How Do You Spell OWN?

Pronunciation: [ˈə͡ʊn] (IPA)

The word "own" is spelled with three letters and is pronounced as /əʊn/ in IPA phonetic transcription. The letter "o" represents the diphthong /əʊ/, which is the sound that is made when the mouth starts with an "uh" sound and then moves into an "oh" sound. The letter "w" represents the sound /w/, which is made when the lips are rounded into the shape of a small "o" and sound is produced by forcing air through tightly-pursed lips. Together, these two sounds create the pronunciation of "own."

OWN Meaning and Definition

Own, as a verb, refers to the act of possessing and having sole rights over something, typically an object, property, or even an idea. It implies having personal ownership or control over the item or concept in question. To own something often means to have acquired it through purchase, inheritance, or other lawful means, establishing a sense of personal entitlement and responsibility towards it.

Moreover, the term "own" is often used to express a sense of identification or connection with a particular characteristic, quality, or action. This can manifest in phrases such as "to own one's mistakes" or "to own up to something," indicating a willingness to acknowledge or take responsibility for one's faults, actions, or decisions.

As an adjective, "own" denotes exclusivity or individuality, indicating that something belongs solely to a particular person or entity and is not shared or borrowed. This usage can appear in phrases like "my own car" or "her own company." Essentially, this characterization emphasizes the distinctiveness and independence of the object or idea being described.

In a broader sense, "own" can also convey a sense of pride, confidence, and self-assurance. When someone is said to "own" a situation or challenge, it suggests their domination or mastery over it. This connotation implies that an individual has complete control, knowledge, or skill in handling a particular task or circumstance, often resulting in a successful outcome.

Top Common Misspellings for OWN *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for OWN

