhale air or blow forcefully in order to extinguish a flame or disperse smoke. Figuratively, it can also mean to make something appear larger, fuller, or more impressive, often through exaggeration or boastfulness.
  • vegged out The idiom "vegged out" refers to a state of extreme relaxation or inactivity, often with a connotation of mindless indulgence or laziness. It suggests spending time idly, without any major physical or mental exertion, usually for pure relaxation or entertainment purposes.
  • veg out The idiom "veg out" refers to the act of engaging in a state of extreme relaxation or idleness, often by doing nothing or indulging in passive activities like watching television, lounging, or daydreaming. It implies a sense of disengagement from one's surroundings and a complete surrender to leisure and laziness.
  • vomit sth out The idiom "vomit sth out" means to express or divulge something hastily, without much thought or consideration. It refers to the act of abruptly and forcefully releasing information or ideas, often in an unorganized or chaotic manner. It suggests a lack of control or refinement in communication or expression.
  • wait sb out To "wait sb out" is an idiomatic expression that means to outlast, endure, or persist until someone surrenders, gives up, or changes their position. It implies staying patient and resolute until the other person or party relents or becomes disheartened.
  • wait sth out The idiom "wait something out" means to remain patient and endure a difficult or challenging situation until it naturally resolves on its own, rather than actively trying to solve or change it. It implies a sense of patience and persistence, waiting for a favorable outcome to occur without taking immediate action.
  • walk out The idiom "walk out" means to leave or exit a place abruptly, typically as a sign of protest, dissatisfaction, or disagreement. It implies a deliberate action of rejecting a situation or refusing to continue participating in it.
  • walk sm out The idiom "walk someone out" means to accompany or guide someone as they leave a place, typically out of respect, courtesy, or to ensure their safety. It often implies providing assistance or protection until the person reaches their desired destination.
  • want out The idiom "want out" typically refers to desiring or seeking an escape or exit from a particular situation, relationship, agreement, or commitment. It implies a strong desire to be free from something that one no longer finds fulfilling, satisfying, or beneficial.
  • wash out The idiom "wash out" means to cause someone or something to fail or be unsuccessful, or to be rained out or cancelled due to bad weather.
  • wash sth out The idiom "wash something out" has several meanings depending on the context, here are the most common definitions: 1. To remove or dilute the color or intensity of something using water or a liquid. For example: - The heavy rain washed out the colors of the painting. - Be careful not to wash out the dyes on your new shirt. 2. To cancel or ruin an event or plan, usually due to bad weather or other unforeseen circumstances. For example: - The storm washed out the picnic, so we stayed indoors. - The concert was washed out because of the torrential downpour. 3. In film or photography, to remove details or the ability to see something clearly due to excessive brightness or overexposure.
  • rain sth out The idiom "rain something out" refers to an event or activity getting canceled or disrupted due to heavy rain or inclement weather.
  • watch out The idiom "watch out" is a phrase used as a warning or cautionary statement, advising someone to be careful or vigilant in a particular situation to avoid potential danger or harm.
  • way out The idiom "way out" typically refers to a possible solution or exit strategy from a difficult or challenging situation. It implies finding a path or means to escape or resolve a predicament. It can also be interpreted as finding an alternative or unconventional approach to a problem.
  • wear out The definition of the idiom "wear out" is to become exhausted, fatigued, or physically tired after strenuous activity. It can also refer to the process of using something to the point where it becomes no longer functional, usable, or in good condition.
  • wear sb out The idiom "wear sb out" means to exhaust someone physically or mentally, often through repeated or prolonged activity or demands. It refers to the state of becoming extremely tired, worn out, or fatigued due to excessive effort or exertion.
  • wear sth out The idiom "wear something out" means to exhaust, tire, or use something to the point where it becomes worn, damaged, or unusable. It can also refer to using up the energy or strength of someone by making them work, exercise, or engage in physical activity to the point of exhaustion.
  • wear sm out The idiom "wear someone out" means to cause someone to become extremely tired or exhausted, either mentally or physically, through prolonged exertion, activity, or stress. It implies pushing someone to their limits, rendering them completely drained.
  • weird out The idiom "weird out" means to feel or make someone feel uncomfortable, confused, or disturbed due to something unusual, strange, or unexpected. It often indicates a feeling of unease or being out of one's comfort zone.
  • well out The idiom "well out" typically means to extend or expand fully or prominently. It is often used to describe something spreading or protruding in a noticeable manner.
  • out West The idiom "out West" typically refers to the western region of a country, usually the United States. It can represent areas that are more rural, less populated, and often associated with open landscapes, cowboy culture, or a sense of adventure. The exact connotation may vary based on the context in which it is used.
  • whine sth out The idiom "whine something out" means to complain or express dissatisfaction in a prolonged, whining manner. It implies that someone is repeatedly voicing their grievances or annoyances, often in a complaining or whining tone.
  • whip sth out To "whip something out" means to quickly and effortlessly take out or produce something, often from a pocket or a bag. It implies a swift and efficient action, often done without much thought or preparation.
  • wig out The idiom "wig out" means to become extremely or irrationally upset, anxious, or agitated, often in an exaggerated or dramatic manner. It can also refer to behaving in a strange or wild manner due to intense emotions or drug-induced states.
  • win out The definition of the idiom "win out" is to ultimately prevail or succeed, especially after a prolonged or difficult struggle. It refers to the idea of achieving victory or achieving one's desired outcome despite challenges or obstacles faced along the way.
  • out the window The idiom "out the window" means to discard, abandon, or disregard something, often used to describe a situation where plans, expectations, or norms are no longer valid or relevant. It suggests that something once considered important or significant is now eliminated or no longer applicable.
  • try one's wings (out) The idiom "try one's wings (out)" means to attempt or explore something new or unfamiliar to gain experience or test one's capabilities in a particular field or area. It often involves taking risks and stepping out of one's comfort zone in order to grow and develop skills.
  • wipe out The idiom "wipe out" means to destroy or eliminate something completely, usually referring to something physical or tangible. It can also refer to causing someone to experience a significant loss or failure, both financially or personally.
  • wipe sth out The idiom "wipe sth out" means to completely eliminate or destroy something, often resulting in its disappearance or annihilation. It implies a rapid and thorough destruction or removal that leaves nothing or very little behind.
  • wipe sm out The idiom "wipe someone out" typically means to completely exhaust or deplete someone's energy, resources, or assets. It can also refer to causing someone's complete destruction or ruin.
  • work out The idiom "work out" has multiple definitions, depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To exercise or engage in physical activity for physical fitness or training. 2. To solve or find a solution for a problem or challenge. 3. To develop or progress in a successful manner. 4. To understand or figure out something that was previously unclear or confusing. 5. To end in a specific way, usually regarding a result or outcome. 6. To establish or maintain a satisfactory relationship or agreement. 7. To calculate or compute something, often related to numbers or equations.
  • work sth out (with sm) To "work something out with someone" means to discuss and find a solution or agreement to a problem or issue by collaborating with that person. It implies that both parties are actively involved in finding a resolution through communication and compromise.
  • write sth out To "write something out" means to transcribe or copy something in a written form, often in order to make it more organized or official. It can also refer to fully elaborating or expressing ideas or thoughts in writing.
  • yell out The idiom "yell out" means to shout or speak loudly, often in a sudden or involuntary manner.
  • zoom out The idiom "zoom out" typically refers to mentally or figuratively stepping back from a situation or focusing on the bigger picture. It means to gain a wider perspective or broader understanding of a situation, issue, or concept. It implies the act of distancing oneself from the details or immediate concerns in order to see the larger context and make more informed decisions or judgments.
  • read out The idiom "read out" means to speak aloud or recite something, typically in a clear and audible manner. It can refer to reading a text, list, or document aloud, often for others to hear and understand. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone exposing or revealing concealed information or secrets.
  • plan sth out The idiom "plan something out" means to carefully and thoroughly organize or arrange a specific activity, event, or project by outlining the details, steps, or strategies in advance. It implies a deliberate and thoughtful approach to creating a thoughtful and well-structured plan.
  • plot sth out To plot something out means to carefully plan or organize the details and sequence of events of something, especially a complex project or a story. It involves breaking down the different components or steps and arranging them in a logical and coherent manner. This idiom can be used in various contexts, such as planning a business strategy, outlining a book or film plot, or organizing a series of tasks for a project.
  • rank sm (out) The idiom "rank sm (out)" typically means to eliminate or completely eradicate something, especially something that is problematic, undesirable, or unhealthy.
  • pad out The idiom "pad out" means to add irrelevant or unnecessary content to something, usually a piece of writing or a speech, in order to make it longer or fill in empty spaces. It is often used when someone wants to reach a specific word count or time limit but lacks substantial information or substance.
  • pad sth out To "pad something out" means to add unnecessary or excess material or information to make it seem longer, fuller, or more substantial than it actually is. It can refer to adding extra words to a piece of writing, filling in gaps in a conversation with irrelevant chatter, or including more details or explanations than are needed in a story or presentation. The purpose is to artificially extend or enhance something without adding value or substance.
  • rack out To "rack out" is an informal idiom that means to go to sleep or take a nap, usually for a longer period of time. It implies a complete or deep sleep, often used in casual or slang contexts.
  • pass out The idiom "pass out" has multiple meanings: 1. To lose consciousness or faint due to extreme tiredness, illness, or intoxication. Example: After working for 24 hours straight, he nearly passed out from exhaustion. 2. To distribute or hand out something to a group of people. Example: She passed out the flyers to everyone at the meeting. 3. To graduate or complete a course of study successfully. Example: She passed out of college with honors. 4. To distribute or circulate information or news to a wider audience. Example: The news of their engagement quickly passed out among their friends and family. 5. To distribute or release something, often referring to gas or odors. Example: The bakery's delicious smell
  • pick out The idiom "pick out" means to choose or select something/someone from a group or collection.
  • peek out The idiom "peek out" means to surreptitiously or briefly look or glance at something from a hidden or partially hidden position. It implies a quick and usually secretive observation, often with the intention of not being noticed by others.
  • point out The idiom "point out" refers to the act of indicating, drawing attention to, or highlighting something or someone, usually in a specific or precise manner. It involves directing someone's focus or making them aware of something by physically or verbally indicating its presence or significance.
  • pay out The idiom "pay out" typically refers to the act of giving or spending money, often in the form of a settlement, compensation, or a payout for a service, investment, or winning. It can also mean to distribute or disburse funds that are owed.
  • pull the rug out The idiom "pull the rug out" means to suddenly and completely remove or undermine someone's support, security, or stability, often leaving them in a difficult or vulnerable position. It suggests an unexpected and disruptive action that can have significant consequences.
  • pull out The idiom "pull out" can have multiple meanings, but the most common definition is: - To physically remove or extract something from a specific location or situation. - To withdraw or retreat from a commitment, activity, or situation. - In a military context, it refers to the act of removing troops or forces from a certain area or ending a military operation. - In a personal or romantic context, it can refer to the act of ending a relationship or withdrawing emotionally from someone.
  • reach out The idiom "reach out" typically means to make contact or communicate with someone, usually with the intention of offering help, support, or establishing a connection. It can also imply a gesture of seeking assistance, guidance, or collaboration from others.
  • pan out The idiom "pan out" refers to the outcome or result of something, usually a plan or a situation. It means to develop or unfold in a certain way, typically in a positive or successful manner.
  • peel out The idiom "peel out" typically means to accelerate suddenly and aggressively while driving a vehicle, causing the tires to spin and make a screeching sound, leaving skid marks on the road. It can also figuratively refer to starting or moving quickly and forcefully in any situation.
  • puzzle sth out Definition: The idiom "puzzle something out" means to solve or figure out a complex or confusing problem, situation, or mystery by carefully considering and analyzing the available information or clues. It refers to the act of using one's intellect and ingenuity to understand or unravel something that initially seems perplexing or difficult.
  • paint sth out The idiom "paint sth out" means to cover or obscure something, particularly by using paint. It refers to the act of concealing an object, image, or information by painting over it completely so that it is no longer visible or identifiable.
  • print sth out The definition of the idiom "print something out" is to produce a physical copy of a document or image by using a printer.
  • psych out The idiom "psych out" refers to the act of using psychological tactics or tricks to manipulate or intimidate someone, usually with the aim of making them doubt themselves, lose focus, or become anxious or uncertain.
  • psych sm out "Psyching someone out" is an idiomatic expression that means to engage in psychological tactics or strategies to unsettle or intimidate someone, often for the purpose of gaining an advantage or affecting their performance negatively. It refers to using mind games, manipulation, or mental pressure to disrupt, distract, or confuse another person.
  • peg out The idiom "peg out" means to die or to pass away.
  • peter out The idiom "peter out" refers to the gradual decline or diminishing of something until it completely comes to an end or fades away. It typically describes a situation, activity, or even a person losing momentum, energy, or interest and becoming less and less successful or effective over time.
  • tough sth out The idiom "tough something out" means to endure or persist through a difficult situation, even if it is uncomfortable or challenging. It implies remaining strong and determined in the face of adversity, rather than giving up or surrendering.
  • spaz out The idiom "spaz out" refers to an instance where someone loses control over their emotions or actions, usually resulting in chaotic or erratic behavior. It implies a sudden, exaggerated, and uncontrolled reaction or display of strong emotions such as anger, excitement, panic, or frustration.
  • peal out The idiom "peal out" refers to the act of accelerating quickly and forcefully in a vehicle, often accompanied by screeching tires and a loud noise.
  • see sb out The idiom "see sb out" refers to the act of accompanying someone to the door or exit of a place when they are leaving. It denotes the act of bidding farewell and ensuring that the person safely leaves the location.
  • serve sth out To "serve something out" typically means to distribute or dispense something, especially in a fair or orderly manner. It can refer to serving food, drinks, or other items.
  • talk sth out The idiom "talk something out" means to discuss or negotiate a problem, disagreement, or issue in order to find a resolution or reach a mutual understanding. It implies a process of open communication and dialogue in order to address and resolve any conflicts or concerns.
  • pig out The idiom "pig out" means to eat excessively and in a greedy or indulgent manner. It is often used to describe someone who consumes a large amount of food without restraint or consideration for moderation.
  • pass sth out (to sm) The idiom "pass sth out (to sm)" means to distribute or hand out something to someone. It can refer to a physical distribution of items, such as handing out papers or objects, or it can also be used metaphorically to describe sharing information or giving something to another person.
  • pay sth out (to sm) The idiom "pay sth out (to sm)" typically means to give or distribute a sum of money to someone as payment or compensation for something. It implies the act of settling a financial obligation or fulfilling a contractual agreement by providing the agreed-upon amount to the recipient.
  • pay sth out The idiom "pay sth out" generally refers to the act of disbursing or dispensing money or other resources, especially as part of a payment or settlement. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of expressing or venting emotions, often in a negative or destructive manner.
  • play sth out The idiom "play something out" refers to carrying out or allowing a situation or event to develop naturally without interference or interruption. It suggests allowing events to unfold without actively manipulating or controlling them.
  • punk out The idiom "punk out" means to back down or withdraw from a challenging or threatening situation due to fear, lack of courage, or insecurity. It implies a failure to follow through on a commitment or to stand up for oneself.
  • rasp sth out The idiom "rasp sth out" typically means to say or speak something in a harsh, rough, or strained manner, often suggesting anger, frustration, or annoyance. It conveys the idea of speaking forcefully or with a grating voice.
  • ream sth out The idiom "ream something out" means to forcefully clean, clear, or remove something, typically a tube, pipe, or container, by scraping, flushing, or washing away unwanted material or clogs. It can also metaphorically refer to thoroughly criticizing or reprimanding someone for their actions or behavior.
  • phase out The idiom "phase out" means to gradually eliminate or reduce something over time, usually in a planned or systematic manner. It implies a gradual transition or removal of something, often to replace it with an alternative or more modern version.
  • puzzle out The idiom "puzzle out" means to solve or figure out a complex or challenging problem or situation using one's intellect, reasoning, or analytical skills. It refers to the act of unraveling a perplexing situation or finding a solution through careful thought and analysis.
  • write out The idiom "write out" can have different meanings depending on the context, but it generally means to put something into written form or to transcribe information. It can also refer to completing a written assignment or writing something in a comprehensive and detailed manner.
  • put out The idiom "put out" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are some common definitions: 1. To extinguish or turn off a fire or flame. Example: "Please put out the candles before leaving the room." 2. To publish or release something, typically a newspaper, magazine, or book. Example: "The magazine will put out its latest issue next week." 3. To make an effort or expend energy towards completing a task or request. Example: "He put out a lot of effort to meet the deadline." 4. To inconvenience or bother someone. Example: "I don't want to put you out, but could you drive me to the airport?" 5. To cause someone to feel upset, annoyed, or
  • wimp out The idiom "wimp out" refers to the act of backing down or chickening out from a difficult or challenging situation due to fear, lack of courage, or a lack of confidence. It implies a person's unwillingness to face adversity or take risks.
  • prove out The idiom "prove out" can have a few different meanings depending on the context, but generally, it refers to the act of verifying or confirming something through testing, evidence, or practical experience. It often implies the need to demonstrate the effectiveness, viability, or truthfulness of a concept, hypothesis, or plan by putting it into action and evaluating the outcome.
  • pound out The idiom "pound out" typically means to produce something with force, energy, or intensity, often referring to repetitive or vigorous action. It can also imply persistently working on or solving something until it is completed or resolved.
  • wait out The idiom "wait out" means to stay in a place or situation until it is over or resolved, often implying a sense of patience or endurance in waiting for a desired outcome or result. It involves remaining patient and withstanding a period of time to achieve a specific goal or to navigate through a difficult situation.
  • vote out The idiom "vote out" refers to the act of removing someone from a particular position or organization through a voting process, typically due to dissatisfaction or lack of support for their actions or performance. It implies the democratic process of taking a vote to decide whether to dismiss someone from their current position.
  • top out The idiom "top out" refers to reaching the highest level or point of something, often in terms of achievement or completion. It can also mean reaching the maximum limit or capacity of a particular situation or circumstance.
  • paint out The idiom "paint out" generally refers to the process of removing or covering up something, usually through painting. It can be used both literally and figuratively. Literally, it can mean to eliminate or conceal paint marks or mistakes by painting over them. Figuratively, it can imply the act of erasing, deleting, or eliminating something unwanted or unnecessary, often to improve or refine a particular situation or outcome.
  • out one's way The idiom "out one's way" typically means to go or stay out of someone's path or not obstruct their movements or plans. It can also imply not interfering or causing inconvenience to someone.
  • out there The idiom "out there" typically refers to something or someone that is unconventional, unique, unusual, or eccentric. It can also imply that something is beyond the boundaries of what is considered normal or mainstream.
  • turf out The idiom "turf out" means to forcefully remove or expel someone or something from a place or position, often involving eviction or removal by force. It is typically used to describe situations where someone is forced out against their will or abruptly removed from a place they consider their own.
  • rout out The idiom "rout out" means to forcefully find or discover someone or something that is concealed, hidden, or difficult to locate. It often implies a thorough or extensive search, often with the intention of removing or dealing with something undesirable.
  • reel out The idiom "reel out" typically refers to the action of extending or unwinding something rapidly and continuously, often with a spinning or rotating motion. It can also mean to deliver or express something smoothly and effortlessly, such as a long speech or a series of ideas or information.
  • rule out The idiom "rule out" means to eliminate or exclude the possibility of something or someone. It refers to the act of deciding or determining that a particular option, choice, or potential cause is not valid or suitable.
  • salt out The idiom "salt out" refers to the process of removing or extracting something valuable from a mixture or solution. This phrase is often used in the context of chemistry or practical applications where salt is used to separate or isolate a desired substance from a mixture. In a broader sense, it can also represent the act of identifying and focusing on what is important or necessary in a complex situation or problem.
  • shell out The idiom "shell out" means to spend or pay a significant amount of money, often reluctantly or unwillingly. It implies the idea of someone parting with money or paying a sum of money, usually for an expense or goods/services.
  • ship out The idiom "ship out" means to send someone or something away or to depart or leave a place, especially for a significant period of time or permanently. It can also refer to sending goods or products to be delivered to customers or different locations.
  • sort out The idiom "sort out" means to resolve or solve a problem or issue, often by organizing or arranging things in a proper or orderly manner. It can also refer to clarifying or understanding a situation or finding a solution to a conflict.
  • spell out The idiom "spell out" means to explain something in a clear and detailed manner, providing all the necessary information and making sure it is easily understandable. It implies the act of providing explicit instructions or stating something explicitly and leaving no room for misunderstanding.
  • spy out The idiom "spy out" refers to closely observing or gathering secret information about something or someone with the intention of gathering intelligence or gaining insight. It involves discreetly and often covertly investigating or monitoring a situation to obtain crucial details or knowledge.
  • stamp out To "stamp out" is an idiom that means to completely eliminate or put an end to something, typically referring to undesirable or harmful activities, behaviors, or practices. It involves taking decisive and effective actions to eradicate or suppress a problem or a negative occurrence.
  • stop out The idiom "stop out" typically means to temporarily cease participating or attending a certain activity or event, especially in an educational context. It often refers to a student who takes a break from their studies or interrupts their education for a period of time before returning to it later.
  • sue out The idiom "sue out" refers to the legal process of initiating a lawsuit or legal action against someone or something. It implies taking legal steps, such as filing a lawsuit or issuing a legal claim, to seek justice or resolve a dispute through the court system.
  • swap out The idiom "swap out" means to replace or exchange something with another thing. It often refers to replacing one component, part, or object for another in various contexts, such as technology, machinery, or personal belongings.
  • sweat out The idiom "sweat out" has several definitions depending on the context: 1. To endure or persist through a difficult or challenging situation, often involving stress or anxiety. Example: "He had to sweat out the final exam to pass the course." 2. To wait nervously or anxiously for something to happen. Example: "They were sweating out the election results, hoping their candidate would win." 3. To cleanse the body by engaging in vigorous or intense physical activity. Example: "After a long day at work, he went to the gym to sweat out his stress." 4. To eliminate toxins or substances by sweating, often referring to substances such as alcohol or drugs. Example: "He went to the sauna to sweat out
  • take out The idiom "take out" has multiple meanings depending on the context: 1. To remove or extract: It refers to physically removing something from a container, a group, or a particular location. For example, "Please take out the trash" means to remove the trash from inside the house and place it outside for disposal. 2. To buy or order food from a restaurant or fast food establishment with the intention of consuming it away from the premises: For instance, "Let's take out pizza for dinner" means to order pizza from a restaurant but not eat it there. Instead, it would be taken home or to another place to consume. 3. To kill or eliminate, often in a violent manner: This meaning is used more figur
  • thrash out The idiom "thrash out" typically means to discuss or debate a topic or issue vigorously and thoroughly in order to reach a resolution or agreement. It implies a process of hashing out ideas, opinions, or arguments through intense dialogue or negotiation until a decision or solution is reached.
  • thresh out The idiom "thresh out" means to discuss, debate, or clarify a matter thoroughly in order to reach a resolution or understanding. It involves carefully examining different points of view, arguments, or details related to a particular topic or issue.
  • trot out The idiom "trot out" refers to presenting something or someone in a predictable or habitual manner, often without much enthusiasm or sincerity. It implies that the thing or person being presented is not particularly new, fresh, or impressive, but is instead recycled or repeatedly used.
  • wear off, out The idiom "wear off, out" is used to describe the gradual diminishing or disappearance of a particular effect or feeling over time, usually due to prolonged use, exposure, or exhaustion. It implies that something loses its initial impact, intensity, or effectiveness as time passes.
  • tired out The idiom "tired out" means to be completely exhausted or extremely fatigued due to physical or mental exertion.
  • brave out The idiom "brave out" means to endure or face a difficult or challenging situation with courage and determination, often despite feeling fear or uncertainty. It involves staying strong, not giving in to pressure or despair, and confronting the circumstances head-on.
  • puzzle out sth The idiom "puzzle out something" means to solve or figure out something that is difficult, confusing, or unclear, typically through careful thinking, analysis, or investigation. It implies trying to understand or find a solution to a problem or mystery.
  • stub out sth The idiom "stub out sth" refers to the act of extinguishing or squashing something, particularly a cigarette or any type of smoking material, by pressing its lit end against a surface until the burning tip is stopped.
  • elbow sm out of sth and elbow sm out The idiom "elbow someone out of something" or "elbow someone out" means to forcefully push, jostle, or maneuver someone out of a position or opportunity, often in order to secure that position or opportunity for oneself. It conveys the idea of using one's physical or metaphorical elbows to assert dominance or gain an advantage over someone else.
  • frighten, scare, etc. the (living) daylights out of sb The idiom "frighten, scare, etc. the (living) daylights out of someone" means to cause someone extreme fear, panic, or terror. It implies that the person becomes so frightened that it feels as if their very life force or "daylights" have been completely drained or depleted. This expression is used to emphasize the intensity or severity of someone's fear-inducing actions or events.
  • kick out of The idiom "kick out of" typically means to force or make someone leave or be expelled from a place, group, or situation. It implies being removed or dismissed often due to misbehavior, non-compliance, or a lack of suitability.
  • go out for (something) The idiom "go out for (something)" means to participate in a particular activity or event, usually involving competition, by making an effort or attempting to achieve a desired outcome. It commonly refers to trying out or auditioning for a sports team, a performance, a job, or a specific role.
  • think the sun shines out arse The idiom "think the sun shines out arse" is typically used to describe someone who has an extremely high opinion of themselves and believes they can do no wrong. It implies that the person is incredibly self-centered and thinks they are superior to others, resulting in a significant level of arrogance and conceit.
  • get out of a fix The idiom "get out of a fix" means to find a solution or way to escape from a difficult or challenging situation. It implies successfully resolving a predicament or getting oneself out of trouble.
  • make sth up out of whole cloth The idiom "make something up out of whole cloth" means to create or fabricate something entirely from scratch, without any basis in truth or reality. It refers to the act of inventing or concocting a story, information, or an explanation without any factual basis.
  • coming out of (one's) ears The idiom "coming out of (one's) ears" refers to an overwhelming or excessive quantity of something. It suggests that there is such an abundance or surplus that it seems to be overflowing, extending beyond the normal limits or expectations.
  • turn sm or sth inside out The idiom "turn someone or something inside out" means to thoroughly search or scrutinize someone or something in a detailed, intensive manner. It implies the act of examining something or someone very carefully and meticulously, often with the intention of finding hidden information or uncovering the truth.
  • come out at an amount The idiom "come out at an amount" refers to the final result or total value of something, typically money, after all calculations or considerations have been made. It denotes the eventual figure or specific amount that is determined through analysis or examination.
  • gouge sth out of sth The idiom "gouge sth out of sth" refers to forcefully extracting or obtaining something from someone or something, often by unfair or excessive means. It implies using aggressive or deceitful tactics to acquire what is desired.
  • spy out the land The idiom "spy out the land" means to gather information or conduct reconnaissance to learn about a situation, place, or people before making decisions or taking action. It implies the act of carefully and discreetly observing, investigating, or exploring to acquire knowledge or assess the circumstances, typically to make informed judgments or plans.
  • out at the heels The idiom "out at the heels" refers to someone who appears shabby, worn-out, or in poor condition. It typically describes someone who is lacking in resources, living in poverty, or experiencing a decline in their social or financial status. The phrase originates from the image of worn-down shoes, particularly at the heels, as an outward sign of someone's impoverished or neglected state.
  • come out for (someone or something) The idiom "come out for (someone or something)" means to publicly express support or endorse someone or something, typically by making a statement or taking a stance in favor of them. It can also refer to attending an event or gathering in support of a person or cause.
  • come out smelling like a rose The idiom "come out smelling like a rose" means to emerge from a difficult or challenging situation or controversy with a positive outcome, reputation, or perception, often despite initially negative circumstances. It implies that someone successfully navigated a potentially damaging or compromising situation and emerged unscathed or even benefiting from it.
  • storm out of the blocks The idiom "storm out of the blocks" typically refers to someone starting or acting quickly and energetically, often with a strong and impressive performance. This phrase is derived from athletics, specifically track and field events, where "storming out of the blocks" describes an athlete starting the race explosively and gaining an early lead over their competitors.
  • chart something out (for someone or something) The idiom "chart something out (for someone or something)" refers to the act of planning, organizing, or outlining something in a systematic or detailed manner, typically in a visual or written form, to help guide or provide guidance to someone or something. It involves creating a thorough plan or strategy, often depicted using charts, diagrams, or written explanations, to offer a clear understanding of how to proceed or achieve a particular goal. The idiom can also imply providing a roadmap or a step-by-step guide to assist someone or something in reaching their intended outcome or objective.
  • out of line The idiom "out of line" refers to someone behaving inappropriately or not following accepted norms or rules. It can also imply someone overstepping boundaries or going beyond what is considered acceptable or expected in a given situation.
  • pour out soul The idiom "pour out soul" refers to expressing one's deep emotions, feelings, or thoughts openly and honestly, often to another person or through writing or art. It conveys the act of revealing one's innermost self, usually without holding back or concealing anything.
  • crush sth out of sm or sth The idiom "crush something out of someone or something" means to forcefully extract or obtain something from someone or something. It often implies using pressure or coercion to obtain a desired outcome or information.
  • drop out (of sth) The idiom "drop out (of sth)" refers to the act of withdrawing or quitting something, typically an activity, course, or organization, before it is completed or finished. It can involve discontinuing participation or membership due to various reasons such as lack of interest, inability to cope, or a change in priorities.
  • couldn't act (one's) way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't act (one's) way out of a paper bag" typically refers to someone's lack of acting ability or talent. It suggests that a person is so inept or unskilled in acting that they would not be able to convincingly portray a character, even if it was as simple as acting their way out of a paper bag.
  • act Out The idiom "act out" generally refers to the behavior of someone expressing their feelings or emotions in a dramatic or exaggerated manner, often in an inappropriate manner. It can also imply someone actually physically performing or reenacting a situation or event.
  • be out of (one's) skull The idiom "be out of (one's) skull" means to be completely crazy, insane, or mentally unstable. It suggests a state of mind where someone is not in touch with reality or is behaving in a highly irrational manner.
  • get sth out of the way The idiom "get something out of the way" means to complete or address a task or obligation quickly and efficiently, so that it is no longer a potential hindrance or distraction. It refers to the act of finishing something promptly in order to move on to more important or enjoyable activities.
  • hear sm out The idiom "hear someone out" means to listen carefully and fully to what someone has to say, without interrupting or forming judgments or opinions prematurely. It implies giving someone a fair chance to express their thoughts, ideas, concerns, or grievances.
  • argue way out of The idiom "argue way out of" means to use persuasive or logical reasoning to avoid or escape a difficult or challenging situation or to avoid taking responsibility for something. It implies that the person is skilled at presenting their case in an argumentative manner to justify their actions or opinions, often counteracting any opposing viewpoints or accusations.
  • get a kick out of The idiom "get a kick out of" means to derive amusement, pleasure, or enjoyment from something. It implies finding something entertaining, exciting, or pleasurable.
  • bring out The idiom "bring out" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To reveal or emphasize a certain quality or characteristic of someone or something. Example: "Her new haircut really brings out the color of her eyes." This means the haircut makes her eye color stand out or become more noticeable. 2. To introduce or launch a new product, publication, or item to the public. Example: "The company plans to bring out a new line of smartphones next month." This means the company is going to release or make available the new smartphones. 3. To encourage or motivate someone to act or express themselves in a particular way. Example: "The passionate speech brought out the patriotism in the crowd."
  • be knocked out cold The idiom "be knocked out cold" means to be rendered unconscious, usually by a blow to the head, to the point where one loses awareness, consciousness, or control over their body.
  • knock oneself out (to do something) (for someone or something) The idiom "knock oneself out (to do something) (for someone or something)" means to put in a great deal of effort or work very hard to achieve or accomplish something, often for the benefit or satisfaction of someone else or a particular cause. This expression implies going to great lengths or pushing oneself to the limit in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • in (or out of) play The idiom "in (or out of) play" refers to an object or situation being actively involved or excluded from a particular game, process, or activity. It suggests that something is either relevant, available, or being considered, or that it is irrelevant, unavailable, or not being considered. It can be used in various contexts, including sports, business, or everyday conversations.
  • burst out The idiom "burst out" is used to describe the sudden eruption or release of emotions, laughter, or sound. It refers to a spontaneous, often uncontrollable, expression that happens abruptly and forcefully.
  • out of earshot The idiom "out of earshot" refers to something being far enough away that it cannot be heard or overheard. It implies that the distance between the speaker and the subject is enough to ensure privacy or secrecy.
  • fagged out The idiom "fagged out" is used to describe a state of extreme exhaustion or fatigue. It refers to being completely drained of energy or physically worn out, often after a period of intense physical or mental activity.
  • throw out sth The idiom "throw out something" means to discard, get rid of, or dispose of something, typically because it is no longer useful, valuable, or relevant.
  • swear sth out against sm The idiom "swear something out against someone" refers to the act of making a formal legal declaration or accusation against someone. It involves providing a sworn statement or testimony, often in a court of law, in which one accuses another person of wrongdoing or a crime.
  • knock sb out The idiom "knock sb out" typically means to render someone unconscious or to surprise, astonish, or impress someone greatly.
  • be out of (one's) face The idiom "be out of (one's) face" typically refers to being under the influence of drugs or excessively intoxicated. It suggests that someone's mind or behavior is altered to an extreme degree due to the influence of substances, rendering them unable to think clearly or act responsibly.
  • bang out The idiom "bang out" refers to the act of quickly and skillfully producing or completing something, typically involving a creative or artistic endeavor. It implies a sense of energy, speed, and efficiency in the process of creating or accomplishing a task.
  • fill out sth The idiom "fill out something" means to complete or provide missing information on a form, questionnaire, or document by adding the necessary details. It refers to the action of filling in all the required fields or sections on a written or electronic form to ensure it is complete and accurate.
  • laugh sth/sb out of court The idiom "laugh something/someone out of court" means to dismiss or reject something or someone in a humorous or mocking manner, usually because they are considered ridiculous or lacking credibility. It is commonly used when a person's argument, claim, or assertion is so absurd or weak that it is met with laughter or mockery instead of serious consideration.
  • flush someone or something out of some place The idiom "flush someone or something out of some place" means to force someone or something to leave a certain place by utilizing tactics or strategies to locate and expel them. It refers to the act of revealing or locating someone or something that is hiding, concealing, or residing in a specific location and making them come out into the open.
  • cut out for sth The idiom "cut out for sth" means being suitable or naturally inclined for a particular task, occupation, or role. It implies that a person has the necessary skills, qualities, or abilities to excel at something or to handle a specific situation.
  • fork something out The idiom "fork something out" means to reluctantly or unwillingly pay money, often a large amount, for something. It implies that the person paying feels that the cost is excessive or unreasonable.
  • chew sm out The idiom "chew someone out" typically means to scold, admonish, or reprimand someone strongly and angrily. It refers to a forceful and intense verbal expression of disapproval towards another person's actions or behavior.
  • trample sth out The idiom "trample sth out" typically means to extinguish or suppress something forcefully or completely, often through force, determination, or sheer power. This can refer to putting an end to an idea, argument, or opposition, or eradicating a problem, conflict, or rebellion. It implies a forceful, dominant action that eliminates or overpowers something.
  • burn (oneself) out The idiom "burn (oneself) out" refers to the state of physical, mental, or emotional exhaustion due to overwork, stress, or excessive involvement in a particular activity or role. It describes a condition where an individual's energy, motivation, and passion wane as a result of prolonged and intense effort. The idiom suggests that one's internal fire, drive, or ability to function effectively has been diminished or extinguished, leaving them feeling depleted and unable to continue at the same level.
  • come out at The idiom "come out at" means to achieve a particular result or outcome after going through a process, especially when it is unexpected or uncertain. It refers to the idea of finally reaching a conclusion or destination, often with the implication of overcoming challenges or difficulties along the way.
  • slink out (of sm place) The idiom "slink out (of sm place)" means to leave a place quietly and secretly, trying to go unnoticed. It implies a sense of sneaking or creeping away without drawing attention or attracting any notice.
  • get out from under (someone or something) The idiom "get out from under (someone or something)" means to free oneself from the control, influence, or burden imposed by someone or something. It implies escaping a situation or relationship that is restrictive, oppressive, overwhelming, or difficult to bear.
  • make capital out of sth The idiom "make capital out of sth" typically means to exploit or take advantage of something, especially for personal gain or to achieve a desired outcome. It can also refer to making the most of a situation by using it as a means of gaining attention, support, or profit.
  • I spoke out of turn. The idiom "I spoke out of turn" means to say something that you should not have said, especially at an inappropriate or unexpected moment. It implies that the person spoke before it was their turn to do so, violating the established order or social norms of the conversation or situation.
  • bust someone out of somewhere The idiom "bust someone out of somewhere" refers to the act of forcibly freeing or rescuing someone from a place, usually against their will or in a covert manner. It implies a clandestine operation or an escape plan to liberate someone from a captivity or confinement situation, such as from prison, a hostage situation, or any other location where they are being held against their wishes.
  • hit out (for sth or sm place) The idiom "hit out (for sth or someplace)" means to set off or embark on a journey or trip towards a specific destination or goal. It implies taking action or making a decisive move towards achieving something or reaching a particular place.
  • set out to The idiom "set out to" means to have the intention or purpose to do something, typically with determination and a specific plan. It indicates a deliberate action or goal-oriented behavior.
  • get (out) while the gettin(g)'s good The idiom "get (out) while the gettin(g)'s good" means to take advantage of a favorable opportunity or situation before it ends or becomes less advantageous. It suggests the importance of seizing the moment and acting promptly in order to secure maximum benefit or avoid potential negative consequences. The phrase often implies a sense of urgency and the need to be proactive in order to make the most of the current circumstances.
  • follow someone or something out The idiom "follow someone or something out" means to go after or accompany someone or something until they exit or leave a place or situation. It often implies that one is closely following or observing the person or thing until they are no longer present.
  • be in work/out of work The idiom "be in work/out of work" typically refers to a person's employment status. - "Be in work" means that a person currently has a job or is employed. - "Be out of work" means that a person is currently unemployed or without a job.
  • If you can’t stand the heat, keep out of the kitchen The idiom "If you can't stand the heat, keep out of the kitchen" means that if someone is unable to handle or cope with the pressure, stress, or difficulty of a situation, they should avoid getting involved or participating in it. It suggests that if someone is not prepared or strong enough to handle the challenges or demands, it is better for them to stay away or not engage in that particular activity or responsibility.
  • count someone out (for something) The idiom "count someone out (for something)" means to exclude or dismiss someone as a possibility or participant in a particular event, activity, or situation. It suggests that the person is not considered a likely contender or is no longer in contention for the mentioned thing.
  • stamp sth out of sm or sth To "stamp something out of someone or something" means to eliminate or eradicate it completely and forcefully. This idiom is often used to describe the act of putting an end to something undesirable, such as a problem, a bad habit, or a negative behavior. The phrase implies a strong and determined effort to eliminate the targeted thing completely, much like stamping out a fire.
  • go balls out The idiom "go balls out" means to do something with maximum effort, energy, or speed. It is often used to describe someone going all out or giving their absolute best in a particular task or activity. The phrase may have originated from an aviation term referring to the throttles on an aircraft, where "balls out" referred to pushing the throttle levers all the way forward, accelerating the engine to maximum power.
  • sketch sth out To "sketch something out" means to roughly outline or plan something in a preliminary or informal way. It involves creating a simple or basic overview of an idea, concept, design, or plan before going into more detail. It is often used when visualizing or brainstorming ideas before executing them fully.
  • out of house and home The idiom "out of house and home" means to be driven or forced to leave one's home or dwelling due to financial difficulties, usually resulting from excessive spending or inability to pay rent or bills. It signifies the loss of a place to live and the extent of one's impoverishment.
  • draw (someone or something) out of (someone or something) The idiom "draw (someone or something) out of (someone or something)" means to extract or bring forth a hidden or concealed aspect, quality, or information from someone or something. It involves encouraging or persuading someone or something to reveal or disclose something that was previously undisclosed or elusive.
  • get bent out of shape The idiom "get bent out of shape" means to become extremely upset, angry, or agitated about something, often in an exaggerated or irrational manner. It suggests a loss of composure or the inability to remain calm in a challenging or frustrating situation.
  • put sm out to pasture The idiom "put someone out to pasture" refers to retiring someone, especially from their occupation or position, usually due to old age or becoming less effective or useful. It implies that the person is being removed from their active role and sent into a quieter, less demanding or influential position, usually with the intention of allowing younger, more capable individuals to take over.
  • contract out The idiom "contract out" means to delegate or outsource a task, project, or service to an external party or a third-party contractor rather than handling it internally. It involves hiring someone or an organization outside of a company or organization to perform a particular job or function.
  • get (someone or something) out of (one's) mind The idiom "get (someone or something) out of (one's) mind" means to try to forget about someone or something, to stop thinking about them or it. It implies a desire or effort to remove thoughts or memories related to the person or thing.
  • knock the bottom out of (something) The idiom "knock the bottom out of (something)" means to completely undermine or disrupt the foundation, essence, or stability of something, rendering it ineffective or useless. It implies causing a significant and often irreversible damage or destruction.
  • draw sth out The idiom "draw something out" typically means to prolong or extend a conversation, process, or event, often unnecessarily or excessively. It can also refer to extracting or evoking something from someone, such as information, opinions, or emotions, through persistent questioning or interaction.
  • stare out at sm or sth The idiom "stare out at someone or something" refers to the act of looking at someone or something intently and for a prolonged period without distraction. It typically implies a fixed, unbroken gaze in order to convey curiosity, bewilderment, contemplation, or even intimidation.
  • have sb eating out of the palm of your hand, at have sb in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of the palm of your hand" or "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, typically due to one's charm, persuasive skills, or ability to manipulate. It suggests that the person under control or influence is completely submissive and willing to do whatever the other person desires, just like a small animal eating out of the palm of one's hand.
  • slash (out) at sm The idiom "slash (out) at someone" means to attack or criticize someone verbally or physically in a forceful and hostile manner. It implies making sudden, aggressive movements or remarks with the intention to harm or injure the other person.
  • go out of way The idiom "go out of one's way" means to make an extra effort or take additional steps beyond what is expected or necessary to accommodate or help someone. It implies going beyond what is convenient or customary to assist or satisfy another person's needs.