  • ioen
  • cown
  • doown
  • gorwn
  • owman
  • adown
  • twn
  • opn
  • olny
  • odwn
  • mwny
  • oln
  • ovn
  • hwne
  • ouwl
  • oepn
  • towyn
  • qown
  • torwn
  • fown
  • owern
  • whwn
  • ownus
  • owch
  • towna
  • toewn
  • ounc
  • doewn
  • oitn
  • ownly
  • opwen
  • borwn
  • uopn
  • ownre
  • yown
  • ahown
  • owd
  • oinf
  • owmen
  • ownig
  • ozon
  • owna
  • diown
  • wown
  • outn
  • alown
  • omn
  • mwn
  • aoun
  • owt
  • opon
  • hwn
  • dorwn
  • wvwn
  • ownwd
  • kwn
  • hown
  • ownwe
  • ownde
  • arown
  • owrn
  • doiwn
  • corwn
  • ownr
  • dowwn
  • ikown
  • ownen
  • ownas
  • opewn
  • dwn
  • ohne
  • thown
  • owr
  • iown
  • ownt
  • ows
  • loawn
  • touwn
  • oan
  • aown
  • downo
  • idown
  • kwno
  • evwn
  • oowa
  • owhen
  • douwn
  • knwn
  • lown
  • ohn
  • oon
  • etown
  • toiwn
  • gouwn
  • ddown
  • toown
  • orn
  • daown
  • oin
  • ofn
  • owh
  • obn
  • ojn
  • ojne
  • osn
  • aen
  • cwl
  • vin
  • oann
  • oyne
  • cwa
  • oco
  • ohan
  • cowen
  • ocl
  • orp
  • o in
  • opa
  • ory
  • owny
  • oyen
  • oehn
  • oene
  • oenu
  • o on
  • ooon
  • oony
  • ouan
  • owyn
  • owynn
  • oywn
  • oinh
  • oinn
  • oowan
  • 9owan
  • 8owan
  • owan
  • oiwan
  • owo
  • oahn
  • oaon
  • oeen
  • oeno
  • oina
  • oino
  • onown
  • kowna
  • ouhn
  • oane
  • oawn
  • oena
  • oeon
  • oien
  • oimn
  • lln
  • ooan
  • ooin
  • ppn
  • ouna
  • oyon
  • oany
  • mdn
  • oini
  • omna
  • oona
  • omno
  • oono
  • omon
  • omwn
  • ouon
  • oyna
  • o-win
  • onun
  • ooun
  • oanu
  • oaen
  • ohna
  • ocv
  • oein
  • ohin
  • ohnm
  • ohmn
  • owem
  • oiny
  • oinm
  • omen
  • ooen
  • omwan
  • omawn
  • oamn
  • o-an
  • oian
  • omin
  • omwni
  • oani
  • omnu
  • om4n
  • om3n
  • omwen
  • omewn
  • oemn
  • o-en
  • omun
  • ommn
  • o0ne
  • o9ne
  • o ne
  • o0no
  • o9no
  • ohno
  • onno
  • o no
  • o0en
  • o5an
  • o4an
  • o2an
  • oune
  • o6en
  • owum
  • oww
  • o3en
  • o2en
  • owwn
  • ow4n
  • ow3n
  • oiwen
  • 0owen
  • o0wen
  • 9owen
  • o9wen
  • oawen
  • owaen
  • oewen
  • oween
  • o3wen
  • ow3en
  • o2wen
  • ow2en
  • owwen
  • owewn
  • ow4en
  • owe4n
  • owe3n
  • owemn
  • owenm
  • owehn
  • owenh
  • oewn
  • oowen
  • owenn
  • o7en
  • ouen
  • owun
  • owmn
  • o wen
  • ow en
  • owe n
  • owena
  • owene
  • owenw
  • owen3
  • owinh
  • owiny
  • owin
  • owinw
  • owino
  • owine
  • 9wn
  • oqn
  • o3n
  • o2n
  • owb
  • oiwn
  • olwn
  • 0own
  • o0wn
  • 9own
  • o9wn
  • oqwn
  • owqn
  • oswn
  • o3wn
  • o2wn
  • ow2n
  • ownb
  • ownm
  • owjn
  • ownj
  • owhn
  • ownh
  • o7n
  • ogn
  • o wn
  • ow n
  • ownee
  • owne5