  • get (some kind of) mileage out of (something) The idiom "get (some kind of) mileage out of (something)" typically means to obtain or derive value, use, or benefit from a particular thing or situation, often in a way that extends its usefulness or provides further advantage. It can refer to making the most of a resource, opportunity, or idea to achieve one's goals or gain an advantage. It implies maximizing the potential or extracting the maximum value out of something.
  • the odd one out The idiom "the odd one out" refers to a person or thing that is different or stands out in a particular group or context. It is often used to describe someone or something that doesn't fit in or isn't similar to the others in a given situation.
  • sacked out The idiom "sacked out" typically means being extremely tired or exhausted and needing to rest or sleep.
  • clean someone out The idiom "clean someone out" refers to thoroughly or completely emptying someone's pockets, bank account, or resources. It implies taking everything of value from someone, leaving them with nothing. It can also be used metaphorically, indicating overwhelming defeat or loss.
  • (one's) way out of a paper bag The idiom "(one's) way out of a paper bag" is typically used to describe someone's lack of skill or ability in a particular area. It implies that the person is incapable of even the simplest or most basic tasks, to the point where they would struggle to find their way out of a paper bag. This idiom is often used humorously or sarcastically.
  • hit (something) out of the (ball)park The idiom "hit (something) out of the (ball)park" means to do something extremely well or achieve a result that significantly exceeds expectations. It is often used to describe a remarkable accomplishment or a major success. The term originates from the sport of baseball, where hitting a ball out of the ballpark is considered a fantastic feat, as it results in a home run.
  • a fish out of water The idiom "a fish out of water" refers to a person who feels uncomfortable, out of place, or unfamiliar with their surroundings or a particular situation. It suggests a sense of unease and awkwardness experienced when someone is in an unfamiliar or incompatible environment.
  • punch (one's) lights out The idiom "punch (one's) lights out" means to hit someone with such a forceful blow that it knocks them unconscious or causes them to lose consciousness temporarily. It implies a powerful and potentially devastating physical attack.
  • breathe out The idiom "breathe out" refers to the act of exhaling or letting go of tension, stress, or negative emotions. It can also mean expressing an opinion or feelings openly and honestly.
  • take the wind out of sails The idiom "take the wind out of sails" means to diminish someone's motivation, enthusiasm, or confidence by preempting or thwarting their plans or achievements. It refers to the act of deflating someone's pride or momentum, similar to how removing the wind from a sail would slow down or halt a sailing vessel.
  • throw the baby out with the bathwater The idiom "throw the baby out with the bathwater" means to discard or get rid of something valuable or important while trying to eliminate something undesirable or problematic. It suggests the act of mistakenly losing or overlooking the good along with the bad when making changes or resolving a situation.
  • flame out The idiom "flame out" refers to a situation where someone or something fails or ends suddenly and dramatically. It often describes a sudden loss of energy, skill, or effectiveness, typically after a period of strong performance or success. It can also refer to an abrupt termination or failure of a technological device or a career. In essence, "flame out" suggests a rapid and dramatic decline or collapse.
  • snuff out The idiom "snuff out" means to extinguish or put an end to something abruptly or forcefully, often referring to a life or existence, similar to blowing out a candle or snuffing out a flame. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of suppressing, eliminating, or eradicating something swiftly and completely.
  • pilot sth out of sth The idiom "pilot something out of something" refers to successfully navigating or guiding something, often a difficult or challenging situation, out of a particular situation or condition. It implies taking control and steering something towards a desired outcome or resolving a problem.
  • thaw sm or sth out To "thaw someone or something out" means to defrost, warm up, or melt something that has become frozen or extremely cold. It is often used literally, such as thawing out frozen food or thawing out a frozen pipe, but it can also be used metaphorically to indicate the process of warming someone's attitude or breaking the ice in a relationship.
  • carry sm or sth out The idiom "carry sm or sth out" means to execute or complete a task, plan, or action. It refers to performing or accomplishing something, often implying that it was executed fully and successfully.
  • creep out (of something) The idiom "creep out (of something)" refers to the action of moving stealthily or cautiously out of a particular place or situation, often with an unsettling or eerie feeling. It can also imply feeling uncomfortable, frightened, or disturbed by something or someone.
  • be out on (one's) ear The phrase "be out on (one's) ear" is an idiomatic expression that means to be forcibly or unexpectedly expelled from a job, position, or place. It implies a situation where someone is dismissed abruptly, often without warning, and without any regard for their dignity or well-being.
  • drum out of (something) The idiom "drum out of (something)" means to force someone out of a group, organization, or place through vigorous and public measures, usually due to misconduct or unpopularity. It derives from the literal action of drumming a person out of a military unit, wherein drums were beaten to publicly denounce and dismiss the individual.
  • flat out like a lizard drinking The idiom "flat out like a lizard drinking" means to be extremely busy or working at a maximum capacity. It implies that someone is working very hard or moving quickly, similar to how a lizard drinks water by rapidly extending its tongue.
  • dope out The idiom "dope out" means to figure out, analyze, or understand something, usually through careful consideration, problem-solving, or investigation.
  • find someone out The definition of the idiom "find someone out" is to discover or uncover someone's true nature, intentions, or secrets, often revealing negative aspects that were previously unknown. It implies exposing someone's hidden or deceptive behavior or motives.
  • fall out (with sm) (over sth) The idiom "fall out (with someone) (over something)" means to have a disagreement or argument with someone about a particular issue or topic, causing a rupture or deterioration in the relationship. It implies a loss of friendship, trust, or harmony due to the disagreement.
  • pig out (on sth) The idiom "pig out (on sth)" means to eat excessively or indulge in a large amount of food, often in an unrestrained or gluttonous manner. It implies overeating or consuming without regard for one's usual limits or portion control.
  • out of stock The idiom "out of stock" refers to a situation in which a particular item or product is currently unavailable or not in supply in a specific location or store. It means that all the inventory of that product has been sold or depleted and cannot be immediately purchased or obtained.
  • break out in(to) tears The idiom "break out in(to) tears" means to suddenly start crying or weeping in an emotional or uncontrollable manner.
  • get (oneself) out of (somewhere) The idiom "get (oneself) out of (somewhere)" means to escape or remove oneself from a difficult or undesirable situation or location. It implies finding a way to extricate oneself or to exit a place with difficulty or ingenuity.
  • get a buzz out of sm or sth The idiom "get a buzz out of something or someone" means to derive pleasure, excitement, or enjoyment from someone or something. It expresses the feeling of being genuinely thrilled or energized by a particular person, activity, or situation.
  • force out Definition: The idiom "force out" means to make someone leave a position, job, or organization against their will, usually through coercion, pressure, or compulsion. It involves using strong measures to push someone out of a position or to remove them forcefully from a particular situation or place.
  • get (one's) claws out The idiom "get (one's) claws out" refers to someone becoming aggressive, combative, or confrontational, typically in a situation where they feel threatened or challenged. It implies a readiness to engage in a fierce or hostile manner, similar to a cat extending its claws in a defensive or aggressive stance.
  • drive (one) out of (one's) mind The idiom "drive (one) out of (one's) mind" means to make someone extremely irritated, frustrated, or crazy. It is used to describe a situation or person that causes someone to become mentally overwhelmed or obsessed, often negatively impacting their mental state or sanity.
  • lie out (in something) The idiom "lie out (in something)" typically means to relax or recline comfortably in a specific place or situation. It can refer to indulging in leisurely activities, enjoying oneself, or luxuriating in a particular environment.
  • die out The idiom "die out" refers to something, such as a species, a custom, a tradition, or a language, becoming extinct or disappearing completely over time. It implies the gradual decline and eventual disappearance of something.
  • jerk someone or something out of something The idiom "jerk someone or something out of something" means to abruptly or forcefully remove or take someone or something out of a situation, place, or state they are in. It implies a sudden, harsh, or unexpected action that disrupts the current condition or progress.
  • rush out (of sth) The idiom "rush out (of sth)" means to exit or leave a place quickly and often in a hurried manner, usually without careful consideration or without completing necessary tasks or duties.
  • make out The idiom "make out" has multiple meanings depending on the context: 1. To understand or decipher something: - Example: "I could barely make out what he was saying over the loud music." 2. To manage or cope with a situation: - Example: "Despite the difficult circumstances, they were able to make out just fine." 3. To engage in passionate kissing or intimate physical contact: - Example: "They were making out in the backseat of the car." It is important to consider the surrounding context to determine the intended meaning of the idiom "make out".
  • head out (for something) The idiom "head out for something" means to leave or depart for a particular destination or purpose. It often implies an intention to go somewhere or engage in a specific activity.
  • have something coming out of your ears The idiom "have something coming out of your ears" is used to express that someone has an excessive amount of something, usually referring to a specific thing or quality. It suggests that the person has an overwhelming abundance of that thing or quality and it is visible or noticeable.
  • bring (something) out of mothballs The idiom "bring (something) out of mothballs" means to reintroduce or bring back something that has been unused or inactive for a long period of time. It often refers to reviving a project, idea, or concept that has been put on hold or forgotten. The expression is derived from the practice of storing clothing or items made of wool or fur, known to attract moths, in mothballs to protect them from damage.
  • elbow out of and elbow out The idiom "elbow out of" and "elbow out" refers to the act of forcefully pushing or maneuvering oneself ahead of others in order to gain an advantage or grab an opportunity. It implies using one's physical or figurative elbows to assert dominance or secure a better position, often at the expense of others.
  • gross sb out To "gross someone out" means to disgust, repel, or make someone feel extremely uncomfortable or nauseated. It refers to a situation or behavior that is so unpleasant or shocking that it elicits a strong negative reaction from someone.
  • be out of your element The idiom "be out of your element" means to be in a situation or environment that is unfamiliar or uncomfortable to you, typically causing you to feel out of place or lacking confidence.
  • out of keeping The idiom "out of keeping" means something that is not in harmony or consistent with its surroundings or expected behavior. It refers to something that is incongruous or out of place in a particular context.
  • bug out The idiom "bug out" generally refers to a colloquial phrase that means to quickly leave or evacuate a place, particularly in a sudden or urgent manner. It can be used to describe fleeing from a dangerous situation or simply to quickly depart from a location.
  • ask (one) out The idiom "ask (one) out" refers to the action of inviting someone, usually romantically, to go on a date or spend time together for a social or romantic purpose.
  • age out The idiom "age out" typically refers to the process of reaching a certain age or stage of life where someone becomes ineligible or no longer qualifies for a particular program, activity, or opportunity. It can also imply the natural progression of getting older and no longer being suited or appropriate for certain actions or experiences.
  • month in, month out The idiom "month in, month out" means that something occurs regularly or consistently, without interruption, month after month. It suggests a recurring pattern or a sustained duration of time without any significant change.
  • gross sm out The phrase "gross someone out" is an idiom used to describe the act of causing someone to feel disgusted, repulsed, or grossed out by something. It refers to any action, object, or situation that elicits a strong negative reaction and makes someone feel uneasy or uncomfortable.
  • cry (something) out (to someone or an animal) The idiom "cry (something) out (to someone or an animal)" means to express or shout something loudly and emotionally to someone or an animal. It often implies a sense of desperation, anguish, or a strong need for attention or communication.
  • bummed (out) The idiom "bummed out" is used to express a state of disappointment, sadness, or feeling downcast. It refers to a feeling of being emotionally let down, deflated, or disheartened about a situation or outcome.
  • be fresh out of The idiom "be fresh out of" means to have none left or to be completely out of something, usually referring to a product or resource that is temporarily or permanently unavailable.
  • drum sb out of sth The idiom "drum sb out of sth" is used to describe the act of forcing someone out of a place or organization, typically due to their behavior, actions, or beliefs. It suggests a situation where a person is ousted or expelled from a particular group or community, often accompanied by public disapproval or scorn.
  • run someone or something out of something The idiom "run someone or something out of something" means to force someone or something to leave or be expelled from a place or a situation. It implies using aggressive or persistent actions to eliminate or displace someone or something from a particular location or context.
  • help someone (or an animal) out (of something) The idiom "help someone (or an animal) out (of something)" means to lend a hand or provide assistance to someone or an animal in order to free them from a difficult or challenging situation. It implies helping someone or an animal escape or get out of a troublesome or confining circumstance.
  • beat someone out The idiom "beat someone out" means to surpass or outperform someone in a competition, race, or endeavor. It implies winning or achieving success by surpassing someone else's efforts or performance.
  • be out for/after (one's) scalp The idiom "be out for/after (one's) scalp" refers to someone who is fiercely determined to defeat, harm, or get revenge on another person. It implies that the person is seeking to metaphorically "scalp" their opponent, similar to an aggressive act in Native American cultures where an enemy's scalp was taken as a trophy. This idiom indicates a strong desire for personal triumph or to see someone suffer a significant loss or defeat.
  • check out The idiom "check out" has multiple meanings depending on the context: 1. Verb definition: To leave or exit a place, typically a hotel, store, or location. Example: "We need to check out of the hotel by noon." 2. Verb definition: To inspect or examine something or someone closely. Example: "Make sure to check out that new restaurant downtown." 3. Verb definition: To investigate or verify information or facts. Example: "I'll check out the details of the proposal before making a decision." 4. Verb definition: To look attractive or interesting; to be worth observing or exploring. Example: "You should check out that new movie, it's really good." 5. Verb definition: To become unconscious or
  • born out of wedlock The idiom "born out of wedlock" refers to a person who is born to parents who are not married to each other at the time of their child's birth. It is commonly used to describe a child born to unwed parents.
  • bust ass out of sm place The idiom "bust ass out of some place" is an informal expression that means to leave or escape from a particular location quickly and energetically. It implies a sense of urgency and determination to depart swiftly.
  • bug the hell/crap/shit out of somebody The idiom "bug the hell/crap/shit out of somebody" means to annoy or irritate someone excessively or persistently. It implies that the person's actions are disruptive, bothersome, or bothersome to a high degree, causing frustration or annoyance.
  • rinse sth out The idiom "rinse sth out" means to remove dirt, residue, or impurities from something by flushing it with water or any other cleaning agent.
  • follow sm or sth out The idiom "follow sm or sth out" refers to the act of going with someone or something until the end or completion of a particular action or event. It implies adhering to or accompanying someone or something throughout the entire process or journey, providing support, or remaining steadfast.
  • drain sth out of sth The idiom "drain something out of something" means to remove or exhaust a substance completely from a particular place or object. It typically refers to the act of eliminating or depleting a liquid or other material from a container, area, or system.
  • live out The idiom "live out" means to fulfill or execute a particular role, lifestyle, or commitment. It typically refers to living according to specific expectations, desires, or goals, often involving adopting a particular way of life or adhering to certain principles.
  • be out of control The idiom "be out of control" refers to a situation or behavior that is no longer manageable, restrained, or governed properly. It implies that things or people involved are behaving in an unpredictable, chaotic, or disorderly manner.
  • hear someone out The idiom "hear someone out" means to listen to someone or give them the opportunity to speak fully and complete their point or argument before making a judgement or responding. It implies patience and attentiveness towards the speaker's thoughts or opinions.
  • well out of The phrase "well out of" typically means being in a favorable or advantageous position after having escaped a potentially harmful or undesirable situation. It suggests being far away or removed from the negative circumstance or consequence.
  • fuck (one's) brains out The idiom "fuck (one's) brains out" is an extremely vulgar expression and is not appropriate for formal or polite conversation. It implies engaging in sexual activity vigorously and intensely.
  • hear (one) out The idiom "hear (one) out" means to listen attentively and without interruption or judgment to someone's viewpoint, opinions, arguments, or concerns, allowing them to fully express themselves. It denotes providing someone with an opportunity to speak or present their side of a story without interruption or premature dismissal.
  • put (sm or an animal) out of sth The idiom "put (someone or an animal) out of (something)" means to cause someone or something to leave or be removed from a particular place or situation, typically because it is causing inconvenience, discomfort, or harm. It can also refer to the act of ending someone's life or euthanizing an animal out of mercy or to prevent further suffering.
  • think the sun shines out (of) (one's) arse The idiom "think the sun shines out (of) (one's) arse" is an exaggerated expression used to describe someone who is excessively self-centered, arrogant, or egotistical. It implies that the person has an inflated view of themselves and believes they are superior or superiorly blessed in all aspects, even to the extent of having the sun shining out of their rear end metaphorically.
  • count out The idiom "count out" generally means to exclude or disregard someone or something, particularly when making a decision or determining the inclusion of others. It can also refer to ruling out a possibility or option.
  • trot out sb/sth The idiom "trot out sb/sth" means to bring someone or something forward or present them, often repeatedly, usually for a particular purpose or to support an argument, but sometimes in a showy or insincere manner. It can also imply showcasing or displaying someone or something, often as a means of demonstrating their qualities or abilities.
  • spew one’s guts out The idiom "spew one's guts out" refers to the act of vomiting or forcefully expelling stomach contents due to sickness, excessive alcohol consumption, or intense nausea. It is a figurative expression used to describe the act of throwing up or being extremely sick to the point of vomiting forcefully.
  • draw someone out The idiom "draw someone out" means to encourage or persuade someone to share their thoughts, feelings, or opinions, especially those that they may be hesitant or reluctant to reveal. It involves engaging in conversation or taking steps to make someone feel more comfortable and open in order to elicit more information or insight from them.
  • balance out The idiom "balance out" typically means to achieve a state of equilibrium or to counteract or offset something in order to create a sense of stability or fairness.
  • out of action The idiom "out of action" refers to something or someone that is not able to function or operate, usually because it is broken, damaged, or temporarily not available. It specifically implies that the object or individual is unable to perform its usual activities or duties.
  • help (someone) out The idiom "help (someone) out" means to provide assistance or support to someone in need, usually in a difficult situation or when they are unable to handle something on their own. It implies lending a helping hand to alleviate their burden or accomplish a task together.
  • blitzed out The idiom "blitzed out" typically refers to a state of being extremely intoxicated or heavily under the influence of drugs, often to the point of losing control or consciousness. It suggests a complete and overwhelming level of intoxication or high.
  • How is sm making out? The idiom "How is someone making out?" is used to inquire about how someone is doing or progressing in a particular situation or endeavor. It typically asks for an update or report on someone's current state, progress, or well-being.
  • fit someone or something out (with something) The idiom "fit someone or something out (with something)" means to provide equipment, supplies, or clothing to someone or something, typically with the intention of preparing them for a specific purpose or task.
  • cut out for (something) The idiom "cut out for (something)" typically means that someone is naturally suited or well-suited for a particular activity, role, or profession. It implies that the person has the necessary skills, abilities, or qualities to excel or be successful in that specific endeavor.
  • burn out (sb) The idiom "burn out (sb)" refers to the state of mental, emotional, or physical exhaustion experienced by someone due to prolonged stress, pressure, or overworking. It implies a loss of motivation, energy, and passion, often resulting in decreased performance and a feeling of being overwhelmed.
  • blow something out The idiom "blow something out" typically means to extinguish or put out a flame or fire, usually by blowing air forcefully. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to causing something, such as a plan, event, or situation, to fail or be ruined.
  • knock out The idiom "knock out" means to defeat or overcome someone or something convincingly, often in a quick and spectacular manner. It can also refer to a sudden and powerful blow that renders someone unconscious. Additionally, "knock out" can be used to describe something that is impressive, outstanding, or highly attractive.
  • out on one's ear The idiom "out on one's ear" refers to a situation where someone is suddenly and abruptly removed or thrown out of a place or job, typically without any warning or consideration. It implies being dismissed or discharged forcefully and unceremoniously.
  • shape up or ship out! The idiom "shape up or ship out!" is a direct and forceful way of telling someone to improve their behavior or performance immediately, or else they will have to leave or face consequences. It is often used as a warning or ultimatum, emphasizing the urgency and seriousness of the situation.
  • pull (someone's) bacon out of the fire The idiom "pull (someone's) bacon out of the fire" means to rescue or save someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, typically by intervening or providing assistance just in time. It refers to the act of rescuing someone from the metaphorical "fire" or trouble, likening it to saving their precious possession (bacon) from being burned or destroyed.
  • find out a thing or two The idiom "find out a thing or two" means to gain knowledge or discover some valuable information or insights about a particular subject or situation. It implies that through personal experience, investigation, or observation, someone has gained a deeper understanding or learned something significant.
  • knock/take the stuffing out of sb/sth The idiom "knock/take the stuffing out of someone/something" means to severely weaken or demoralize someone or something, typically by causing a major setback or loss. It refers to the act of removing the "stuffing" or filling from a stuffed object, leaving it empty and deflated. It implies a significant blow or defeat that drains someone's energy, enthusiasm, or confidence.
  • let out some kind of sound The idiom "let out some kind of sound" means to make a noise or emit a vocal expression, often due to surprise, pain, fear, or excitement. It implies an uncontrollable or spontaneous reaction that involves producing a sound from one's mouth.
  • elbow (one) out of (something) The idiom "elbow (one) out of (something)" means to forcefully or aggressively remove someone from a group, project, position, or situation, often in order to take their place or gain an advantage. It implies using one's physical or metaphorical elbow to push someone aside in a competitive or assertive manner.
  • gaze out on sth To "gaze out on something" typically means to look at or observe something, often with a distant or contemplative expression. It implies a long or intense look, as if the person is taking in the view or scenery deeply. It can also suggest a sense of reflection or introspection while observing something.
  • out on your ear The idiom "out on your ear" means to be forcefully dismissed or evicted from a place or situation, often in a sudden and unexpected manner. It suggests being removed abruptly and without sympathy.
  • want out of The idiom "want out of" refers to the desire or wish to escape or be released from a particular situation, commitment, or relationship.
  • tease sth out of sth The idiom "tease sth out of sth" means to extract, discover, or obtain something with difficulty, often through persistent questioning or gentle persuasion. It implies skillful or gradual extraction of information, details, or hidden qualities from a person or a situation.
  • sob your heart out The expression "sob your heart out" means to cry deeply or excessively, often to release pent-up emotions or grief. It implies crying with great intensity or for an extended period of time.
  • stoned out of one’s head The idiom "stoned out of one's head" typically means to be under the influence of drugs (such as marijuana) to an excessive or extreme extent, resulting in a state of significant intoxication or altered consciousness.
  • stand out (from sth) The idiom "stand out (from sth)" means to be easily noticeable or distinguishable from a group or surrounding objects or people. It refers to the act of being different or superior in some way, making one's presence or characteristics easily recognized or remembered.
  • slide sth out of sth The idiom "slide something out of something" means to remove or take out an object or item from a particular location or container in a smooth or effortless manner.
  • hurl sm or sth out (of sm place) The idiom "hurl someone or something out (of some place)" refers to forcefully and abruptly throwing or ejecting someone or something from a particular location. It conveys the idea of taking swift and violent action to remove a person or object.
  • Never halloo till you are out of the woods. The idiom "Never halloo till you are out of the woods" means that one should not celebrate or claim victory prematurely, but instead should wait until they have completely overcome a challenge or obstacle before rejoicing. It emphasizes the importance of being cautious and not making assumptions until a situation has been fully resolved.
  • hold out hope The idiom "hold out hope" means to maintain optimism, belief, or expectation, even in challenging or difficult circumstances. It refers to staying positive and optimistic about a specific outcome or situation, despite uncertainty or setbacks.
  • cut out for (someone or something) The idiom "cut out for (someone or something)" means to be naturally suited or well-suited for a particular task, role, or occupation. It implies that a person or thing possesses the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities for a specific situation or purpose.
  • (Have you) been keeping out of trouble? The idiom "(Have you) been keeping out of trouble?" is a question commonly asked to someone, usually in a lighthearted or humorous manner, to inquire about whether they have managed to avoid any problems or mischievous activities. It implies checking if the person has been behaving well and staying away from any potentially troublesome situations.
  • worm sth out of sm The idiom "worm sth out of someone" means to persistently and artfully extract information, secrets, or hidden feelings from someone, usually through persistent questioning or coaxing. It implies a skillful and persistent effort to obtain something through subtle or cunning means.
  • out of a (or the) clear (blue) sky The idiom "out of a (or the) clear (blue) sky" means something unexpected or surprising, occurring suddenly and without any warning or previous indication. It denotes an event or statement that appears completely out of nowhere, catching someone off guard or surprising them.
  • out of courtesy (to sm) The idiom "out of courtesy (to sm)" typically refers to doing something as a polite gesture or sign of respect towards someone. It means performing an action or displaying behavior out of consideration for another person's feelings, even if one is not personally obliged to do so.
  • out an amount of money The idiom "out an amount of money" means to spend or pay a specific sum of money for something. It implies that money is being used or given in exchange for goods, services, or an expense.
  • bellow sth out The idiom "bellow sth out" means to shout or yell something loudly and forcefully. It usually implies a sense of urgency or intensity in the delivery of one's words.
  • jump out of the frying pan into the fire The idiom "jump out of the frying pan into the fire" means to go from a difficult or risky situation to an even worse or more dangerous one. It implies that someone's attempt to escape or improve a difficult situation has only resulted in finding themselves in an even more unfavorable or problematic position.
  • spin out sth To "spin out something" means to extend or prolong a situation or event, often unnecessarily or excessively. It can also refer to losing control or becoming overwhelmed by a situation.
  • Bad money drives out good The idiom "Bad money drives out good" refers to a phenomenon in economics where when there are two forms of currency in circulation, people tend to hoard and use the inferior or debased currency while spending or getting rid of the superior or unaltered currency. This happens as individuals prefer to keep the high-quality currency for themselves and pass on the low-quality one to others. The idiom suggests that people are inclined to preserve or save the better valuables for themselves, resulting in the devaluation or disappearance of the superior form of money from the market.
  • talk way out of The idiom "talk way out of" generally means to use persuasive or convincing words to successfully avoid or escape from a difficult or unfavorable situation. It refers to the ability to talk or argue one's way out of trouble, often by providing justifications, explanations, or excuses that help to alleviate the consequences or negative outcomes of a situation.
  • get a lot of mileage out of The idiom "get a lot of mileage out of" means to derive a significant amount of use, benefit, or value from something, particularly an idea, concept, or possession. It suggests utilizing or exploiting something to its fullest potential or for an extended period, often resulting in maximum effectiveness or advantage.
  • put sth out of your mind The idiom "put something out of your mind" means to deliberately force yourself to stop thinking about or to forget about something that is disturbing, bothersome, or unimportant. It refers to the act of mentally decluttering or eliminating certain thoughts or concerns from one's mind.
  • last sth out The idiom "last something out" typically refers to enduring or remaining until the end of a certain situation, event, or period of time. It implies staying or persevering until the conclusion or the last moment of something, despite difficulties, challenges, or distractions.
  • blow your/somebody’s brains out The idiom "blow your/somebody’s brains out" is an expression that refers to the act of shooting someone in the head. It describes extreme violence resulting in the destruction of the brain, which often leads to death. However, it is worth noting that this idiom can also be used figuratively, representing a severe emotional or mental impact, rather than literal physical violence.
  • chew sb's ass (out) The idiom "chew sb's ass (out)" is an informal expression that means to scold or reprimand someone severely and angrily for something they have done wrong or something they should not have done.
  • strut out of The idiom "strut out of" means to confidently and proudly walk away from a situation, often with an air of arrogance or self-importance. It implies showing off or flaunting one's superiority before leaving.
  • pull the chestnuts out of the fire The idiom "pull the chestnuts out of the fire" means to rescue or take risks on behalf of others, often when they are in a difficult or dangerous situation, without receiving adequate recognition or reward for doing so.
  • cut sm or sth out The idiom "cut someone or something out" means to remove or eliminate someone or something from a situation or plan. It can be used to indicate the act of excluding or disregarding someone or something completely.
  • worry an animal out of sth The idiom "worry an animal out of sth" refers to the act of pursuing or bothering an animal until it leaves or abandons something, often a location or a possession. It implies persistent disturbance or harassment that leads to the animal giving up or escaping from the situation or object.
  • jury is still out (on sm or sth) The idiom "jury is still out (on sm or sth)" refers to a situation where a decision or judgment has not yet been made or a consensus has not been reached. It implies that further examination, time, or evidence is needed to determine the final verdict or opinion on a specific subject or issue.
  • be out on ear The idiom "be out on ear" means to be forcibly expelled or fired from a job or a place, often as a result of misconduct or incompetence. It implies being dismissed or removed abruptly, without any opportunity for negotiation or resolution.
  • dry someone out The idiom "dry someone out" typically refers to the process of helping someone overcome or recover from an addiction, particularly alcohol or drug addiction. It means to assist someone in undergoing detoxification or going through a period of abstinence in order to become sober or drug-free.
  • inside and out The idiom "inside and out" means to have complete knowledge or understanding of something or someone. It refers to being familiar with every aspect, detail, or characteristic of a particular subject.
  • heart goes out to (someone) The idiom "heart goes out to (someone)" is used to express feelings of sympathy, compassion, or empathy towards someone who is experiencing a difficult or challenging situation. It typically implies a heartfelt connection or emotional response to someone's hardships or struggles.
  • sing (one's) heart out The idiom "sing (one's) heart out" means to sing with great enthusiasm, passion, and emotion. It suggests that someone is putting their whole heart and soul into their singing, expressing their feelings and emotions through their voice.
  • air sth out The idiom "air something out" means to freshen, ventilate, or remove stale air from a confined space or an object by exposing it to the open air. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of discussing or expressing thoughts, feelings, or opinions openly and honestly.
  • make capital out of The idiom "make capital out of" means to take advantage of a situation or exploit it for your own benefit or gain. It often refers to leveraging or using something to achieve personal or professional advantage.
  • be out to do something The idiom "be out to do something" means to have a determined intention or purpose to achieve or accomplish something. It suggests that someone is actively pursuing a goal or engaged in a particular plan or action.
  • knock the stuffing out of somebody The idiom "knock the stuffing out of somebody" means to render someone completely exhausted, drained, or defeated, both physically and emotionally. It implies causing someone to lose all their energy, courage, or enthusiasm.
  • strike out for The idiom "strike out for" means to set off or to start a journey or venture with determination, courage, or ambition. It often implies leaving a familiar or comfortable situation behind in order to pursue new opportunities, goals, or experiences.
  • pluck sth out of the air The idiom "pluck something out of the air" means to come up with an idea, solution, or answer spontaneously or without proper thought or consideration. It suggests that the person is making a guess or creating something out of thin air rather than basing it on any concrete information or careful thinking.
  • like getting blood out of/from a stone The idiom "like getting blood out of/from a stone" means that something is extremely difficult or impossible to obtain or accomplish. It refers to the idea that trying to extract blood from a stone, which is naturally impossible, is an excessively challenging task.
  • leave out The idiom "leave out" means to intentionally exclude or omit someone or something from a group, activity, or conversation.
  • flush out of sm place The idiom "flush out of some place" is used to mean forcefully driving someone or something out of a particular location, often by causing them to reveal their presence or by searching extensively. It suggests a forceful action taken to remove whatever or whoever is hiding or lurking in a specific area.
  • crawl out The idiom "crawl out" typically means to emerge from a difficult, embarrassing, or unpleasant situation. It implies taking oneself out of a position of vulnerability or shame and reclaiming one's self-esteem or dignity.
  • make sth out of nothing The idiom "make something out of nothing" means to create or accomplish something significant or meaningful, even when starting with little or no resources or material. It refers to the ability to turn a seemingly insignificant or insignificant situation into something valuable or impressive through one's skills, creativity, or resourcefulness.
  • sing out (sth) The idiom "sing out (sth)" means to announce or proclaim something loudly and with enthusiasm. It implies expressing one's thoughts, feelings, or opinions boldly and confidently.
  • see something out of the corner of your eye The idiom "see something out of the corner of your eye" means to perceive or notice something indirectly or peripherally, rather than by looking directly at it. It implies catching a glimpse or being aware of something without giving it full attention.
  • bring (one) out of one's shell The idiom "bring (one) out of one's shell" means to help someone become more sociable, outgoing, or confident in interacting with others. It refers to the process of encouraging and supporting someone to overcome their shyness, introversion, or reluctance to engage with people, thereby allowing their true personality to emerge.
  • be out of sb's league The idiom "be out of someone's league" means that a person or thing is considered to be too good, too attractive, or at a higher social status than someone else, making them unlikely to be a suitable or compatible match. It suggests that the person or thing is considered beyond the other individual's reach or out of their league in terms of desirability or achievements.
  • make a big thing (out) of sth The idiom "make a big thing (out) of something" refers to the act of exaggerating or giving excessive importance to a particular situation, event, or issue. It suggests that someone is amplifying or overreacting to something that could be considered minor or insignificant.
  • out of someone's league The idiom "out of someone's league" means that someone or something is beyond or outside of someone's respective reach, ability, or qualifications. It implies that the person or thing in question is of a much higher social, physical, or intellectual caliber, making any potential relationship or interaction unlikely or difficult to achieve.
  • run something out of something The idiom "run something out of something" means to deplete or use up a particular resource or supply completely or almost completely. It implies that there is no more of that resource remaining for further use or consumption. This idiom is often used in the context of running out of everyday items such as food, fuel, or other essentials.
  • blow out of proportion The idiom "blow out of proportion" means to exaggerate or magnify the importance, significance, or seriousness of something beyond its actual or reasonable level.
  • go out with the girls The idiom "go out with the girls" refers to a social activity in which a woman spends time with her female friends or peers, typically outside of their regular routine or usual company, often for entertainment, relaxation, or simply to enjoy each other's company.
  • brave something out The idiom "brave something out" means to face a difficult or unpleasant situation without backing down or giving up. It implies showing courage, strength, and resilience in order to endure or overcome challenges.
  • ladle sth out of sth The idiom "ladle something out of something" means to extract or take out a specific quantity or portion of something, typically a liquid or substance, using a ladle. It can also be used figuratively to refer to extracting information, details, or qualities from a larger source or context.
  • in (or out of) order The idiom "in (or out of) order" typically means that something is not working correctly or is not arranged properly. It can also refer to behavior that is inappropriate or not in accordance with accepted norms or rules.
  • out of it The idiom "out of it" typically refers to a state of being disconnected, unaware, or mentally absent. It implies that someone is not fully engaged or present in a particular situation or conversation. It can also describe feeling confused, disoriented, or detached from reality.
  • Wash your mouth out! "Wash your mouth out!" is an idiom used to express disapproval or outrage at something offensive or inappropriate that someone has said. It is typically used to admonish or reprimand someone for using offensive language or expressing disrespectful remarks. The phrase implies the need for the person to clean their mouth as a punishment for their offensive words.
  • out of the ordinary The idiom "out of the ordinary" means something that is not usual or typical. It refers to situations, events, or objects that deviate from the expected or different from what is considered ordinary or normal.
  • soak sth out of sth The idiom "soak something out of something" typically means to extract or remove something from a substance or material by soaking or immersing it. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to extracting or obtaining information, knowledge, or lessons from a particular situation or experience.
  • bow out (or in) The idiom "bow out" means to remove oneself gracefully or voluntarily from a situation, usually due to a feeling of not being able to continue or succeed any further. It can signify withdrawing from a competition, event, or responsibility. Conversely, the phrase "bow in" is less commonly used but may suggest entering a situation or event with a gesture of respect or humility, similar to a bow.
  • come out on top The idiom "come out on top" means to emerge or prevail as the ultimate winner or successful party in a competition, conflict, or difficult situation. It implies achieving a desired outcome or being in a superior position in comparison to others involved.
  • con (someone) out of (something) The idiom "con (someone) out of (something)" means to deceive or trick someone into giving up or losing something valuable or important, typically through fraudulent or manipulative means. It implies the act of exploiting or swindling someone for personal gain.
  • weep (one's) heart out The idiom "weep (one's) heart out" means to cry heavily or intensely, expressing deep sadness, grief, or disappointment. It refers to the act of shedding tears to release strong emotions and can imply a prolonged period of mourning or sorrow.
  • turn out to be The idiom "turn out to be" means that something or someone is revealed or discovered to be a certain way or have certain characteristics, often unexpectedly.
  • psyched (out) The idiom "psyched (out)" refers to being mentally and emotionally prepared, excited, or motivated for a particular event or situation. It suggests being in a state of heightened anticipation or enthusiasm.
  • hammer sth out To "hammer something out" means to discuss, negotiate, or resolve something through persistent and intense effort, often involving debate or argument. It refers to the act of physically or metaphorically using a hammer to shape or create something through repeated strikes. In the context of communication or collaboration, "hammering something out" implies working diligently to reach an agreement or solution by ironing out differences or conflicting viewpoints.
  • out the goodness of (one's) heart The idiom "out the goodness of (one's) heart" means to do something kind or generous without expecting anything in return. It refers to performing an action solely out of genuine compassion, sympathy, or goodwill towards someone or a cause.
  • fluff sth out To "fluff something out" means to add or include additional details, information, or content in order to make it more substantial, complete, or interesting. This can be in reference to writing, speeches, presentations, or any form of communication where it is necessary to provide more content to enhance its quality or effectiveness.
  • cash out (sth) The idiom "cash out (sth)" refers to converting an asset, usually in the form of stocks, bonds, or investments, into cash by selling or liquidating it. It implies the act of extracting the value or equity from the asset to receive the money or profit it represents. This phrase is often used in financial contexts when individuals or businesses want to divest their holdings or collect their earnings.
  • scare, annoy, etc. the hell out of somebody The idiom "scare, annoy, etc. the hell out of somebody" means to cause extreme fear, annoyance, or other intense emotions in someone. It implies that the person's reaction is intense enough to the point of being unsettling and may even involve shock or disbelief. The addition of "the hell" emphasizes the severity or extremity of the emotion experienced.
  • go in one ear and out the other The expression "go in one ear and out the other" refers to when someone hears information or advice but does not pay attention to it or quickly forgets it. It implies that the person does not retain or act upon the information received.
  • bust out of sm place The idiom "bust out of sm place" means to escape or break free from a particular location or situation forcefully and unexpectedly. It implies a sense of liberation, often accompanied by a sense of urgency or a need for drastic measures to leave behind a confining or undesirable place.
  • chuck (something) out The idiom "chuck (something) out" means to dispose of or discard something, to get rid of something. It implies a casual or careless attitude towards the object being discarded.
  • frighten the hell out of The idiom "frighten the hell out of" means to scare or terrify someone intensely. It implies causing extreme fear or panic in an individual.
  • scare the crap out of (someone) The idiom "scare the crap out of someone" means to frighten or startle someone intensely. It implies that the fear or shock experienced is so extreme that it figuratively causes one to lose control of their bodily functions (excrement). It emphasizes the extent of the fear, often indicating a very powerful or deeply unsettling scare.
  • squeeze something out of something The idiom "squeeze something out of something" typically means to extract, obtain or obtain something with effort or difficulty from a particular source or situation. It can imply a sense of exerting pressure or working hard to achieve a desired outcome, often in limited or challenging circumstances.
  • out loud The idiom "out loud" means to vocalize or say something audibly, rather than just thinking it or saying it silently.
  • make a mountain out of a molehill The idiom "make a mountain out of a molehill" means to exaggerate or overreact to a minor or insignificant issue, turning it into a much larger and more serious problem than it actually is.
  • back someone or something out (from something) The idiom "back someone or something out (from something)" means to help or assist in exiting or removing someone or something from a particular situation, place, or position, usually by reversing or withdrawing support or assistance.
  • I'm out of here The idiom "I'm out of here" is used to express one's desire or intention to leave a place or situation immediately. It implies a sense of urgency and often indicates dissatisfaction, frustration, or a need to escape.
  • dish it out The idiom "dish it out" means to criticize, ridicule, or speak harshly to someone, especially in a confrontational or aggressive manner. It refers to someone's ability or tendency to give or deliver harsh comments, judgment, or insults to others.
  • dip out The idiom "dip out" refers to the act of leaving or departing quickly or unexpectedly, often without giving notice or saying goodbye.
  • start out with The idiom "start out with" typically means to begin something with a particular action, object, or idea. It refers to the initial step or starting point of a process or journey.
  • brown out The idiom "brown out" is typically used to describe a decrease in electricity supply, resulting in a dimming or reduction of brightness in the lights. It is a milder form of a blackout, where electricity is completely cut off.
  • burst out laughing/crying The idiom "burst out laughing/crying" refers to the sudden and uncontrollable expression of laughter or tears. It implies that the person is unable to contain their emotions and they are expressed abruptly and intensely.
  • bark out at The idiom "bark out at" refers to the act of speaking or shouting abruptly and loudly in a harsh or commanding manner, often accompanied by anger or irritation. It implies a forceful expression of one's thoughts, demands, or orders.
  • bail out on someone The idiom "bail out on someone" means to leave or abandon someone in a difficult or challenging situation, especially when they were relying on your support or assistance.
  • stake out a claim to sth The idiom "stake out a claim to something" means to assert one's right or ownership over something, often by making it known or by taking action to secure it. It comes from the practice of physically marking or staking out a piece of land to mark ownership or claim. It can be used figuratively to indicate the act of laying a formal or informal claim to any kind of territory, property, or idea.
  • step out (on sm) The idiom "step out (on someone)" means to be unfaithful or disloyal to a romantic partner by engaging in a secret relationship or affair with someone else. It implies cheating or betraying the trust of one's partner.
  • hide out The idiom "hide out" refers to a specific location or place where someone can hide or stay concealed in order to avoid detection, typically from the authorities or people who may be pursuing them. It can also imply evading or escaping from a difficult or dangerous situation.
  • starve (sm or an animal) out of sm place The idiom "starve (someone or an animal) out of (some place)" means to intentionally deprive someone or an animal of food or resources in order to force them to leave a particular location. It implies using starvation or deprivation as a means of coercion or eviction.
  • Cut it out! The idiom "Cut it out!" is an expression used to tell someone to stop doing or saying something, often because it is annoying, inappropriate, or causing trouble. It is a direct command to cease the behavior immediately.
  • out of step The idiom "out of step" refers to someone or something that is not in harmony or not in alignment with others or their surroundings. It primarily implies being out of sync with the majority or going against established norms or expectations.
  • hang sb out to dry The idiom "hang sb out to dry" refers to leaving someone in a vulnerable or unsupported position, typically by not helping them or taking responsibility for their actions. It implies abandoning or betraying someone, often by making them bear the full consequences of a situation alone.
  • run out of steam To "run out of steam" means to lose the energy, enthusiasm, or motivation required to continue doing something. It refers to becoming tired or exhausted and being unable to sustain or complete a task.
  • fight something out The idiom "fight something out" means to resolve or settle a conflict or disagreement through confrontation, vigorous argument, or physical altercation, rather than avoiding or ignoring the issue. It implies engaging in a determined and intense struggle until a clear resolution is reached.
  • be out of your league The idiom "be out of your league" means that someone or something is not attainable, suitable, or compatible with a person, usually due to differences in social status, skill level, intelligence, or attractiveness. It implies that the person or thing is considered superior or more advanced, making a connection or involvement unlikely or impossible.
  • battle sth out To "battle something out" is an idiomatic expression that means to resolve a conflict, disagreement, or dispute through intense or determined effort, often involving discussions, arguments, or negotiations. It implies a confrontation or struggle to come to a resolution or decision.
  • get, pull, etc. your finger out The idiom "get, pull, etc. your finger out" is a colloquial expression that means to start taking action, working harder, or making progress on something. It is usually used to urge someone to stop being lazy, procrastinating, or being less productive and to be more proactive in their efforts.
  • wash your mouth out (with soap/soapy water) The idiom "wash your mouth out (with soap/soapy water)" is used to express shock, disapproval, or offense at something someone has said. It is a figurative way of suggesting that the person's words are offensive, inappropriate, or vulgar and that they should cleanse their mouth as a form of punishment or correction.
  • draw out The idiom "draw out" typically means to elicit or extract information, feelings, or opinions from someone, often by asking probing questions or engaging in conversation. It can also refer to prolonging or extending a particular situation or event.
  • come out badly The idiom "come out badly" refers to a situation or event where the outcome is unfavorable or unsuccessful. It implies that something did not turn out as expected or desired, resulting in negative consequences or disappointment.
  • hightail it out of (smw) The idiom "hightail it out of (smw)" means to quickly and urgently leave a place, often to escape from danger or to avoid an undesirable situation. It implies a sense of urgency and swift movement, as if someone is running away at high speed.
  • inveigle sm out of sth The idiom "inveigle sm out of sth" refers to the act of persuading or coaxing someone into giving or revealing something, usually through clever or manipulative means. It implies using cunning tactics or flattery to extract a desired outcome from someone who might initially be unwilling to comply.
  • jolt sm out of sth The idiom "jolt someone out of something" means to abruptly and forcefully free someone from a certain state or condition, usually one that is negative or unproductive. It can imply a sudden awakening or realization that brings someone out of a stagnant or complacent mindset.
  • eyes are out on stalks The idiom "eyes are out on stalks" is a figurative expression used to describe someone who is looking intently or with great excitement at something. It implies a sense of fascination or astonishment, as if one's eyes are protruding from their sockets like stalks.
  • stalk out of The idiom "stalk out of" is used to describe someone leaving a place or situation in an angry or proud manner. It implies walking away dramatically, with purpose, and often with a display of irritation or disdain.
  • luck out The idiom "luck out" means to be fortunate or lucky in a particular situation, often implying unexpectedly positive outcomes or opportunities.
  • punch sb's lights out The idiom "punch someone's lights out" means to physically strike someone with such force that they lose consciousness or are severely injured, typically by delivering a powerful blow to the head. It implies an act of violence or aggression intended to disable or harm someone.
  • be speaking out of both sides of mouth The idiom "be speaking out of both sides of the mouth" means to say contradictory or inconsistent things, often for the purpose of deception or double-dealing. It refers to someone who speaks in a way that supports two opposing viewpoints simultaneously, leading to confusion or distrust among others.
  • burst out with The idiom "burst out with" means to suddenly and loudly say or express something, often without warning or control. It can also refer to suddenly starting to do something or display a particular behavior in an unrestrained manner.
  • worry an animal out of The idiom "worry an animal out of" typically means to exhaust or fatigue an animal through excessive fretting, concern, or distress. It implies that constant worry or anxiety can have a detrimental effect on an animal's well-being or vitality.
  • slug it out The idiom "slug it out" means to engage in a prolonged, intense, and potentially physical confrontation or competition, often involving a battle of endurance, strength, or skill. It refers to a situation where two or more individuals or groups fight or compete against each other with great determination and effort until a winner emerges.
  • be out to lunch The idiom "be out to lunch" means to be unaware, inattentive, or ignorant of what is happening. It implies that someone is mentally or emotionally disconnected, lost, or not fully engaged in a conversation or situation.
  • jerk out The idiom "jerk out" typically means to yank or pull something out suddenly and with forceful motion. It can also imply doing something quickly, abruptly, or without much consideration or finesse.
  • fake out The idiom "fake out" means to deceive or trick someone by pretending to do one thing but then doing something else entirely. It refers to creating a false impression or misleading someone intentionally for a strategic advantage.
  • get a rise out of someone The idiom "get a rise out of someone" means to provoke or elicit a strong reaction or emotional response from someone intentionally, to deliberately make them angry, upset, or frustrated.
  • smooth out sth The idiom "smooth out something" means to resolve or eliminate difficulties, problems, or inconsistencies in a situation, making it more pleasant, harmonious, or easy to deal with. It refers to the act of ironing out or rectifying any rough or uneven aspects to create a smoother and more polished outcome.
  • out of spite The idiom "out of spite" refers to doing something in order to intentionally cause harm, annoyance, or inconvenience to someone else as a result of feelings of anger, resentment, or a desire for revenge.
  • bounce out The idiom "bounce out" means to leave or exit a place quickly, energetically, or with a sense of urgency. It implies a hasty departure, often accompanied by bouncing or moving with a lively and springy motion.
  • be out of line The idiom "be out of line" means to behave inappropriately or to act in a way that is beyond acceptable or reasonable boundaries. It refers to someone going against social norms, rules, or expectations.
  • groan something out The idiom "groan something out" refers to expressing something with great effort or reluctance, often accompanied by audible dissatisfaction or disappointment. It implies that the words or statement being articulated are difficult or unpleasant to vocalize, resulting in a groaning sound.
  • blow sth out of (all) proportion The idiom "blow something out of (all) proportion" means to exaggerate or magnify a situation, issue, or problem beyond its true significance or impact. It refers to the act of making something appear larger, more serious, or more dramatic than it actually is.
  • flesh sth out (with sth) The idiom "flesh something out (with something)" means to add more details, information, or substance to something in order to make it more complete or comprehensive. It is often used when discussing a concept, idea, or plan that needs further elaboration or development.
  • eat heart out The idiom "eat your heart out" is used to express pride or satisfaction about something that another person might envy or be jealous of. It essentially means to boast or show off one's accomplishments or possessions.
  • let something out (to someone) The idiom "let something out (to someone)" means to reveal or disclose information, secrets, or emotions to someone. It involves sharing something that was previously kept private or hidden, typically with the intention of seeking advice, support, or simply confiding in someone.
  • flunk out (of school) The idiom "flunk out (of school)" means to fail or be expelled from school, typically due to poor academic performance or not meeting the necessary requirements to continue one's education. It suggests an inability to meet the academic standards set by the institution, leading to dismissal or being unable to advance to the next level.
  • root sm or sth out of sth The idiom "root sm or sth out of sth" means to find or discover something or someone, especially after a thorough and determined search or investigation. It is often used to describe the process of eliminating or getting rid of something undesirable or hidden.
  • hide out (from sm or sth) The idiom "hide out (from someone or something)" means to conceal oneself or stay in a place where one cannot easily be found or detected. It often implies evasion or avoiding a person or situation that may pose a threat or undesirable consequences.
  • be tearing (one's) hair out The idiom "be tearing (one's) hair out" means to be extremely frustrated, worried, or anxious about something. It describes a state of intense stress or exasperation.
  • put out to pasture The idiom "put out to pasture" refers to the action of retiring someone or something, often due to age or obsolescence. It originated from the practice of moving old or injured livestock to a pasture for them to live out their remaining years without having to work or be productive. This phrase is commonly used metaphorically to describe removing someone or something from active participation or use.
  • run out of time The expression "run out of time" means to exhaust the available period for completing a task or achieving a goal. It implies that there is a deadline or limit that has been reached, and there is no more time left to continue or finish the intended activity.
  • blab out The idiom "blab out" means to inadvertently reveal or disclose information that should have been kept a secret, usually due to speaking without thinking or without intending to divulge the information.
  • burnt out The idiom "burnt out" refers to a state of physical or mental exhaustion, usually resulting from prolonged stress, excessive work, or lack of interest or fulfillment in one's activities. It implies that a person has reached a point where they feel emotionally drained, depleted, and unable to continue functioning at the same level they once did.
  • out of the loop The idiom "out of the loop" means to be unaware or not included in the latest information or developments regarding a specific matter or situation. It refers to someone who is not a part of the group or conversation that is aware of recent happenings or decisions.
  • throw the baby out with the bath water The idiom "throw the baby out with the bath water" means to get rid of something valuable or important along with something undesirable, usually as a result of a hasty or careless decision. It suggests that in the process of attempting to remove or eliminate something negative, one inadvertently discards something positive that should have been preserved or considered.
  • churn something out The idiom "churn something out" means to produce or create something quickly, often in large quantities and without much thought or care for quality. It refers to the action of repeatedly and rapidly making or generating something, similar to churning butter or milk to obtain a large amount.
  • drown sm or sth out The idiom "drown someone or something out" means to overpower or obscure the sounds of someone or something else by making a louder or more dominant noise. It suggests that the original sound is rendered inaudible or less noticeable due to the overwhelming presence of the louder noise.
  • ease sm out of sth The idiom "ease someone out of something" means to gradually or subtly remove or displace someone from a position, situation, or involvement by reducing their influence or importance. It often implies a smooth or strategic approach to transition someone out rather than a sudden or forceful removal.
  • bolt out (of some place) The idiom "bolt out (of some place)" means to suddenly and quickly leave a place in haste or with great speed. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire to escape or avoid something.
  • couldn't act/argue/fight your way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't act/argue/fight your way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone's extreme incompetence or lack of skill in a particular area. It implies that the person is so incapable that they would struggle to accomplish even the simplest task, such as getting out of a flimsy paper bag.
  • burn something out The idiom "burn something out" commonly refers to the act of using something excessively or intensively to the point where it no longer functions properly or becomes worn out. It can be used to describe the exhaustion or depletion of resources, energy, or enthusiasm.
  • swear out The idiom "swear out" means to make a formal and official statement, typically under oath, regarding an accusation or a legal matter. It is often used in the context of swearing out a warrant or swearing out an affidavit, where a person provides a sworn statement as evidence.
  • scare out of The idiom "scare out of" refers to intimidating or frightening someone to the extent that they are forced or compelled to leave a particular place or situation. It implies instilling fear or panic as a means of removing someone or something from a specific location or circumstance.
  • conk out The idiom "conk out" refers to the sudden and complete failure or breakdown of a mechanical or electrical device. It can also be used to describe when a person becomes extremely tired and falls asleep unexpectedly.
  • straighten sm out The idiom "straighten someone out" means to help or assist someone in getting their thoughts, ideas, or behavior organized or in alignment with what is considered correct or acceptable. It usually involves correcting misunderstandings, providing guidance, or giving advice to someone who is confused, troubled, or misguided.
  • get finger out The idiom "get finger out" means to start acting promptly or quickly, to stop being lazy or procrastinating, and to get to work or make progress on a task or responsibility. It is often used as a blunt or slightly harsh way of telling someone to stop wasting time and start taking action.
  • broaden something out The idiom "broaden something out" typically means to expand or increase the scope, range, or variety of something. It refers to making something more extensive or inclusive.
  • feel out of things The idiom "feel out of things" means to feel excluded, disconnected, or not included in a particular situation, group, or social interaction. It conveys a sense of being left out or lacking involvement, resulting in a feeling of being isolated or detached from what is happening around you.
  • cry your heart out The expression "cry your heart out" means to weep or sob intensely and openly, releasing all of one's pent-up emotions.
  • build sth out of sth The idiom "build something out of something" means to construct or create something using the materials or resources that are available. It implies using ingenuity and creativity to make something functional or impressive.
  • out of (one's) brain The idiom "out of (one's) brain" typically means to be extremely irrational, crazy, or mentally unstable. It suggests that a person's thoughts or actions are not rational or logical.
  • hound sth out of sm To "hound something out of someone" means to persistently and relentlessly pressure or harass someone until they reveal information or disclose a secret. It is an idiomatic expression that implies pursuing someone like a hound dog relentlessly until the desired information or truth is obtained.
  • bawl sm out The idiom "bawl someone out" means to scold or reprimand someone loudly and angrily. It implies a forceful and aggressive manner of expressing disapproval or reprimanding someone for their actions or behavior.
  • the jury is out The idiom "the jury is out" means that a decision or verdict has not yet been reached, implying that there is still uncertainty or debate about a particular topic or issue. It suggests that further consideration or evidence is needed before coming to a conclusion or making a judgment.
  • straight out of the chute The idiom "straight out of the chute" means something that is done or achieved immediately or without hesitation, right from the beginning or right from the starting point. It refers to a swift or prompt action, similar to something emerging quickly and smoothly from a chute or a narrow passage.
  • cancel out (of sth) The definition of the idiom "cancel out (of sth)" is to eliminate or neutralize the effect or influence of something, often resulting in a situation where there is no overall impact or consequence.
  • tear out of The idiom "tear out of" means to leave in a hurry or to depart quickly and forcefully, typically while exhibiting intense energy or aggression. It conveys the idea of rushing out or exiting with great speed and energy.
  • sweat sth out of sm The idiom "sweat something out of someone" means to obtain or extract information, a secret, or a confession from someone through persistence, pressure, or intense questioning. It implies that the person being questioned or interrogated is made to feel uncomfortable or anxious, forcing them to divulge the information.
  • throw out The idiom "throw out" typically means to discard, get rid of, or reject something, such as an object, idea, or suggestion. It implies the act of forcefully or decisively disposing of something unwanted or unnecessary.
  • bust sm out of sm place The idiom "bust someone out of somewhere" refers to the act of freeing or rescuing someone from a particular place, typically against their will or in a daring or improvised manner. It implies a forceful or illicit action to release someone from confinement, such as breaking out of prison, escaping captivity, or liberating someone from a difficult or restricted situation.
  • chew (one) out The idiom "chew (one) out" means to scold or reprimand someone angrily and severely for their actions or behavior. It implies a forceful and intense verbal reprimand, often characterized by harsh words and a strong tone of voice.
  • make (sm) sense (out) of sm or sth The idiom "make (sm) sense (out) of sm or sth" means to understand or comprehend something that may initially be confusing or unclear. It refers to the ability to make logical connections or find meaning in a particular situation, concept, or information.
  • figure sb out The idiom "figure someone out" means to understand or comprehend someone's thoughts, intentions, behavior, or personality, especially in a situation where they are difficult to understand or predict. It refers to the process of gaining insight into someone's motives or understanding what makes them tick.
  • leap out The idiom "leap out" means to suddenly become noticeable or apparent, as if jumping out or standing out from the rest. It refers to something that becomes visibly obvious or striking, often in a surprising or unexpected way.
  • put out (the/one's) feelers The idiom "put out (the/one's) feelers" refers to the act of cautiously inquiring or seeking information and opinions from others, typically in order to assess a situation or gather insights before making a decision or taking action. It can also imply testing the waters or exploring possibilities without committing fully. The phrase alludes to the way some animals, such as insects or rodents, use their antennae or sensitive organs to gather information about their surroundings. In a figurative sense, it suggests a similar cautious and exploratory approach when interacting with others.
  • buy (one's) way out (of something) The idiom "buy one's way out (of something)" means to use money or influence to escape or avoid a difficult situation, punishment, or responsibility. It implies that someone is using their wealth or power to resolve a problem or extricate themselves from a negative consequence.
  • boom sth out The idiom "boom sth out" typically means to produce or play something, such as music, very loudly and forcefully. It refers to the act of emitting a loud, deep noise that echoes or reverberates in a powerful manner.
  • take someone out to dinner The idiom "take someone out to dinner" means to invite or treat someone to a meal at a restaurant, usually as a gesture of goodwill or to spend quality time together.
  • eat sth out The idiom "eat something out" refers to consuming or using up all of a particular food or substance. It can also mean to deplete or exhaust something completely. Additionally, it can be used metaphorically to describe thoroughly understanding or mastering a particular topic or subject.
  • cry out for (someone or something) The idiom "cry out for (someone or something)" means to strongly suggest or require the presence, involvement, or intervention of a specific person or thing. It conveys a sense of urgency or necessity, emphasizing that the situation or problem is in dire need of the person or thing mentioned.
  • be out of this world The idiom "be out of this world" is used to describe something exceptional, extraordinary, or amazing. It refers to a quality or experience that is beyond what is typically found or experienced in the world, often suggesting a sense of awe, astonishment, or amazement.
  • How is making out? The idiom "How is making out?" or "How are you making out?" is commonly used as a casual way of inquiring about someone's progress or situation. It usually refers to asking how someone is managing or coping with a particular situation or task.
  • live out of a suitcase The idiom "live out of a suitcase" means to have a transient lifestyle, constantly traveling or moving from one place to another, often without a permanent or stable home. It refers to the act of living with minimal belongings and relying on a suitcase to carry essential items.
  • set sth out (for sm or sth) The idiom "set sth out (for sm or sth)" means to arrange or display something in a particular way, often in preparation for someone or something. It can refer to organizing objects or items in an ordered manner or explaining ideas, plans, or intentions clearly and comprehensively.
  • exorcise sth out of sm The idiom "exorcise something out of someone" refers to the act of getting rid of or removing a negative or troubling element or influence from someone's mind or behavior. It implies the effort to eliminate or eradicate something undesirable from a person's thoughts, emotions, or actions. Similar to how an exorcism is used to free someone from evil spirits or demons, this idiom metaphorically conveys the idea of freeing someone from something that is in some way tormenting or troubling them.
  • inveigle someone out of something The idiom "inveigle someone out of something" means to coax, persuade, or manipulate someone into giving up or surrendering something, typically through deceit or flattery. It involves using cunning tactics to acquire something from someone, often against their better judgment or without their full awareness of the situation.
  • get a buzz out of someone or something The idiom "get a buzz out of someone or something" means to derive excitement, enjoyment, or satisfaction from someone or something. It refers to a feeling of pleasure or thrill that is typically derived from a particular person, activity, or situation. It can also imply a sense of exhilaration or a temporary high experienced from a specific source.
  • fish out of water, a The idiom "fish out of water" refers to a person who feels uncomfortable or out of place in a particular situation or environment. It often implies that the person lacks the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to fit in their surroundings, making them appear awkward or incongruous.
  • stick out a mile The idiom "stick out a mile" means that something is very obvious or easily noticeable.
  • out of hock The idiom "out of hock" means to have repaid a debt or to be released from a financial obligation or burden. It refers to being free from owing money or being financially indebted.
  • put something out of its misery The idiom "put something out of its misery" means to end the suffering or distress of someone or something by providing a quick and merciful resolution, often through an act like euthanasia or termination. It is commonly used metaphorically to express the need to end or resolve a difficult situation or problem promptly and decisively.
  • cuss someone out The idiom "cuss someone out" means to express anger, frustration, or disapproval towards someone by using profane or abusive language, often in a loud and aggressive manner. It refers to verbally attacking or berating someone with offensive and vulgar words.
  • out the kindness of (one's) heart The idiom "out the kindness of (one's) heart" refers to doing something for someone without any expectation of getting something in return. It implies performing a generous action solely motivated by compassion, empathy, or goodwill towards others.
  • come out (of) the little end of the horn The idiom "come out (of) the little end of the horn" means to experience a negative or unfavorable outcome or consequence as a result of one's actions or decisions. It implies that the result is unsatisfying or disadvantageous, akin to receiving the smaller, less desirable end of a horn.
  • can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear The idiom "can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear" means that it is impossible to turn something of low quality or value into something refined or impressive. It implies that the inherent nature or quality of something cannot be fundamentally changed or improved beyond its natural limitations.
  • dig sm or sth out of sth The idiom "dig someone or something out of something" means to locate, find, or uncover someone or something that is hidden, buried, or inaccessible within something else. It often refers to retrieving objects from a cluttered or crowded place. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of uncovering information, memories, or emotions from the past.
  • put out to grass The idiom "put out to grass" refers to the act of retiring or replacing someone or something, typically due to age or obsolescence. It originally comes from the practice of moving older or worn-out livestock to a pasture or grassy area where they can live out the remainder of their days.
  • foul out The idiom "foul out" is a term used in sports, particularly in basketball and baseball, which refers to the act of a player accumulating a specific number of fouls, resulting in their disqualification from the game. In basketball, a player fouls out after committing a certain number of personal fouls (usually five or six), while in baseball, a player fouls out after hitting a ball foul when they already have two strikes. In both cases, fouling out means the player must leave the game and cannot participate further.
  • pour your heart out The idiom "pour your heart out" means to reveal or share one's deepest feelings, emotions, or thoughts in a sincere and uninhibited manner, typically to someone who is willing to listen and provide support.
  • laugh out of the other side of your mouth, at be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh out of the other side of your mouth" or "laugh on the other side of your face" implies a sudden change or reversal of attitude, expression, or circumstances. It suggests that someone who was initially happy, confident, or triumphant will eventually find themselves experiencing disappointment, defeat, or embarrassment. It highlights the idea that one's current situation or emotions may completely transform, often in an unexpected or ironic manner.
  • get it out of your system The idiom "get it out of your system" means to do or say something that one has been wanting to do or say for a while, in order to release any pent-up feelings or desires. It refers to the act of expressing or getting rid of something that has been bothering or occupying one's mind or emotions.
  • clean something out The idiom "clean something out" means to remove all the contents or clutter from a space or container, thoroughly organize and tidy it to make it empty, neat, or ready for use again. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to getting rid of unnecessary or unwanted things or individuals.
  • blow sth out The idiom "blow sth out" typically means to extinguish or put out something forcefully, usually referring to a flame or fire. It can also be used metaphorically to mean to cancel, destroy, or diminish something with great force or impact.
  • board (sm or an animal) out The idiom "board (someone or an animal) out" means to arrange for someone or an animal to be cared for or lodged in a specific place, usually for an extended period of time, such as boarding a pet at a kennel or sending a child to a boarding school. It implies that the person or animal will be provided with accommodations and necessary support while temporarily living away from their usual residence.
  • out of somebody's hands The idiom "out of somebody's hands" means that someone has lost control or power over a situation or decision. It suggests that the person in question is no longer able to influence or take action regarding a particular matter.
  • hammer out The idiom "hammer out" means to negotiate, discuss, or resolve a problem, disagreement, or agreement through vigorous and persistent effort or debate. It usually refers to reaching a final and satisfactory solution by working through the issues and coming to a compromise or agreement.
  • live out of cans The idiom "live out of cans" refers to someone who primarily eats canned food, usually due to a lack of access to fresh or cooked meals. It can also imply a sense of minimalism or simplicity in one's lifestyle, relying on convenience foods rather than elaborate cooking or dining experiences.
  • out of round The idiom "out of round" refers to something that is not perfectly circular, symmetrical, or in proper form. It is often used to describe objects that have become misshapen, distorted, or unbalanced.
  • blow someone’s brains out The idiom "blow someone’s brains out" means to shoot someone in the head with extreme force or violence, causing severe injury or instant death. It is a figurative expression used to emphasize the idea of delivering a powerful or fatal blow, often used in relation to violent or aggressive acts. Note that this idiom should not be taken literally and should not promote or encourage any form of violence or harm.
  • burn out The idiom "burn out" refers to a state of physical or mental exhaustion and fatigue due to excessive work, stress, or pressure. It is often used to describe the feeling of being overwhelmed, emotionally drained, or no longer able to cope with one's commitments or responsibilities.
  • be out of the ark The idiom "be out of the ark" refers to something or someone being outdated, old-fashioned, or out of touch with modern times. It suggests that the subject or object in question belongs to a much earlier era, similar to the time when Noah's Ark was built.
  • keep your/an eye out for sb/sth To "keep your/an eye out for someone/something" means to remain alert, watchful, and attentive in order to notice or discover a particular person or thing. It suggests the act of being vigilant and actively looking for someone or something, typically with the intention of finding or sighting them.
  • put (someone or something) out of business The idiom "put (someone or something) out of business" means to cause someone's business to fail or shut down completely.
  • parcel out sth To "parcel out something" means to distribute or divide something, usually in a fair or organized manner. It often refers to dividing or allocating resources, tasks, responsibilities, or portions of something among different people or groups.
  • bombed out The idiom "bombed out" typically refers to a situation where someone has failed or performed poorly, often resulting in disappointment or defeat. It can also describe a place or area that has been severely damaged or destroyed, often due to bombings or other forms of devastation.
  • laugh out of the other side of mouth The idiom "laugh out of the other side of the mouth" refers to a situation where someone initially expresses joy or triumph, but later experiences disappointment or sorrow due to a change in circumstances. It implies a sudden shift in emotions from happiness to despair.
  • pitch sth out The idiom "pitch something out" means to throw or discard something, typically in a careless or abrupt manner. It refers to getting rid of something unwanted or unnecessary without much consideration or concern.
  • out of work The idiom "out of work" refers to being unemployed or without a job. It means that someone does not currently have a job or is not actively employed.
  • (one's) Venus turns out a whelp The idiom "(one's) Venus turns out a whelp" means that someone's beloved or idealized person or thing turns out to be disappointing or flawed. It implies that the initially perceived beauty or goodness is mere illusion, and the reality is far from what was expected. The phrase is derived from the Roman goddess Venus, associated with beauty and love, and the word "whelp" referring to a young animal, often used to describe a puppy.
  • beat out The idiom "beat out" means to defeat someone or something in a competition or contest by competing with them and emerging as the winner or victor. It can also be used to describe surpassing or outperforming someone or something in a particular area or aspect.
  • out of touch (with sm or sth) The idiom "out of touch (with someone or something)" refers to a situation where a person lacks understanding or knowledge about a particular subject or someone's perspective. It suggests that the person is unaware, uninformed, or disconnected from current developments, trends, opinions, or emotions related to that person or thing.
  • scare the hell out of (one) The idiom "scare the hell out of (one)" means to frighten or terrify someone intensely or to cause extreme fear.
  • knock the stuffing out of someone The idiom "knock the stuffing out of someone" means to severely defeat, overwhelm, or physically harm someone, often leaving them feeling completely battered or disheartened. It implies delivering a strong blow or impactful action that removes all determination, motivation, or confidence from the person.
  • fork out The idiom "fork out" means to spend or give money, often reluctantly or unwillingly, to pay for something.
  • out of the red The idiom "out of the red" refers to a situation where a person or a company has successfully overcome financial difficulties or debts and is now in a profitable or stable financial position. It means that they have moved from a negative or deficit state, represented by the color red (as used in financial recordings), to a positive or surplus state, often represented by the color black (hence the contrasting expression "in the black").
  • your sins will find you out The idiom "your sins will find you out" means that eventually, one's wrongdoings or immoral actions will be exposed or become known to others, often resulting in negative consequences or judgment. It suggests that it is nearly impossible to keep one's misdeeds hidden indefinitely, as the truth will eventually be revealed.
  • price (oneself, someone, or something) out of the market The idiom "price (oneself, someone, or something) out of the market" means to set a price that is so high that it makes a product, service, or individual unaffordable or uncompetitive compared to similar alternatives. It refers to the act of making oneself or something too expensive to be viable in the marketplace or causing potential customers to seek cheaper alternatives.
  • roll out the red carpet (for someone) The idiom "roll out the red carpet (for someone)" means to give someone an extravagant and highly welcoming reception, often for an important or special occasion. It implies treating someone with great honor, respect, and VIP treatment.
  • blow your/somebody's brains out The idiom "blow your/somebody's brains out" is an expression used to describe an act of extreme violence or aggression, often involving shooting or killing someone with tremendous force. It is a graphic and metaphorical way to emphasize a violent action or threat of great harm.
  • be out of the woods The idiom "be out of the woods" means to have overcome a difficult or dangerous situation, usually with the implication that there is no longer a threat or risk involved. It suggests that a person is no longer in immediate danger or facing a challenging circumstance.
  • cancel something out The idiom "cancel something out" means to nullify or negate the effect or impact of something, often by introducing an opposing or counteracting element. It implies that the two things in question counterbalance each other, resulting in an overall neutral or insignificant outcome.
  • beat the shit out of The idiom "beat the shit out of" is a colloquial expression that means to physically assault someone forcefully or severely. It suggests the act of causing significant harm or delivering a vigorous beating. The idiom is often used figuratively to describe defeating or overwhelming someone or something with great force or intensity, often in a non-physical context.
  • pull a rabbit out of your hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of your hat" means to perform a surprising or extraordinary feat, often at the last moment or under challenging circumstances, as if by magic. It refers to the act of producing something unexpected or remarkable, similar to a magician pulling a live rabbit out of an empty hat.
  • Things will work out The idiom "things will work out" means that, despite the current difficulties or uncertainties, the situation will eventually resolve itself in a positive or satisfactory way. It implies that there is no need to worry or stress excessively because there is confidence that everything will eventually be resolved or fall into place.
  • take it out on The idiom "take it out on" refers to the act of directing anger, frustration, or negative emotions towards someone or something unrelated to the actual cause of those feelings. It means to vent or release one's emotions on an innocent or undeserving target instead of addressing the real issue.
  • out to win The idiom "out to win" refers to someone who is determined and making great efforts to achieve victory or success in a given situation or competition.
  • take the bread out of someone's mouth The idiom "take the bread out of someone's mouth" means to deprive someone of their means of survival or livelihood, especially by taking away their job, source of income, or opportunities for personal growth. It implies a severe disruption or harm to someone's well-being or sustenance.
  • frighten/scare the wits out of sb, at frighten/scare sb out of their wits The idiom "frighten/scare the wits out of someone" or "frighten/scare someone out of their wits" means to greatly terrify or alarm someone, causing them to become extremely frightened or scared. It implies that the person's fear is so intense that it affects their ability to think or reason clearly.
  • gyp someone out of something The idiom "gyp someone out of something" means to deceive or defraud someone by unfairly taking away something that rightfully belongs to them, typically through cunning or dishonesty. It implies manipulating or cheating someone out of their possessions, rights, or benefits in an underhanded manner.
  • hollow out The idiom "hollow out" refers to the process of removing the inner part or core of something, leaving behind only the outer shell or exterior. This can also be used metaphorically to describe the depletion or loss of important elements within a system or organization, resulting in its overall weakening or decline.
  • don't let the door hit you on the way out The idiom "don't let the door hit you on the way out" is a dismissive or sarcastic remark typically used to bid farewell to someone who is leaving, often with the implication that the speaker is glad to see them go. It suggests that the departure of the person is of no concern or importance to the speaker, and they do not wish to prolong the interaction further. It can be used playfully or with genuine disdain, depending on the context and tone.
  • clear out of some place The idiom "clear out of some place" means to leave or vacate a particular place quickly and completely. It implies a sense of urgency or making a hasty exit from the location.
  • your heart out The idiom "your heart out" is used to emphasize that someone is doing something with great enthusiasm, skill, or to an impressive extent.
  • charge out (of sm place) The idiom "charge out (of sm place)" typically means to leave a place quickly and forcefully, often with great energy or determination. It can also imply a sudden and hasty departure from a location, usually due to feeling excited, angry, or in a rush.
  • max (yourself) out The idiom "max (yourself) out" refers to pushing oneself to the absolute limit or giving everything one has in terms of effort, energy, or resources. It often implies exerting oneself physically, mentally, or financially to the fullest extent possible.
  • check out sb/sth The idiom "check out sb/sth" means to examine or inspect someone or something in order to assess their qualities, condition, or suitability. It can also refer to observing or investigating someone or something out of curiosity or interest.
  • get someone or something out of someone or something The idiom "get someone or something out" can have different meanings based on context. However, a general definition for this idiom is: to extract, remove, or free someone or something from a particular situation, location, predicament, or state.
  • bawl out To "bawl out" is an idiomatic expression that means to verbally scold or reprimand someone harshly and loudly. It implies expressing anger or disapproval loudly and forcefully to convey strong criticism towards someone's behavior or actions.
  • out of consideration (for someone or something) The idiom "out of consideration (for someone or something)" means to act in a way that shows thoughtfulness, respect, or concern for someone or something. It refers to taking into account the feelings, needs, or well-being of others before making decisions or taking actions.
  • get out of a mess To "get out of a mess" means to successfully extricate oneself from a difficult, complicated, or problematic situation. It implies finding a solution or resolving a problem that one is involved in, often with effort or ingenuity.
  • deck someone or something out (in something) The idiom "deck someone or something out (in something)" means to dress or adorn someone or something in a particular outfit or attire, typically in a showy or extravagant manner. It refers to the act of embellishing or lavishly decorating someone or something.
  • fill out The idiom "fill out" typically means to complete or provide all the necessary information or details required for a specific form, document, or application. It can also refer to physically increasing in size, volume, or weight, or to add substance or content to something that is lacking.
  • talk sb out of sth The idiom "talk someone out of something" means to persuade or convince someone not to do or pursue something that they initially intended or desired to do. It involves using persuasive arguments or reasoning to change someone's mind or dissuade them from a particular course of action.
  • frighten the daylights out of The idiom "frighten the daylights out of" means to scare someone very greatly or intensely. It implies causing extreme fear or terror in a person.
  • come out with The idiom "come out with" means to make a statement, declaration, or announcement, typically in a surprising or unexpected manner. It can also be used to describe the act of releasing or publishing something, such as a book, a song, or a product.
  • (one's) tongue is hanging out The idiom "(one's) tongue is hanging out" refers to a state of extreme exhaustion or fatigue, often suggesting that someone is physically or mentally drained to the point where they have no energy left. It can be used to describe someone who has expended all their energy or resources and can no longer go on.
  • out of the corner of your eye The idiom "out of the corner of your eye" refers to seeing or perceiving something indirectly or without directly looking at it, often in a quick or fleeting manner. It implies noticing something unintentionally or without giving it full attention.
  • be out like a light The idiom "be out like a light" means to fall asleep quickly and soundly, often implying that one is deep asleep and unaware of their surroundings.
  • fork sth out The idiom "fork sth out" means to reluctantly or unwillingly spend an amount of money on something, often seen as excessive or unexpected.
  • put somebody/something out of their/its misery The idiom "put somebody/something out of their/its misery" means to end someone's suffering or to quickly and compassionately kill or eliminate something in a severe or hopeless situation. It commonly refers to relieving physical or emotional pain by ending a person's life, usually an animal that is suffering or in a dire condition.
  • bust out laughing The idiom "bust out laughing" means to suddenly burst into uncontrollable or loud laughter in response to something funny or amusing.
  • ooze (out) (from sm or sth) The idiom "ooze (out) (from sm or sth)" means to slowly and gradually flow or seep out from someone or something. It typically describes a substance or a quality that exudes or emerges slowly and consistently.
  • iron the wrinkles out (of/in something) The idiom "iron the wrinkles out (of/in something)" means to resolve or eliminate any problems, inconsistencies, or imperfections in a situation, plan, or process. It implies the act of smoothing out difficulties or resolving conflicts, similar to how ironing removes wrinkles from clothing, thereby achieving a more polished outcome.
  • dance out of step The idiom "dance out of step" refers to someone behaving or acting differently from the rest of a group, often going against the majority or deviating from the established norms or expectations. It implies someone doing their own thing or holding unique perspectives, which may result in them standing out or appearing unconventional compared to others.
  • like it is going out of fashion or style The idiom "like it is going out of fashion or style" means to do something excessively, excessively or in large amounts. It suggests that the person is doing something as if it is about to go out of style or popularity, indicating extravagance, abundance, or an excessive amount.
  • pull/get your finger out The idiom "pull/get your finger out" is an informal expression that means to start working or taking action with increased effort, determination, or urgency. It is often used to convey a sense of impatience or frustration towards someone who has been procrastinating or underperforming.
  • the shit out of sb/sth The idiom "the shit out of sb/sth" often indicates performing an action or activity with great intensity, skill, force, or vigor. It is used to emphasize the level of effort, proficiency, or impact in a particular situation.
  • come out to The idiom "come out to" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To publicly disclose or reveal something, particularly about one's personal beliefs, preferences, or identity. This is often used when someone reveals their sexual orientation or gender identity to others, known as "coming out." Example: "She came out to her family as gay last weekend." 2. To match or total a specific amount, often referring to a financial or numerical value. Example: "After adding up all expenses, the final cost of the project came out to $10,000." 3. To attend or participate in an event, gathering, or social activity. Example: "Are you coming out to the concert tonight
  • edit out The idiom "edit out" refers to the act of removing or deleting certain content or parts of a text, conversation, or other media material, with the aim of refining, improving, or censoring it.
  • pull something/a rabbit out of the hat The idiom "pull something/a rabbit out of the hat" means to unexpectedly produce a solution, idea, or remarkable result, especially in a challenging or difficult situation. It is often used to describe someone's ability to come up with a surprising or clever solution to a problem.
  • cross sm or sth out The idiom "cross sm or sth out" means to draw a line through a word, phrase, or sentence in order to indicate it should be removed or disregarded. It symbolizes the act of invalidating or deleting something that is no longer relevant, accurate, or wanted. This idiom is commonly used when editing or revising written content.
  • climb out (of sth) The idiom "climb out (of sth)" generally means to escape, overcome, or emerge from a difficult or challenging situation. It implies that one has been in a negative or unwanted circumstance and manages to improve or move on from it.
  • ease someone (on) out The idiom "ease someone (on) out" refers to the gradual removal or replacement of someone from a position, role, or organization, usually done in a gentle or subtle manner to avoid confrontation or resistance. It implies a slow and careful process of reducing someone's involvement or influence without abruptly or forcefully removing them.
  • cancel out (of) The idiom "cancel out" means to neutralize or negate the effects or influence of something. It is often used to describe situations where two or more factors or actions counteract each other, resulting in a balanced outcome or no significant impact.
  • bang something out To "bang something out" means to do something quickly and with little effort, typically referring to writing or producing something hastily. It implies a sense of speed and lack of careful attention to detail in order to complete a task or project as fast as possible.
  • make a federal case out of The idiom "make a federal case out of" means to overreact or make a big deal out of something that is not particularly significant or important. It implies that the person is excessively dramatic or exaggerated in their response, similar to the way a federal case can be blown out of proportion in comparison to a minor offense.
  • holler something out The idiom "holler something out" means to shout or yell something loudly and forcefully. It implies a sense of urgency or an attempt to draw attention.
  • out of square The idiom "out of square" refers to something that is not aligned or not straight, often used to describe an object or structure that is not perfectly perpendicular or at right angles to something else. It implies a lack of symmetry or proper alignment.
  • smell out The idiom "smell out" means to detect or discover something, often negative or hidden, through intuition, investigation, or careful observation. It implies the ability to identify or uncover secrets, lies, or deceitful behavior.
  • lean out of something The idiom "lean out of something" refers to the act of extending or protruding one's body or part of it beyond the normal or safe boundary of an object, typically looking or reaching out further than intended.
  • scare out of one's wits The idiom "scare out of one's wits" means to frighten someone to an extreme degree, causing them to become terrified or panicked. It implies a state of intense fear or alarm that may momentarily affect one's mental faculties.
  • have coming out of ears The idiom "have (something) coming out of ears" is used to emphasize an excessive or abundant quantity of something. It implies that someone has an overwhelming or excessive amount of a particular thing. It can be used for both physical objects or abstract concepts.
  • have somebody eating out of your hand The idiom "have somebody eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, typically by being able to manipulate or persuade them easily. It implies having someone at your mercy or under your spell, as if they were figuratively eating out of your hand, solely relying on your actions or decisions.
  • wash out (of sth) The idiom "wash out (of something)" typically means to fail, quit, or be eliminated from a particular activity, competition, or endeavor. It suggests that someone's performance or ability was not up to the required standards or expectations, resulting in being removed or not being able to continue in that particular pursuit.
  • crap out (of sth) (on sm) The idiom "crap out (of sth) (on sm)" means to abandon, fail at, or give up on something or someone when they are expected to show commitment, effort, or support. It can also imply betraying or disappointing someone by not fulfilling their expectations or obligations.
  • drop out of (something) The idiom "drop out of (something)" means to withdraw or quit from a particular activity, program, or endeavor prematurely or before its completion. It often refers to leaving an educational institution, such as school or college, without completing the full course or degree. It can also be used in a broader sense for any situation or commitment from which someone decides to discontinue participation.
  • lay out sth The idiom "lay out something" means to arrange or display something in a particular way, usually in a systematic or organized manner. It can refer to physical items being arranged, such as laying out clothes, tools, or objects, or it can also represent organizing information, plans, or ideas in a clear and ordered fashion.
  • form sth out of sth The idiom "form something out of something" means to create or construct something by using or transforming existing materials, resources, or ideas. It refers to the act of shaping or designing something by organizing or rearranging certain elements or components. This idiom emphasizes the process of making or building something using available means rather than starting from scratch.
  • on the way out The idiom "on the way out" refers to something or someone that is declining or becoming less popular, influential, or relevant. It implies that the thing or person in question is in a state of decline or heading towards obscurity or insignificance.
  • bum someone out The idiom "bum someone out" means to make someone feel sad, disappointed, or disheartened. It refers to a situation or an action that brings down someone's mood or dampens their spirits.
  • out of bounds The idiom "out of bounds" typically refers to something or someone being outside the permitted or restricted area, limit, or boundary. It is commonly used to indicate that someone or something is not following the established rules, is beyond the accepted limits, or is prohibited from a particular area or action.
  • brazen it out The idiom "brazen it out" means to act confidently, boldly, or defiantly in a situation where one's actions or behavior are considered inappropriate, unlawful, or immoral. It refers to someone openly and shamelessly facing or confronting the consequences of their actions, without showing any signs of guilt, fear, or remorse.
  • out of one's head The idiom "out of one's head" typically means to be mentally unstable, crazy, or delirious.
  • be out on your ear The idiom "be out on your ear" means to be forcefully and abruptly dismissed or removed from a place or situation, typically without any warning or consideration. It implies being fired, expelled, or cast out unceremoniously.
  • make out a case The idiomatic expression "make out a case" means to present or construct a persuasive argument or justification for a particular situation, opinion, or action. It involves providing evidence, reasoning, or supporting points to support or validate a certain stance or assertion.