  • owne4
  • owne2
  • o8en
  • ohen
  • oenn
  • ohon
  • 0oon
  • ouny
  • 5oan
  • 4oan
  • 2oan
  • 5owan
  • 4owan
  • 2owan
  • rwn
  • sln
  • 3oon
  • ow in
  • 3own
  • twa
  • 6own
  • 5own
  • otwn
  • 4own
  • ownie
  • 6owny
  • 5owny
  • 4owny
  • oyn
  • fowne
  • Bowna
  • owany
  • oawm
  • oawny
  • lownn
  • omwe
  • Owam
  • oin6
  • oin5
  • Oin4
  • Oinu
  • o0ny
  • o9ny
  • ohny
  • o ny
  • o0on
  • 9oon
  • o9on
  • oo0n
  • oo9n
  • oomn
  • oonm
  • oohn
  • oonh
  • oonn
  • oo n
  • ouwin
  • ownin
  • oayn
  • 5oin
  • 4oin
  • 5oon
  • 4oon
  • 5oun
  • 4oun
  • 5owen
  • 4owen
  • 6oon
  • 2oon
  • owon
  • oyni
  • oano
  • o0ni
  • o9ni
  • ohni
  • 0owan
  • poewn
  • oyin
  • oyan
  • 3oin
  • ewwn
  • oana
  • ounn
  • oiwin
  • oiin
  • o5en
  • o4en
  • o5on
  • o4on
  • O2on
  • oawin
  • oewin
  • owwin
  • O3win
  • oynn
  • Ohwen
  • Onwen
  • omwa
  • o0na
  • o9na
  • oonw
  • owma
  • oawyn
  • oewyn
  • owwyn
  • O3wyn
  • owinn
  • onwy
  • 5onn
  • 4onn
  • ooyn
  • Ohyn
  • Onyn
  • Omyn
  • o5in
  • o4in
  • O2in
  • o5win
  • o4win
  • O2win
  • o3in
  • ow9n
  • ow8n
  • owim
  • 0owin
  • o0win
  • 9owin
  • o9win
  • owain
  • owein
  • ow3in
  • ow2in
  • owuin
  • owiun
  • owoin
  • owion
  • ow9in
  • owi9n
  • ow8in
  • owi8n
  • owimn
  • owinm
  • owihn
  • owni
  • oowin
  • owiin
  • O7in
  • Ouin
  • owi n
  • owayn
  • ownwy
  • own4y
  • own3y
  • owneh
  • owneu
  • owne7
  • owne6
  • oweny
  • ownye
  • owney
  • Ownuy
  • Ownmy
  • Ownay
  • Owne9
  • Ownei
  • owmin
  • ohnn
  • owaun
  • owaon
  • owa9n
  • owa8n
  • owian
  • owani
  • Owaan
  • Owamn
  • Owahn
  • owhnn
  • owunn
  • ow7nn
  • ow6nn
  • owymn
  • owyhn
  • owynm
  • owynh
  • oywnn
  • ownyn
  • Ow9nn
  • Owy.n
  • Owyon
  • Owyno
  • o5na
  • o4na
  • O2na
  • owana
  • Ohwin
  • Onwin
  • Omwin
  • oowyn
  • Ohwyn
  • Onwyn
  • Omwyn
  • owina
  • Bwu
  • oowon
  • 9oan
  • 8oan
  • owona
  • ohun
  • oyun
  • Oeun
  • ohwna
  • ohwne
  • omwna
  • onwa
  • o na
  • oeny
  • 5ohn
  • 4ohn
  • omwh
  • oEN1
  • oaN3
  • ownz
  • ownw
  • own3
  • oinw
  • oewm
  • oenm
  • 0oin
  • o0in
  • 9oin
  • o9in
  • oiun
  • oi9n
  • o8in
  • oi8n
  • oihn
  • oi n
  • oin3
  • swno
  • jjwn
  • oanm
  • oFWG
  • oowm
  • ounm
  • oumn
  • oAUN
  • onnm
  • o0nw
  • o9nw
  • omnw
  • ohnw
  • onw3
  • onw2
  • onnw
  • onww
  • o nw
  • o0an
  • oiwm
  • 0owm
  • o0wm
  • 9owm
  • o9wm
  • o3wm
  • ow3m
  • o2wm
  • ow2m
  • owwm
  • owmm
  • o wm
  • ow m
  • omw3
  • omw2
  • omww
  • owmw
  • ovww
  • owom
  • 2own
  • Oa-N
  • o0nu
  • o9nu
  • ohnu
  • oonu
  • onnu
  • o nu
  • omhn
  • oanh
  • owmi
  • owwan
  • ohwm
  • 6oan
  • oenh