  • out of your depth The idiom "out of your depth" means to be in a situation or undertaking that is beyond one's abilities, expertise, or understanding. It implies that someone is overwhelmed, outmatched, or lacking the necessary knowledge or skills to handle a particular task or situation effectively.
  • beat one’s brains out The idiom "beat one's brains out" means to exert a great amount of mental effort or strain in order to solve a problem, make a decision, or understand something complex. It suggests intense or prolonged thinking or contemplation.
  • hire someone or something out The idiom "hire someone or something out" means to rent or lease a person or object for a specific period of time. It implies offering a person's services or renting out an item, typically in exchange for payment.
  • lay someone out To "lay someone out" is an idiomatic expression that means to knock someone down or render them unconscious, usually as a result of a physical blow or attack. It can also refer to forcefully confronting or criticizing someone verbally.
  • knock the spots out of The idiom "knock the spots out of" means to surpass or outperform someone or something by a considerable margin. It suggests a level of superiority or excellence that exceeds all expectations or competitors.
  • lease sth (out) to sm The idiom "lease sth (out) to sm" means to rent or allow someone else to use a property, vehicle, or asset for a specific period of time in exchange for payment. It refers to the act of granting the right of possession and use of something to another person or entity in return for a rental fee or lease agreement.
  • come out in the wash, it will The idiom "come out in the wash, it will" means that a particular situation or issue will resolve itself over time or with further examination. It suggests that any problems or difficulties will eventually be resolved or clarified. Similar to how dirt or stains on clothes are removed during the washing process, this idiom implies that the truth or solution will become evident or apparent in due course.
  • max out The idiom "max out" means to reach the maximum limit or capacity of something, typically an individual's capabilities, resources, or achievements. It often implies giving one's full effort or utilizing all available resources to the fullest extent possible.
  • find something out The idiom "find something out" means to discover or obtain information, usually through investigation or inquiry. It implies the act of uncovering or learning something that was previously unknown or hidden.
  • check out (of something) The idiom "check out (of something)" typically means to leave or depart from a place, often referring to the completion of a stay or visit. It can be used in various contexts, such as checking out of a hotel, a hospital, a rental property, or any other location where one has been temporarily staying or using a service.
  • snuff out sth The idiom "snuff out sth" means to extinguish or put an end to something abruptly or forcefully. It is often used figuratively to describe the act of eliminating or eradicating something, such as an idea, a problem, or a threat.
  • iron out the wrinkles (of/in something) The idiom "iron out the wrinkles (of/in something)" means to resolve or smooth out the difficulties, problems, or inconsistencies in a situation or plan. It refers to the act of removing wrinkles from clothes with an iron, implying the act of making something tidy, organized, or flawless.
  • I don't want to wear out my welcome The idiom "I don't want to wear out my welcome" means that someone is cautious not to overstay their welcome or overdo their presence in a particular situation or place. It expresses a desire to maintain a good relationship or impression by not staying too long or becoming too burdensome.
  • (out) in the middle of nowhere "(Out) in the middle of nowhere" is an idiom that refers to a remote or isolated place that is far away from civilization or populated areas. It suggests being in a location that is difficult to reach or where there are few, if any, amenities or services available. It often conveys a sense of desolation or being far removed from urban areas.
  • beat/kick (the) hell out of somebody/something The idiom "beat/kick (the) hell out of somebody/something" means to physically assault or harm someone or something very aggressively or intensely. It expresses a severe level of violence or domination employed in a confrontation.
  • be out of bounds The idiom "be out of bounds" typically refers to a situation or action that is prohibited, inappropriate, or beyond the accepted limits or rules. It suggests that something is not permissible or allowed in a certain context or situation.
  • roll out sth The idiom "roll out something" refers to the act of introducing or unveiling something new, such as a product, service, or initiative, usually on a large or widespread scale. It implies the process of launching or making something available to the public or a target audience.
  • crap out (of something) (on someone) The idiom "crap out (of something) (on someone)" is an informal expression generally used to describe someone failing to fulfill a commitment or responsibility, often at the last minute. It suggests that the person unexpectedly quits, backs out, or abandons a task, leaving someone else to deal with the consequences or pick up the pieces. The term "crap out" emphasizes a sudden and unpleasant departure or withdrawal from a situation or agreement.
  • the genie is out of the bottle The idiom "the genie is out of the bottle" means that a situation or problem has been unleashed or brought into existence, and it is now difficult or impossible to control or put back. It implies that the consequences or effects of an action or decision cannot be reversed or undone.
  • get out The idiom "get out" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are a few common definitions: 1. To leave or exit a place or situation. Example: "I need to get out of this boring meeting." 2. To express disbelief, shock, or surprise. Example: "Get out! I can't believe you won the lottery." 3. To communicate or express oneself clearly or effectively. Example: "She has a way with words and can always get her point out." 4. To escape or free oneself from a difficult or dangerous situation. Example: "He managed to get out of the burning building before it collapsed." Note that the exact interpretation may vary depending on the context in which the idiom is used.
  • fink out The idiom "fink out" refers to someone backing out or betraying someone or something at the last moment, often due to fear, cowardice, or lack of integrity. It implies the act of abandoning or reneging on a commitment or promise when faced with difficulty or pressure.
  • take a leaf out of sb's book The idiom "take a leaf out of sb's book" means to imitate or learn from someone else's behavior or actions because they have demonstrated success or good qualities in a certain area. It implies adapting or emulating someone's positive attributes or methods in order to achieve a similar outcome or improve oneself.
  • get a kick out of someone/something The idiom "get a kick out of someone/something" means to derive enjoyment, amusement, or excitement from someone or something. It implies finding great pleasure, satisfaction, or entertainment in a particular person or situation.
  • dash out (for something) The idiom "dash out (for something)" typically means to quickly leave a place or move with great haste in order to obtain something or get it done. It implies a sense of urgency or urgency in one's actions.
  • edge out of The idiom "edge out of" means to gradually or slyly withdraw or maneuver oneself out of a situation or commitment, usually in a cautious or non-confrontational manner. It implies a slow, careful, and often strategic approach to remove oneself from a difficult or unwanted circumstance.
  • lash out The idiom "lash out" means to suddenly and violently express anger, frustration, or criticism towards someone or something.
  • run out of sm place The idiom "run out of (some) place" means to use up or exhaust the supply of something, often to the point of having none left, while being physically located or confined within a specific area or space.
  • put someone’s nose out of joint To "put someone's nose out of joint" means to irritate or upset someone, typically by undermining their position, authority, or self-esteem. It refers to causing offense or a sense of dissatisfaction, making the person feel slighted or disrespected. It implies that someone's ego or pride has been wounded, leading to a feeling of annoyance or anger.
  • reason sth out The idiom "reason something out" means to think through or use logical thinking and analysis to solve or understand something. It implies the process of examining the facts, considering various possibilities, and reaching a rational conclusion or solution.
  • ration sth out (among sm) The idiom "ration something out (among someone)" means to distribute or divide something, such as food, supplies, or resources, in a limited or controlled manner among a group of people. It often implies that the available quantity is scarce or insufficient, necessitating careful distribution to ensure everyone receives a fair share.
  • blot someone or something out The idiom "blot someone or something out" means to eliminate, erase, or completely remove someone or something from existence or memory. It is often used figuratively to describe the act of eradicating or obliterating a person, thing, or idea.
  • cancel out (of something) The idiom "cancel out (of something)" means to withdraw, quit, or remove oneself from a particular event, activity, or commitment. It refers to the act of deciding not to participate or be involved in something previously planned or agreed upon.
  • wring sth out The idiom "wring something out" means to extract or remove liquid by twisting or squeezing, typically from a cloth or a soaked object, in order to make it drier. It can also be used figuratively to describe the process of extracting the maximum benefit or information from a situation or someone.
  • flush out sb/sth The idiom "flush out sb/sth" means to force someone or something out of hiding or concealment, often by using tactics or strategies that expose or reveal their true nature or location. It refers to the act of making someone or something visible or accessible by removing any obstacles, hindrances, or privacy.
  • out of the clear blue sky The idiom "out of the clear blue sky" means that something unexpected or surprising occurs, seemingly without any warning or prior indication. It implies that the event or statement comes as a complete surprise, much like something falling from the sky.
  • out of line (with somebody/something) The idiom "out of line (with somebody/something)" is typically used to describe an action or behavior that goes against established rules, norms, or expectations, often causing offense, disagreement, or conflict with someone or something. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to is not behaving or acting appropriately within a particular context, relationship, or situation.
  • get out of the way The idiom "get out of the way" means to move aside or step aside in order to allow something or someone to pass through or continue their progress without obstruction. It can also be used metaphorically to advise someone to remove themselves from a situation or to avoid interfering or causing further problems.
  • be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind" refers to an extreme state of boredom, fear, anger, intoxication, or any other intense emotion. It indicates that someone is experiencing such emotions to the utmost degree, overwhelming their mind or mental state.
  • bring sth out The idiom "bring something out" typically means to make something accessible or available, often in the context of releasing or introducing a product, publication, or information to the public. It can also refer to revealing someone's hidden qualities or characteristics.
  • talk sm out of sth The idiom "talk someone out of something" means to convince or persuade someone not to do or pursue a particular action, plan, or decision. It involves discouraging or dissuading someone from a course of action through conversation, reasoning, or argument.
  • go all out The idiom "go all out" means to put forth maximum effort or to do something to the fullest extent possible without holding back or reserving any energy or resources. It implies complete dedication, determination, and commitment towards achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • been keeping out of trouble? The idiom "been keeping out of trouble" means to have avoided or stayed away from any kind of problem, misbehavior, or danger. It implies that the person has managed to maintain a trouble-free or well-behaved existence.
  • drag out The idiom "drag out" refers to extending or prolonging a situation, event, or conversation longer than necessary or desired, often resulting in a sense of boredom, frustration, or weariness. It implies making something last longer than it should.
  • Three strikes and you are out The idiom "Three strikes and you are out" refers to a rule in various sports and activities, particularly baseball, where a person or team is given three chances, attempts, or opportunities to succeed. However, if they fail or make three mistakes, they are disqualified, removed from the game, or considered a failure. It is often used as a metaphor to indicate that someone has reached their limit or exhausted their chances and will face consequences or be unsuccessful if they fail again.
  • zonk out The idiom "zonk out" refers to the act of falling asleep or becoming unconscious, usually in an abrupt or deep manner. It implies a sudden and complete loss of alertness or consciousness.
  • the bottom falls out of something The idiom "the bottom falls out of something" is used to describe a situation where something suddenly collapses, fails, or disintegrates, typically with significant consequences. It suggests a sudden and drastic decline, often in reference to a previously stable or successful situation or endeavor.
  • think out loud The idiom "think out loud" refers to someone verbalizing their thoughts or ideas, usually spontaneously and without filtering, as a way of problem-solving or expressing their thought process. It refers to speaking or sharing one's thoughts aloud instead of keeping them private or internalized.
  • nose out The idiom "nose out" refers to the act of surpassing or emerging victorious over someone or something through determination, effort, or skill, even in a close competition or race. It implies being able to finish ahead or to succeed by a narrow margin. It can also imply being able to discover or find something that was hidden or obscure.
  • your brains out The idiom "your brains out" refers to carrying out a particular activity or action with extreme intensity, effort, or persistence. It often implies giving one's best or fullest effort in a certain task or endeavour.
  • ask someone out (to something) The idiom "ask someone out (to something)" means to invite someone to accompany you to a social event or activity, typically with a romantic or romantic interest in mind.
  • draw out of sm place The idiom "draw out of sm place" typically refers to physically or figuratively coaxing or extracting someone or something from a particular location or situation. It can imply persuading someone to leave a place or situation, or bringing something hidden or tacit into the open.
  • hang (one) out to dry The idiom "hang (one) out to dry" means to betray, abandon, or deceive someone by leaving them to face a difficult or challenging situation alone, without assistance or support. It implies leaving someone in a vulnerable position or exposing them to criticism, blame, or punishment without offering any help or protection.
  • come/crawl out of the woodwork The idiom "come/crawl out of the woodwork" is used to describe a situation where people suddenly appear or emerge, often in large numbers, from unexpected or hidden places. It refers to the idea of insects or pests that live in the cracks and crevices of wooden structures suddenly coming out when the woodwork is disturbed or in disrepair. Similarly, the idiom implies that individuals suddenly appear or make themselves known when there is an opportunity or a reason to do so.
  • out of town The idiom "out of town" generally refers to someone or something that is away or absent from their usual or home location. It can be used to describe individuals who are traveling, or to indicate that something is happening outside of the local area or within a different city.
  • come out of a/the clear blue sky The idiom "come out of a/the clear blue sky" means that something unexpected or surprising happens suddenly without warning or previous indication. It typically refers to an event or information that is surprising because it was completely unforeseen or not anticipated.
  • have (one's) hand out The idiom "have (one's) hand out" means to rely on or actively seek financial assistance or favors from others, usually in a way that is considered excessive or too frequent. It implies a sense of dependency or a habit of constantly asking for help.
  • carry sth out The idiom "carry something out" means to complete, fulfill, or perform a task, plan, or action. It refers to successfully executing or putting into practice a specific action or objective.
  • growl sth out The idiom "growl sth out" means to say something in a gruff, low, or threatening manner, often expressing anger, annoyance, or irritation. It implies speaking with a rough or guttural voice, resembling the deep rumbling sound of a growl.
  • dry sm out The idiom "dry someone out" typically refers to the process of helping someone overcome alcohol or drug addiction by abstaining completely from substance use. It can involve a period of detoxification, often in a controlled environment or rehabilitation center, to remove the effects of substances from the body and allow the individual to recover to a state of sobriety.
  • know (someone or something) inside out The idiom "know (someone or something) inside out" means to be extremely familiar with every aspect or detail of someone or something. It suggests a deep understanding or thorough knowledge that encompasses all the intricacies and nuances.
  • put a contract out on sm The idiom "put a contract out on someone" means to hire or arrange for someone to be killed or harmed, usually as a result of anger, revenge, or a personal grudge. It implies the intention to have someone eliminated through illegal means, typically involving professional hitmen or organized crime.
  • wiggle out of sth The idiom "wiggle out of something" means to avoid or escape from a responsibility, obligation, or difficult situation, typically by using cunning or evasive tactics. It implies maneuvering or wriggling in order to evade a predicament or to avoid taking responsibility for something.
  • go out of service The idiom "go out of service" typically means the inability or suspension of a system, machine, device, or facility to function or operate. It refers to a state where something is temporarily or permanently taken out of use or made unavailable for its intended purpose.
  • shoot it out (with somebody) The idiom "shoot it out (with somebody)" typically refers to a situation where two or more individuals engage in a physical confrontation or conflict, often involving the use of firearms. It implies a showdown or a battle with the intention of settling a dispute or conflict through violence.
  • cry eyes out The idiom "cry eyes out" refers to the act of crying excessively and intensely, often to the point of tears streaming uncontrollably and for an extended period of time. It signifies crying with great emotive force or deep sadness.
  • boom out The idiom "boom out" typically means to speak, sing, or yell loudly and forcefully. It suggests a confident and powerful projection of one's voice.
  • get a bang out of someone/something The idiom "get a bang out of someone/something" means to derive great pleasure, amusement, or excitement from someone or something. It suggests finding joy or entertainment in a particular person, experience, or activity.
  • be put out of humour The idiom "be put out of humour" refers to becoming irritated, annoyed, or upset, often due to a specific situation, event, or person's actions. It means to have one's mood or demeanor negatively affected, resulting in feelings of displeasure or discomfort.
  • in (or out of) office The idiom "in (or out of) office" refers to the status of a person holding an official position or serving in a particular role. "In office" means that the individual is currently occupying or fulfilling their duties and responsibilities associated with the position they hold. Conversely, "out of office" refers to the individual no longer being in that position, either due to resignation, term limits, or not being reelected.
  • fly out The idiom "fly out" typically refers to the act of departing or leaving quickly, often used in the context of someone or something moving swiftly or abruptly. It can also mean that something or someone is being transported by air.
  • well out of sth The idiom "well out of something" means to be glad or fortunate to have escaped a particular situation or event. It implies that being removed from that situation is a positive outcome and that one is better off without it.
  • thump sth out (on the piano) The idiom "thump sth out (on the piano)" means to play the piano in a forceful, heavy-handed, or clumsy manner, usually resulting in loud and unrefined music. It implies a lack of finesse or technical skill in piano playing.
  • talk out of both sides of (one's) mouth The idiom "talk out of both sides of (one's) mouth" refers to someone who speaks in a contradictory or hypocritical manner. It describes a person who says one thing to one person or group but says something completely opposite or conflicting to another person or group. Generally, this idiom implies that the individual is being dishonest or insincere.
  • nose out of joint, have one's To have one's nose out of joint means to feel annoyed, offended, or upset, typically due to feeling slighted, overlooked, or excluded in a situation where one expected recognition or importance.
  • opt out (of) The idiom "opt out (of)" refers to the act of choosing not to participate or be involved in something, typically by withdrawing oneself from a situation, agreement, or commitment. It implies a decision to not partake in an activity or to remove oneself from a specific arrangement or obligation.
  • out of whack The idiom "out of whack" means that something is not properly arranged, functioning, or balanced. It refers to a state of being in disorder, disarray, or not operating correctly.
  • give sm a (good) bawling out To give someone a (good) bawling out means to scold, criticize, or reprimand someone loudly and aggressively. It implies a strong and intense verbal rebuke, often accompanied by anger or frustration.
  • sort out the men from the boys The idiom "sort out the men from the boys" means to separate those who are capable, experienced, or tough from those who are not. It is often used to describe a challenging situation or test that helps determine who is truly competent or capable of handling a certain task or situation.
  • put sb out to pasture The idiom "put someone out to pasture" means to retire or remove someone, typically an older person, from a job or position due to their age or declining abilities. It comes from the idea of moving aging or no longer useful animals, such as horses, to a pasture to peacefully live out the rest of their days.
  • take a bawling out The idiom "take a bawling out" refers to receiving a severe rebuke, scolding, or reprimand from someone, usually in a loud and angry manner. It means being verbally chastised or criticized strongly.
  • leave it out! The idiom "leave it out!" is an informal expression used to tell someone to stop doing or saying something annoying, offensive, or unnecessary. It is often used to express frustration or annoyance with someone's behavior and can be similar to saying "cut it out" or "stop it."
  • beat the daylights out of The idiom "beat the daylights out of" means to physically assault or beat someone very severely. It implies a sense of extreme violence and aggression.
  • hold out the olive branch The idiom "hold out the olive branch" means to offer peace or reconciliation, usually after a conflict or disagreement. It refers to extending an invitation or gesture of goodwill to resolve differences and foster harmony between two parties.
  • deck out The idiom "deck out" means to embellish or decorate something in a fancy or exaggerated manner. It is often used to describe the act of adorning oneself or an object with elaborate or showy decorations or accessories.
  • spurt out (of sm or sth) The idiom "spurt out of (someone or something)" typically refers to a sudden and forceful ejection or release of liquid or substance from a particular source. It implies a quick and powerful burst or flow of material, often due to pressure or a sudden release of built-up energy.
  • empty something out The idiom "empty something out" means to remove or take out the entire contents of something, often implying that the item or container is completely emptied or cleared. It can be used both in a literal sense, referring to physically removing objects from a space, or in a figurative sense, referring to the act of getting rid of thoughts, emotions, or any other intangible elements.
  • out of joint The idiom "out of joint" refers to something that is disturbed, disordered, or not functioning as it should. It is often used to describe a situation that is not in its proper or harmonious state. It can also refer to a person feeling mentally or emotionally unsettled or agitated.
  • swab sth out of sth The idiom "swab sth out of sth" means to thoroughly clean or remove something from a surface or container. It often refers to using a swab or similar tool to wipe or mop up a substance or residue.
  • be in (or out of) the frame The idiom "be in (or out of) the frame" refers to being included (or excluded) from a particular situation, usually social or professional, such that one is considered relevant (or irrelevant) to the matter at hand. It means being either involved and present or not involved and absent from consideration or attention.
  • carve sth out (of sth) The idiom "carve something out (of something)" means to create or obtain something by skillfully and persistently working on it, often in the face of challenges or obstacles. It suggests the notion of carefully shaping or extracting something valuable from a larger existing entity, whether it be a physical object, a niche in a market, a career path, or a personal achievement.
  • be out of your mind with boredom/fear/worry etc. The idiom "be out of your mind with boredom/fear/worry etc." refers to being extremely bored, fearful, worried, or experiencing intense emotions to the point where one's rational thinking or mental stability may be compromised. It denotes a state of extreme and often overwhelming emotions that can negatively affect one's mental state or ability to think clearly.
  • put sth out of joint When referring to the idiom "put something out of joint," it means to disturb or unsettle something, often causing disorder or disruption. It can also refer to physically dislocating a joint in one's body, resulting in pain or discomfort.
  • chew someone out The idiom "chew someone out" means to reprimand or scold someone severely and aggressively, typically for their mistakes, misconduct, or a particular action. It involves harshly expressing anger, dissatisfaction, or disappointment towards another person.
  • quiz out (of sth) The idiom "quiz out (of sth)" refers to passing a quiz or a test with high marks that enables an individual to be exempted from a particular requirement or obligation related to that subject or topic. It means to achieve a score or level of performance that allows someone to opt out or be excused from further participation in a specific task, class, or activity.
  • burn (itself) out The idiom "burn (itself) out" refers to the process of becoming exhausted or depleted due to excessive energy expenditure or overworking. It often describes a situation or a person who becomes worn out, physically or emotionally, due to continuous effort or a lack of balance between work and personal life.
  • eyeballs out The idiom "eyeballs out" typically means to push oneself to the limit, to go all out or give maximum effort in a particular task or activity. It implies engaging in an intense and determined manner, often with a sense of urgency or desperation.
  • close something out The idiom "close something out" typically means to complete or finish a task, project, or event, often by tying up loose ends, settling remaining issues, or finalizing details. It refers to the final stages of bringing something to a conclusion or bringing it to an end in a comprehensive manner.
  • fast-talk out of To "fast-talk out of" means to use persuasive or cunning language or tactics to successfully avoid or escape a difficult or undesirable situation, often by talking so quickly or convincingly that the other person is convinced or distracted. It refers to the act of talking one's way out of a problem or convincing someone to change their mind or decision through smooth and clever speech.
  • made out of whole cloth The idiom "made out of whole cloth" means that something is completely fabricated or invented, having no basis in truth or reality. It refers to the creation of something entirely from scratch, without any existing material or evidence to support it. This idiom is often used to describe a story, claim, or explanation that is entirely fictional or made up.
  • trot sm or sth out The idiom "trot someone or something out" means to introduce or present someone or something, often in a manner that is lacking enthusiasm or sincerity. It implies a sense of routine or repeated use, often without much thought or consideration.
  • put out (sm) feelers (on sm or sth) The idiom "put out (sm) feelers (on sm or sth)" refers to making subtle inquiries or discreetly seeking information or opinions about someone or something. It usually involves attempting to gauge interest, gather feedback, or assess potential opportunities without openly expressing one's intentions.
  • age out (of sth) The idiom "age out (of sth)" refers to reaching the maximum age or limit for participation or eligibility in a particular activity, organization, or program, thereby becoming too old to continue or be involved in it.
  • cut out to be The idiom "cut out to be" means to possess the necessary qualities or abilities to excel in a certain role or task. It implies that someone is well-suited or naturally inclined to be successful in a particular endeavor.
  • if (the) word gets out The idiom "if (the) word gets out" refers to when confidential or secret information is revealed or shared with others, possibly leading to unexpected consequences or outcomes. It implies that if the information becomes widely known or public, it may cause embarrassment, harm, or disruption to someone or something involved.
  • out of luck The definition of the idiom "out of luck" means to be in a situation where luck or chances are not in one's favor. It signifies being unlucky or unfortunate, often implying that one has exhausted all possibilities or options for a positive outcome.
  • ace out The idiom "ace out" means to defeat, surpass, or outperform someone or something decisively or effortlessly. It refers to achieving a great success or victory, typically by using one's exceptional skills, capabilities, or strategic advantage.
  • reach out (to sb) The idiom "reach out (to someone)" means to make contact or interact with someone, usually with the intention of offering help, support, or seeking assistance or a connection. It implies extending oneself emotionally, socially, or professionally, reaching out to establish a connection or offer support.
  • shake sth out The idiom "shake something out" typically means to remove dust, dirt, or wrinkles from something by shaking it vigorously. It can also be used metaphorically to suggest resolving issues or finding a solution through careful examination or thorough investigation.
  • nose is out of joint The idiom "nose is out of joint" means to be upset, hurt, or offended, usually because of a perceived slight or injustice. It suggests that someone's emotions are out of balance, just as if their nose was dislocated or broken.
  • come out of one's shell The idiom "come out of one's shell" means for someone to become more sociable, outgoing, or less shy. It refers to a person who has been introverted or reserved, transforming into a more open and confident individual in social situations or interactions.
  • eat sm out of house and home The idiom "eat someone out of house and home" means to consume or use up a large amount of food or resources, often to the point of leaving the person or household with little or nothing left. It can also refer to someone who is very hungry, continuously eating and depleting the available food.
  • cross someone or something out To "cross someone or something out" means to draw a line through their name or writings to indicate their deletion or cancellation. It symbolizes removing or eliminating someone or something from consideration, attention, or existence.
  • stoned out of one’s gourd The idiom "stoned out of one's gourd" refers to being heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, typically marijuana. It implies being in an extremely altered state of mind or experiencing a strong psychoactive effect.
  • just because I'm paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get me The idiom "just because I'm paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get me" is a humorous statement used to convey the notion that one can still have legitimate concerns or fears, even if they may seem exaggerated or overly suspicious to others. It implies that just because someone may be overly cautious or skeptical, it does not necessarily mean their concerns are unfounded. In a broader sense, it reminds individuals to trust their instincts and not dismiss potential threats or dangers solely based on others' perception of them.
  • give (someone) an out The idiom "give (someone) an out" means to provide a person with a way to avoid an obligation, commitment, or responsibility. It essentially offers them an opportunity to escape or be excused from a difficult or uncomfortable situation.
  • bomb sth out To “bomb something out” is an informal idiom that means to perform or execute an action or task with great speed, intensity, or effectiveness. It is often used to describe completing a task quickly or thoroughly, usually with a positive connotation.
  • put out (some) feelers (on someone or something) The idiom "put out (some) feelers (on someone or something)" means to discreetly gather information or test the waters regarding a person or a situation. It involves making subtle inquiries or conducting initial exploratory actions in order to gauge interest, get a response, or collect preliminary data.
  • a night out The idiom "a night out" refers to an occasion when someone spends an evening away from home, typically to socialize, have fun, or engage in leisure activities outside of their usual routine or responsibilities. It often implies going to events, parties, restaurants, bars, or entertainment venues with friends or loved ones.
  • measure sth out To "measure something out" means to carefully determine or allocate a specific quantity or amount of something, typically by using a measuring tool or following a prescribed system of measurement. It can also refer to dividing or portioning something into equal or desired parts.
  • burn sth out The idiom "burn something out" typically means to exhaust or use up something completely, often referring to the depletion of energy, resources, or supplies. It can also imply causing something to cease functioning or working due to excessive use or strain.
  • lose out The idiom "lose out" refers to missing an opportunity or losing a competition or advantage due to a certain circumstance or action. It implies experiencing a disadvantage or failure.
  • argue something out The idiom "argue something out" refers to discussing or debating a topic or issue in order to reach a resolution or decision through reasoned and thorough arguments. It involves presenting different perspectives, engaging in a constructive exchange of ideas, and eventually arriving at a consensus or conclusion. The process involves reflecting on different viewpoints, providing evidence, and challenging or defending various aspects of the subject matter until a mutually satisfactory resolution is achieved.
  • dig out of (something) The idiom "dig out of (something)" means to extricate or free oneself from a difficult or challenging situation, often requiring substantial effort or perseverance. It implies overcoming obstacles, be it physical, emotional, or metaphorical, to gradually work one's way out of a problematic or undesirable circumstance.
  • out of plumb The idiom "out of plumb" refers to something that is not straight or aligned properly, often referring to a vertical or upright position. It is used to describe a situation, object, or structure that is crooked, tilted, or off balance.
  • bilk sm out of sth The idiom "bilk someone out of something" means to deceive or swindle someone, usually in order to gain possession of their money or belongings. It suggests cunningly manipulating or cheating someone out of what is rightfully theirs.
  • blow out The idiom "blow out" has multiple meanings and can be used in different contexts. Here are a few common definitions for this idiom: 1. To extinguish a flame or fire forcefully or suddenly. Example: "She blew out the candles on her birthday cake." 2. To burst or explode suddenly. Example: "The car tire blew out while I was driving on the highway." 3. To fail or collapse suddenly and dramatically. Example: "The company's financials took a hit, and they eventually blew out." 4. To make something expand or increase rapidly. Example: "The movie's success blew their expectations out of the water." 5. To greatly surpass or defeat someone or something. Example: "The soccer team
  • scare the hell out of The idiom "scare the hell out of" means to frighten someone or cause extreme fear, shock, or anxiety. It implies generating a strong and intense emotional reaction, often catching someone off guard or surprising them.
  • blow sb's brains out The idiom "blow someone's brains out" is a graphic and violent expression that means to shoot someone in the head, resulting in a fatal or severe injury. It is often used metaphorically to emphasize extreme anger, frustration, or the desire to cause harm to someone.
  • get something out The idiom "get something out" can mean different things depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To remove or extract something from a particular place or location. Example: I couldn't get the stain out of my shirt. 2. To express or communicate something, often a feeling or information, to someone else. Example: She finally got her true feelings out during our conversation. 3. To publish or release something, like a publication or a product. Example: The company plans to get their new software out before the end of the year. 4. To retrieve something that was hidden or difficult to access. Example: The archaeologists got an ancient artifact out of the tomb. 5. To achieve a specific result or
  • mellow out The idiom "mellow out" means to relax, calm down, or become less tense or stressed. It refers to a shift from a state of agitation or excitement to a more peaceful and calm state.
  • get out of control The idiom "get out of control" means to become difficult or impossible to manage or govern. It refers to a situation or behavior becoming unruly, wild, chaotic, or excessive, making it challenging to maintain order or control over it.
  • come out of left field The idiom "come out of left field" means to come unexpectedly or from an unexpected source. It is often used to describe something that is surprising, unusual, or unconventional. The phrase originated in baseball, where the left field is typically where unexpected or unanticipated hits land.
  • bend out of shape The idiom "bend out of shape" means to become excessively or overly upset, angry, or irritated about something that may not warrant such a strong emotional reaction. It refers to a person's mental or emotional state being distorted or altered due to a perceived offense or frustration.
  • in (or out of) phase The idiom "in (or out of) phase" refers to two or more things being synchronized or coordinated (in phase) or being unsynchronized or not coordinated (out of phase). It is often used to describe the alignment or timing of events, actions, or processes.
  • be out of your depth To be out of your depth means to be in a situation or attempting a task that is beyond your level of skill, knowledge, or understanding. It often refers to feeling overwhelmed, unable to cope, or lacking the necessary expertise to handle a situation or perform a particular task.
  • clear out of sm place The idiom "clear out of sm place" means to depart or leave a location quickly and completely, often implying that the person or group is being asked or forced to leave abruptly. It suggests a sense of urgency or necessity in vacating the premises.
  • fish out of water The idiom "fish out of water" refers to a person who feels awkward, uncomfortable, or out of place in a particular situation or environment, usually due to their lack of familiarity or experience with it.
  • be no question of (doing) sth, at be out of the question The idiom "be no question of (doing) something" or "be out of the question" means that something is impossible or not allowed. It implies that there is no doubt or uncertainty about the matter at hand. It emphasizes that a particular action or idea is completely unthinkable or not feasible.
  • tear heart out The idiom "tear heart out" typically refers to experiencing extreme emotional pain or anguish, often caused by a very distressing or heartbreaking situation. It represents the deep sense of emotional devastation and sorrow that one feels, as if their heart is being metaphorically torn apart.
  • pour heart out The idiom "pour heart out" means to openly and sincerely express one's emotions, thoughts, or feelings to someone else. It implies sharing deep and personal matters in a sincere and unreserved manner.
  • out of the woodwork The idiom "out of the woodwork" is typically used to describe a situation where people or things suddenly appear or emerge unexpectedly, especially in large numbers or from obscure or unexpected places. It suggests that these individuals or objects appeared seemingly out of nowhere, just like creatures that suddenly emerge from the hidden recesses of a wooden structure (woodwork).
  • out of keeping (with sth) The idiom "out of keeping (with sth)" means not in line with, not consistent with, or not appropriate for something. It refers to a situation or behavior that does not match or fit well with a particular context, standard, or expectation.
  • figure out sth The idiom "figure out something" means to solve or understand something, typically through analysis, reasoning, or careful thought. It refers to the process of finding an answer or solution to a problem or puzzle by using one's intelligence or expertise.
  • rule sm or sth out The idiom "rule someone or something out" refers to the act of excluding or eliminating a person, option, or possibility as a viable choice or solution. It means to decide or declare that someone or something is not suitable, appropriate, or capable of fulfilling a certain requirement or purpose.
  • start out at an amount of money The idiom "start out at an amount of money" refers to the initial or starting point of a financial transaction or negotiation, specifically denoting the specified amount of money with which one begins. It implies the starting value or baseline from which further financial actions or considerations are taken into account.
  • startle sm out of sth The idiom "startle someone out of something" means to surprise or shock someone to the extent that they are distracted or lose focus on a specific task or state.
  • keep an eye out for (something or someone) The idiom "keep an eye out for (something or someone)" means to be watchful and attentive in order to notice the presence or arrival of a specific thing or person. It implies being observant and alert in order to spot or be aware of something of interest or importance.
  • out of business The idiom "out of business" refers to a situation where a company or business has ceased its operations and is no longer in business or able to operate profitably. It signifies the closure or failure of a business entity, often due to financial difficulties or lack of demand for its products or services.
  • carry something out The idiom "carry something out" means to complete or accomplish a task, plan, or action. It implies taking responsibility for ensuring the task is fully executed or implemented.
  • black out The idiom "black out" refers to the sudden loss of consciousness or memory. It can also be used to describe the loss of electrical power or the intentional blocking of information.
  • out of/off your head The idiom "out of/off your head" refers to an individual being mentally unstable, extremely intoxicated, or under the influence of drugs. It implies that the person's behavior or thoughts are irrational, erratic, or beyond what is considered normal or acceptable.
  • bail something out The idiom "bail something out" means to provide financial assistance or rescue someone or something from a difficult or troublesome situation, often by providing funds or support. It is commonly used when referring to financial or economic scenarios where an entity requires assistance to avoid failure or collapse.
  • your eyes nearly pop out of your head The idiom "your eyes nearly pop out of your head" refers to a state of astonishment, shock, or surprise where a person's eyes widen significantly or appear to come out of their sockets due to the intensity of their emotions or reactions.
  • marry way out of The idiom "marry way out of" typically means to marry someone who is of a higher social or economic status than oneself.
  • one's work is cut out for one The idiom "one's work is cut out for one" means that somebody has a significant and challenging task or assignment ahead of them. It implies that the work is demanding and requires great effort and focus to complete successfully.
  • bored out of (one's) brains The idiom "bored out of (one's) brains" means to be extremely or excessively bored, to the point where one's mind is feeling dull or unstimulated. It implies being extremely uninterested or lacking any excitement or entertainment.
  • flex sth out of shape The idiom "flex something out of shape" means to distort, twist, or contort something by applying excessive force or pressure. It is often used metaphorically to describe a situation where too much stress, pressure, or influence causes something to become distorted or damaged, either physically or metaphorically.
  • (straight) out of central casting The idiom "(straight) out of central casting" refers to someone or something that perfectly fits into a stereotypical role or stereotype associated with a particular character, profession, or situation. It is often used to describe a person who embodies a familiar archetype or cliché, fulfilling all the expected characteristics or behaviors.
  • You're out of your mind! The idiom "You're out of your mind!" is an expression used to indicate that someone's words or behavior are irrational, crazy, or unreasonable. It suggests that the person is behaving in a way that is considered absurd or completely unwise.
  • be out of sorts The idiom "be out of sorts" means to feel irritable, moody, or not oneself, often due to being unwell or upset about something. It refers to a state of being in a bad mood or feeling off.
  • run out the clock The idiom "run out the clock" means to intentionally use up time, often in order to avoid taking action or making a decision, until a deadline or time limit expires. It refers to the strategy of avoiding any risks or changes by maintaining the current situation until time runs out.
  • blow sth/sb out of the water The idiom "blow something/somebody out of the water" means to completely surpass or outperform something or someone in an impressive or dominant manner. It often refers to exceeding expectations, defeating competitors decisively, or achieving a level of excellence that is unparalleled.
  • hoodwink someone out of something The idiom "hoodwink someone out of something" means to deceive or trick someone into giving up or losing something valuable, usually through dishonest or manipulative tactics. It implies taking advantage of someone's trust or naivety to exploit them for personal gain.
  • send sm (out) on an errand The idiom "send someone (out) on an errand" means to assign or ask someone to go somewhere and complete a task or perform a specific errand. It implies sending someone away temporarily to accomplish a specific mission or errand.
  • get some kind of mileage out of The idiom "get some kind of mileage out of" refers to deriving some benefit or advantage from a particular situation, experience, or resource. It implies making effective use of something or finding value, usefulness, or enjoyment in it.
  • blow somebody/something out of the water The idiom "blow somebody/something out of the water" means to completely surpass or outperform someone or something in an impressive or overwhelming manner. It suggests the idea of overwhelming force or superiority, often leaving the other person or thing completely defeated or overshadowed.
  • drown someone or something out The idiom "drown someone or something out" means to make someone or something's voice or sound inaudible or less noticeable by creating a louder noise or sound. It implies overpowering or overwhelming someone or something with a stronger or louder impact.
  • eat your heart out The idiom "eat your heart out" is used to express a feeling of pride or satisfaction in a boastful manner. It implies that the person being addressed should feel jealous or envious of someone else's success, skills, or possessions.
  • stake sm or sth out The idiom "stake someone or something out" means to mark or establish a claim or boundary by placing stakes or markers in the ground. It can also refer to keeping a close watch or surveillance on someone or something.
  • come in out of the rain, know enough to The idiom "come in out of the rain, know enough to" means to understand or possess enough knowledge or wisdom to make a logical decision or take appropriate action. The phrase often implies that someone should have enough sense or understanding to avoid a situation that may cause harm or difficulty, just as one would naturally take shelter from the rain. It emphasizes having enough intelligence or awareness to make sensible choices.
  • measure out Definition: To carefully allocate or apportion something, usually in specific quantities or proportions. Example: The chef carefully measured out the ingredients for the recipe to ensure the perfect balance of flavors.
  • kick out (at sm or sth) The idiom "kick out (at someone or something)" refers to attempting to strike or attack someone or something forcefully with one's foot. However, this expression can also be used figuratively, meaning to express anger, frustration, or disagreement with someone or something in a forceful manner, typically through words or actions.
  • stand/stick out like a sore thumb The phrase "stand/stick out like a sore thumb" is an idiomatic expression that means to be highly noticeable, conspicuous, or out of place due to being significantly different from the surrounding or expected environment.
  • rake sth out of sth The idiom "rake something out of something" typically means to remove or gather something, usually with an effort or difficulty, from a particular place or source. It implies that the task requires thoroughness and persistence, similar to how a rake is used to gather leaves or debris.
  • in (or out of) place The idiom "in (or out of) place" refers to something that is either suitable and appropriate for a particular situation, or something that is unsuitable and does not belong in its current situation. It is often used to describe an object, person, or behavior that either fits well within its context or stands out as being odd or irrelevant.
  • get sth out of your system To "get something out of your system" means to fulfill a strong desire or urge for something so that it no longer dominates your thoughts or behavior. It refers to the act of venting or satisfying a need or impulse, usually in a temporary manner, to rid oneself of fixation or obsession with that particular thing.
  • copy (something) out of (something) The idiom "copy (something) out of (something)" means to transcribe or reproduce something exactly as it is from a given source. It refers to the act of duplicating or replicating the content, typically word for word, without any alterations or additions. This can apply to various forms of media, such as copying text out of a book, transcribing notes from a lecture, or reproducing information from a document.
  • cry heart out The idiom "cry heart out" means to cry intensely or express one's emotions, typically in a loud and unrestrained manner, usually to provide emotional release or relief.
  • as it/things turned out The idiom "as it/things turned out" refers to the actual outcome or result of a particular situation or event, which may be different from what was initially expected or predicted. It implies that the final or real conclusion was unforeseen or surprising based on the preceding circumstances or assumptions.
  • rout out of sm place The idiom "rout out of (some place)" means to force someone or something to leave a particular location by searching or by using force. It implies a determined effort to find and remove the person or thing from the specified place.
  • put something out of your head The idiom "put something out of your head" means to intentionally stop thinking or dwelling on a particular thought, idea, or concern. It suggests dismissing or forgetting about something, especially when it is causing distress, worry, or unwanted preoccupation.
  • ask out The idiom "ask out" is commonly used to refer to the act of inviting someone, typically of romantic interest, to go on a date or spend time together in a social context.
  • go out The idiom "go out" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are a few common definitions for this idiom: 1. To leave one's home or location, usually in order to participate in social activities or events. Example: "Let's go out tonight and have dinner together." 2. To cease to burn or glow, referring to flames, lights, or fires. Example: "The candles went out as soon as the power went off." 3. To no longer be in fashion or style. Example: "Bell-bottom jeans went out of style in the 1970s." 4. To become extinguished or no longer functional. Example: "The fire alarm went out, so we couldn't hear the warning." 5
  • all out The idiom "all out" means to give the maximum possible effort or to do something with great intensity, energy, or enthusiasm. It implies going to the fullest extent or taking extreme measures to achieve a desired outcome.
  • bow out (of sth) The idiom "bow out (of sth)" means to gracefully or politely withdraw or retire from a situation, activity, or commitment. It often implies relinquishing a position, participation, or responsibility.
  • be out of (one's) hands The idiom "be out of (one's) hands" means that a situation or decision is no longer under someone's control or influence. It indicates that the matter has progressed to a point where the individual can no longer have any impact or take any action.
  • he, she, etc. couldn't punch his, her, etc. way out of a paper bag The idiom "he, she, etc. couldn't punch his, her, etc. way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who lacks strength, bravery, or fighting ability. It implies that the person is so weak or ineffective that they would be unable to even break or tear their way out of a simple and flimsy paper bag, symbolizing their overall incapacity.
  • rule out sth The idiom "rule out something" means to eliminate or reject a possibility or option. It refers to the act of deciding that something is not a valid or applicable choice in a specific situation.
  • Get your nose out of my business! The idiom "Get your nose out of my business!" means that someone is telling another person to stop interfering or meddling in their personal or private matters. It is often used to express frustration or anger at someone who is being nosy or intrusive.
  • gross out The idiom "gross out" means to cause someone to feel disgusted, repulsed, or nauseous by something that is disturbing, offensive, or revolting in nature.
  • blow out sth To "blow out something" is an idiom that means to extinguish or put out something, typically referring to fire or flames. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation where something is stopped abruptly or forcefully.
  • pull someone's chestnuts out of the fire The idiom "pull someone's chestnuts out of the fire" means to rescue or save someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at great personal risk or effort. It implies helping someone out of a predicament that they may have gotten themselves into, typically when they are unable to resolve it on their own.
  • be out on (one's) feet The idiom "be out on (one's) feet" means to be extremely exhausted, physically or mentally, to the point where one can no longer function effectively. It often implies that the person is near collapse or too tired to continue with their current activities.
  • be frightened (or scared) out of your wits The idiom "be frightened (or scared) out of your wits" means to be extremely scared or terrified. It implies that something has scared or startled a person to the point where they are no longer able to think clearly or rationally. This phrase emphasizes the intensity of fear and the impact it has on one's mental state.
  • get out of hand The idiom "get out of hand" refers to a situation or activity that becomes uncontrollable, disorderly, or more intense than anticipated, often due to a lack of proper management or supervision.
  • pooch out The idiom "pooch out" typically means to protrude or stick out, resembling the shape or appearance of a dog's stomach or belly. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • apportion sth out (among sm people) The idiom "apportion something out (among some people)" means to divide or distribute something among a specific group of people in a fair and equitable manner. It implies that the distribution is done in proportion to each individual's needs, shares, or entitlements.
  • leach out of something The idiom "leach out of something" means to slowly and gradually extract, drain, or flow out of a substance or object, usually referring to a liquid or solute that separates or seeps out. It implies a gradual, often unintended or undesirable, loss or weakening of something.
  • talk out of (one's) hat The idiom "talk out of one's hat" typically means to speak or make claims without having knowledge or facts to support one's statements, often resulting in making false or nonsensical statements. It implies that the person is speaking without thought or understanding, akin to talking nonsense.
  • fight way out The idiom "fight way out" refers to a situation where one has to use physical or mental strength, determination, or resourcefulness to escape a difficult or challenging circumstance. It can apply to both literal situations involving physical combat, or metaphorical situations requiring perseverance and resilience to overcome obstacles or adversity.
  • crawl out (of sth) The idiom "crawl out (of sth)" refers to the act of emerging or extricating oneself from a difficult or problematic situation, usually involving a gradual or laborious process. It portrays the notion of overcoming obstacles or challenges.
  • live out one's days The idiom "live out one's days" refers to the act of living or existing until the end of one's natural life or until old age. It conveys the idea of spending the remaining time one has, typically in a comfortable or fulfilling manner, often implying a peaceful and contented retirement.
  • be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind" means to be extremely bored, drunk, or experiencing a particular state to such an intense degree that it becomes overwhelming or unbearable. It emphasizes the intensity or extremity of the feeling or state being described.
  • a down and out The idiom "a down and out" refers to a person who is in a state of loss, deprivation, or extreme hardship, usually due to unfortunate circumstances, such as being without a job, money, or a home. It is often used to describe someone who is economically or socially marginalized and struggling to cope with their situation.
  • slog (one's) guts out The idiom "slog (one's) guts out" means to work extremely hard or make a great effort to accomplish something. It suggests putting in a maximum amount of physical or mental effort, often with a lack of rest or relaxation.
  • out of sorts The idiom "out of sorts" refers to feeling unwell, physically or emotionally. It indicates a state of being slightly or mildly distressed, irritable, or not one's usual self.
  • lay out the welcome mat (for someone) The idiom "lay out the welcome mat (for someone)" means to warmly and eagerly welcome someone, usually guests or visitors. It implies creating a hospitable and inviting atmosphere for them.
  • set out sth The idiom "set out something" means to arrange or display something in a specific way, to start or begin something, or to explain or present something in a detailed manner.
  • skip out (on sth) The idiom "skip out (on sth)" means to intentionally avoid or leave something, especially a responsibility, commitment, or financial obligation without proper explanation or justification. It typically refers to evading an obligation or leaving abruptly without fulfilling one's duties or promises.
  • dash out The idiom "dash out" means to leave quickly or hastily, often with a sense of urgency. It refers to the act of rushing out or hurrying away from a place or situation.
  • hammer out sth The idiom "hammer out something" means to negotiate, discuss, or resolve a problem, issue, or agreement through persistent and determined efforts in order to reach a satisfactory solution or outcome. It often involves intense and sometimes heated discussions or debates, similar to the forceful action of striking with a hammer to shape or mold an object.
  • book (on) out The idiom "book (on) out" refers to the act of reserving or filling all available spots or spaces for a specific event or service.
  • shell out sth The idiom "shell out sth" means to spend or pay a significant amount of money, often reluctantly or begrudgingly. It implies the act of handing over money, as if removing it from a protective shell or pocket. It is usually used when referring to a considerable expense or payment.
  • out of whole cloth The idiom "out of whole cloth" means to entirely fabricate or invent something without any basis in truth or reality. It refers to creating a story, idea, or information completely from scratch, with no supporting evidence or facts.
  • wipe out (sb/sth) The idiom "wipe out (sb/sth)" typically means to completely destroy or eliminate someone or something. It can refer to physical destruction, as well as figurative elimination or defeat.
  • farm sth out The idiom "farm something out" means to delegate or outsource a task or project to someone else or another organization. It refers to the practice of sending work or assignments outside of one's own company or personal responsibility to be completed by others, typically specialists or subcontractors.
  • bluff way out The idiom "bluff way out" refers to the act of using deception or false confidence to escape a difficult or challenging situation. It suggests that a person is trying to deceive others into believing they have a solution or plan when, in reality, they might not have one.
  • ease out of The idiom "ease out of" typically means to gradually or slowly extract oneself from a situation, task, or commitment. It implies a smooth or careful transition, avoiding abruptness or causing disruption.
  • gross someone out To "gross someone out" means to cause someone to feel disgusted, repulsed, or extremely uncomfortable by something, either through words, actions, or visuals. It refers to an action or behavior that is deemed highly unpleasant or disturbing, leading to a strong negative reaction from an individual.
  • order out of sm place The idiom "order out of sm place" refers to the act of bringing structure, organization, or control to a chaotic or disorganized situation. It implies transforming a disorderly or messy environment into a well-arranged and systematic one.
  • break out sth The idiom "break out something" means to start or release something suddenly and unexpectedly. It can be used to refer to a variety of situations where something is brought forth or initiated abruptly.
  • find out The idiom "find out" means to discover or obtain information, facts, or details about something or someone by investigation, research, or inquiry.
  • billow out The idiom "billow out" refers to the action of expanding or extending forcefully, usually in reference to something that is loose or flowing, such as fabric or smoke. It often implies a sudden and dramatic movement that results in a bulging or spreading appearance.
  • it will come out in the wash The idiom "it will come out in the wash" generally means that a problem, issue, or situation will resolve itself eventually, even without intervention or effort. It suggests that time and circumstance will lead to a resolution or reveal the truth.
  • start sm out at an amount of money The idiom "start someone out at an amount of money" refers to the action of initially paying or offering a particular sum of money to begin an employment or business arrangement. It signifies the starting salary or compensation provided to an individual when they start a new job or venture.
  • go out for someone or something The idiom "go out for someone or something" means to pursue or compete for someone's affection or attention, or to attempt to achieve a particular goal or position. It often involves actively seeking someone's company or trying to impress them in order to form a romantic relationship. Similarly, when it refers to going out for something, it can mean trying to obtain a specific role, position, or opportunity by actively competing or striving for it.
  • out of favor The idiom "out of favor" refers to a situation where someone or something has lost the approval, support, or popularity they once had, resulting in a decline in their standing or recognition.
  • let out The idiom "let out" has multiple meanings. Here are a few of the most common: 1. To release or allow someone or something to leave a specific place or location. Example: "He let out the dog for a walk." 2. To make a sound or noise, especially a loud one. Example: "The crowd let out a cheer when their team scored a goal." 3. To reveal or disclose information or a secret. Example: "She couldn't keep the secret any longer and let it out to her friends." 4. To alter or adjust clothing by making it wider or looser, usually by removing or adjusting seams. Example: "She needed to let out her pants because they were too tight." Note: The
  • pork out (on sth) The idiom "pork out (on sth)" means to spend a large amount of money on something, usually in a generous or extravagant manner. It implies a willingness to splurge or indulge in a particular expense.
  • point sm or sth out The idiom "point something out" means to bring attention to, indicate, or show something to someone.
  • Don’t make a federal case out of it! "Don't make a federal case out of it!" is an idiom used to convey the idea of not exaggerating or making something overly complicated, serious, or significant. It is often said when someone is making a big deal out of a minor issue or situation. The idiom alludes to the complex and serious nature of federal court cases in the legal system.
  • out of the way The idiom "out of the way" means that something or someone has been moved or cleared in order to remove any obstacles or distractions in a particular situation. It suggests that the person or thing is no longer a hindrance or obstruction.
  • cough out The idiom "cough out" typically means to reveal or disclose something reluctantly or under pressure, often referring to information or secrets that are difficult or uncomfortable to share.
  • cop out The idiom "cop out" refers to an act or decision of avoiding responsibility, commitment, or action, especially in a situation where one's involvement or effort is expected. It suggests a lack of courage, dedication, or integrity in attempting to evade or escape from a difficult or challenging task or situation.
  • have something out (with someone) The idiom "have something out (with someone)" means to resolve or discuss a problem, disagreement, or issue with someone. It refers to having an open and honest conversation to address and clarify any misunderstandings or conflicts.
  • hash out sth The idiom "hash out something" means to discuss or negotiate a problem, issue, or idea in order to reach an agreement or resolution. It involves thoroughly discussing and dissecting the matter at hand, often in a detailed and sometimes heated manner, until a solution or consensus is reached.
  • flick something out The idiom "flick something out" typically means to swiftly or forcefully remove or expel something by using a quick, snapping motion. It often refers to getting rid of an object or substance by a sudden motion of the hand or fingers.
  • Let's get out of here The idiom "Let's get out of here" is an expression used to suggest leaving a place quickly or urgently, often to escape an unpleasant or undesirable situation. It can also imply a desire to move on or depart from a location.
  • Never tell tales out of school. The idiom "Never tell tales out of school" means that it is not appropriate or ethical to share confidential or private information about someone, especially if it involves their personal life or secrets that were entrusted to you. It advises against gossiping or revealing sensitive details that should remain within a certain context or among a specific group of people.
  • kick the (natural) stuffing out of sm The idiom "kick the (natural) stuffing out of someone" means to physically beat or assault someone severely. It implies a ruthless and aggressive act, emphasizing the use of force to inflict significant harm or injury.
  • think the sun shines out of somebody's arse/backside The idiom "think the sun shines out of somebody's arse/backside" is an exaggerated expression used to describe someone who excessively admires or idolizes another person. It implies that the person being idolized is considered faultless, perfect, or superior in every way.
  • find out how the land lies The idiom "find out how the land lies" means to gather information about a situation or the underlying circumstances before making a decision or taking action. It refers to understanding the current state or condition of a particular matter to determine the best course of action.
  • be out of mind with boredom etc. The idiom "be out of mind with boredom etc." means to be extremely bored, frustrated, or annoyed to the point of losing focus or concentration. It implies a state of mental distress or restlessness caused by the lack of stimulation or interest in one's surroundings.
  • set out to do "To set out to do" means to intentionally start or begin a specific goal or task, often with determination and a clear purpose or plan. It implies a deliberate intention or commitment to accomplish something.
  • pour out one's heart The idiom "pour out one's heart" means to openly express one's deepest emotions, feelings, or secrets to someone else, usually in a sincere and vulnerable manner. It involves sharing personal thoughts or experiences without any reservations or holding back.
  • leave out in the cold The idiom "leave out in the cold" means to deliberately exclude or overlook someone, particularly in a situation where they should be included or involved. It refers to making someone feel isolated, neglected, or ignored, especially when they have a legitimate claim or expectation to be included.
  • beguile (someone) out of (something) The idiom "beguile (someone) out of (something)" means to deceive or trick someone into giving up or losing something, often through cunning or charm. It implies the use of manipulation or deceit to persuade someone to part with their possessions, money, or valuable possessions willingly or unknowingly.
  • bawl (one's) eyes out The idiom "bawl (one's) eyes out" means to cry very loudly and intensely, usually due to extreme sadness, grief, or emotional distress. It signifies a person shedding tears uncontrollably and expressing their emotions in a highly vocal and noticeable manner.
  • jab sth out The idiom "jab something out" refers to forcefully and quickly poking or pushing something out with a sudden movement, usually done with a hand or a finger. This action is typically done without much precision or careful consideration.
  • bring sb out of their shell, at come out of your shell The idiom "bring someone out of their shell" or "come out of your shell" refers to the act of encouraging or helping someone to become more sociable, outgoing, or confident. It suggests that a person who is introverted or shy is becoming more comfortable in social situations, expressing their thoughts, and interacting with others.
  • weed out sb/sth The idiom "weed out" means to eliminate or remove someone or something unwanted or undesirable from a group or system. It is often used when referring to the process of getting rid of people or things that are considered unnecessary, unproductive, or ineffective, in order to improve the overall quality or efficiency of the group or system.
  • bliss out The idiom "bliss out" refers to the act of achieving a state of extreme happiness, relaxation, or contentment. It implies being completely absorbed in the present moment and experiencing pure pleasure or bliss.
  • clean (someone or something) out of (something) The idiom "clean (someone or something) out of (something)" means to completely deprive someone or something of a particular object, resource, or possession. It implies a thorough removal or elimination.
  • get out of hair The idiom "get out of hair" means to leave someone alone or stop bothering them. It implies a desire for personal space or relief from someone's presence or constant attention.
  • call someone out The idiom "call someone out" means to publicly accuse, challenge, or criticize someone for their actions, behavior, or beliefs, especially when it is perceived as wrong, inappropriate, or deceitful. It involves confronting someone with evidence or pointing out their mistakes or wrongdoing in a direct and public manner.
  • skip out (on sm or sth) The idiom "skip out (on someone or something)" means to leave or abandon someone or something without warning or permission, often to avoid a responsibility, obligation, or commitment. It implies a sense of irresponsibility or dishonesty in neglecting one's duties or obligations.
  • drown sm (or an animal) out The idiom "drown someone (or an animal) out" refers to overpowering or overriding someone's voice or sound with a louder noise. It can also mean to overshadow or make someone or something less noticeable or important by being more prominent or attention-grabbing.
  • belt out The idiom "belt out" refers to singing or speaking loudly and with great energy or enthusiasm.
  • out on a limb The idiom "out on a limb" refers to being in a vulnerable or unsupported position, often due to taking a risky or unpopular stance on a matter. It suggests putting oneself in a situation where there is little or no help or support available, leaving a person exposed to potential criticism, failure, or isolation.
  • string sth out The idiom "string sth out" means to prolong or extend something, often unnecessarily, or to delay the completion of something. It refers to the act of making something last longer than it should or stretching it for a longer duration than expected.
  • crash out (of some place) The idiom "crash out (of some place)" means to leave a place suddenly and forcefully, often due to exhaustion or frustration. It can also imply a hasty departure without proper farewell or goodbye.
  • run out of gas The idiom "run out of gas" means to lose energy, enthusiasm, or motivation. It refers to the feeling of being physically or mentally exhausted and unable to continue with a task or endeavor. It can also be used to describe a situation where one has depleted all available resources or options.
  • crank sth out The idiom "crank sth out" means to produce or create something quickly, often with little effort or thought. It implies the act of generating a large volume of work in a mechanical or rapid manner, often disregarding the quality or attention to detail.
  • like getting blood out of a stone The idiom "like getting blood out of a stone" is used to describe a situation or task that is extremely difficult or impossible to accomplish. It refers to the idea that trying to extract blood from a stone, which is inherently impossible, would require significant effort and yield no results.
  • file out (of something) The idiom "file out (of something)" means to leave or exit a place or situation in an orderly, organized manner, one after another, like a line of people moving in a single file. It implies that the departure is done in a disciplined and structured fashion.
  • eat somebody out of house and home The idiom "eat somebody out of house and home" means to consume or use up a large amount of food or resources, often to the point of depleting the supply completely. It is used figuratively to describe someone who, either intentionally or unintentionally, eats or consumes excessively, causing a great strain on the host or provider of the resources.
  • put out feelers The idiom "put out feelers" means to make discreet inquiries or to gather preliminary information or opinions before making a decision or taking action. It refers to the act of probing or testing the waters regarding a specific matter in order to gain insights or gauge potential interest or support.
  • out of proportion The idiom "out of proportion" means that something is excessively or excessively larger or smaller when comparing it to other related things or in relation to a particular situation or context. It suggests that the size, importance, intensity, or significance of something is not in balance or proper ratio.
  • do well out of somebody/something The idiom "do well out of somebody/something" means to benefit greatly or derive advantage from someone or something in a particular situation. It implies that a person or entity gains profit, success, or advantage from the mentioned person or thing.
  • be out of action The idiom "be out of action" refers to being temporarily unable to work or function due to injury, illness, or mechanical failure. It typically implies being unavailable or unable to fulfill responsibilities or carry out tasks for a certain period of time.
  • lay (oneself) out The idiom "lay (oneself) out" means to put forth maximum effort or to exert oneself to the fullest extent physically, emotionally, or mentally in order to achieve something or complete a task. It suggests total dedication and commitment.
  • fish out of There is no specific idiom "fish out of" in English. It seems to be a partial phrase or incomplete idiom. If you provide more context or the full phrase, I will be happy to assist you with its meaning.
  • block something out The idiom "block something out" means to intentionally ignore or suppress certain thoughts, memories, or information, often as a defense mechanism or coping strategy. It suggests mentally shielding oneself from something uncomfortable, distressing, or undesirable.
  • out of hands The idiom "out of hands" typically means that a situation or problem has become unmanageable, beyond control, or is no longer within someone's power to handle.
  • break out in a rash The idiom "break out in a rash" refers to the sudden appearance of a skin rash or irritation. It is often used figuratively to describe a strong negative reaction, such as feeling uncomfortable, annoyed, or frustrated in response to a particular situation or stimulus.
  • build out onto (something) The idiom "build out onto (something)" refers to the act of extending or expanding a structure, project, or idea onto a specific area or platform. It involves enlarging or enhancing something that already exists, often by connecting it to additional components, features, or spaces.
  • chart out The idiom "chart out" refers to the act of carefully planning or mapping out a course of action, typically in a systematic or detailed way. It implies creating a plan, schedule, or strategy for achieving a particular goal or objective.
  • sluice sth out To "sluice something out" means to clean or wash out thoroughly, often using a strong flow of water or liquid. It can also refer to flushing out or removing unwanted or undesirable elements from a specific area or object. The term "sluice" originally refers to a device used in mining or irrigation to direct the flow of water. In the context of this idiom, it signifies the act of thoroughly rinsing or purging something.
  • scrape sth out of sth The idiom "scrape something out of something" refers to the act of obtaining or obtaining a small amount of something from a source that has very little or none of that thing left. It implies that getting or extracting it requires effort, as one must remove or collect it bit by bit, typically using a scraping motion.
  • go out with something The idiom "go out with something" typically means to leave or depart from a place or situation while carrying or accompanied by a particular object or thing. It implies that the person is taking the object along as they leave.
  • go out on a limb The idiom "go out on a limb" means to take a risk or to express an opinion or belief that is not widely supported or accepted. It implies going beyond what is safe or commonly done, often with limited or no support from others.
  • filter out The idiom "filter out" refers to the process of removing or separating something from a larger group or mixture, typically to extract only what is wanted or needed. It often implies the act of discerning or eliminating undesirable elements or elements that do not meet certain criteria.
  • stick out The idiom "stick out" means to be easily noticed or distinguishable due to being different, unusual or outstanding from the rest. It can also refer to protruding or extending beyond a certain point physically.
  • carve something out The idiom "carve something out" means to create or establish something, usually by dedicated effort, skill, or determination. It often implies that the thing being created or established is distinctive or unique, as if it were meticulously crafted or shaped.
  • drum out of The idiom "drum out of" refers to forcefully removing or dismissing someone from a group, organization, or position, often due to their improper or unacceptable behavior. It implies a public and noticeable expulsion as if someone is being "beaten out" or "driven out" like the beat of a drum.
  • out like a light The idiom "out like a light" means to fall asleep very quickly, usually implying deep and sound sleep.
  • bleach sth out The idiom "bleach something out" refers to the process of removing color or fading something, such as fabric or an image, by using bleach. It can also be used metaphorically to describe weakening or diminishing something, often in reference to emotions, memories, or the impact of certain experiences.
  • look (out) on (to) sth The idiom "look (out) on (to) sth" refers to the act of having a view or perspective of something. It means to have a direct line of sight onto a particular thing or area, usually from a window or elevated position. The phrase can also imply observing or watching something closely.
  • fade sth out The idiom "fade sth out" refers to gradually diminishing or reducing something, typically a sound, volume, or visual effect, until it becomes indistinct or disappears completely. It is commonly used in the context of audio or video editing, where a fade-out effect is applied to gradually decrease the volume or fade the image to black.
  • hand sth out The idiom "hand sth out" means to distribute or give something to people. It often refers to giving something to multiple individuals or a group of people.
  • talk out of both sides of mouth The idiom "talk out of both sides of the mouth" means to speak dishonestly or with contradictory statements; to say one thing and then say the opposite, often in order to deceive or manipulate others. It describes someone who is inconsistent or hypocritical in their speech, often trying to please different people or conceal their true intentions.
  • jump/leap out of your skin The idiom "jump/leap out of your skin" refers to feeling startled, shocked, or extremely surprised by something. It implies an intense and sudden reaction, as if one's whole being is propelled outwards through their skin due to the shock or surprise.
  • get out of doing (something) The idiom "get out of doing (something)" means to avoid or be excused from a task, obligation, or responsibility that one is expected or supposed to do.
  • maneuver sm out of sth The idiom "maneuver someone out of something" refers to the strategic or skillful actions taken by a person to remove, displace, or eliminate someone from a particular situation, position, or circumstance. It implies manipulating or outsmarting the individual in order to achieve this objective.
  • fall out with sb The idiom "fall out with sb" means to have a disagreement, argument, or deterioration in a relationship with someone, usually resulting in a break in communication or estrangement.
  • put the flags out! The idiom "put the flags out!" refers to a phrase often used to express excitement or celebration of something. It originates from the tradition of hanging flags and decorations during festive occasions or important events. So, when someone says "put the flags out!" figuratively, it means to celebrate or show excitement about a particular event or achievement.
  • fling sm or sth out of sth The idiom "fling something/someone out of something" means to forcefully or quickly remove or expel something or someone from a particular place or situation. It generally implies a sudden, forceful action.
  • eat out The idiomatic phrase "eat out" typically refers to the act of dining at a restaurant or consuming a meal outside of one's home, usually for enjoyment or convenience.
  • get out of The idiom "get out of" means to avoid or escape from a situation, responsibility, or obligation. It implies finding a way to not have to do something or be involved in something.
  • dash out (for sth) The idiom "dash out (for sth)" means to quickly leave a place or hurry somewhere to obtain or fetch something. It implies a sense of urgency or haste in order to accomplish the task swiftly.
  • coax (someone or something) out of (something) The idiom "coax (someone or something) out of (something)" means to convince, persuade, or gently encourage someone or something to leave a particular place, situation, or possession, often using gentle and gradual methods rather than force or aggression.
  • bring out the worst in somebody The idiom "bring out the worst in somebody" means to cause someone to display their most negative or undesirable qualities or behaviors. It suggests that certain situations or individuals have the ability to provoke negative reactions or behaviors in someone that are not typically seen under normal circumstances.
  • toss sm or sth out of sth The idiom "toss someone or something out of something" is used to describe the act of forcefully expelling or removing someone or something from a particular place or situation. It implies a forceful and abrupt action of getting rid of someone or something, often without regard for their feelings or well-being.
  • out of date The idiom "out of date" refers to something that is no longer current, relevant, or up to date. It means that the person, thing, or idea is obsolete or behind the times. It suggests that it lacks the latest information, knowledge, or style.
  • build (sth) out over sth The idiom "build (sth) out over sth" typically refers to extending or expanding something, whether it is a physical structure, a project, or an idea, further than its original or initial position or scope. It implies the act of stretching or elongating something over a specific area or period, to create a larger or more comprehensive result.
  • pluck something out of the air The idiom "pluck something out of the air" means to come up with or invent something quickly and without any real basis or careful thought. It refers to making a statement or suggestion without any evidence, research, or support, simply pulling it out of thin air.
  • run out on The idiom "run out on" means to abandon or leave someone or something behind, especially in a sudden or irresponsible manner.
  • breeze out (of sm place) The idiom "breeze out of sm place" means to leave a place quickly and effortlessly, often with a sense of nonchalance or indifference. It implies a smooth and uncomplicated departure, as if the person is gliding away easily, without much effort or concern.
  • bail sm out of jail The idiom "bail someone out of jail" means to rescue or provide financial help for someone who has been arrested or imprisoned, usually by paying their bail or arranging for their release from jail by other means. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to helping someone out of a difficult or challenging situation.
  • tear (one's) hair out The idiom "tear (one's) hair out" means to feel extreme frustration, anger, or exasperation over a situation or person. It refers to being so distressed that one might literally pull their hair in frustration.
  • keep an ear out (for something or someone) The idiom "keep an ear out (for something or someone)" means to be attentive or vigilant in order to notice or become aware of something or someone. It suggests actively listening or paying attention in order to perceive any relevant information, signals, or cues about a specific person or thing.
  • spin sth out of sth The idiom "spin something out of something" means to create or develop something additional, often by making the most of limited resources or using existing material. It implies an imaginative or creative approach to generating new ideas or opportunities.
  • beat sm or sth out The idiom "beat someone or something out" typically means to defeat or surpass someone or something, often in a competitive or challenging situation. It conveys the idea of outperforming or outshining others, usually through hard work, determination, or exceptional effort.
  • out of a/the clear blue sky The idiom "out of the clear blue sky" is used to describe something unexpected or surprising that happens without any warning or preparation.
  • bend sth out of shape The idiom "bend something out of shape" means to distort or deform something, often in a figurative sense. It refers to causing damage or harm to an object, idea, or situation, resulting in it losing its original form or intended purpose.
  • fight it out The idiom "fight it out" means to engage in a physical or verbal altercation until a resolution or outcome is determined. It implies a situation where conflicting parties or individuals are determined to resolve a disagreement or conflict through direct confrontation or intense competition.
  • a falling out The idiom "a falling out" refers to a disagreement or an estrangement between two or more people who were previously close or in good terms. It implies a deterioration or break in a relationship, often resulting in a loss of trust or friendship.
  • spoon sth out The idiom "spoon sth out" typically refers to the act of distributing or serving something, usually a substance or food item, in a measured or controlled manner using a spoon. It suggests a careful or deliberate manner of giving or portioning out.
  • bounce out (of something) The idiom "bounce out (of something)" refers to the act of quickly or energetically leaving a particular place or situation. It often implies a sudden exit with a sense of liveliness or excitement.
  • wash out (sth) The idiom "wash out (sth)" means to remove or clean something, usually by using water or another liquid. It can also refer to the negation or cancellation of an event or plan.
  • pump sth out of sm or sth The idiom "pump something out of someone or something" means to forcefully extract or obtain something, typically information or resources, from someone or something. It implies a persistent or aggressive effort in obtaining what is desired.
  • take sth out in trade "Take something out in trade" is an idiom that refers to exchanging or bartering goods or services instead of using money as payment. It often implies a non-monetary transaction, where one item or service is given in exchange for another.
  • fall out The idiom "fall out" has several possible definitions, depending on the context in which it is used. Here are some common interpretations: 1. To have a disagreement or argument with someone, resulting in a strained relationship or the termination of a friendship or association. Example: "Sarah and I used to be best friends, but we fell out over a disagreement about money." 2. To happen unexpectedly or as a consequence of a certain event or situation. Example: "When the news broke, the scandal started to fall out, revealing more shocking details." 3. To accidentally come loose or drop out. Example: "Be careful with that backpack; things tend to fall out of the pockets easily." 4. To occur or happen in a particular way
  • get the hell out of The idiom "get the hell out of" is an expression used to convey the urgency or intensity of someone wanting or demanding someone else to leave immediately or quickly. It emphasizes a strong desire for the person to depart swiftly, often due to frustration, anger, fear, or impatience.
  • go out of way to To go out of one's way to do something means to make a special effort or take extra steps to do it, often to accommodate or help someone else. It implies going beyond what is expected or required, showing willingness to inconvenience oneself or make sacrifices for someone or something.
  • be out of mind The idiom "be out of mind" typically means to be insane, irrational, or mentally unstable. It suggests a state of losing control over one's thoughts and actions.
  • go (out) on strike "Go (out) on strike" is an idiom that refers to a collective action where workers refuse to work, usually to protest against poor conditions, low wages, or unfair treatment by their employers.
  • wheel sm or sth out of sth The idiom "wheel something out of something" is typically used to describe the action of bringing or introducing something, especially an object or idea, out of a particular place or situation. It implies that the item or concept is being presented, sometimes for the purpose of showcasing or displaying it. The term "wheel" in this idiom metaphorically refers to the act of bringing or rolling something on wheels, similar to how a cart or trolley is used to transport objects.
  • knock the hell out of The idiom "knock the hell out of" means to strike or hit something or someone with great force or intensity, causing significant damage or impact. It is often used figuratively to describe an action or situation that involves exceedingly strong or powerful force.
  • beat the living daylights out of The idiom "beat the living daylights out of" means to physically assault someone very severely, often causing immense pain or injury.
  • the crap out of The idiom "the crap out of" is a colloquial expression used to emphasize the intensity or thoroughness of an action or outcome. It implies doing something forcefully, energetically, or to an extreme degree.
  • fit sm or sth out (with sth) The idiom "fit someone or something out (with something)" means to provide or equip someone or something with a particular item or set of items necessary for a specific purpose or activity.
  • (almost) jump out of one's skin The idiom "(almost) jump out of one's skin" refers to being extremely startled, startled, or highly surprised by something. The phrase emphasizes the intensity of the reaction, as if one's body is physically jumping or being expelled from one's own skin due to the sudden shock or astonishment.
  • get (oneself) out of (something) The idiom "get oneself out of something" means to extricate or free oneself from a difficult or unwanted situation. It implies taking action or making efforts to escape or avoid a predicament.
  • cuss out The idiom "cuss out" means to use profane or offensive language to verbally attack, insult, or criticize someone in an aggressive or angry manner. It involves expressing strong disapproval or anger through the use of vulgar or disrespectful language.
  • pull your finger out The idiom "pull your finger out" is an informal expression that means to start putting in effort, taking action, or working harder at something. It carries the connotation of urging someone to stop being lazy, procrastinating, or being slow, and to start taking the necessary steps to accomplish a task or goal.
  • pick (someone or something) out of a hat The idiom "pick (someone or something) out of a hat" refers to a situation where someone or something is chosen randomly or without any particular thought or plan. It alludes to the idea of picking a name or object from a hat as a method to make a selection without bias or predetermined intention.
  • eat out of The idiom "eat out of" means to be extremely fond of someone or something, often to the point of being easily influenced or manipulated by them. It implies a strong emotional attachment or admiration.
  • out of gear The idiom "out of gear" refers to a situation where something or someone loses synchronization, coordination, or efficiency. It typically describes a state of disarray, unproductiveness, or disorder.
  • fit out The idiom "fit out" refers to the process of equipping or preparing someone or something with the necessary items or supplies needed for a specific purpose or situation. It often implies making sure that everything is in order and suitable for its intended use.
  • chisel sm out of sth The idiom "chisel (someone) out of something" means to deceive or trick someone into losing or giving up something valuable, usually through dishonest or cunning means. It implies a sense of manipulation or taking advantage of someone's trust or vulnerability for personal gain.
  • talk out of arse The idiom "talk out of arse" (also commonly known as "talk out of one's ass") is a vulgar and informal expression that means to speak or express opinions without any factual basis or knowledge, often resulting in nonsensical or exaggerated statements. It implies that the person is not being honest, reliable, or well-informed about the topic they are discussing.
  • muscle sm out of sth The idiom "muscle (someone/something) out of (something)" means to use one's physical strength, influence, or power aggressively or forcefully in order to remove or displace someone or something from a particular position, situation, or opportunity. It implies using strength or assertiveness to gain an advantage or control over a situation.
  • air something out The idiom "air something out" means to make something known or to discuss something openly, particularly if it has been kept secret or hidden. It implies bringing a topic, information, or opinions into the open for discussion or resolution.
  • put the word about/around/out/round The idiom "put the word about/around/out/round" means to spread information, rumors, or gossip about something or someone, typically by word of mouth, to reach a wider audience or community. It implies the act of sharing news or details with others, often to increase awareness or generate interest.
  • be out of (one's) league The idiom "be out of (one's) league" means to be involved or competing in a situation that is beyond one's abilities, skills, or social status. It implies that the person or thing surpasses one's capability or is not a suitable match.
  • duck out (of something) The idiom "duck out (of something)" means to leave or escape from a situation or commitment in a swift or secretive manner, often in order to avoid responsibility or obligations.
  • be like a fish out of water The idiom "be like a fish out of water" means to feel awkward, uncomfortable, or out of place in a particular situation or environment, usually because one is unfamiliar or unaccustomed to it.
  • edit something out of something The idiom "edit something out of something" refers to the act of removing or deleting a specific part or element from a larger whole, typically in written or visual media. It implies the removal of unwanted or unnecessary content to enhance clarity, conciseness, or improve the overall quality of the final product.
  • loom out of sth The idiom "loom out of something" means to appear suddenly or unexpectedly, often in a large or threatening manner. It describes the emergence or presence of something in a way that captures attention or causes concern. The emphasis is usually on the surprise or looming aspect of the appearance.
  • (one's) guts out The idiom "(one's) guts out" means to do something extremely or excessively, often with great effort, intensity, or enthusiasm. It implies going to the maximum or extreme limit of one's capabilities or endurance.
  • sneak out (of sm place) The idiom "sneak out (of sm place)" means to leave a place without others noticing or without getting caught. It implies a secretive or stealthy departure from a location.
  • have someone eating out of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, typically through the ability to manipulate or persuade them easily. It suggests that the person is so subservient or obedient that they will do whatever is asked of them.
  • put some creature out of its misery The idiom "put some creature out of its misery" means to end the suffering or pain of a living being, often by causing its death. It is usually used in a compassionate context to justify a merciful act of euthanizing a suffering animal or relieving a person from extreme agony or torment.
  • get the hell out (of someplace) The idiom "get the hell out (of someplace)" is an informal expression that means to leave a place quickly, immediately, or with a sense of urgency. It often implies a desire to escape or avoid a situation or location. The phrase "get the hell out" adds emphasis or intensity to the action of leaving.
  • eat (one) out of house and home The idiom "eat (one) out of house and home" means to consume a substantial amount of someone's food or resources, often resulting in excessive expenses for the provider. It implies that the person eating has an insatiable appetite and takes advantage of the generosity or abundance of the host. This idiom is used figuratively to describe someone who consumes more than their fair share or constantly depletes resources, causing significant inconvenience or financial strain for the provider.
  • bring (someone or something) out in droves The idiom "bring (someone or something) out in droves" means attracting or causing a large number of people or things to gather or appear. It suggests that the person, event, or situation is highly popular and has mass appeal, resulting in a significant turnout or response.
  • invite someone out The idiom "invite someone out" means to ask someone to join you for a social gathering or activity outside of their usual surroundings, typically for a meal, entertainment, or any event of mutual interest.
  • hold out (for sm or sth) The idiom "hold out (for someone or something)" means to refuse to accept a lower offer or settle for something less than desired. It implies a determination to wait and persist until a desired outcome or condition is achieved, often involving negotiations or bargaining efforts.
  • help out with The idiom "help out with" means to provide assistance or support in a particular task, activity, or situation. It implies offering aid or lending a hand to someone or a group of people in need.
  • boot out The idiom "boot out" means to forcefully or abruptly evict or remove someone from a place, usually referring to being expelled or dismissed.
  • scoop sth out of sth The idiom "scoop something out of something" means to remove or gather something from a particular place or container by using a scoop or similar tool. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of obtaining information or details from a person or source, especially before anyone else.
  • scare the shit out of somebody The idiom "scare the shit out of somebody" means to frighten or terrify someone to an extreme degree. It implies causing a person to be so scared that they experience a sudden and intense reaction, often startled or paralyzed by fear.
  • frighten the life out of (one) The idiom "frighten the life out of (one)" means to scare someone very deeply or intensely, causing extreme fear or terror. It implies that the person is so frightened that it feels as if their life is being drained or taken away by the fear.
  • frighten one out of one's wits The idiom "frighten one out of one's wits" means to scare or terrify someone to such an extreme extent that it causes them to lose or be completely overcome by their sense of reason, thinking abilities, or mental composure. It implies a profound and intense level of fear that temporarily "shocks" a person's senses.
  • let the cat out of the bag The idiom "let the cat out of the bag" means to reveal a secret or disclose confidential information unintentionally or mistakenly.
  • grow out of (something) The idiom "grow out of (something)" means to stop having a particular behavior, interest, or liking as one gets older or matures. It implies that one has outgrown or become disinterested in something that was once enjoyable or relevant to them.
  • ferret sth out (from sth) The idiom "ferret something out (from something)" means to search or discover something, especially when it is hidden, by persistent and thorough investigation or probing. It implies finding something by diligently and skillfully going through various sources or places to uncover or extract the desired information or object. The verb "ferret" is derived from the behavior of ferrets, which are small, agile mammals known for their ability to dig deep into burrows to find hidden prey. Therefore, when used metaphorically, "ferret something out" suggests a similar persistent and determined search.
  • lights out The definition of the idiom "lights out" is to turn off all the lights, usually before going to sleep or leaving a place.
  • frighten the hell out of sm The idiom "frighten the hell out of someone" means to scare or terrify someone intensely or to an extreme degree. It implies inducing a deep and intense fear or panic.
  • crop someone or something out The idiom "crop someone or something out" refers to the act of removing or eliminating someone or something from a photograph, picture, or any other visual representation. It involves altering the image by cutting or editing out the unwanted element, typically to focus on a specific subject or to remove an unwanted person or object.
  • beat the hell out of sth The idiom "beat the hell out of something" means to physically or figuratively defeat or overpower something or someone to a significant degree. It suggests a forceful, aggressive, or dominant action that exceeds what is expected or necessary.
  • come out in the open The idiom "come out in the open" means to reveal or make something known or obvious, especially something that was previously hidden or kept secret. It often implies being open, honest, or transparent about thoughts, feelings, intentions, or information.
  • call sm out The idiom "call someone out" refers to confronting or challenging someone about their actions, behavior, or statements. It implies holding someone accountable or making them answer for something they have done or said, often in a direct and public manner.
  • out of one's skull The idiom "out of one's skull" means to be extremely bored, uninterested, or inattentive due to a lack of mental stimulation or excitement. It implies being mentally disconnected or unfocused, often to the point of feeling like one's mind is wandering away or not fully engaged.
  • dish sth out The idiom "dish sth out" means to distribute or give out something, especially information or criticism, often without considering the consequences or being harsh and unkind.
  • crowd out of The idiom "crowd out of" means to squeeze or force someone or something out of a space or a situation due to the presence of too many people or things. It implies being unable to maintain a position or access due to excessive competition or lack of available resources. It can also indicate being overlooked or disregarded because of the overwhelming presence of others.
  • let out (with) sth The idiom "let out (with) sth" means to express or reveal something that was previously kept secret or hidden. It can also refer to sharing an emotion or a thought openly. It implies releasing or speaking out about a particular matter.
  • pull the rug (out) from under sb/sth The idiom "pull the rug (out) from under someone/something" means to suddenly and unexpectedly take away support, assistance, or stability from someone or something, causing them to lose control or become vulnerable to failure. It is often used to describe actions or situations that undermine or sabotage someone's plans or efforts.
  • leak sth (out) The idiom "leak something (out)" refers to the unintentional or unauthorized disclosure of information to the public or to someone who is not supposed to know about it. It often implies that the information was meant to be kept confidential or secret but somehow becomes known to a wider audience or unauthorized individuals. This can happen due to negligence, gossip, or unauthorized access to information.
  • out of contention (for something) The idiom "out of contention (for something)" refers to a situation where someone or something is no longer in the running or has been eliminated from a competition, contest, or consideration for a specific goal or achievement. It implies that they no longer have a chance or possibility to succeed or achieve what they were trying to.
  • average out (to) The idiom "average out (to)" means to calculate or determine the average or mean value of a set of numbers or data. It implies finding the typical or representative value that results from combining various figures or quantities.
  • send sm out (for sm or sth) The idiom "send sm out (for sm or sth)" means to dispatch someone to acquire or retrieve something or someone. It implies that a person is being sent on a task or errand to bring someone or something back.
  • freak (sb) out The idiom "freak (sb) out" means to cause someone to become extremely scared, anxious, or agitated, usually as a result of something unexpected, strange, or shocking. It implies that the person's emotional state has been significantly disturbed or disrupted.
  • black out sth The idiom "black out something" commonly means to intentionally censor, suppress, or prevent the dissemination or accessibility of information or details about something. It refers to hiding or concealing certain aspects of an event, occurrence, or situation.
  • pester the life out of sm The idiom "pester the life out of someone" means to annoy or bother someone persistently and excessively to the point of making their life difficult or unbearable. It refers to continuously hounding or pestering someone, causing them significant inconvenience, frustration, or distress.