  • 0oun
  • o0un
  • 9oun
  • o9un
  • ouyn
  • o8un
  • ou8n
  • o7un
  • ou7n
  • ounh
  • ouun
  • o un
  • ou n
  • oynm
  • oymn
  • o&nm
  • o&mn
  • ohwn
  • oaan
  • ohnh
  • okwk
  • owmh
  • OANw
  • 0ohn
  • o0hn
  • 9ohn
  • o9hn
  • onhn
  • oyhn
  • ohhn
  • o hn
  • oh n
  • owhh
  • 0oen
  • 9oen
  • o9en
  • oe4n
  • oe3n
  • oe n
  • 0onn
  • o0nn
  • 9onn
  • o9nn
  • omnn
  • onmn
  • onnh
  • onnn
  • o nn
  • on n
  • owmo
  • omwi
  • 0omn
  • o0mn
  • 9omn
  • o9mn
  • om n
  • oynh
  • onwh
  • onwi
  • onwm
  • onwo
  • onwu
  • KoWZ
  • 3oen
  • 2oen
  • owln
  • 3onn
  • 2onn
  • owno
  • ownu
  • 3owm
  • 2owm
  • oenw
  • twnz
  • owniu
  • ouwm
  • o03n
  • 0o3n
  • o06n
  • 0o6n
  • o07n
  • 0o7n
  • o8mn
  • o08n
  • 0o8n
  • o09n
  • 0o9n
  • o0n0
  • o0n1
  • o0n4
  • o0n5
  • o0n6
  • 1o9n
  • 2o0n
  • 2o9n
  • 3o9n
  • 4o0n
  • 6o9n
  • 7o0n
  • 7o9n
  • 8o0n
  • o91n
  • 9o1n
  • o92n
  • 9o2n
  • o99n
  • 9o9n
  • o9n1
  • o9n2
  • o9n3
  • o9n7
  • 0oan
  • o9an
  • o0nh
  • o9nh
  • o nh
  • o0nm
  • o9nm
  • oiyn
  • 0oyn
  • o0yn
  • 9oyn
  • o9yn
  • o7yn
  • oy7n
  • o6yn
  • oy6n
  • oyyn
  • o yn
  • oy n
  • 2oin
  • OWmU
  • own5
  • own4
  • onwn
  • owm9
  • owm8
  • ownmi
  • owmni
  • OWMy
  • 8onn
  • owhm
  • oeyn
  • lwun
  • omn6
  • omn5
  • o6mn
  • o5mn
  • 5omn
  • 4omn
  • 3omn
  • 2omn
  • OWmE
  • omn4
  • o6an
  • onn2
  • oMWU
  • oUNI
  • omwny
  • oin1
  • oin2
  • omwm
  • omwo
  • ouno
  • ounu
  • oynu
  • oEN2
  • oW4M
  • oIYWN
  • oiwon
  • oUNW
  • oawna
  • owwmn
  • oawnn
  • oamwn
  • oawnm
  • oAWMN
  • OiWMN
  • OeWMN
  • OAWoN
  • ow/nm
  • oemwn
  • oen6
  • oen5
  • o4yn
  • o3yn
  • oe7n
  • oe6n
  • oweyn
  • OGNy
  • ohn2
  • ohwan
  • ohawn
  • owean
  • ohn0
  • oywm
  • ohwnm
  • ohwmn
  • oi6n
  • oi5n
  • omn1
  • omn7
  • omwne
  • omwy
  • ohn1
  • oon1
  • onn1
  • o n1
  • oin9
  • o0n9
  • o9n9
  • ohn9
  • oon9
  • onn9
  • o n9
  • on9n
  • on8n
  • onw9
  • onw8
  • onw5
  • onw4
  • oownm
  • oowmn
  • ow/ne
  • owym
  • o6-n
  • o5-n
  • ou6n
  • ou5n
  • ow/on
  • owanw
  • OWnEA
  • ownha
  • owhna
  • o3hn
  • o2hn
  • oiwhn
  • 0owhn
  • o0whn
  • 9owhn
  • o9whn
  • oawhn
  • oewhn
  • o3whn
  • ow3hn
  • o2whn
  • ow2hn
  • ownhn
  • owuhn
  • owhun
  • owhyn
  • owhmn
  • owhnm
  • owhhn
  • owhnh
  • oowhn
  • owwhn
  • o whn
  • ow hn
  • owh n
  • OWIy
  • ownma
  • owmna
  • ow5m
  • oy1n
  • oy2n
  • oon2
  • ownem
  • oy5n
  • oyno
  • 6onn
  • 6owan
  • 7owm
  • 6owm
  • O/W/n
  • o18n
  • o2NY
  • o10n
  • 0o/n
  • o0/n
  • 9o/n
  • o9/n
  • o11N
  • o'in
  • 1ONn
  • 3oan
  • o own
  • on wn
  • own o
  • Owndi
  • Vowrn
  • OWUW
  • Zowng
  • ebown