  • get blood out of/from a stone The idiom "get blood out of/from a stone" means to attempt or demand something that is impossible to obtain or achieve, referring to a task that is extremely difficult or an individual who is unwilling or unable to cooperate. It implies that the action being requested is as difficult as extracting blood from a solid stone.
  • wring sth out of sm The idiom "wring something out of someone" means to forcefully extract information, answers, or details from someone who is unwilling to share or reveal them. It implies using persistent questioning, pressure, or persuasion in order to obtain the desired information.
  • zonked (out) The idiom "zonked out" is used to describe a state of extreme exhaustion or fatigue. When someone is "zonked out," it means they are completely worn out or depleted of energy, often to the point of being unable to stay awake or function properly.
  • try sm or sth out The idiom "try something out" means to test or experiment with something in order to see how it works or if it meets one's expectations. It is often used when trying a new product, technique, or idea before making a final decision or judgment.
  • a bolt from/out of the blue The idiom "a bolt from/out of the blue" refers to something unexpected or surprising that happens suddenly, without any warning or anticipation. It is used to describe situations or events that catch someone completely off guard or unexpectedly. Similar to a bolt of lightning striking from a clear blue sky, this idiom implies that the incident comes out of nowhere and is completely unanticipated.
  • dance out of time The idiom "dance out of time" typically refers to someone or something that is not synchronized or coordinated with others in a particular situation, such as being out of step or rhythm. It can be used metaphorically to describe someone who is not conforming or fitting in with a group or a certain context.
  • blown (all) out of proportion The idiom "blown (all) out of proportion" means to exaggerate or magnify something to an excessive or unreasonable degree. It refers to situations where a minor issue or event is made to seem more significant or serious than it actually is.
  • want in (or out or off, etc.) The idiom "want in (or out or off, etc.)" is used to express one's desire or lack thereof to be involved in a particular situation, activity, or group. It often implies a strong eagerness or reluctance to participate or be a part of something. The specific preposition used after "want" (in, out, off, etc.) indicates the desired action or state. For example: - "She wants in on the project." (She desires to be included or participate in the project.) - "He wants out of his contract." (He desires to be released or freed from his contractual obligation.) - "They want off this roller coaster." (They desire to get off or be removed from the roller coaster ride
  • went out with the ark The idiom "went out with the ark" refers to something being old-fashioned, outdated, or belonging to a bygone era. It originates from the story of Noah's Ark in the Bible, symbolizing a very distant past. Therefore, when something "went out with the ark," it suggests that it has been around for a long time and is no longer relevant or in use.
  • lose out on The idiom "lose out on" means to miss an opportunity or suffer a disadvantage as a result of not participating or taking advantage of something.
  • be hung out to dry The idiom "be hung out to dry" means to be left alone, unsupported, or abandoned in a difficult or challenging situation, often by someone who was expected to provide assistance or help. It implies that the person being "hung out to dry" is left vulnerable, exposed, or without any means of help or defense.
  • be carried out feet first The idiom "be carried out feet first" refers to someone's manner of dying, indicating that they will die inside a building or place and have their body removed in a horizontal position, with their feet leading the way. This phrase is often used humorously or colloquially to imply that someone will be in a location for a very long time or until their death.
  • out and out The idiom "out and out" means completely or fully. It is often used to emphasize the intensity or degree of something.
  • lay someone out in lavender The idiom "lay someone out in lavender" refers to pampering or caring for someone with great attention, often with the intention of making them feel relaxed, comfortable, and at ease. It suggests providing someone with special treatment or indulging their needs.
  • come out smelling of roses The idiom "come out smelling of roses" means to emerge from a situation or event with a positive or favorable outcome. It signifies overcoming obstacles or challenges and achieving success or redemption, often resulting in an improved reputation or image.
  • bilk (one) out of (something) The idiom "bilk (one) out of (something)" means to deceive or swindle someone in order to dishonestly obtain something from them, typically money or possessions. It refers to taking advantage of a person's trust or vulnerability for personal gain.
  • buy out The idiom "buy out" refers to the act of purchasing the entirety or a controlling stake of a company, business, or someone's share or interest in it. It often involves acquiring all assets and liabilities, effectively taking complete ownership and control.
  • hit out The idiom "hit out" typically means to lash out or to react aggressively, both verbally and physically. It suggests an emotional response, often in a defensive or angry manner, where someone expresses their frustration or disapproval forcefully.
  • take the words right out of someone's mouth The idiom "take the words right out of someone's mouth" means to say exactly what someone else was about to say, often expressing agreement or sharing the same sentiment. It signifies a situation where one person accurately predicts or expresses someone else's thoughts or feelings before they have a chance to verbalize them.
  • pissed out of your head/mind/skull The idiom "pissed out of your head/mind/skull" is a colloquial expression used to describe an extreme state of drunkenness or intoxication. It implies that someone has consumed excessive amounts of alcohol or drugs, leading to a loss of control, impaired judgment, or disorientation. The phrase emphasizes the overwhelming and intense nature of the intoxication.
  • lay, put, roll, etc. out the welcome mat The idiom "lay, put, roll, etc. out the welcome mat" means to warmly greet or welcome someone, usually by making a special effort to make them feel comfortable and at home. It suggests making a friendly and inviting gesture to someone who is visiting or joining a group, indicating that they are highly valued and appreciated.
  • get out of bed the wrong side The idiom "get out of bed the wrong side" means to start the day in a bad mood or feeling irritable and grumpy. It suggests that someone's day begins on an unfavorable note, as if they woke up on the wrong side of the bed.
  • filter sth out of sth The idiom "filter sth out of sth" refers to the process of removing unwanted or undesirable elements or substances from something. It is commonly used when talking about extracting or eliminating specific components, often metaphorically, to refine or purify a particular entity or situation.
  • get a bang out of The idiom "get a bang out of" means to derive great enjoyment, excitement, or satisfaction from something. It implies finding something thrilling, pleasurable, or entertaining.
  • break out in tears and break in tears The idioms "break out in tears" and "break in tears" are expressions used to describe suddenly crying uncontrollably or bursting into tears. These phrases imply a sudden and intense emotional response, often triggered by sadness, grief, or overwhelming feelings.
  • edge sm out of sth The idiom "edge someone/something out of something" means to gradually, tactfully, or subtly push or force someone or something out of a certain situation, position, or competition in order to gain an advantage or take their place. It implies using strategic tactics or actions to surpass or replace others.
  • weed sm or sth out The idiom "weed something out" means to remove or eliminate undesirable or unnecessary elements from something. It can refer to physically removing weeds from a garden or metaphorically getting rid of unwanted or unnecessary things from a group, system, or any situation.
  • out of (one's) hair The idiom "out of (one's) hair" means to be free from or relieved of someone or something that was causing stress, annoyance, or responsibility. It implies getting rid of a problem or an unwanted situation, resulting in a sense of relief or freedom.
  • get the crap kicked out of (someone) The idiom "get the crap kicked out of (someone)" means to be severely and violently beaten or assaulted physically. It describes a situation where someone is subjected to a severe physical attack, leaving them battered and injured. The phrase is often used figuratively to describe someone being thoroughly defeated or outmatched in a non-physical context as well.
  • gasp sth out The idiom "gasp something out" means to say or speak something with great difficulty or a struggle, often due to intense emotion, shock, surprise, or exhaustion. It typically implies a sudden or abrupt exclamation that is expressed breathlessly or with a deep inhalation.
  • get a charge out of sm or sth To "get a charge out of someone or something" means to derive excitement, enjoyment, or amusement from a person, action, or situation. It implies finding something or someone highly entertaining or stimulating.
  • talk out of both sides of your mouth The idiom "talk out of both sides of your mouth" means to say contradictory or insincere things, often to deceive or manipulate others. It refers to the act of using double-faced or deceptive language to express conflicting ideas or opinions in order to confuse or mislead others.
  • hand out The idiom "hand out" typically means to distribute or give something to people, usually in a generous or organized manner.
  • out of your mind The idiom "out of your mind" refers to someone being in a state of extreme irrationality, insanity, or craziness. It suggests that the person's behavior or thoughts are illogical, foolish, or irrational.
  • feel out of humour "Feel out of humour" is an idiomatic expression that means to be in a state of moodiness, irritation, or a general sense of being unhappy or dissatisfied.
  • hunt someone or something out The idiom "hunt someone or something out" means to actively search or seek for someone or something, often requiring determination and effort to find them or it.
  • bail (one) out of jail The idiom "bail (one) out of jail" refers to the act of securing someone's release from imprisonment by providing the required amount of money, called bail, as a guarantee that they will return to court for trial. The phrase can also be used figuratively to mean rescuing or helping someone out of a difficult or problematic situation.
  • hold out on To "hold out on" someone means to withhold information, resources, or assistance from them intentionally, usually for personal gain or to exert control over them. It implies not being forthcoming or sharing something that is expected or deserved.
  • charge out The idiom "charge out" typically means to leave or depart quickly or forcefully. It can also refer to someone aggressively confronting or attacking another person or situation.
  • call someone or something out To "call someone or something out" means to publicly challenge or criticize someone or something for their actions or behavior. It often involves pointing out flaws, mistakes, or dishonesty in order to hold them accountable or make them aware of the negative consequences of their actions.
  • burst out (of something) The idiom "burst out (of something)" means to suddenly and forcefully come out or emerge from a particular place or situation. It often implies a sudden release or escape, as if breaking free from confinement or constraint.
  • come out The idiom "come out" generally means to emerge or appear, either literally or figuratively, often referring to the release or disclosure of information, feelings, or personal attributes.
  • squeeze out of The idiom "squeeze out of" means to extract or obtain something with great difficulty, effort, or force. It suggests that the action requires considerable exertion, as if one is physically or mentally squeezing out something that is initially difficult to let go of or gain access to.
  • flush out sth The idiom "flush out something" means to force something, usually something hidden or concealed, to come out or be revealed. It can also refer to driving something or someone out of a place or hiding spot through the use of various methods or tactics.
  • keep an eye out The idiom "keep an eye out" means to remain vigilant, observant, or watchful for something or someone. It often implies the act of being alert and attentive in order to notice or perceive something readily.
  • ride out sth The idiom "ride out something" typically means to endure or survive a difficult or challenging situation, often with patience or resilience. It implies staying steadfast and waiting for the situation to pass without being greatly affected or giving up.
  • run sth out of sth The idiom "run something out of something" means to use up or deplete a certain resource or supply completely. It implies the action of exhausting or consuming all available quantity or reserve of something.
  • hang (something) out (of something) The idiom "hang (something) out (of something)" typically refers to the act of placing or extending an object outside of a window, ledge, or opening in order to have it visible or accessible. It can also be used metaphorically to describe open or publicly display something.
  • whacked (out) The idiom "whacked (out)" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone or something that is exhausted, fatigued, or mentally drained. It is often used to express extreme tiredness or feeling completely worn out.
  • cut someone or something out The idiom "cut someone or something out" typically means to remove or eliminate someone or something from a situation or a group. It can be used to describe the act of excluding someone or something.
  • bum out The idiom "bum out" refers to feeling disappointed, upset, or depressed about a particular situation or event. It is often used to convey a sense of discouragement or a low mood caused by something that brings about negative emotions.
  • hew something out of something To "hew something out of something" means to shape or carve something from a material, usually by cutting or chopping with force and determination. It is often used metaphorically to describe the process of creating or achieving something significant or meaningful through hard work, perseverance, or resourcefulness.
  • map out sth The idiom "map out something" means to plan or strategize for something in a detailed and organized manner. It refers to the process of carefully outlining or creating a plan, often depicted graphically like a map, to achieve a specific goal or objective. It involves considering various factors, possible obstacles, and steps required to accomplish the desired outcome.
  • be out on a limb The idiom "be out on a limb" generally means to be in a vulnerable or precarious situation. It refers to a person being isolated or taking a risky stance, similar to how a person climbing a tree would be physically vulnerable when hanging onto a limb with no other support.
  • seep out (of sth) The idiom "seep out (of sth)" refers to a gradual and usually unnoticed leakage or escape of something, typically a liquid or gas, from a sealed or confined area. It implies that the substance is slowly and subtly permeating or escaping through small openings or pores.
  • do something out of turn The idiom "do something out of turn" means to behave or act in a way that is not in accordance with the established or expected order or sequence. It refers to doing something ahead of when it is designated or before it is socially acceptable or appropriate to do so.
  • frighten/scare the life out of somebody The idiomatic expression "frighten/scare the life out of somebody" means to terrify or cause extreme fear or anxiety in someone. It suggests that the person becomes so frightened that it feels as if their life is being taken away or threatened.
  • munch out The idiom "munch out" refers to the act of eating a large amount of food, often in a voracious or indulgent manner. It implies a sense of thoroughly enjoying and consuming food, perhaps with great appetite or without control.
  • stick your chin out "Stick your chin out" is an idiom that means to show courage, determination, or bravery in the face of a challenge or adversity. It implies being willing to confront or face difficulties head-on, without fear or hesitation. It can also suggest taking risks or standing up for oneself or one's beliefs, even when it may be risky or unpopular.
  • bitch out The idiom "bitch out" is a slang term that means to act in a cowardly or submissive manner, often when faced with a difficult or challenging situation. It can also refer to someone backing out or reneging on a promise or commitment.
  • come out in sth The idiom "come out in sth" typically means to develop or experience a particular physical reaction or symptom, usually as a result of an allergic reaction or illness. It can refer to the appearance of a rash, hives, sweat, or any visible or noticeable bodily reaction.
  • argue out The definition of the idiom "argue out" is to engage in a lengthy or intense discussion or debate in order to resolve a disagreement or issue. It implies the act of thoroughly discussing different perspectives, presenting compelling arguments, and reaching a conclusion or agreement through thoughtful conversation and reasoning.
  • make a fool (out) of sm The idiom "make a fool (out) of someone" means to cause someone to look foolish, silly, or stupid, usually by tricking or deceiving them or by exposing their foolishness or ignorance. It implies embarrassing or humiliating someone by making them appear foolish in front of others.
  • hoodwink sm out of sth The idiom "hoodwink someone out of something" means to deceive or trick someone in order to obtain or take something from them through dishonest or cunning means. It implies manipulating or misleading someone to gain possession of their belongings, funds, or resources without them realizing it.
  • zone out The idiom "zone out" means to mentally disconnect from one's surroundings and enter a trance-like state, often resulting in a loss of focus or attention. It refers to the tendency to become absorbed in one's thoughts or daydreams, disregarding the current situation or environment.
  • pick out sb/sth The idiom "pick out sb/sth" means to choose or select someone or something from a group or assortment. It refers to the act of identifying and selecting a specific person or thing from a larger set of options.
  • Keep out of this! The idiom "Keep out of this!" means to urge someone to not become involved in a situation, conversation, or dispute that does not concern them. It is a way of telling someone to stay out of the current matter and not interfere.
  • work (one's) guts out The idiom "work (one's) guts out" means to work extremely hard, putting in excessive effort and exertion in order to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • the sands of time are running out The idiom "the sands of time are running out" means that there is limited time left for someone to achieve or complete something. It implies that time is slowly diminishing, and if action is not taken soon, the opportunity will be lost.
  • look out The idiom "look out" means to be vigilant, alert, or attentive in order to detect potential dangers, hazards, or threats. It can also be used as a warning to advise someone to be cautious or careful about a specific situation.
  • hollow sth out The idiom "hollow something out" means to remove the interior or core of something, leaving only the outer shell or surface. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • the odd man out The idiom "the odd man out" refers to a person or thing that is different or does not fit in with the others in a particular group or situation. It can be used to describe someone or something that stands out or is left out due to their distinct qualities, characteristics, or circumstances.
  • out of touch (with sth) The idiom "out of touch (with something)" refers to a person or a group of people who are disconnected, unaware, or uninformed about a particular situation, trend, or the general state of affairs. It suggests a lack of understanding or knowledge about a specific subject, often resulting from being isolated or removed from the relevant information or experiences.
  • carve something out (of something) The definition of the idiom "carve something out (of something)" is the act of creating or achieving something by using skill, effort, or persistence. It implies that something is achieved through determination and hard work, often against obstacles or challenging circumstances.
  • drift out The idiom "drift out" usually means to gradually lose interest or attention, to become disengaged, or to slowly move away from a particular activity, group, or situation without making a conscious decision to do so.
  • leap out (of sth) The idiom "leap out (of sth)" typically means to suddenly or quickly emerge or appear from a place or object. It often implies a sudden and unexpected action or movement.
  • sweat it out The idiom "sweat it out" refers to enduring an uncomfortable, difficult, or uncertain situation while waiting for it to resolve or improve. It implies remaining patient and persistent despite the challenges or uncertainty. The phrase often suggests that one must work hard or wait anxiously to achieve a desired outcome or overcome obstacles.
  • the jury is (still) out The idiom "the jury is (still) out" refers to a situation where a final decision or judgment has not yet been reached on a particular matter. It implies that there is still ongoing debate, uncertainty, or further evaluation needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • dart out (of something) (at someone or something) The idiom "dart out (of something) (at someone or something)" means to suddenly emerge or move quickly out of a particular place or object towards a specific person or thing. It implies a sudden and swift movement, typically like that of a dart or a quick thrust.
  • get euchred out of something The idiom "get euchred out of something" means to be tricked or deceived in such a way that you are cheated out of something, typically referring to losing an opportunity, reward, or advantage due to unfair or manipulative tactics. The term "euchred" comes from the card game Euchre, where the objective is to prevent the opponent from making their required number of tricks.
  • press sth out of sth The idiom "press something out of something" means to extract or squeeze out something from a substance or object by applying pressure. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of obtaining or extracting information, answers, or secrets from someone by applying pressure or persistence.
  • wheeze sth out To "wheeze sth out" is an idiomatic expression that means to say or speak with difficulty, often due to a respiratory condition or illness such as asthma or a cough. It implies a strained or labored effort to utter something.
  • wear out your/its welcome The idiom "wear out your/its welcome" refers to someone or something that has been present or used for too long, to the point where it becomes annoying or unwelcome. It implies that the initial positive reception has worn off and the person or thing has become tiresome or overstayed its initial purpose.
  • hang someone out to dry The idiom "hang someone out to dry" means to intentionally leave someone in a difficult or challenging situation without any support or assistance, often to protect oneself or shift blame onto that person. It implies the act of abandoning or betraying someone by making them solely responsible or accountable for a problem or mistake. It can also refer to exposing someone to public criticism or ridicule without providing any defense or backup.
  • ace out (of something) The idiom "ace out (of something)" typically means to exit or withdraw from a particular situation, event, or venture suddenly and unexpectedly. It implies that the person or entity in question has decided to opt out or disengage abruptly, often catching others by surprise.
  • bring out in droves The idiom "bring out in droves" refers to a situation where a large number of people or things are attracted or enticed to gather or participate in something. It indicates a significant and enthusiastic turnout of individuals.
  • come out in the open with The idiom "come out in the open with" means to openly express or reveal something that was previously concealed or hidden. It suggests sharing information, feelings, or opinions openly and honestly, without any reservation or secrecy.
  • muster out of sth The idiom "muster out of something" refers to the process of departing, leaving, or being discharged from a specific organization, group, or situation, particularly in a formal or structured manner. It commonly applies to military or organizational contexts where individuals complete their service or end their participation.
  • snap out of sth The idiom "snap out of sth" means to quickly and abruptly recover from a negative or unproductive state of mind or behavior. It implies shaking off one's inertia, returning to a more positive mindset, or ceasing unhelpful actions.
  • jerk sm or sth out of sth To "jerk something out of something" is an idiom used to describe forcefully and abruptly removing or extracting something from a particular place or situation. It implies a sudden, vigorous, and often rough action or movement to retrieve or snatch something quickly.
  • stick/put your tongue out The idiom "stick/put your tongue out" refers to the act of extending one's tongue beyond the closed lips, often as a gesture of playfulness, mischief, or defiance. It can be used to express childlike behavior or teasing.
  • dope out (something) The idiom "dope out (something)" generally means to figure out, solve, or comprehend something through careful thought, analysis, or investigation. It refers to the process of working out details, finding a solution, or understanding the intricacies of a particular situation, problem, or task.
  • average out (at sth) The idiom "average out (at sth)" means to reach or produce a final or overall result that is a typical or ordinary representation of a series of values or occurrences. It implies finding the mean or typical value by calculating or combining various factors or results.
  • frighten the life out of The idiom "frighten the life out of" means to shock or scare someone extremely or to cause such intense fear that it feels as if their life is being taken away for a moment.
  • scare/frighten the life out of sb The idiom "scare/frighten the life out of someone" means to terrify or cause intense fear in someone, often to the extent that it feels as if their life is being threatened. It implies a situation or event that is so alarming or shocking that it greatly affects a person's emotional and psychological well-being.
  • knock something out The idiom "knock something out" has multiple meanings depending on the context: 1. To create or produce something quickly or easily, often referring to a piece of work or a task. It suggests completing something efficiently or without much effort. Example: "She's so talented, she can knock out a painting in just a few hours." 2. To render someone unconscious or cause them to fall down or be unable to continue fighting. Example: "With one punch, the boxer knocked his opponent out." 3. To repair or fix something, especially in a casual or unskilled way. Example: "I managed to knock out a quick fix for the broken cabinet." 4. To defeat or eliminate something or someone thoroughly or decisively.
  • black something out The idiom "black something out" typically refers to completely blocking or obscuring a particular memory, information, or event. It implies the act of intentionally forgetting or suppressing certain details.
  • a hair out of place The idiom "a hair out of place" refers to a person or thing that is unusually or excessively neat, well-groomed, or perfectly arranged in appearance. It implies that even the slightest imperfection or disorder is unacceptable or noticeable.
  • deal out The idiom "deal out" typically means to distribute or give out something, usually in a fair and impartial manner. It can also refer to dealing cards in a game or handling a particular situation in a specific way.
  • toss out sth The idiom "toss out something" means to discard or throw away something, typically referring to getting rid of items that are no longer useful or needed. It can also be used to describe dismissing or rejecting an idea, suggestion, or opinion.
  • even something out The idiom "even something out" means to make something equal or balanced, by adjusting or making changes to achieve a fair or uniform state. It can also refer to smoothing out irregularities, variations, or inconsistencies in a particular situation or outcome.
  • out of focus The idiom "out of focus" typically refers to something that is unclear, undefined, or lacking clarity or distinctness. It is often used to describe blurred or indistinct images, but it can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation, idea, or thought that lacks clarity or focus.
  • put (one's) nose out of joint The idiom "put (one's) nose out of joint" means to annoy or offend someone, usually by interfering with their affairs, opinions, or expectations. It refers to a situation where someone's pride or sense of importance is wounded, causing them to feel upset or slighted.
  • bottle out The idiom "bottle out" refers to a situation where someone fails to follow through with a plan or commitment due to fear, lack of confidence, or anxiety. It implies that the person withdraws or retreats at the last moment, usually when facing a challenging or daunting task.
  • be knocked out of the box The idiom "be knocked out of the box" refers to being surprised, shocked, or caught off guard by something unexpected or unforeseen. It signifies being taken by surprise or having one's meticulous plan or expectation disrupted. It often implies a deviation from the anticipated outcomes or a sudden change in circumstances.
  • from (or out of) left field The idiom "from (or out of) left field" refers to something unexpected or unrelated to the current topic, situation, or conversation. It originated from the sport of baseball, where left field is typically the farthest position from where a batter would expect to hit the ball. When something comes "from left field," it means it unexpectedly comes from an unforeseen or surprising direction.
  • blot something out The idiom "blot something out" means to completely remove or erase something, often from memory or existence. It can refer to forgetting or suppressing a particular memory, or to eliminating or obliterating something physically.
  • out of condition The idiom "out of condition" refers to someone or something that is not in good physical shape, lacking the necessary level of fitness or vigor. It suggests a state of being unfit or unhealthy due to a lack of exercise or proper care.
  • sprawl out The idiom "sprawl out" refers to the act of stretching, extending, or lying down lazily or relaxed in a comfortable position, often with limbs outstretched in various directions. It implies a casual or carefree manner of occupying space or occupying a larger area than necessary.
  • pull a rabbit out of (one's)/the hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of (one's)/the hat" means to produce or accomplish something unexpectedly or to find a remarkably creative or innovative solution in a challenging situation. It is often used to describe someone who successfully performs a feat that seemed impossible or surprising. This idiom is derived from the concept of a magician pulling a rabbit out of a hat, which is an unexpected and impressive trick.
  • spit sth out The idiom "spit something out" means to forcefully expel or eject something, usually from the mouth, with a sudden burst of air or saliva. It can be used both literally and figuratively. Literally, it refers to the act of forcefully removing liquid or food from the mouth by spitting. Figuratively, it means to quickly and forcefully disclose or reveal information, opinions, or thoughts.
  • fall out of favor The idiom "fall out of favor" means to lose popularity, approval, or support that one previously held. It refers to a decline in someone's or something's reputation or status.
  • poke sth out of sth The idiom "poke something out of something" refers to forcefully or aggressively removing something from a specific location or object. It implies using a pointed object or applying pressure to push or extract something out of its original position.
  • scare the life out of someone The idiom "scare the life out of someone" means to frighten or terrify someone to an extreme degree. It implies that the person is so scared that it feels as if their life force or vitality has been momentarily taken away.
  • as if the sun shines out (someone's) backside The idiom "as if the sun shines out (someone's) backside" is used to describe someone who is extremely arrogant, self-important, and thinks highly of themselves. It implies that the person believes they radiate or emit a level of brilliance similar to the radiant energy of the sun. However, this idiom is often used sarcastically or mockingly to criticize someone's inflated ego or exaggerated self-perception.
  • know inside out The idiom "know inside out" means to have a thorough and comprehensive understanding of something or someone. It implies familiarity or expertise to the point of knowing every detail, aspect, and intricacy.
  • duck out (of smw) The idiom "duck out (of smw)" means to leave or depart from a place or situation without drawing attention or without being noticed. It implies slipping away quietly or in a stealthy manner.
  • hang out with (one) The idiom "hang out with (one)" means to spend time together casually or informally with someone, usually in a relaxed or social setting. It implies a casual friendship or companionship without any specific plans or activities.
  • go out with the boys The idiom "go out with the boys" refers to the act of a person, usually male, spending time and socializing with their group of male friends or peers. It implies engaging in various activities or events exclusively with this group, often excluding others or particular individuals.
  • make a production (out) of sth The idiom "make a production (out) of something" means to excessively or unnecessarily emphasize, amplify, or exaggerate the importance or significance of an event, situation, or activity. It implies that the person is making it dramatic, elaborate, or overly theatrical, often for attention or to create a spectacle.
  • keep out of the way The idiom "keep out of the way" means to avoid being in a particular person's path or avoid causing any obstruction or interference. It suggests staying clear of someone or a situation to prevent any inconvenience or trouble.
  • out at (the) elbows The idiom "out at (the) elbows" is used to describe someone who is looking poor, shabby, or in a state of disrepair. It refers to worn-out clothes with frayed elbows, indicating a lack of means or resources to maintain proper attire. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is financially or socially struggling.
  • hold out for The idiom "hold out for" means to persistently demand or continue to seek for something better, usually in negotiations or decision-making processes, rather than accepting what is being offered or settling for less. It involves having the determination and patience to wait until a more desirable outcome or agreement is achieved.
  • figure sm or sth out The idiom "figure someone or something out" refers to the act of understanding or solving a problem or situation through careful analysis or investigation. It generally implies finding a solution, explanation, or meaning for someone or something that may be confusing or complex.
  • talk out of doing The idiom "talk out of doing" means to dissuade or convince someone not to do something they had originally intended to do. It refers to persuading or convincing someone to abandon a plan or idea through discussion or conversation.
  • yank sm or sth out of sth The idiom "yank something/someone out of something" means to forcefully or abruptly pull or remove something or someone from a place or situation. It typically implies a sudden or forceful action, often without much consideration or regard for the consequences.
  • stretch sm or sth out The idiom "stretch someone or something out" means to extend or lengthen someone or something, usually in a physical manner. It can refer to physically stretching a body part or object to make it longer, or to metaphorically extend or prolong a period of time, a process, or a specific situation.
  • take a bite out of The idiom "take a bite out of" means to reduce or diminish something significantly or to confront and tackle a problem or challenge head-on. It is often used metaphorically, suggesting the act of taking a bite from a larger whole.
  • from/out of nowhere The idiom "from/out of nowhere" means unexpectedly or without warning. It refers to something that happens or appears suddenly, without any previous indication or expectation.
  • bottom falls out The idiom "bottom falls out" refers to a sudden and significant decline or collapse of a situation, event, or plan, typically resulting in complete failure or disaster. It implies that the foundation or support on which something was built or relied upon is suddenly lost or shattered, leading to a rapid unraveling of the circumstances.
  • keep eye out The idiom "keep an eye out" means to be alert and vigilant in watching for something or someone. It is often used to advise someone to watch carefully for a specific thing or situation.
  • knock (someone) out of the box The idiom "knock (someone) out of the box" typically refers to a situation where someone or something unexpectedly disrupts or surpasses others in a field or competition, making them lose their chance or position. It often implies that the person or thing that knocked someone out of the box performs exceptionally well, rendering others comparatively less successful or competitive.
  • get no change out of The idiom "get no change out of" means to have no success or positive outcome from a particular situation or person. It implies that despite efforts or attempts, there is no favorable or satisfactory response or result.
  • cry out for sth The idiom "cry out for sth" typically means that something is strongly desired or needed. It suggests that a situation or circumstance is lacking or incomplete and requires a specific action or solution.
  • bear sth out The idiom "bear something out" means to support or confirm a statement, claim, or belief through evidence, testimony, or personal experience. It involves providing evidence that validates or justifies a particular assertion or argument.
  • squeeze sth out of sth The idiom "squeeze something out of something" means to obtain or extract something, often with great effort or difficulty. It implies extracting the maximum possible outcome or result from a situation or resource.
  • bleach something out The definition of the idiom "bleach something out" is to use bleach or a strong detergent to remove stains or color from fabric or material, often resulting in the lightening or whitening of the item. It can also be used figuratively to mean removing, diluting, or minimizing the impact of something negative or unwanted.
  • put sb out to grass The idiom "put someone out to grass" refers to the act of retiring or dismissing someone from their job or position, usually due to old age or inability to perform their duties effectively. It often implies that the person is no longer seen as useful or relevant. "Putting someone out to grass" can also be used metaphorically to mean removing someone from a position of power or influence.
  • graph sth out The idiom "graph something out" refers to the act of visually representing or plotting something, usually data or information, on a graph or chart. It involves organizing and displaying the information in a graphical format to make it easier to understand or analyze.
  • flush out The idiom "flush out" refers to the act of forcing someone or something out of hiding or secret by using tactics or actions that expose or reveal their true intentions or identity.
  • pull (one's) finger out The idiom "pull (one's) finger out" means to start working or taking action, often in a more timely or efficient manner. It is an informal expression used to urge someone to stop procrastinating, overcome laziness, or become more productive.
  • dish out The definition of the idiom "dish out" is to distribute or serve something, often in a rapid or casual manner. It can also refer to providing criticism, punishment, or unpleasant information.
  • out of key The idiom "out of key" refers to something being off or not in harmony with the surrounding elements. It can indicate a lack of alignment, compatibility, or synchronization, often used to describe a person or thing that is out of tune or out of sync with others.
  • be picked out of a hat The idiom "be picked out of a hat" refers to a random or arbitrary selection process where one is chosen without any particular reason or qualifications. It suggests being chosen by chance rather than any intentional or merit-based decision.
  • blow brains out The idiom "blow brains out" is an expression used to describe an act of extreme frustration, annoyance, or anger. It implies a feeling of wanting to release or vent emotions forcefully by metaphorically exploding one's own or someone else's brains. It does not refer to actual violence or harm inflicted upon oneself or others.
  • read out of The idiom "read out of" refers to the act of excluding or dismissing someone from a group, organization, or community. It implies that the person has done something or holds certain beliefs that are not acceptable or in line with the standards of the group, resulting in their removal or separation.
  • the bottom falls out of your world The idiom "the bottom falls out of your world" is used to describe a sudden and extreme disruption or collapse of one's life or circumstances. It signifies a situation where everything falls apart, often leading to feelings of disorientation, despair, and loss.
  • ace out (of sth) The idiom "ace out (of sth)" refers to the act of removing oneself abruptly or forcefully from a situation, event, or responsibility. It suggests disengaging quickly or finding a way to avoid participating further.
  • in/out of the running The idiom "in/out of the running" means to be participating or no longer participating in a competition, race, or contest. It refers to being either a contender or not being considered as a potential winner or participant.
  • flog your guts out The idiom "flog your guts out" means to exert maximum effort or work extremely hard to complete a task or achieve a goal. It implies working tirelessly or putting in extraordinary effort to accomplish something.
  • tear sb's heart out The idiom "tear sb's heart out" means to cause extreme emotional pain or anguish to someone. It refers to a situation or action that deeply affects and distresses someone, often involving the loss or betrayal of a loved one, a major disappointment, or a heartbreaking event.
  • can't punch (one's) way out of a paper bag The idiom "can't punch (one's) way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who is weak, powerless, or lacking in physical strength or ability. It implies that the person is incapable of defending themselves or overcoming even the slightest obstacle. It is often used figuratively to emphasize a person's ineffectiveness or incompetence in a particular situation.
  • say sth out loud The idiom "say something out loud" means to speak or vocalize something audibly, rather than merely thinking or whispering it. It refers to expressing thoughts, opinions, or words in a clear and audible manner for others to hear.
  • keep out The idiom "keep out" typically refers to a warning or command to stay away or not enter a certain place or area.
  • blurt something out (at someone) The idiom "blurt something out (at someone)" refers to speaking impulsively or without thinking, usually revealing something candid or inappropriate. It implies the act of saying something abruptly and without considering the consequences, directed towards someone in particular.
  • know something/someone inside out The idiom "know something/someone inside out" means to have a thorough and extensive understanding or knowledge of something or someone, including all its details, characteristics, and intricacies. It implies being familiar with every aspect or aspect of the subject matter to the fullest extent.
  • hold sm or sth out (of sth) The idiom "hold something or someone out (of something)" means to prevent or exclude something or someone from entering or participating in a specific situation or event. It can also refer to keeping something or someone at a distance or not allowing them to have access to something.
  • dope something out The idiom "dope something out" means to solve or figure out a problem or situation through careful analysis, investigation, or thinking. It refers to using intelligence, logic, or ingenuity to find a solution or understand something that may initially be complex or unclear.
  • stick sth out To "stick something out" means to continue doing or enduring something difficult, despite challenges or hardships, until it is completed or resolved. It implies perseverance, determination, and the willingness to see something through until the end.
  • turn some place inside out The idiom "turn some place inside out" means to search a location thoroughly or extensively, often with the intention of finding something specific or discovering hidden information or secrets. It implies a meticulous and comprehensive exploration of every corner or aspect of a place.
  • bleep sth out The idiom "bleep something out" refers to the act of censoring or replacing offensive or inappropriate language with a beep or a censoring sound, typically done in media such as television or radio, to prevent the explicit content from being heard or understood by the audience.
  • help out The idiom "help out" means to assist or lend a hand to someone in need or to contribute to a task or situation. It denotes offering support, aid, or assistance willingly and willingly contributing to the resolution of a problem or completion of a task.
  • fan out The idiom "fan out" refers to the action of spreading or dispersing in different directions, similar to the pattern created by a fan when it opens up. It can be used to describe the act of expanding, diverging, or branching out from a central point or starting position, either physically or metaphorically.
  • be out of touch with The idiom "be out of touch with" means to be unaware or unfamiliar with something due to a lack of interaction, communication, or involvement. It suggests that the person does not have current knowledge or understanding of a particular subject, situation, or development.
  • buy something out The idiom "buy something out" typically refers to purchasing complete ownership or controlling interest in a business, company, or organization, by buying out all the shares or stakes from other shareholders or partners. It implies acquiring full control or possession through a financial transaction.
  • take somebody out of himself, herself, etc. The idiom "take somebody out of himself, herself, etc." means to distract or divert someone's attention or focus from their own thoughts, problems, or emotions. This phrase is often used when someone is feeling down, stressed, or overwhelmed, and an activity or interaction manages to temporarily lift their spirits or provide a necessary break from their current state. It implies that this diversion helps to bring the person back to a state of happiness, relaxation, or engagement with the external world.
  • usher sm or sth out of sm place The idiom "usher sm or sth out of sm place" means to guide or escort someone or something out of a particular location or area with politeness or authority. It implies the act of directing or leading in an orderly manner, often to ensure that the person or thing is removed from the place smoothly and without any disruption.
  • come out against The phrase "come out against" means to openly and publicly express opposition, disagreement, or disapproval towards someone or something. It is often used when one declares their stance or takes a position against a particular issue, policy, or individual.
  • keep (one's) nose out of (something) The idiom "keep (one's) nose out of (something)" means to refrain from interfering or being involved in a matter that does not concern or involve oneself. It suggests avoiding meddling or prying into other people's business or affairs.
  • be out of way The idiom "be out of the way" typically means to remove oneself or something from a space or location, often in order to avoid obstructing or interfering with others. It can also refer to the act of organizing or clearing an area to make it more accessible or free from obstructions.
  • out of true The idiom "out of true" refers to something that is not straight, accurate, or aligned as it should be. It is often used in reference to objects or situations that are not functioning or performing correctly, deviating from the desired or expected standard.
  • empty sth out The idiom "empty something out" means to remove or make something completely empty by taking out all its contents or contents. It is often used when referring to removing all the contents from a container, space, or area.
  • cut out sth The idiom "cut out something" can be defined as to eliminate or remove something, often an undesirable or unnecessary element or action. It is typically used in contexts where someone wants to get rid of or cease a particular behavior, activity, or situation.
  • be out of the picture The idiom "be out of the picture" typically means someone is no longer involved or relevant in a situation or scenario. It suggests that the person is not considered, included, or influential anymore.
  • lunch out The idiom "lunch out" refers to the act of eating lunch outside of one's usual workplace or home, typically in a restaurant or food establishment. It can imply taking a break from responsibilities, socializing with colleagues or friends, or simply enjoying a meal away from one's usual environment.
  • let sth slip (out) The idiom "let something slip (out)" means to unintentionally reveal or disclose information or a secret that was meant to be kept hidden or confidential. It refers to a situation where someone speaks or conveys something without intending to do so, often resulting in an unintended reveal.
  • snap out of it/something The idiom "snap out of it/something" means to recover quickly from a state of sadness, distraction, or shock, by regaining control of one's emotions or focus. It often implies a need for someone to quickly shake off their negative or unhelpful state of mind and return to a more productive or positive mindset.
  • feel sm out (about sm or sth) The idiom "feel someone out (about something)" means to try to gauge someone's opinion, thoughts, or attitude about a particular person, issue, or topic in a discreet or indirect manner. It usually involves approaching the person with subtle questions, comments, or observations to determine their perspective or level of interest.
  • screen sm or sth out of sth The idiom "screen something/someone out of something" means to exclude or eliminate something or someone from a particular situation or group. It refers to the process of filtering or removing undesirable elements or factors.
  • come out with (something) The idiom "come out with (something)" means to express or announce something, especially something that was unexpected or surprising. It implies revealing or making something known for the first time.
  • make a federal case (out) of sth The idiom "make a federal case (out) of something" means to overreact or exaggerate the importance or seriousness of a situation or issue. It implies turning a relatively minor matter into a major and unnecessarily complicated one. The phrase originates from the American legal system, where a federal case refers to a legal matter that falls under the jurisdiction of the federal courts, indicating its complexity and gravity.
  • edge sth out of sth The idiom "edge something out of something" means to gradually push or force something out of a competitive or desirable position, often by using one's skill, influence, or strategy. It can denote the act of gaining an advantage over someone or something and displacing them gradually, slowly, or subtly.
  • buy (someone or something) out The idiom "buy (someone or something) out" typically refers to a situation where one person or group purchases full ownership or control of another person, business, or organization by offering a sum of money. This can involve acquiring someone's shares in a company, purchasing their ownership rights, or paying off their investment to gain complete control. Moreover, it can also refer to someone buying out the entire stock or inventory of a business, essentially taking ownership of the goods or products. Additionally, in certain contexts, "buying someone out" can imply paying off a person or party to prevent their involvement or influence in a particular situation or decision-making process.
  • show someone out The idiom "show someone out" refers to accompanying or guiding someone to the exit or door of a place as an act of hospitality or courtesy. It usually implies politely escorting a guest or visitor out of a building, home, or premises.
  • chalk sth out The idiom "chalk something out" means to plan or outline something in a detailed and specific manner. It originates from the practice of using chalk to draw or mark a sketch or plan on a chalkboard or any other surface that can be easily erased or modified.
  • keep nose out of business The idiom "keep nose out of business" means to refrain from interfering in or getting involved with someone else's affairs or matters that do not concern oneself. It suggests minding one's own business and avoiding unnecessary interference in the affairs of others.
  • blot sth out The idiom "blot sth out" typically means to erase or eliminate something completely, often referring to a memory, thought, or event that one wishes to forget or remove from their mind or existence.
  • deal (one) out of (something) The idiom "deal (one) out of (something)" means to intentionally cheat or deprive someone of something, typically a fair or equal share. It implies that someone has been excluded from receiving what they deserve or have a rightful claim to.
  • break out with The idiom "break out with" typically means to suddenly and unexpectedly develop or experience something, such as a skin rash, acne, a contagious disease, or allergies. It implies that this manifestation occurs in a noticeable or visible manner, often described as an outbreak, eruption, or sudden appearance.
  • jump out of (one's) skin The idiom "jump out of (one's) skin" means to experience a sudden and intense surprise, shock, or fright that causes one to react in an exaggerated manner. It implies being startled to the point where one's body or emotions instinctively respond with a strong physical or emotional reaction.
  • couldn't pour water out of a boot The idiom "couldn't pour water out of a boot" is used to describe someone who is extremely incompetent or lacking basic skills and abilities. It implies that the person is so inept that they cannot even complete a simple task such as pouring water out of a boot, which requires minimal effort and proficiency.
  • be out of order The idiom "be out of order" means that something is not functioning properly or is not working as it should.
  • fork sm money out (for sth) The idiom "fork out money (for something)" means to spend or give a significant amount of money in order to acquire or purchase something. It implies that the cost or expenditure involved is considerable or burdensome.
  • throw the baby out with the bath The correct idiom is "throw the baby out with the bathwater." It means to discard or get rid of something valuable or important while trying to eliminate something undesirable or unnecessary. It emphasizes the idea of making a mistake or being careless in the process of trying to improve a situation.
  • jury is still out (on someone or something) The idiom "jury is still out (on someone or something)" means that a decision or a judgment about someone or something has not yet been made. It implies that the situation is still uncertain, with no consensus or final verdict reached. It suggests that further evaluation, observation, or time is needed before a conclusion can be reached.
  • bluff (someone) out of (something) The idiom "bluff (someone) out of (something)" means to deceive or trick someone into giving up or relinquishing something, usually through the use of fake confidence or a strong, intimidating demeanor. It involves using psychological tactics to convince the person that they have no chance of succeeding or holding onto what they possess, leading them to back down or surrender.
  • be fresh out of something The idiom "be fresh out of something" means to have completely run out of a particular item or resource and not have any more available.
  • out and about The idiom "out and about" refers to being active, moving around, or engaged in various activities outside of one's usual environment or routine. It implies being lively, energetic, and exploring different places or completing tasks rather than staying at home or being idle.
  • miss out on The idiom "miss out on" means to fail to participate in or experience something that could be enjoyable, beneficial, or important. It refers to the act of not taking advantage of an opportunity or experiencing something special.
  • fresh out (of something) The idiom "fresh out (of something)" refers to the situation where someone has just run out or depleted their stock of a particular item or resource. It implies that there are no more quantities available and the individual is unable to provide or offer more of that specific thing at the moment.
  • let the genie out of the bottle The idiom "let the genie out of the bottle" means to unleash or initiate something that cannot be easily controlled or undone, often resulting in unforeseen consequences or difficulties. It refers to a situation where a powerful force or idea has been set free, causing significant changes or damage.
  • blot out sth The idiom "blot out sth" typically means to obscure, block, or erase something from memory or existence. It can refer to intentionally forgetting or disregarding a particular event, person, or memory.
  • bail out (of sth) The idiom "bail out (of sth)" typically means to leave a situation hastily or to withdraw support or involvement in something that is not going well. It is often used to describe someone or a company's decision to discontinue their participation in a project, business venture, or relationship due to difficulties or problems.
  • be on the look out The idiom "be on the lookout" means to be observant, attentive, and watchful for something or someone. It implies being vigilant and ready to take action or notice anything suspicious or of interest.
  • out the ass The idiom "out the ass" is used informally to describe a situation where there is an excessive or overwhelming amount of something. It implies that there is an abundant quantity of a particular thing, often referring to something negative, undesirable, or unwanted.
  • (slip/be thrown) out of gear The idiom "slip out of gear" or "be thrown out of gear" refers to a situation where something is no longer functioning smoothly or properly, often caused by losing control, making mistakes, or experiencing disruption. It can be used to describe a person, a plan, a machine, or any process that deviates from its intended course or loses effectiveness.
  • come out of The idiom "come out of" typically means to emerge or result from a specific situation or experience. It can imply the emergence of a person, object, or outcome after being hidden or concealed. It can also indicate the origin or cause of something.
  • bow out of the running The definition of the idiom "bow out of the running" is to withdraw or remove oneself from a competition, contest, or pursuit. It usually implies voluntarily stepping away or conceding defeat due to various reasons such as lack of interest, inability to compete, or acknowledging the superiority of other candidates.
  • cry out (in sth) The phrase "cry out (in sth)" typically means to express a strong emotion or feeling loudly or passionately. It is often used to describe someone's utterance or exclamation during a moment of intense pain, fear, surprise, or excitement.
  • bomb out (of something) The idiomatic expression "bomb out (of something)" generally means to fail or perform poorly in a particular endeavor or situation. It conveys a sense of disappointment or lack of success.
  • ninetynine times out of a hundred, at nine times out of ten The idiom "ninetynine times out of a hundred, at nine times out of ten" is an expression used to signify a high probability or likelihood of a certain outcome or result. It suggests that in most cases or situations, the expected outcome will occur. It emphasizes near certainty or a very high success rate, with only a minimal chance of failure or deviation from the norm.
  • dole sth out The idiom "dole sth out" means to distribute or give out something, often in small amounts or in a strict manner. It conveys the idea of dispensing or dividing something, typically resources, responsibilities, or rewards, in a controlled or parsimonious manner.
  • beat/knock the tar out of sb The idiom "beat/knock the tar out of someone" means to severely batter, defeat, or physically assault someone to the point of exhaustion or submission. It implies a forceful and brutal act of violence or punishment.
  • parcel sm or sth out The idiom "parcel sm or sth out" means to divide something into smaller parts or portions and distribute them separately to different recipients or destinations.
  • It's a jungle out there. The idiom "It's a jungle out there" means that the world or a particular situation is chaotic, competitive, and unpredictable, much like a tropical jungle where survival requires careful navigation and constant vigilance.
  • put out of The idiom "put out of" typically means to cause someone to feel inconvenience, annoyance, or frustration, often by disrupting their plans or routine. It can also refer to removing someone from a position, typically against their will, or forcing them to leave a place or situation.
  • iron out The idiom "iron out" means to resolve or work out difficulties, conflicts, or disagreements in order to reach an agreement or find a solution. It refers to the process of smoothing out the wrinkles or kinks, similar to ironing a wrinkled clothing.
  • snap somebody out of it/something The idiom "snap somebody out of it/something" means to shock or jolt someone out of a state of distraction, sadness, or reverie, typically through a sudden action, reminder, or realization. It is used when someone is engrossed in their thoughts or emotions and needs to be brought back to reality or attention.
  • figure out The idiom "figure out" means to solve or understand a problem or situation through careful thought, analysis, or investigation. It refers to the process of finding a solution or reaching a conclusion by using one's intellect or reasoning abilities.
  • get (someone) out of (something) The idiom "get (someone) out of (something)" is used to express the act of freeing or helping someone escape from a difficult or unpleasant situation. It implies that the person in question is stuck or trapped in something undesirable, and someone else is aiding or rescuing them.
  • line out The idiom "line out" often refers to the act of speaking or stating something in a straightforward and clear manner. It means to express thoughts or ideas directly and honestly, without any ambiguity or confusion.
  • take the bread out of people's mouths The idiom "take the bread out of people's mouths" typically means to deprive someone of their livelihood or means of making a living. It implies a situation where one's actions or decisions negatively impact others financially or harm their ability to sustain themselves.
  • clean sm out The idiom "clean someone out" is typically used to mean to take or acquire all of someone's money or resources, leaving them with none or very little. It can also refer to removing or depleting something completely or thoroughly.
  • apportion something out (among some people) The idiom "apportion something out (among some people)" means to divide or distribute something, such as resources or responsibilities, among a group of people in a fair and proportionate manner. It implies that the allocation is done equitably, ensuring that each person receives their rightful share.
  • get (something) out of (something) The idiom "get (something) out of (something)" means to derive or obtain a particular benefit, enjoyment, or understanding from a certain experience, situation, or object. It refers to gaining value, knowledge, or fulfillment out of something.
  • take the wind out of someone's sails The idiom "take the wind out of someone's sails" means to diminish someone's enthusiasm, confidence, or momentum by delivering news or information that undermines their position or achievements. It refers to the act of deflating or removing the driving force behind someone's thoughts, plans, or aspirations, leaving them feeling disappointed, discouraged, or disheartened.
  • hire sm or sth out The idiom "hire sm or sth out" means to rent or lease someone or something to another person or organization for a specific period of time. It involves temporarily utilizing or employing someone's services or lending out an object in exchange for payment.
  • grind out The idiom "grind out" typically means to produce something, usually work or a task, by putting in continuous, hard, and often monotonous effort. It implies a persistent and determined approach towards achieving a goal, often in less than ideal circumstances.
  • go out of favor The idiom "go out of favor" refers to a situation or person losing popularity, support, or approval. It is often used to describe a decline in public opinion or the diminishing appeal of a particular thing or individual.
  • let out sth The idiom "let out something" typically means to release, reveal, or disclose something that was previously concealed, hidden, or kept secret. It can also refer to making an item or space larger by extending or stretching it.
  • scare the life out of (one) Definition: To scare the life out of someone means to frighten or terrify them to an extreme extent, often resulting in a loss of composure or causing them to feel very fearful or anxious.
  • order sm out of sm place The idiom "order someone out of somewhere" means to command or instruct someone to leave a particular place forcefully or with great authority. It implies that the person being ordered is not welcome or should not be present in that specific location.
  • frighten/scare the (living) daylights out of somebody The idiom "frighten/scare the (living) daylights out of somebody" means to intensely scare or terrify someone. It implies instilling such fear that it feels as though all the light, energy, or life force has been temporarily drained out of them. It emphasizes the extreme degree of fright or terror imposed on the person.
  • put (one) out of (one's) misery The idiom "put (one) out of (one's) misery" means to end someone's suffering or to bring relief to someone who is in a difficult or painful situation by taking a decisive action, usually an act of mercy.
  • lock sm or sth out of sth To "lock someone or something out of something" means to prevent them from entering or accessing a place or situation. It often refers to barring someone from a specific area or excluding them from a particular opportunity or experience. It implies utilizing physical or metaphorical barriers to keep someone or something away from a specific location or context.
  • cry out for sm or sth The idiom "cry out for something or someone" means to strongly or desperately need or require something or someone. It implies that the situation or circumstances are loud or urgent enough to alert others about the necessity of fulfilling that need or want.
  • out of a paper bag The idiom "out of a paper bag" typically means having poor or inadequate skills, abilities, or competence in a particular area. It is often used to indicate someone's inability to perform a basic task or lacking basic knowledge or understanding.
  • usher out of sm place The idiom "usher (someone) out of (some place)" means to guide or lead someone out of a specific location in a polite and orderly manner. It suggests assisting someone in leaving a place, often indicating that their presence is no longer desired or appropriate. The phrase emphasizes a degree of formality and sometimes implies that the person being ushered out may have overstayed their welcome or is being removed from a situation.
  • gouge sth out of sm The idiom "gouge something out of someone" means to obtain something, usually information or money, from someone with great effort, often through persistent questioning or manipulation. It suggests forcefully or aggressively obtaining something from someone who may be reluctant to provide it.
  • fan out (from sm place) The idiom "fan out (from sm place)" refers to the act of spreading out or dispersing from a central location or starting point. It is often used to describe the movement or distribution of people, objects, or ideas in various directions, resembling the shape of a fan.
  • churn sth out The idiom "churn sth out" means to produce something in large quantities, often quickly and without much attention to quality or detail. It implies a repetitive and efficient process of manufacturing or generating output, often with little regard for the individual value or uniqueness of each item.
  • fade something out The idiom "fade something out" refers to gradually decreasing or diminishing something, often bringing it to an end or causing it to become less noticeable or prominent. It originates from audio and visual editing techniques where a fade-out is applied to gradually decrease the volume or visibility of a sound or image. In a broader sense, it can also imply the gradual or subtle elimination or cessation of something.
  • frighten out of wits The idiom "frighten out of wits" means to scare someone extremely or to cause great fear or panic. It portrays a situation where someone experiences such a fright that it overwhelms their thoughts and senses, temporarily impairing their ability to think or react.
  • settle (sth) (out of court) The idiom "settle (sth) (out of court)" refers to resolving a legal dispute or disagreement outside of the courtroom, usually through negotiation or an agreement between the parties involved. It implies that both parties have reached a consensus without requiring a formal trial or legal proceedings. This resolution often involves reaching a compromise or reaching a financial settlement without the need for a judge or jury to make a decision.
  • leave somebody out in the cold The idiom "leave somebody out in the cold" means to exclude or neglect someone, leaving them without assistance, support, or involvement in a particular situation. This can refer to intentionally disregarding someone's needs or wishes, or unintentionally overlooking or forgetting about someone.
  • come out of the box The idiom "come out of the box" typically means to think or behave in a unique or innovative way, to be creative or original, and to approach situations with a fresh perspective. It refers to someone's ability to break away from conventional or traditional methods and come up with new and unconventional ideas or solutions.
  • cross out The idiom "cross out" refers to the act of drawing a straight line through a word, sentence, or paragraph to indicate deletion, removal, or annulment. It is often used metaphorically to show the disregard or rejection of something previously stated or written.
  • be fresh out of sth The idiom "be fresh out of something" means to have completely run out of or depleted a particular item or resource, leaving none available. It implies that there is none left to offer or provide.
  • turn sb out (of smw) The idiom "turn sb out (of smw)" means to force someone to leave a place or property, often in a sudden or unexpected manner. It implies removing someone from a location or premises against their will. This idiom can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • snap out of it The idiom "snap out of it" means to quickly or abruptly recover from a state of sadness, depression, or distraction, and return to a more normal or focused state of mind. It implies the need to regain control or shake off one's current state to refocus and engage with the present.
  • out of order The idiom "out of order" typically refers to something that is not functioning properly or is not in its usual working condition. It can also be used to describe a situation or behavior that is inappropriate or not according to expectations.
  • go out of (one's) way to (do something) The idiom "go out of (one's) way to (do something)" means to make an extra effort or go to great lengths in order to achieve or accomplish something. It implies going beyond what is expected or required, often to accommodate someone else or to help them in a specific way.
  • duck out The idiom "duck out" means to quickly and discreetly leave or exit a situation, usually in order to avoid being noticed or to avoid a responsibility or obligation.
  • frighten one out of wits The idiom "frighten one out of wits" means to terrify or scare someone so intensely that it completely overwhelms or paralyzes them mentally or emotionally. It implies extreme fear or panic that leaves a person feeling terrified or shocked to the point of being unable to think or react logically.
  • conduct someone out of something The idiom "conduct someone out of something" refers to guiding or escorting someone out of a place or situation. It implies assisting someone in leaving a specific area, often with a sense of formality or professionalism.
  • watch out for sm The idiom "watch out for someone" means to be cautious or alert because that person may pose a potential threat, danger, or problem. It implies the need to take precautions or be wary of someone's actions or intentions.
  • give a bawling out To "give a bawling out" means to scold or reprimand someone in a loud, angry, or harsh manner. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is berating or disciplining another person for their actions or behavior.
  • dole something out The idiom "dole something out" means to distribute or give something out in small portions or amounts, usually in a strict or limited manner. It implies a sense of control or restriction in the distribution process, often suggesting a lack of generosity or abundance.
  • pour out on The idiom "pour out on" commonly refers to expressing or exhibiting a strong emotion, particularly in an unrestrained or uncontrolled manner. It implies an intense release of feelings or thoughts, often without holding back.
  • blow sm or sth out of the water The idiom "blow someone or something out of the water" refers to completely surpassing or defeating someone or something in a remarkable and impressive way. It implies an overwhelming and decisive victory or accomplishment that leaves the other party or thing completely overshadowed or defeated.
  • set out (on sth) The idiom "set out (on sth)" means to begin a journey, a task, or a project with a specific goal or intention in mind. It often implies that one is prepared and ready to embark on the endeavor.
  • eat someone out of house and home The idiom "eat someone out of house and home" means to consume all of someone's food or resources, usually referring to someone who eats a large amount of food and leaves none for others or exhausts all available resources. It is often used figuratively to describe someone who eats excessively or demands more than what is reasonable.
  • hunt sm or sth out The idiom "hunt someone or something out" means to search thoroughly and diligently for someone or something until they are found or located. It implies a dedicated and persistent effort to find and discover something that may be hidden or difficult to find.
  • fluff something out To "fluff something out" means to make something appear larger, fuller, or more impressive by adding extra content, details, or information. It is often used in reference to writing or verbal communication, where one embellishes or expands upon a topic or argument to make it seem more substantial or comprehensive. This idiom can also imply adding unnecessary or superfluous elements to obscure the main point or to make something appear more significant than it actually is.
  • take a rise out of, at get a rise out of The idiom "take a rise out of" or "get a rise out of" means to provoke someone in order to elicit a reaction or response, often for one's own amusement or entertainment. It involves intentionally saying or doing something to agitate or irritate someone in order to get a strong emotional response from them.
  • burst out into (something) The idiom "burst out into (something)" means to suddenly start exhibiting or expressing a particular behavior, emotion, or action in a forceful and sudden manner. It implies a sudden and uncontrollable outburst or eruption of something, often involving enthusiasm, laughter, tears, anger, or other intense emotions.
  • bring sth out of mothballs The idiom "bring something out of mothballs" refers to the act of reintroducing or using something that has been stored, neglected, or dormant for a long period of time. It typically implies that the item or idea being brought back has not been in use or popular for an extended duration.
  • leap out (of something) The idiom "leap out (of something)" means to suddenly and quickly emerge or come out of a place or situation. It often implies a sudden or unexpected action, as if the person or object is springing forth with force or urgency.
  • price yourself/something out of the market The idiom "price yourself/something out of the market" means to set a price for a product or service that is so high that it becomes unaffordable or undesirable for potential customers. It implies that the excessively high price prevents people from buying or participating in the market, making the product or service less competitive and less appealing compared to more reasonably priced alternatives.
  • out of the corner of one's eye The idiom "out of the corner of one's eye" refers to seeing or noticing something indirectly or peripherally, usually without directly focusing on it. It suggests a subtle or unintentional perception of something, typically catching a glimpse or being aware of it without giving it full attention.
  • garbage in, garbage out The idiom "garbage in, garbage out" refers to the concept that if you input poor or inaccurate information or data into a system or process, the output will also be poor or inaccurate. It emphasizes the importance of ensuring quality inputs in order to achieve desirable results.
  • duke out The idiom "duke out" means to engage in a physical confrontation or fight, typically between two individuals. It is often used to describe a situation where two people fight or argue in an attempt to determine who is stronger, more skilled, or superior in some way. The term "duke" is a slang term derived from the phrase "put up your dukes," referring to raising one's fists in preparation for a fight.
  • If can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen The idiom "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen" means that if someone is unable to handle or cope with a difficult or demanding situation, they should remove themselves from it. It suggests that if a person is unable to withstand the pressure or challenges of a particular task, they should step aside and let others handle it. It emphasizes the notion of self-awareness and recognizing one's own limits.
  • be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast/hot/thin, etc. as all get out" is used to describe someone or something as extremely fast, hot, thin, and so on. It emphasizes the extreme or exceptional quality of the described attribute. For example, "She's as fast as all get out on the track" means that she is incredibly swift in her running ability, or "That car is as hot as all get out" indicates that the car is extremely attractive or impressive. It is a colloquial expression used to intensify a particular characteristic or quality.
  • come out for The idiom "come out for" typically means to publicly support or endorse a particular person, group, cause, or belief, especially by attending an event, demonstration, or public gathering. It can also refer to declaring one's support or position on a certain matter.
  • be rained out The idiom "be rained out" refers to a situation where an outdoor event, activity, or game is canceled or postponed due to heavy rain or inclement weather conditions.
  • groan sth out The idiom "groan sth out" refers to expressing something with a deep, prolonged sound of discomfort, annoyance, or exhaustion. It implies that the individual vocalizes their thoughts, feelings, or words with a noticeable and audible groaning sound.
  • stake out a claim to something To "stake out a claim to something" means to assert one's ownership or right to possession of something, typically a piece of land or a particular position or territory. It involves making a clear and firm declaration or demonstration of one's entitlement or ownership, often by marking boundaries or providing evidence of exclusive use.
  • be/go out on the tiles The idiom "be/go out on the tiles" typically means to go out for a night of socializing and partying, particularly involving drinking and dancing, usually in bars or clubs. It suggests a lively and enjoyable night out on the town.
  • catch someone out The idiom "catch someone out" means to discover or expose someone's mistake, deceit, or dishonesty, usually when they least expect it or intend to deceive others. It involves catching someone off guard or revealing the truth about someone's actions or intentions.
  • think out of the box The idiom "think out of the box" means to think creatively or unconventionally, beyond the limits or boundaries of traditional or pre-determined ideas. It encourages thinking in innovative ways and exploring alternative solutions or perspectives that are not limited by conventional or predictable thoughts or approaches.
  • bust ass out of (some place) The idiom "bust ass out of (some place)" is an informal expression that means to leave or escape from a particular place quickly and with great energy or urgency. It often implies a sense of urgency or determination in departing from a location, often due to adverse circumstances, discomfort, or a desire for liberation.
  • grind something out The idiom "grind something out" refers to the act of persistently working on a task or problem, often through repetitive or unpleasant means, until it is completed or resolved. It implies a relentless pursuit of progress or completion, despite the challenges or obstacles involved.
  • draw out of and draw out The idiom "draw out of and draw out" can have two different meanings: 1. To draw something out of someone/something: It means to extract, remove, or bring forth a particular quality, emotion, reaction, or information from someone or something. It implies the act of coaxing or eliciting a response or information. Example: The therapist was skilled at drawing out the patient's deepest fears and insecurities. 2. To draw something out: It means to prolong, extend, or lengthen the duration, time, or process of something. It is often used to indicate the act of making something last longer than expected. Example: The speaker continued to draw out his presentation, making the meeting run over schedule.
  • haul ass out of somewhere The idiom "haul ass out of somewhere" typically means to leave or escape quickly and urgently from a particular place. It emphasizes the idea of moving swiftly, often to avoid a potentially dangerous or undesirable situation.
  • be out of (one's) element The idiom "be out of (one's) element" is used to describe a situation where someone feels uncomfortable, unfamiliar, or lacking their usual abilities or expertise. It refers to being in an environment or doing something that is not within one's normal range of skills, knowledge, or comfort zone.
  • stampede out of The idiom "stampede out of" means to quickly and uncontrollably rush or flee from a place, often due to fear, panic, or excitement. It conveys a sense of a mass movement or chaotic activity as if a herd of animals were stampeding.
  • beat something out The idiom "beat something out" typically means to persistently or vigorously complete a task or accomplish a goal, often through determination, effort, or competition. It can also refer to forcefully obtaining information from someone or something.
  • cuss sm out The idiom "cuss sm out" means to use strong, abusive, or offensive language to reprimand or chastise someone heavily. It implies the act of verbally lashing out at someone with explicit language to express anger, frustration, or disapproval.
  • not out of the woods The idiom "not out of the woods" means that someone is still facing difficulties or challenges and has not yet overcome them completely. It implies that even though progress has been made, the situation is still uncertain or risky, similar to being lost in a forest and not being assured of finding a way out.
  • knock the daylights out of The idiom "knock the daylights out of" means to hit or strike someone or something with great force, causing significant damage or injury. It implies a strong, powerful blow that can potentially render the recipient unconscious or unable to function properly.
  • trick sm out of sth The idiom "trick someone out of something" means to deceive or manipulate someone in order to obtain something from them, often through dishonest or cunning means. It implies using tricks, deceit, or cunning tactics to unjustly acquire someone's possessions, money, or resources.
  • stand (out) in relief The idiom "stand (out) in relief" refers to something or someone standing out or becoming more noticeable or prominent compared to the surroundings. It originates from the visual effect of a three-dimensional object being highlighted or appearing more distinct when viewed against a contrasting background. This idiom is often used to describe an individual or thing that distinguishes itself from others, draws attention, or becomes easily noticeable due to its unique qualities or outstanding characteristics.
  • pull out of a hat The idiom "pull out of a hat" means to produce or create something unexpectedly or mysteriously, often as a solution to a problem or to demonstrate a skill. It refers to the idea of a magician pulling something out of a hat seemingly out of thin air, without prior knowledge or preparation.
  • spit it out! The idiom "spit it out!" is used to encourage someone to quickly and directly say what they want to say or express their thoughts without hesitation or evasion. It is often used when someone appears hesitant or struggling to articulate their thoughts or when someone is beating around the bush instead of getting to the point.
  • climb out (of something) The idiom "climb out (of something)" refers to overcoming or successfully recovering from a difficult or challenging situation. It suggests that one has managed to escape or rise above a particular problem or predicament. This expression often implies resilience, perseverance, and personal growth.
  • be frightened out of your wits The idiom "be frightened out of your wits" means to be extremely scared or terrified. It suggests a level of fear that is so intense that it momentarily or temporarily overpowers one's ability to think or reason clearly.
  • out of the goodness of heart The idiom "out of the goodness of one's heart" means to do something kind or generous without expecting anything in return, purely out of a genuine desire to help or be compassionate.
  • burn someone out The idiom "burn someone out" refers to the act of exhausting or overwhelming someone emotionally, mentally, or physically due to excessive demands, stress, or work.
  • hair out of place The idiom "hair out of place" refers to a person's appearance lacking perfection or impeccable grooming. It implies that something seems slightly disheveled or unkempt.
  • level out The idiom "level out" refers to the act of stabilizing or reaching a balance after a period of fluctuation, improvement, or decline. It implies a cessation of rapid change and the establishment of a more consistent state.
  • gaze out on something The idiom "gaze out on something" means to look at or observe something, typically a view or scenery, for an extended period of time, often in a contemplative or thoughtful manner. It suggests a deep and absorbed observation of the surroundings.
  • set out stall The idiom "set out stall" refers to presenting or displaying one's abilities, skills, or products in a confident and assertive manner, typically in order to compete or attract attention or customers. It stems from the practice of market stallholders setting up their stalls and organizing their merchandise neatly to showcase their offerings during a market day.
  • get out of my face! The idiom "get out of my face" is an expression typically used when someone wants another person to leave them alone or to stop bothering them. It signifies annoyance, frustration, or a desire for personal space and privacy.
  • work things out The idiom "work things out" means to find a solution or resolution for a problem, disagreement, or difficult situation through discussion, negotiation, or effort. It implies seeking compromises, taking action, or making an effort to reach a mutually beneficial outcome.
  • get (something) out of perspective The definition of the idiom "get (something) out of perspective" is to misunderstand or misinterpret a situation or issue, usually by exaggerating or distorting its true significance or importance. It refers to the act of losing a balanced and accurate view or understanding of something.
  • fear of missing out The idiom "fear of missing out" is commonly referred to as FOMO and it describes the feeling of anxiety or insecurity that arises when one believes others are experiencing more interesting, enjoyable, or fulfilling things than they are. It is often associated with the fear of not being included or informed about social events or experiences, leading to a desire to constantly stay connected and involved in order to avoid feeling left out.
  • far out The idiom "far out" is an expression that refers to something that is unconventional, unusual, or extreme. It is often used to describe things that are beyond the norm or expected, often in a positive or exciting manner.
  • smoke out sth The idiom "smoke out something" means to force something or someone into the open by throughly investigating or revealing their true intentions, secrets, or hiding place. It can also refer to using smoke or an actual fire to drive out animals from their shelters or hiding spots.
  • eat sb out of house and home The idiom "eat someone out of house and home" means to consume such a large amount of food or resources that it puts a significant strain on the host's supplies or finances. It implies that the person's appetite or consumption is excessive or insatiable, often leading to the host feeling overwhelmed or financially burdened.
  • lash out (at someone or something) The idiom "lash out (at someone or something)" means to suddenly respond to a situation or person with intense anger, criticism, or aggression. It refers to an impulsive and often uncontrolled reaction.
  • get the hell out (of here) The idiom "get the hell out (of here)" is an emphatic and colloquial way of telling someone to leave or go away immediately. It conveys a sense of urgency or annoyance and can be used in various contexts to express disbelief, anger, or a desire for someone to depart quickly.
  • terrify sm or an animal out of sth The idiom "terrify someone/an animal out of something" means to cause extreme fear and make someone or an animal to completely abandon or give up on a particular thing or activity. It implies that the fear instilled is so intense that it overrides any desire or motivation one may have had in the first place.
  • conduct (someone or something) out of (some place) The idiom "conduct (someone or something) out of (some place)" means to guide or lead someone or something away from a particular location or setting. It suggests an action of escorting or directing someone or something out of a place in a courteous or protective manner.
  • eat one’s heart out The idiom "eat one's heart out" means to feel intense envy, jealousy, or regret over someone else's achievement, possession, or success. It refers to the feeling of perpetual dissatisfaction and longing for something unattainable.
  • live out your dreams/fantasies The idiom "live out your dreams/fantasies" means to fulfill or actualize one's deepest desires, aspirations, or imaginations in reality. It refers to actively pursuing and achieving the things one has always wished for or imagined, often involving experiences or accomplishments that go beyond the ordinary or expected.
  • lay out The idiom "lay out" has multiple meanings and can be interpreted in different ways depending on the context. Here are a few common definitions: 1. To arrange or organize something in a particular way. Example: "She carefully laid out the ingredients before starting to cook." 2. To explain or describe something in a clear and detailed manner. Example: "During the presentation, he laid out his plan for the project." 3. To prepare a dead body for a viewing or burial. Example: "The funeral home will lay out the deceased for the wake." 4. To spend a large amount of money on something. Example: "He laid out a substantial sum to buy the new car." 5. To knock someone down or defeat them in
  • be out of it The idiom "be out of it" means to be in a state where one is mentally or physically disengaged or disconnected from their surroundings. It suggests a lack of awareness, focus, or understanding of what is happening or being said.
  • blow sm's brains out The idiom "blow someone's brains out" is a graphic and violent phrase used figuratively to vividly express the act of causing extreme fear, shock, or astonishment to someone. It implies completely overwhelming or frightening them to the point where their thoughts and rationality cease to exist, metaphorically "blowing their brains out" with an intense emotional impact.
  • rinse mouth out The idiom "rinse (one's) mouth out" means to clean or refresh the mouth, typically by using a liquid rinse or by drinking water, after eating something distasteful or foul-tasting. It can also be used figuratively to refer to removing the memory or association of something unpleasant or offensive by taking some kind of action.
  • bring something out The idiom "bring something out" means to release, introduce, or make something publicly available, typically referring to a product, publication, or information. It entails making something known or accessible to the public or a specific audience.
  • camp out The idiom "camp out" means to sleep or spend the night outdoors in a tent or makeshift shelter, usually in a temporary or informal way, typically for recreational purposes such as hiking, fishing, or other outdoor activities. It can also imply temporarily living or staying in a less-than-ideal or makeshift accommodation.
  • make a big deal out of The idiom "make a big deal out of" means to exaggerate the significance or seriousness of something, often giving it more attention or importance than it deserves.
  • out front The idiom "out front" typically means being in a prominent or leading position, often referring to someone who is prominent, visible, or in control. It can also refer to being at the forefront or in advance of others in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • give out with something The idiom "give out with something" means to express or emit something, usually with enthusiasm or excitement. It refers to sharing thoughts, opinions, information, or emotions openly and freely.
  • be out of hands The idiom "be out of hands" typically means to be out of control, chaotic, or difficult to manage. It suggests a situation where one has lost authority or power over something, making it challenging to handle or bring under control.
  • keep out of trouble The idiom "keep out of trouble" means to avoid getting involved in situations or activities that may lead to problems, difficulties, or danger. It implies staying away from risky or problematic circumstances and maintaining a safe or trouble-free existence.
  • blab sth out The idiom "blab sth out" typically means to reveal or disclose something without consideration or caution, often unintentionally or in a careless manner. It indicates a lack of control over one's speech and a tendency to divulge information without thinking about the consequences.
  • blab something out The idiom "blab something out" means to speak impulsively or indiscreetly, revealing information that was meant to be kept secret or private. It refers to the act of carelessly disclosing information without thinking about the consequences or without considering the importance of keeping it confidential.
  • step/be out of line The idiom "step/be out of line" means to behave inappropriately, deviating from the accepted rules or standards of behavior. It suggests someone's actions or words are not in accordance with what is expected or deemed appropriate in a particular situation.
  • hang out your shingle The idiom "hang out your shingle" refers to starting one's own business or practice and publicly advertising it. It originated from the practice of lawyers or doctors literally hanging a sign, often a shingle, outside their office or residence to indicate their profession and availability for clients or patients. Thus, "hang out your shingle" means to officially establish oneself as a professional and promote their services or expertise.
  • shell an amount of money out The idiom "shell out an amount of money" means to reluctantly or unwillingly spend or pay a significant sum of money. It implies that the person is parting with their money with some hesitation or reluctance.
  • slog your guts out The idiom "slog your guts out" means to work extremely hard or make tremendous efforts to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It refers to putting in maximum physical or mental effort, often for a prolonged period, to overcome challenges or complete something demanding.
  • crop out The idiom "crop out" typically refers to the physical act of removing something or someone from a photograph or image by using cropping techniques. In a broader sense, it can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of removing or excluding someone or something from a situation, group, or event.
  • burst out crying The idiom "burst out crying" means to suddenly and uncontrollably start crying, usually due to strong emotions such as extreme sadness, grief, or even joy.
  • price yourself out of the market The definition of the idiom "price yourself out of the market" is to set the price of a product or service so high that it becomes unaffordable or unattractive to potential customers, leading to a loss of sales or market share.
  • hang out to dry The idiom "hang out to dry" means to leave someone in a difficult or vulnerable situation without offering support or assistance. It is often used when someone is abandoned or betrayed by others, leaving them to face the consequences of their actions alone.
  • fork out the dough The idiom "fork out the dough" means to spend or pay a significant amount of money, often reluctantly or under duress. It implies that the person or entity has to make a substantial financial contribution or payment.
  • run sb out of town (on a rail) The idiom "run someone out of town (on a rail)" refers to forcefully and publicly expelling or banishing someone from a community due to their unacceptable behavior, generally in a manner that inflicts humiliation or disgrace upon them. It implies a collective act of extreme disapproval or rejection by the community towards an individual, often intending to make it clear that the person is not welcome. The phrase "on a rail" implies a traditional method of expulsion where the person is made to sit on a rail (a long, narrow object) and then carried or paraded out of town.
  • fill sth out The idiom "fill something out" refers to completing or providing all the necessary information on a form, document, or questionnaire.
  • fink out (on someone or something) The idiom "fink out (on someone or something)" means to betray, deceive, or let down someone or something that you were previously committed to or responsible for. It refers to the act of unexpectedly abandoning or failing to follow through on a promise, obligation, or loyalty.
  • out of shape The idiom "out of shape" refers to being physically unfit, lacking stamina, or being in poor physical condition. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is not performing at their best or is unprepared for a particular task or situation.
  • walk out (on sth) The idiom "walk out (on sth)" means to abruptly leave or abandon something, typically a job, a relationship, or an event, often as a sign of protest or dissatisfaction. It implies a sudden and deliberate act of quitting or showing disapproval by physically removing oneself from the situation.
  • take a leaf out of life, book The idiom "take a leaf out of someone's book" means to learn from or emulate someone's behaviors, actions, or qualities that have led to their success or accomplishments. It suggests adopting a similar approach or following the example set by someone successful in order to achieve similar results in life.
  • work out sth The idiom "work out something" means to find a solution, resolution, or answer to a problem or situation through effort, analysis, or calculation. It can also refer to the act of engaging in physical exercise or fitness activities.
  • bust out of some place The idiom "bust out of some place" means to escape or break free from a specific location or situation, typically with great force, determination, or suddenness. It implies a strong desire or need to leave a place or situation, often due to feeling trapped, confined, or restricted.
  • stand out from the crowd The idiom "stand out from the crowd" means to be distinct, exceptional, or noticeably different from others in a group or a particular situation. It refers to someone or something that attracts attention or catches people's eyes due to their unique qualities, abilities, or appearance. It implies standing apart or standing above others in terms of individuality, talent, or distinction.
  • be talking out of both sides of (one's) mouth The idiom "be talking out of both sides of one's mouth" means that someone is speaking insincerely or hypocritically by saying different or contradictory things depending on the audience or situation. It refers to someone who is being deceitful or two-faced, often making conflicting statements to manipulate or deceive others.
  • mete out sth The idiom "mete out something" means to distribute or give something, typically punishment or justice, in a controlled and measured manner. It implies the act of dispensing or administering something in a fair and appropriate manner, often with a sense of authority.
  • cash out The idiom "cash out" typically refers to the act of converting an asset, such as stocks, bonds, or even virtual currency, into cash or liquidating an investment in order to make a profit or meet financial obligations. It can also refer to withdrawing funds from a bank account or using up all available credit on a prepaid card.
  • beat brains out The idiom "beat brains out" means to work extremely hard or make an intense effort to accomplish something.
  • out at the knees The idiom "out at the knees" refers to something or someone that is in a state of decay or decline. It often describes a person, object, or situation that is worn, worn-out, dilapidated, or impoverished. The phrase suggests that the knees, which are typically vulnerable and prone to damage, have been exposed or worn through due to excessive use or lack of care.
  • keep out of sight The idiom "keep out of sight" means to intentionally remain hidden or concealed, to avoid being noticed or seen by others. It suggests keeping a low profile or staying away from public attention.
  • be out of humour The idiom "be out of humour" refers to being in a bad or foul mood, feeling unhappy, irritable, or annoyed. It implies that someone is displeased or discontented with their current state or situation, causing them to behave or react negatively.
  • pull the rug out (from under sm) The idiom "pull the rug out from under someone" means to suddenly or unexpectedly undermine or deprive someone of support, stability, or security, causing them to fall or be in a state of shock or disarray. It is often used to describe an action that completely disrupts someone's plans, beliefs, or expectations.
  • scour sth out of sth The idiom "scour something out of something" typically refers to the act of diligently searching or thoroughly examining something in order to find or obtain a desired outcome or information. It often implies a process of intense scrutiny or persistent effort to extract something from a particular source or place.
  • pull a rabbit out of a hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of a hat" means to successfully accomplish or produce something seemingly impossible or unexpected, often in a surprising or astonishing way.
  • out of courtesy (to someone) The idiom "out of courtesy (to someone)" means to do something as a polite gesture or act in a certain way to show respect, consideration, or politeness towards someone. It involves going beyond what is necessary or expected to ensure that others feel comfortable or appreciated.
  • cut out (for sm place) The idiom "cut out (for sm place)" means that someone is perfectly suited or well-suited for a specific place, situation, or role. It implies that the person possesses the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities that are required or expected in that particular setting.
  • lend sth out (to sm) The idiom "lend sth out (to sm)" means to permit someone to borrow or use something that you possess temporarily, with the expectation that it will be returned at a later time.
  • ground out The idiom "ground out" typically refers to a phrase used in baseball to describe when a batter hits the ball on the ground and is thrown out at first base. However, the idiom can also be used more generally to describe someone persistently or methodically completing a task, often with little excitement or flair.
  • lie (one's) way out of (something) The idiom "lie one's way out of (something)" refers to the act of using dishonesty or falsehoods to escape a difficult situation, typically by inventing or fabricating stories or explanations. It implies deceitful behavior in order to avoid facing consequences or taking responsibility for one's actions.
  • spend money like it's going out of style The idiom "spend money like it's going out of style" means to spend a large amount of money in a reckless or extravagant manner, without concern for the cost or consequences of one's spending habits. It suggests a person who is spending money at an incredibly fast pace, often beyond their means or in a way that is unnecessary or excessive.
  • Keep out of my way The idiom "keep out of my way" means to avoid or stay clear of someone, usually because they are in a bad mood, angry, or want to be left alone. It suggests that the person does not want any interference or interaction with others and desires personal space.
  • lay sth out The idiom "lay something out" means to arrange or organize something in a deliberate and systematic manner. It is often used when describing the act of planning or designing something, such as a project, event, or layout. It can also refer to clearly explaining or presenting information or ideas in a structured manner.
  • put (someone or something) out of its/(one's) misery The idiom "put (someone or something) out of its/(one's) misery" means to end someone's suffering, usually by killing them or by eliminating a hopeless or unbearable situation. It can also refer to putting an end to something that is causing distress or harm.
  • frighten the (living) daylights out of (someone) The idiom "frighten the (living) daylights out of (someone)" means to scare or startle someone extremely or intensely. It suggests a level of fear or shock that is so strong that it feels as if it has temporarily removed the brightness or vitality from one's being.
  • rip/tear the heart out of something The idiom "rip/tear the heart out of something" means to take away or remove the most vital or essential part of something, causing significant damage or harm to its core functions, purpose, or significance. It implies a destructive act that undermines the fundamental integrity or essence of a person, organization, concept, or system.
  • branch out The idiom "branch out" means to expand or diversify one's interests, activities, or business into new areas or directions. It implies moving away from one's usual or established path and exploring new possibilities.
  • Do I have to spell it out? The idiom "Do I have to spell it out?" means that someone is stating something so obvious or clear that there should be no need for further clarification. It implies that the speaker believes the listener should already understand or comprehend the situation without any additional explanation.
  • slop out (of sth) The idiom "slop out (of sth)" refers to someone or something pouring or spilling out of a container or space in a messy or uncontrolled manner. It often suggests a lack of precision or care in handling the contents, resulting in a mess or waste.
  • surge out (of sth) The idiom "surge out (of sth)" typically refers to a sudden rush or burst of energy, movement, or activity in a particular direction, often from a confined or restricted space. It can also describe a sudden and noticeable increase in intensity, strength, or force of something.
  • come in out of the rain The idiom "come in out of the rain" means to seek shelter or refuge from a difficult or unpleasant situation. It implies that one should escape or avoid the troubles or hardships they are currently facing.
  • don't let the door hit your ass on the way out The idiom "don't let the door hit your ass on the way out" is a sarcastic or humorous way of telling someone to leave quickly or without causing any further trouble. It implies that the person is not appreciated or wanted, and is not welcome to linger or delay their departure.
  • have (something) coming out of (one's) ears The idiom "have (something) coming out of (one's) ears" refers to having an excessive amount of something or an overload of a particular thing. It implies that there is an abundant supply or an overwhelming quantity of the mentioned item.
  • flick sth out The idiom "flick something out" means to quickly and forcefully remove or expel something by using a flicking motion. It usually refers to getting rid of an object or substance in a swift and efficient manner by flicking it away with a snap of the wrist or fingers.
  • throw out the baby with the bathwater The idiom "throw out the baby with the bathwater" means to discard or get rid of something valuable or important while trying to eliminate something undesirable. It refers to a situation where someone unintentionally or thoughtlessly gives up something worthwhile along with something they wanted to remove or reject.
  • put sth out of its misery The idiom "put something out of its misery" means to end or terminate something that is suffering or causing pain, usually in a compassionate or merciful manner. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • have luck run out The idiom "have luck run out" means when one's streak of good fortune or success comes to an end, typically resulting in a period of setbacks or disappointments. It implies that the individual or situation was previously fortunate but has now experienced a shift in luck, leading to unfavorable outcomes.