Etymology of OWN

The word "own" can be traced back to the Old English term "āgen". This originated from the West Germanic language group, specifically from the Old High German word "eigan" and the Old Saxon word "ēgan", both of which meant "possession" or "property". The West Germanic root “aig” is believed to have Indo-European origins and is related to words such as "owe" and "ought". Over time, "āgen" transformed into "own" in Middle English, and the word has since been used to denote possession or belonging.

Idioms with the word OWN

  • for its own sake The idiom "for its own sake" is used to express that something is done solely or purely for the inherent value or enjoyment it provides, and not for any external or practical reasons.
  • save your own skin/hide The idiom "save your own skin/hide" means to prioritize one's own safety, well-being, or self-interest above others, often by avoiding harm or negative consequences. It suggests acting in a self-preserving manner, sometimes at the expense of others, in order to protect oneself.
  • unto thine own self be true The idiom "unto thine own self be true" means to have authenticity, honesty, and integrity in one's actions and decisions. It encourages individuals to stay true to their own values, beliefs, and principles, even when faced with challenges or pressures to conform. It advises against compromising personal integrity for the sake of pleasing others or conforming to societal expectations.
  • go your (own) separate ways "Go your (own) separate ways" is an idiom that means two or more people or groups are choosing to pursue different paths or outcomes, usually after having been together or collaborated in some way. It suggests a divergence of goals, interests, or beliefs, leading to a decision to part ways and continue individually.
  • do sth off your own bat The idiom "do sth off your own bat" means to do something independently or without any instruction, assistance, or influence from others. It refers to taking initiative and being self-motivated to accomplish a task or pursue a goal on one's own accord.
  • sign your own death warrant The idiom "sign your own death warrant" is used to describe a situation in which someone's actions or decisions directly lead to or result in their own downfall, demise, or ruin. It signifies committing an act or making a decision that ultimately leads to negative consequences or a catastrophic outcome for oneself.
  • pick on sm your own size The idiom "pick on someone your own size" is a phrase used to advise or caution against bullying or targeting someone who is smaller, weaker, or less able to defend themselves. It suggests that one should challenge or confront others who are in a similar position or have similar capabilities rather than engaging in unfair behavior.
  • beat sb at their own game The idiom "beat someone at their own game" means to outwit or outperform someone in a situation where they are known to be skilled or experienced. It refers to surpassing someone's abilities or tactics in a particular field or activity by using similar methods or strategies.
  • stand on your own (two) feet The idiom "stand on your own (two) feet" means to be independent and self-sufficient, both financially and emotionally. It refers to having the ability to take care of oneself and not relying on others for support or assistance.
  • under your own steam The idiom "under your own steam" means to accomplish something or continue doing something without assistance, independently, relying solely on one's own efforts or resources. It refers to someone being self-reliant and able to function effectively without additional support.
  • stew (in your own juice) The idiom "stew (in your own juice)" refers to a situation where someone is left to worry or suffer the consequences of their own actions or decisions. It describes a state of being left alone to deal with the negative consequences or frustrations that they have created for themselves, often without intervention or assistance from others.
  • be a victim of your own success The idiom "be a victim of your own success" means that someone experiences unforeseen or negative consequences as a result of achieving great success or achieving their goals. It implies that the success or accomplishment brings about unexpected challenges, pressures, or problems that can be overwhelming or burdensome.
  • act/do sth on your own responsibility The idiom "act/do something on your own responsibility" means to take independent action or make a decision without relying on or seeking the advice or guidance of others. It implies that the individual must accept full accountability for the consequences or outcomes of their actions without expecting support or assistance from others.
  • go your own (sweet) way The idiom "go your own (sweet) way" means to pursue one's own path or make independent choices, even if it differs from others or goes against conventional norms and expectations. It implies that one is confident and unapologetic about their choices and is willing to follow their own instincts and desires. The addition of "sweet" in some versions of the idiom emphasizes the idea of finding pleasure, contentment, or fulfillment in one's independent choices.
  • give sb a dose/taste of their own medicine The idiom "give someone a dose/taste of their own medicine" means to retaliate or treat someone in the same negative or hurtful way that they have treated others. It refers to reciprocating the same kind of behavior or treatment that someone has inflicted upon others, in order to make them experience the same consequences or feelings they have caused.
  • the devil's own The idiom "the devil's own" refers to something or someone that is extremely difficult, troublesome, or troublesome to deal with. It implies that the situation or person in question has inherently challenging or diabolical characteristics, often causing frustration or complications.
  • do your own thing The idiom "do your own thing" means to pursue one's own interests, desires, or activities without being influenced or controlled by others. It encourages individuality, independence, and following one's own path rather than conforming to societal expectations or norms.
  • throw sb back on their own resources The idiom "throw sb back on their own resources" means to leave someone to rely on their own abilities, skills, or knowledge in a challenging or difficult situation, often without any external support or assistance.
  • go your own way The idiom "go your own way" means to pursue a path or course of action that is independent, uninfluenced, or different from others. It implies making choices or decisions based on personal preferences or convictions, regardless of what others may think or do. It signifies a sense of independence, individuality, and non-conformity.
  • get your own way The idiom "get your own way" refers to someone's ability or tendency to have things go exactly as they want or to get things done according to their own desires or preferences, often disregarding the opinions or wishes of others.