  • swear out against The idiom "swear out against" typically refers to the act of formally and officially making a legal complaint or accusation against someone. It involves swearing an oath or providing a sworn statement, often in a court of law, to initiate or support a legal proceeding against the individual in question.
  • out of sync The definition of the idiom "out of sync" is when something or someone is not synchronized or does not align harmoniously with something else, such as timing, movements, or intentions. It implies a lack of coordination or compatibility.
  • pull out of The idiom "pull out of" means to withdraw, discontinue, or retreat from a commitment, agreement, or situation. It can refer to withdrawing support, ending involvement, or quitting something.
  • claw your way back, into something, out of something, etc. The idiom "claw your way back" or "claw your way into/out of something" refers to the act of making a strenuous effort or struggle to regain or achieve something, usually after experiencing setbacks, obstacles, or adversity. It implies a metaphorical action of using claws (like an animal) to fiercely and determinedly fight one's way towards a goal or to escape from a difficult situation.
  • stamp a fire out The idiom "stamp a fire out" means to extinguish or put an end to a problem, conflict, or controversy with force or determination. It emphasizes using strong, decisive actions to suppress and eliminate something quickly, much like stomping on a fire to put it out.
  • make a virtue (out) of sth The idiom "make a virtue (out) of sth" means to turn a particular quality or behavior into something admirable or praiseworthy, usually in an attempt to justify or glorify it, especially when it may not be inherently positive. It involves reframing or presenting an aspect of a situation or person as advantageous or commendable, even if it is not universally seen that way. It involves finding a way to make something that might be perceived as a weakness or flaw appear positive or desirable.
  • knock the props out from under sm The idiom "knock the props out from under someone" means to undermine or weaken someone's position, argument, or self-confidence by revealing flaws, inconsistencies, or errors in their statements or beliefs. It suggests completely dismantling or removing the support or foundation that someone relies upon.
  • jolt someone out of something The idiom "jolt someone out of something" refers to the act of surprising or shocking someone in order to make them stop or change a particular behavior, habit, mindset, or state of mind. It implies shaking or startling someone in order to bring them to a new realization, awareness, or action.
  • find (something) out the hard way The idiom "find (something) out the hard way" means to learn or discover something through direct experience, often resulting in difficulty, pain, or failure. It implies that the knowledge or understanding is acquired by going through a challenging or unpleasant situation, instead of learning from others' advice or warnings.
  • run sm or sth out of sth The idiom "run someone or something out of something" means to force someone or something to leave a particular place or situation by using pressure or intimidation.
  • pick sm or sth out (for sm or sth) The idiom "pick someone or something out (for someone or something)" means to select or choose someone or something from a group or collection, typically for a particular purpose or role. It implies singling out a specific individual or item, often based on suitability, preference, or specific criteria.
  • take a page out of (someone's) book The idiom "take a page out of (someone's) book" means to imitate or learn from someone else's actions or behaviors, especially if they have been successful or achieved a certain outcome. It implies adopting or copying someone's approach, strategies, or methods in order to achieve similar results.
  • growl something out The idiom "growl something out" means to speak or utter something in a low and deep, often angry or threatening tone. It implies expressing something with annoyance, frustration, or aggression.
  • bilk someone out of something The idiom "bilk someone out of something" typically means to deceive or defraud someone, particularly by tricking them out of money or possessions through dishonest or unfair means. It implies taking advantage of someone's trust or vulnerability to wrongfully obtain something from them.
  • hold out little, etc. hope The expression "hold out little hope" means to have very little optimism or expectation for a positive outcome or result. It suggests that there is limited belief or confidence in a particular outcome or situation.
  • buy sth out The idiom "buy something out" refers to the act of purchasing or acquiring the full ownership or controlling interest in a company, business, or organization. It typically involves purchasing all the shares or assets of a particular entity, resulting in complete ownership or control.
  • couldn't act way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't act way out of a paper bag" refers to someone who is extremely untalented or incompetent in acting or performing a task. It implies that the person lacks any skill, ability, or talent, to the point where they would not even be able to perform a simple task such as getting out of a paper bag.
  • come out in The idiom "come out in" typically refers to a physical reaction of the body, specifically when someone develops a visible symptom or reaction. It is commonly used to describe the appearance of a rash, spots, or other skin-related issues. For example, "After eating seafood, she came out in hives."
  • in phase/out of phase The idiom "in phase/out of phase" refers to the alignment or synchronization of two or more things. When something is "in phase," it means that the components are harmoniously synchronized or working together effectively. On the other hand, "out of phase" means that the components are not aligned or synchronized properly, resulting in a lack of coordination or effectiveness. This idiom is often used to describe situations where individuals, processes, or systems are either working well together or experiencing a lack of synchronization.
  • bluff one's way out (of sth) The idiom "bluff one's way out (of sth)" means to deceive or mislead others with confidence or bravado in order to escape a difficult or uncomfortable situation. It involves using assertiveness, bluster, or clever tactics to create an impression that one has the necessary skills, knowledge, or authority to navigate their way out of a challenging circumstance.
  • burn sm out The idiom "burn someone out" generally means to exhaust or overwhelm someone physically, emotionally, or mentally, usually due to excessive work, stress, or demands. It implies pushing someone to their limits and depleting their energy or enthusiasm, often resulting in a loss of motivation or effectiveness.
  • bring something out (in someone) The definition of the idiom "bring something out (in someone)" is to cause or stimulate a certain quality, behavior, or emotion in someone. It refers to the ability to provoke a particular reaction or response from an individual.
  • ninetynine times out of a hundred The idiom "ninetynine times out of a hundred" means a situation or outcome that occurs almost always or in the majority of cases. It implies a high probability or likelihood of something happening.
  • take the easy way out The idiom "take the easy way out" means to choose the simplest or least challenging option or approach, often avoiding the effort, difficulty, or responsibility that a situation demands. It implies opting for convenience or immediate gratification instead of putting in the necessary work or making tougher decisions.
  • out of a clear blue sky The idiom "out of a clear blue sky" refers to something unexpected or surprising that happens without any warning or prior indication. It suggests that the event or occurrence catches someone off guard, as if it came out of nowhere.
  • out of touch The idiom "out of touch" refers to being unaware or having a lack of understanding about a particular situation, person, or current trends. It depicts a state where someone is disconnected or unable to relate or empathize with the experiences, feelings, or needs of others.
  • burst out with (something) The idiom "burst out with (something)" means to suddenly and energetically express or exclaim something, often with emotion or enthusiasm. It implies a sudden release, as if the words or expression couldn't be contained any longer and burst forth.
  • out of nowhere The idiom "out of nowhere" refers to something unexpected or surprising that occurs suddenly, without prior warning or preparation. It implies that the occurrence seemed to come from a place or situation that was entirely unanticipated.
  • get the hell out The idiom "get the hell out" is an expression used to strongly urge or demand someone to leave a particular place or situation immediately. It implies a sense of urgency and is often used when someone is annoyed, angry, or wants someone to go away quickly.
  • spear sth out (of sth) The idiom "spear sth out (of sth)" generally refers to forcefully or quickly extracting or removing something from a particular location or environment. It may imply the use of a spear-like object, symbolizing a swift and decisive action. This idiom can be used both literally and figuratively to convey the idea of taking something out forcefully, efficiently, or with urgency.
  • come out against (someone or something) The idiom "come out against (someone or something)" refers to publicly expressing disapproval, opposition, or disagreement towards a person, idea, action, or cause. It implies taking a stand against someone or something and making one's position or opinion known.
  • snatch sth out of sth The idiom "snatch something out of something" typically means to quickly grab or take something forcefully or unexpectedly from a particular place or person. It often implies a sense of urgency or surprise in retrieving the item.
  • keep an ear out (for someone or something) The idiom "keep an ear out (for someone or something)" means to remain attentive or alert in order to listen or watch for someone or something. It implies being vigilant, ready to notice any specific sound, information, or presence one is expecting or interested in.
  • call out The idiom "call out" has multiple definitions, depending on the context. Here are some possible definitions: 1. To publicly challenge or criticize someone for their actions, behavior, or words. Example: "She called out her colleague for spreading false information." 2. To summon or request someone's presence, often for assistance or a specific purpose. Example: "The teacher called out the student's name to answer a question." 3. To announce or declare something, often in a public manner. Example: "The company called out its earnings for the quarter." 4. In sports, to declare or make an official ruling on a questionable play or violation. Example: "The referee called out the player for a foul." It's important to note
  • hold someone or something out (of something) The idiom "hold someone or something out (of something)" means to prevent or refrain someone or something from entering or accessing a certain place or situation. It can also refer to keeping someone or something away from a specific activity or participation.
  • empty out The idiom "empty out" means to remove or take out all the contents from something, often referring to a container or a space. It can also be used figuratively to indicate the act of completely emptying one's thoughts or emotions.
  • know (something) inside and out The idiom "know (something) inside and out" means to have a thorough understanding or knowledge of a subject or topic. It implies that someone is familiar with every aspect, detail, or intricacy of the thing they claim to know.
  • drown out The idiom "drown out" means to make a sound or noise so loud or overpowering that it covers or dominates the sound of something else, thus making it inaudible or difficult to hear. It can also refer to an action of overpowering or overshadowing something else, such as voices, opinions, or thoughts.
  • out of one's mind The idiom "out of one's mind" means to be mentally disturbed, insane, or irrational. It refers to a state of mind in which a person's thoughts or behaviors are perceived as abnormal or detached from reality.
  • come out on The idiom "come out on" typically means to ultimately succeed, prevail, or achieve a favorable outcome in a challenging situation or competition. It implies overcoming obstacles, emerging as the winner, or achieving a desired result.
  • have something out The idiom "have something out" typically means to discuss or resolve a problem or issue between two or more people through open communication. It refers to a situation where individuals willingly engage in a conversation or confrontation to address their disagreements, misunderstandings, or conflicts in order to find a resolution or understanding.
  • separate sth out of sth The idiom "separate something out of something" means to extract, isolate, or remove a particular element or component from a larger whole. It refers to the action of distinguishing and setting apart a specific part or item from a mixture, group, or combination.
  • marry one's way out of sth The idiom "marry one's way out of something" refers to the act of marrying someone in order to escape or avoid a difficult or undesirable situation, typically involving financial or social difficulties. It implies that getting married to someone of higher social or economic standing can provide a means to improve one's circumstances or escape an undesirable situation.
  • out of the frying pan (and) into the fire The idiom "out of the frying pan (and) into the fire" means to go from a difficult or unpleasant situation to one that is even worse. It implies that attempting to escape or improve a situation has actually resulted in a more challenging or undesirable circumstance.
  • bomb out (of sth) The idiom "bomb out (of sth)" means to fail or be unsuccessful in a particular endeavor or activity. It usually implies a sudden or significant failure, often resulting in disappointment or embarrassment.
  • play out sth The idiom "play out something" refers to the act of carrying out or executing a particular event, situation, or course of action, often to observe its outcome or consequences. It can also imply the gradual unfolding or development of a situation or scenario.
  • all tuckered out The idiom "all tuckered out" means to be extremely tired or exhausted after expending a lot of energy or effort.
  • laugh someone or something out of court The idiom "laugh someone or something out of court" means to dismiss or ridicule someone or something in such a way that they or it are not taken seriously or considered credible. It refers to a situation where an argument or claim is so absurd, laughable, or lacking evidence that it is immediately rejected or ridiculed out of a legal or formal setting, such as a court of law. In essence, it suggests that someone or something has been discredited or invalidated through mocking laughter.
  • sweat out sth The idiom "sweat out something" means to endure, endure anxiously, or struggle through a difficult or tense situation until it is resolved. It suggests going through a period of stress, worry, or discomfort while waiting for the outcome or resolution of a challenging circumstance.
  • cut out for The idiom "cut out for" means to be naturally suited or well-suited for a particular task, role, or occupation. It implies that a person has the necessary skills, abilities, or personality traits needed to succeed in that specific area.
  • duke it out The phrase "duke it out" means to engage in a physical fight or confrontation, often one-on-one, with the aim of determining a winner or settling a dispute. It implies a combative or competitive situation where the involved parties are determined to prove their strength, skill, or superiority.
  • put nose out of joint The idiom "put nose out of joint" refers to someone feeling annoyed, offended, or upset due to being slighted or feeling ignored, particularly when someone else receives attention or praise instead. It implies a sense of feeling left out or having one's pride hurt.
  • lengthen out The idiom "lengthen out" means to make something longer in duration, extent, or distance. It implies extending or prolonging something beyond its original or typical length.
  • get something out of one's system The idiom "get something out of one's system" means to indulge in or expel particular thoughts, desires, or behaviors until they are satisfied or no longer felt so strongly. It refers to the act of doing something as a form of emotional release or to free oneself from an obsession or compulsion.
  • crapped out The idiom "crapped out" means to fail, break down or stop working, usually in reference to a machine or equipment. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone who has failed or given up in some way.
  • whittle sth out of sth The idiom "whittle something out of something" means to create or carve something by carefully and skillfully removing pieces from a larger material. It often refers to creating a smaller or more refined object from a larger or rougher material through patient and intricate work. This idiom can also be used figuratively to describe the process of gradually shaping or constructing something, such as an idea or a solution, through careful thought and refinement.
  • straighten sb out The idiom "straighten somebody out" means to help someone understand something correctly, clarify a misunderstanding, or resolve a problem they are facing. It usually involves offering guidance, advice, or corrective action to bring clarity or improvement to the person's situation.
  • bottom fell out (of sth) The idiom "bottom fell out (of sth)" refers to a sudden and significant collapse, failure, or decline of something, often in terms of financial or emotional aspects. It describes a situation where the stability or support of a specific object, plan, relationship, or system suddenly disintegrates or fails completely. It suggests a rapid and drastic change that can lead to chaos, loss, or a significant setback.
  • get out of sight The idiom "get out of sight" means to disappear or hide oneself from view. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to removing something or someone from attention or notice.
  • get a bang out of (something) The idiom "get a bang out of (something)" means to derive excitement, enjoyment, or entertainment from a particular experience or activity.
  • find sth out The idiom "find something out" means to discover or obtain information about something through investigation, inquiry, or research. It refers to the act of figuring out or learning the truth or details about a particular situation, topic, or secret.
  • out for, be The idiom "out for, be" means to have the intention or desire to achieve a particular goal or objective, often implying a determined and focused attitude. It refers to someone actively seeking or pursuing something, usually with a strong determination to succeed.
  • get out of my sight! The idiom "get out of my sight!" is an expression used to forcefully and angrily demand someone to leave or go away, indicating that the presence of that person is unwanted or unwelcome.
  • freak sm out The idiom "freak someone out" means to cause someone extreme fear, anxiety, or discomfort. It is used to describe a situation or action that surprises, shocks, or disturbs a person to the point where they are deeply affected emotionally.
  • drown someone (or an animal) out The idiom "drown someone (or an animal) out" means to make someone or something inaudible or unheard by speaking or making noise loudly or at the same time. It is often used when someone wants to silence or overpower another person with their own voice or sounds.
  • be cleaned out The idiom "be cleaned out" means to have all of one's possessions, resources, or money taken away or depleted, leaving one with nothing or in a state of emptiness. It can refer to losing all of one's savings, being left with no options or opportunities, or having everything confiscated or stolen.
  • out from under The idiom "out from under" refers to being liberated or freed from a burdensome situation or oppressive authority. It suggests escaping or being released from something that was holding one down or limiting their freedom or possibilities.
  • reject sm or sth out of hand To reject something or someone out of hand means to reject or dismiss it/them immediately and without any consideration or examination. It implies refusing or denying without giving it/them any chance or thought.
  • out of spirits The idiom "out of spirits" typically refers to feeling low-spirited, depressed, or lacking enthusiasm. It suggests a temporary state of emotional or mental fatigue, where one's energy, motivation, or cheerfulness is diminished.
  • flick out The definition of the idiom "flick out" refers to the quick and swift motion of extending or moving something, typically a small object, with a sudden jerk or snap.
  • spell out sth The idiom "spell out (something)" means to explain or describe something in a clear, detailed, or explicit manner, leaving no room for confusion or misunderstanding. It involves conveying information or instructions in a direct and explicit way, often by breaking it down into easily understandable parts or by providing step-by-step details.
  • come out to be The idiom "come out to be" means the final or ultimate result or outcome of a situation, event, or process. It refers to when something is revealed or becomes evident, often in a surprising or unexpected way.
  • knock the stuffing out of (one) The definition of the idiom "knock the stuffing out of (one)" means to thoroughly defeat or overcome someone, typically by delivering a powerful blow or defeating them soundly in a competition or argument. It implies a forceful and decisive action that leaves the person physically or emotionally weakened.
  • be blown out of the water The idiom "be blown out of the water" means to completely defeat or surpass someone or something in a spectacular or overwhelming way. It signifies the act of overwhelming or surpassing someone or something to such an extent that they are left astonished or completely unable to compete or compare. This idiom is often used to describe a situation where one's expectations, performance, or achievements are greatly exceeded or surpassed by someone or something else. It implies a sense of unexpected and emphatic defeat or outperformance.
  • be speaking/talking out of both sides of your mouth To be speaking/talking out of both sides of your mouth means to express conflicting or contradictory statements, typically with the intention of deceiving or misleading others. It implies that someone is not being sincere or honest in their communication, saying one thing to one person or group while saying the opposite to another. It can also suggest a lack of consistency or clarity in one's words or actions.
  • be (all) out to (do something) The idiom "be (all) out to (do something)" means to be determined, fully committed, or highly motivated to achieve or accomplish something. It implies that someone is willing to put in maximum effort or go to great lengths in pursuing their goal or objective.
  • peek out of sth The idiom "peek out of sth" means to look out or show a small part of something while being partially hidden or concealed. It often implies a cautious or secretive act of observation.
  • factor out The idiom "factor out" means to remove or separate a specific element or factor from a larger whole. It refers to the act of isolating certain components or variables in order to analyze or address them individually, often in mathematical or logical contexts.
  • laugh oneself out of The idiom "laugh oneself out of" means to laugh so much or so hard that it becomes difficult to control oneself or stop laughing. It implies that something is extremely funny or amusing, causing fits of laughter that cannot easily be suppressed.
  • (one's) nose is out of joint The idiom "(one's) nose is out of joint" means that someone is feeling offended, upset, or annoyed because their expectations have been disrupted or they have been slighted or disregarded in some way. It implies that the person's pride or ego has been injured, causing them to feel aggrieved or out of sorts.
  • make a man (out) of sb The idiom "make a man (out) of sb" means to help someone develop qualities or skills that are considered typical or essential of an adult or mature person. It implies that through some experience, challenge, or guidance, the person will become more confident, self-reliant, or responsible. This idiom is often used when referring to challenging or transformative experiences that help someone grow and mature.
  • fling out of The idiom "fling out of" typically means to forcefully eject or throw someone or something out of a place or situation. It implies a sudden, forceful, and often unexpected removal.
  • chicken out on sm The idiom "chicken out on someone or something" means to back out or withdraw from a commitment or difficult situation due to fear, lack of courage, or being intimidated. It implies an act of avoiding or not fulfilling one's responsibility or promise out of apprehension or anxiety.
  • out of the chute The idiom "out of the chute" is an expression that refers to something happening or starting immediately or without delay. It originates from the imagery of a rodeo event called "bull riding," where a bull is released from a chute or pen into the arena for the rider to mount and ride. "Out of the chute" metaphorically implies the beginning or initiation of an action, process, or event that occurs rapidly and abruptly.
  • pour out one's soul The idiom "pour out one's soul" means to speak or express one's deepest and most personal thoughts, feelings, or emotions freely and intensely, often to someone trusted or during a moment of vulnerability. It is an act of complete openness and emotional disclosure.
  • bear out The idiom "bear out" means to support, confirm, or prove someone's statement, argument, or belief to be true or accurate. It refers to providing evidence or testimony that validates or substantiates a claim.
  • board (someone or an animal) out The idiom "board (someone or an animal) out" refers to the act of providing accommodation and care for someone or an animal, typically in exchange for payment. It implies temporarily housing and taking responsibility for their well-being, usually in a boarding house, kennel, or similar establishment.
  • crowd sm or sth out of sth The idiom "crowd someone or something out of something" means to force someone or something out of a particular place or position by filling that space with a large number of people or objects. It implies pushing aside or displacing someone or something due to an overwhelming presence or quantity.
  • pluck (Something) out of the/thin air The idiom "pluck (something) out of thin air" means to come up with an idea or solution suddenly and seemingly from nowhere, without any prior thought or preparation. It suggests that the idea or solution appeared magically or out of nothingness.
  • stick out like a sore thumb The idiom "stick out like a sore thumb" means to be very noticeable or conspicuous in a situation or environment, often due to being different or out of place compared to the surroundings or the people around. It implies that the person or object being referred to is easily identified or stands out due to being highly noticeable, just like a sore thumb stands out compared to other fingers.
  • don't knock yourself out The idiom "don't knock yourself out" means not to exert excessive effort or energy for something that is not worth the trouble or importance. It suggests that one should not go to great lengths or become overly involved in a task, as it is not worth the strain or exhaustion.
  • out cold The phrase "out cold" is an idiom that refers to being unconscious or knocked out due to a fall, injury, or blow to the head.
  • chisel someone out of something The idiom "chisel someone out of something" means to deceive, manipulate, or swindle someone in order to obtain or take away something from them dishonestly or cunningly. It implies dishonest tactics or unethical behavior used to cheat someone out of their rightful possession, money, or opportunity.
  • laugh somebody/something out of court The idiom "laugh somebody/something out of court" means to dismiss or reject someone or something, especially a proposal or argument, in a mocking or ridiculing manner. It implies that the person or thing is being ridiculed to such an extent that they are completely disregarded or deemed unworthy.
  • bust ass out of somewhere The idiom "bust ass out of somewhere" is an informal expression typically used to describe quickly escaping or leaving a place with significant speed, urgency, or enthusiasm. It implies a sense of determination or haste in departing from a particular location.
  • go out on the tiles The idiom "go out on the tiles" means to go out for social activities, typically involving drinking and partying at various venues or nightclubs. It suggests a night of fun and entertainment, often with a group of friends.
  • (one) needs to get out more The idiom "(one) needs to get out more" generally means that the person being referred to is socially isolated or lacks exposure to new experiences. It implies that they should participate in more social activities or explore the world beyond their usual routine to broaden their perspective and engage with others.
  • not be out of the wood/woods The idiom "not be out of the wood/woods" means to still be experiencing difficulties or challenges even after overcoming a significant obstacle or problem. It suggests that although progress has been made, there is still a risk of encountering further complications or setbacks.
  • get out of bed (on) the wrong side The idiom "get out of bed (on) the wrong side" refers to someone who wakes up in a bad mood or starts their day in a negative or grumpy manner. It suggests that the person is not behaving or feeling their best from the moment they wake up.
  • cut out of The idiom "cut out of" typically means to exclude or remove someone or something from a particular situation, group, or opportunity. It suggests being omitted or left out intentionally.
  • keep out from under feet The idiom "keep out from under feet" means to stay away from or not interfere with someone's activities, particularly when they are busy or need space to work or move around. It implies the need to avoid being a hindrance or causing inconvenience to others.
  • edit sth out of sth The idiom "edit something out of something" means to remove or delete a particular part or content from a larger piece, such as a text, video, or audio. It involves removing or excluding specific information, details, or sections to modify or refine the overall content.
  • monkeys might fly out of my butt The idiom "monkeys might fly out of my butt" is a humorous and exaggerated way of expressing extreme disbelief or skepticism. It implies that something is highly unlikely or impossible to occur.
  • whale the tar out of sm The idiom "whale the tar out of someone" means to beat or strike someone forcefully or relentlessly, often used metaphorically. It implies a thorough and intense beating or defeat.
  • bring sm out (on sth) The idiom "bring sm out (on sth)" refers to the act of making hidden or suppressed qualities or emotions of a person become apparent or evident due to a particular situation or event. It implies that something triggers or causes those qualities or emotions to be displayed openly or brought to the surface.
  • Go blow it out your ear! The idiom "Go blow it out your ear!" is an expression typically used as a strong and impolite way to tell someone to leave or dismiss their comments or opinions. It is considered a rude or offensive way of expressing frustration or annoyance towards someone's ideas, suggestions, or behavior.
  • work your guts out The idiom "work your guts out" means to work extremely hard, putting in maximum effort and intensity, often to the point of physical or mental exhaustion. It indicates that someone is exerting all their energy and giving everything they have in order to accomplish a task or achieve a goal.
  • cry (sth) out (to sm or an animal) The idiom "cry (sth) out (to someone or an animal)" means to call out loudly, usually in distress or a desperate situation, to get someone's attention or assistance. It implies a sense of urgency or the need for immediate help.
  • pull (one's) hair out The idiom "pull (one's) hair out" means to be extremely frustrated, agitated, or irritated to the point of extreme exasperation. It suggests a high level of stress, anxiety, or annoyance that might evoke a strong desire to literally pull one's own hair in frustration.
  • straighten sth out The idiom "straighten something out" means to resolve or clarify a situation, misunderstanding, or problem. It refers to finding a solution or bringing order and clarity to a confusing or chaotic circumstance.
  • out of your gourd The idiom "out of your gourd" is a colloquial expression that means to be crazy, eccentric, or mentally unstable. It implies that the person's thoughts or behaviors are irrational or nonsensical, often beyond what is considered normal or reasonable.
  • be first out of the box The idiom "be first out of the box" refers to someone or something that is the first or quickest to begin or take action in a particular situation. It often implies being ahead of others in terms of readiness, speed, or efficiency.
  • shut sm or sth out The idiom "shut someone or something out" means to deliberately exclude or block someone or something from entering or being involved in a particular situation, conversation, or group. It refers to a deliberate act of keeping someone or something away or isolated.
  • call sm or sth out To "call someone or something out" means to publicly challenge or criticize them for their actions, behavior, or statements, typically in order to hold them accountable or to confront them directly about something they have done wrong or inappropriate.
  • sob (one's) heart out The idiom "sob (one's) heart out" means to cry fiercely and uncontrollably, typically due to extreme sadness, grief, or emotional pain.
  • deck out sb/sth To "deck out" someone or something means to decorate or adorn them in an extravagant or elaborate manner, often with various accessories or adornments. It implies that the person or thing is dressed or embellished in a showy or extravagant way.
  • eke sth out The idiom "eke sth out" means to make a small or limited supply of something last longer or go further by using it sparingly or supplementing it with additional resources or efforts.
  • be out in left field The idiom "be out in left field" refers to someone who is confused, mistaken, or holding an opinion that is considered strange or far-fetched. It originates from the game of baseball, where left field is the area farthest from the action and often perceived as less important or involved than other positions. Therefore, being "out in left field" means being disconnected from reality or lacking insight.
  • get out of Dodge The idiom "get out of Dodge" means to leave a dangerous or uncomfortable situation quickly or to avoid trouble or confrontation. It originated from the television series "Gunsmoke," in which the character Marshal Matt Dillon often advised people to "get out of Dodge City" to escape danger. Over time, it became a colloquial expression used metaphorically in various contexts.
  • price out of the market The idiom "price out of the market" means to set a price that is unreasonably high, making a product or service unaffordable or noncompetitive compared to others in the same market. It refers to the situation where the cost of a particular item or service exceeds what the majority of consumers are willing or able to pay, resulting in a decline in demand or loss of customers.
  • drone (sth) out The idiom "drone (sth) out" refers to speaking in a monotone, monotonous, or boring manner, usually for an extended period of time. It can also indicate the act of speaking continuously and tediously without variation or interest, often causing disinterest or drowsiness in the listener. The term "droning out" is commonly used to describe someone who talks incessantly and with little enthusiasm or animation.
  • weigh sth out The idiom "to weigh something out" means to carefully measure or consider the pros and cons, advantages and disadvantages, or various aspects of a situation or decision before making a choice or taking action. It originates from the act of measuring out ingredients or substances by weight in cooking or science experiments, implying the need for precise evaluation and consideration.
  • back out of The idiom "back out of" means to withdraw from a previously agreed upon commitment, agreement, or plan, often at the last moment or without prior notice. It refers to the action of deciding not to participate or fulfill one's obligation, backing away from a situation.
  • three strikes and (one's) out The idiom "three strikes and (one's) out" refers to a rule or situation where someone has reached their limit of chances or opportunities in a particular endeavor. It originates from baseball, where a batter is allowed three unsuccessful attempts (strikes) to hit the ball before being declared out. In a broader sense, this phrase implies that after a series of failed attempts, no further opportunities or forgiveness will be given, and one will be forced to leave or give up on their endeavor.
  • like it’s going out of fashion The idiom "like it's going out of fashion" means to do something excessively or in an extremely extravagant manner. It refers to doing an activity or behaving in a way that is so excessive or intense that it appears as if it will soon become unpopular or out of style.
  • hold out an olive branch (to someone) To "hold out an olive branch" means to make a gesture of peace or reconciliation towards someone, usually after a disagreement or conflict. It implies an act of extending an offer or an opportunity to restore friendly relations and resolve differences.
  • bring out the best in (one) The idiom "bring out the best in (one)" refers to an action or circumstance that motivates and encourages someone to display their most positive qualities, skills, or abilities. It denotes the ability of a person or situation to elicit and highlight the highest potential and superior traits of an individual.
  • let it all hang out The idiom "let it all hang out" typically means to behave or express oneself freely and openly, without any reservations, inhibitions, or concern for social expectations or consequences. It implies being uninhibited, honest, and transparent in one's thoughts, actions, or emotions.
  • frighten the hell out of (one) The idiom "frighten the hell out of (one)" means to scare or startle someone greatly. It implies that the person is frightened to an extreme extent, causing them to be terrified or alarmed. The phrase "frighten the hell out of (one)" emphasizes the intensity of the fear or shock experienced by the person.
  • reach out to sm The idiom "reach out to someone" means to make an effort to contact or communicate with someone, typically to seek help, support, or connection. It implies a willingness to initiate contact and engage with the person, often with the intention of offering assistance, creating a connection, or resolving an issue.
  • draw sb/sth out To draw someone or something out means to extract information, feelings, or hidden qualities from them through conversation or other means. It refers to the act of encouraging or coaxing someone or something to reveal details or share more about themselves or a particular topic.
  • find out/see how the land lies The idiom "find out/see how the land lies" means to assess or gather information about a situation or the opinions and attitudes of others before making any decisions or taking action. It refers to seeking an understanding of the current circumstances in order to make informed choices or plans.
  • burned out The idiom "burned out" refers to someone who is physically, mentally, or emotionally exhausted or overwhelmed due to prolonged stress, overwork, or a lack of interest or passion in their activities. It suggests a state of fatigue, diminished motivation, and feeling drained, often leading to a decrease in productivity and overall well-being.
  • get blood out of a stone The idiom "get blood out of a stone" means that an action or task is extremely difficult or nearly impossible. It implies that obtaining a particular outcome or result is as challenging as trying to extract blood from an inanimate object such as a stone, which is usually unfeasible.
  • churn out To "churn out" means to produce or create something, often in a large quantity and quickly. It implies a continuous and repetitive production process without much attention to quality or individuality.
  • fence (someone or an animal) out The idiom "to fence someone or an animal out" means to erect a physical barrier, typically made of wood or metal, in order to prevent someone or an animal from entering a specific area or property. It implies creating a boundary or separation for the purpose of keeping someone or something out.
  • out of sight of The idiom "out of sight of" means to be beyond the range of vision or the line of sight. It refers to when something or someone is not visible or able to be seen.
  • in (or out of) key The idiom "in (or out of) key" refers to something being in harmony or conformity (in key) or not in harmony or out of conformity (out of key) with a particular situation or context. It originated from music, where being "in key" means playing or singing the correct notes that match the established musical key, while being "out of key" means playing or singing off-pitch or out of tune. In a broader sense, the idiom is used to describe being in line with expectations, norms, or circumstances (in key) or not aligned with them (out of key).
  • bark sth out at sm The idiom "bark something out at someone" means to say something loudly, abruptly, and often in an aggressive or commanding manner to someone. It implies a forceful or harsh tone of voice, resembling a dog barking.
  • beat someone’s brains out The idiom "beat someone's brains out" means to physically assault or attack someone violently, typically resulting in serious injury or even death. It is an expression used to emphasize extreme force or aggression being used towards another person.
  • chew someone’s ass out The idiom "chew someone's ass out" is an informal expression that means to reprimand, scold, or criticize someone harshly and angrily. It implies a strong and intense verbal admonishment or rebuke.
  • out of way The idiom "out of the way" means moving or being positioned aside or aside from a path or route, typically to clear a passage or avoid obstruction. It can also refer to completing or finishing something in order to eliminate an obstacle or hindrance.
  • cry out (in something) The idiom "cry out (in something)" means to express one's feelings or emotions loudly and passionately, usually in a particular manner or with a specific emotion. It suggests a strong and intense reaction or response to a situation or experience. The phrase can be used both in a literal sense, as in physically crying out in pain or distress, and in a figurative sense, as in emotionally expressing oneself in a powerful and audible manner.
  • watch out for sb/sth The idiom "watch out for someone/something" means to be cautious or attentive and to pay close attention to someone or something in order to avoid potential harm or danger. It implies the need to be alert and aware of potential risks or threats.
  • (made up) out of whole cloth The idiom "made up out of whole cloth" means that something is entirely fabricated or invented without any basis or truth to support it. It refers to something that is entirely imagined or created from scratch, without any factual or evidential foundation.
  • frighten (or scare) the (living) daylights out of The idiom "frighten (or scare) the (living) daylights out of" means to terrify someone or to cause extreme fear or shock. It implies that the person is so scared that all the light (symbolic of courage or bravery) is expelled from them, leaving them in a state of intense fear or apprehension.
  • snap sth out of sth The idiom "snap something out of something" means to abruptly or forcefully remove someone or something from a certain state, feeling, or situation, typically in a decisive or sudden manner. It implies taking action to break free from a negative or unproductive state and regain control or focus.
  • block out The idiom "block out" means to deliberately ignore or forget something, especially traumatic or unpleasant events. It can also refer to intentionally preventing feelings or thoughts from entering one's mind.
  • weirded out The idiom "weirded out" is used to describe a feeling of being uncomfortable, confused, or strange due to a particular situation, behavior, or person, often resulting from something unusual, unexpected, or bizarre. It implies a sense of unease or being unsettled by the situation.
  • broaden sth out The idiom "broaden something out" refers to expanding or expanding the scope of something, making it more comprehensive, inclusive, or diverse. It often implies widening the range or extent of knowledge, experiences, perspectives, or opportunities.
  • light out The idiom "light out" typically refers to the act of suddenly departing or fleeing from a place or situation in a quick and hasty manner. It implies a sense of urgency or escape.
  • not a hair out of place The idiom "not a hair out of place" is used to describe someone or something that is in perfect order or arrangement, with no flaws, mistakes, or imperfections. It signifies an exceptional level of neatness, tidiness, or meticulousness.
  • out of range (of something) The idiom "out of range (of something)" means to be beyond the limits or capabilities of a particular person or thing. It implies being too far away or unable to reach or affect something. It can also refer to being beyond the acceptable or comfortable range of a person's understanding, knowledge, or authority.
  • make an honest woman (out) of sb The idiom "make an honest woman (out) of someone" is an expression typically used to refer to the act of marrying someone, particularly when implying that the person being married was previously involved in a questionable or scandalous relationship.
  • follow out The idiom "follow out" typically means to carry out or complete a plan, task, or action until its conclusion. It refers to persistently pursuing and executing something until it is finished or achieved.
  • turn inside out The idiom "turn inside out" means to physically reverse the position, orientation, or direction of something. It can also be used figuratively to describe thoroughly examining or exploring something, often with great intensity or depth.
  • beat (something) out of (someone or something) The idiom "beat (something) out of (someone or something)" typically means to forcefully extract information or a desired result from someone or something through vigorous questioning, intense effort, or relentless pursuit. It can involve pressuring someone or persistently attempting various methods until the desired information or outcome is obtained.
  • laugh out of the other side of one's mouth The idiom "laugh out of the other side of one's mouth" means to experience a reversal of fortune, often resulting in a change of attitude or perspective. It implies that someone who was once confident, triumphant, or mocking becomes humbled, disappointed, or regretful.
  • couldn't punch (one's) way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't punch (one's) way out of a paper bag" means that someone is extremely weak or inept, particularly when it comes to physical confrontations or assertiveness. It suggests that the person lacks both the skill and strength to effectively defend themselves or take control of a situation.
  • hold out on sb To "hold out on someone" means to purposely withhold information, resources, or assistance from them, often in a selfish or secretive manner. It implies that someone is not sharing or providing what they could or should, keeping it concealed or unavailable for personal reasons.
  • talk out of (one's) arse The idiom "talk out of (one's) arse" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone speaking without knowledge or understanding, providing false or exaggerated information, or making statements that are unfounded or nonsensical. It implies that the person is talking in a manner that lacks substance, credibility, or truthfulness.
  • ease out of (something) The idiom "ease out of (something)" means to gradually and gently extricate oneself from a situation, task, or responsibility. It implies a deliberate and careful exit without causing abrupt changes or disruptions.
  • help out (with something) The idiom "help out (with something)" means to lend assistance or support in a particular task, situation, or endeavor. It implies voluntarily offering aid or contributing one's efforts to assist someone or achieve a common goal.
  • feel out of sorts The idiom "feel out of sorts" means to feel unwell, not one's usual self, or in a state of general discomfort or unhappiness.
  • frighten the life out of someone The idiom "frighten the life out of someone" means to scare or startle someone so intensely that it causes extreme fear or panic. It implies that the person is terrified to the point that it feels as if their very life is at stake.
  • come out for sm or sth The idiom "come out for sm or sth" typically means to publicly declare one's support or show a favorable stance towards someone or something. It implies actively expressing approval, encouragement, or endorsement for a particular person, cause, or idea.
  • out of the woods The definition of the idiom "out of the woods" is to be free from a difficult or dangerous situation, to have overcome a problem or obstacle, or to be in a better or safer condition after a period of trouble or uncertainty.
  • miss out (on sth) The idiom "miss out (on sth)" refers to the act of not experiencing or benefiting from something that others have had the opportunity to enjoy. It implies the feeling of regret or disappointment due to being excluded or not taking advantage of a particular opportunity, activity, or experience.
  • dine out on The idiom "dine out on" means to repeatedly and often boastfully talk or share stories about an impressive or noteworthy accomplishment or experience, usually to gain attention, admiration, or praise from others. It implies that the person continues to relish or delight in the memory of a particular event or achievement and uses it as a means of self-promotion.
  • vote sm out of sth The idiom "vote someone out of something" refers to the act of collectively deciding or choosing to remove someone from a position, organization, or any other specific context through a formal voting process. It implies that the person being voted out has lost favor or support from the majority and is being expelled or dismissed.
  • pick something out of a hat The idiom "pick something out of a hat" means to make a random or arbitrary choice from a selection of options, often without much thought or consideration. It implies that the decision is not based on any specific criteria or preference, but rather on chance or luck.
  • pull all the stops out The idiom "pull all the stops out" means to put in maximum effort or use all available resources in order to achieve or accomplish something. It implies going to great lengths or exerting oneself to the fullest extent possible. This phrase often conveys the idea of going above and beyond what is expected or required, leaving no stone unturned to ensure success.
  • go out on a high note The idiom "go out on a high note" means to end or conclude something in a positive or impressive manner. When someone or something goes out on a high note, it means they finish strong, leaving a lasting and favorable impression. This can be applied to various situations, such as a successful performance, a successful career, or the completion of an important project.
  • help sm (or an animal) out (of sth) The idiom "help someone (or an animal) out (of something)" means to assist or support someone or an animal in getting out of a difficult or challenging situation or predicament. It implies providing aid, guidance, or resources to alleviate the problem or help them overcome a particular obstacle.
  • test out (of sth) The idiom "test out (of sth)" means to take an examination or assessment in order to demonstrate knowledge or competence and be exempted from participating in or completing a particular course, program, or requirement. It involves proving one's proficiency in a subject or skill to exempt oneself from further study or involvement.
  • grunt sth out The idiom "grunt something out" means to accomplish or complete something difficult, especially through sheer determination, hard work, or physical effort. It implies that the task or action requires a great deal of exertion and perseverance to achieve the desired outcome.
  • drown out sth The idiom "drown out something" refers to the act of making a sound or noise so loud that it masks or overpowers another sound, making it difficult or impossible to hear.
  • fake someone out The idiom "fake someone out" means to deceive or trick someone by giving false information or creating a false impression in order to confuse or mislead them. It commonly refers to intentionally leading someone to believe something that is not true.
  • crop sm or sth out The idiom "crop sm or sth out" refers to the act of removing or eliminating a specific part or element from something, typically by using image editing software to cut or trim unwanted portions of a photograph or picture.
  • (out) on parole The idiom "(out) on parole" refers to a person who has been released from prison with certain conditions and restrictions, which they must adhere to until the end of their sentence or until they are granted full freedom. Parole grants individuals conditional release, usually under the supervision of a parole officer, as an opportunity to reintegrate into society.
  • like a bat out of hell The idiom "like a bat out of hell" is an expression used to depict someone or something moving or behaving extremely quickly, haphazardly, or recklessly. It suggests a sense of urgency, speed, or intensity similar to the behavior or flight of a bat when startled or frightened.
  • slog guts out The idiom "slog guts out" means to work extremely hard and tirelessly to achieve a goal, often in difficult or challenging circumstances. It conveys the idea of exerting maximum effort, perseverance, and determination regardless of the obstacles faced.
  • cut out The idiom "cut out" can have multiple definitions depending on the context. Here are a few common meanings: 1. To stop doing something or cease a particular activity abruptly. Example: "I need to cut out eating sweets to improve my diet." 2. To remove or separate something, usually by using scissors or a knife. Example: "She carefully cut out a picture from the magazine." 3. To remove someone from a will or inheritance. Example: "The wealthy man cut his ungrateful son out of his will." 4. To be well-suited for a particular task or activity. Example: "She's really cut out for a career in music." 5. To leave or exit a place quickly. Example: "
  • ladle something out of something The idiom "ladle something out of something" means to extract or remove something, usually in a generous or abundant manner, from a particular source or place. It is often used metaphorically, describing the act of taking or getting a substantial amount of something from a larger quantity or pool.
  • in (or out of) your element