  • be your own person/woman/man The idiom "be your own person/woman/man" means to have independence and individuality, not being easily influenced or controlled by others. It implies being true to oneself, making decisions based on personal values and beliefs rather than conforming to societal expectations or the opinions of others. It emphasizes finding and asserting one's unique identity and pursuing personal goals and desires without being overly influenced by external pressures.
  • in your own words The idiom "in your own words" means expressing something using your own way of speaking or writing, rather than directly quoting someone else or using predetermined phrases. It refers to expressing a concept or idea using one's own unique language and understanding.
  • in a world of your own The idiom "in a world of your own" means to be completely absorbed in one's own thoughts, daydreams, or imagination, often resulting in a lack of awareness or detachment from one's surroundings. It suggests that a person is mentally disconnected or preoccupied and not fully present or engaged with the present moment or reality.
  • in another world, at in a world of your own The idiom "in another world" or "in a world of your own" refers to a state where someone is mentally or emotionally detached from their surroundings or preoccupied with their own thoughts. It suggests that the person is not fully engaged or attentive to the present situation, often lost in their own imagination or mental space.
  • be your own worst enemy The idiom "be your own worst enemy" means to act or make choices that hinder or undermine oneself, ultimately causing harm or preventing one's own success or progress. It refers to being self-destructive or having traits such as self-doubt, self-sabotage, or self-defeating behavior that impede personal growth or achievement.
  • your own flesh and blood The idiom "your own flesh and blood" refers to someone who is closely related to you, typically a family member such as a child, parent, or sibling. It emphasizes the strong bond and connection that exists between family members, often highlighting the importance of loyalty, love, and support within the family unit.
  • be sb's own flesh and blood The idiom "be sb's own flesh and blood" means to be someone's close relative or family member. It typically implies a strong bond of kinship and connection between individuals.
  • blow your own trumpet/horn The idiom "blow your own trumpet/horn" means to boast about oneself or to excessively praise oneself or one's own achievements. It refers to someone who often talks about their own accomplishments or abilities in a self-promoting manner.
  • come into your own The idiom "come into your own" means to reach a level of confidence, ability, success, or maturity where one's true potential is realized or recognized. It refers to a person finally finding their rightful place or role and being able to excel in it.
  • have a mind of its own The idiom "have a mind of its own" refers to an object, system, or situation that behaves or functions independently, contrary to what is expected or intended. It suggests that it possesses autonomy or unpredictability, exhibiting a will or character that goes beyond the control or influence of others.
  • mind your own business The idiom "mind your own business" refers to the advice or admonition to not interfere in or pry into the affairs, concerns, or personal matters of others, but rather focus on one's own affairs.
  • play sb at their own game The idiom "play someone at their own game" means to engage or compete with someone using the same tactics, strategies, or methods that they typically employ, usually in an attempt to outperform, outwit, or defeat them. It implies that one is adapting to someone else's style or approach and turning it against them for personal advantage.
  • leave sb to their own devices To "leave someone to their own devices" means to allow or leave someone to make their own decisions or choices without interference, supervision, or direction. It implies trusting someone to handle a situation or solve a problem on their own without offering guidance or intervention.
  • hold your own The idiom "hold your own" means to be able to compete or perform at the same level as others, especially in challenging or difficult situations. It implies that a person can stand their ground, maintain their position, or handle themselves adequately without requiring assistance or being inferior to others.
  • pull/haul yourself up by the/your (own) bootstraps The idiom "pull/haul yourself up by the/your (own) bootstraps" means to improve one's situation or achieve success through one's own efforts and resources, without relying on external assistance. It implies self-reliance, resilience, and a willingness to work hard to overcome hardships or obstacles. The phrase originates from the concept of lifting oneself up by pulling on one's own bootstraps, which is technically impossible, metaphorically illustrating the idea of accomplishing something seemingly impossible through sheer determination and personal initiative.
  • after your own heart The idiom "after your own heart" refers to someone who shares your values, beliefs, or preferences. It suggests that the person has qualities or interests that you admire or relate to, making them similar to you in some way.
  • dig your own grave The idiom "dig your own grave" means to unintentionally or unknowingly engage in actions or make choices that will ultimately lead to one's own downfall or ruin. It implies the sense of self-destruction or self-sabotage caused by one's own decisions or behavior.
  • take matters into your own hands The idiom "take matters into your own hands" means to assume control or responsibility for a situation or problem instead of relying on others. It suggests that someone is choosing to act independently and proactively without waiting for someone else to resolve or handle the issue.
  • be hoist(ed) with/by your own petard "Be hoist(ed) with/by your own petard" is an idiom that means to be harmed or defeated by one's own plot or plan, often referring to a situation where someone's deceitful or malicious intentions backfire on them. The phrase is derived from a literal interpretation of being blown up or thrown into the air by one's own explosive device, called a "petard."
  • with your own fair hand(s) The idiom "with your own fair hand(s)" refers to performing an action personally, usually involving physical effort or craftsmanship, rather than delegating or relying on someone else to do it. It emphasizes the individual's direct involvement and personal touch in completing a task.
  • feather your own nest The idiom "feather your own nest" refers to the act of using one's position or resources to enrich oneself or to secure benefits solely for personal gain and comfort, typically at the expense or to the disadvantage of others. It implies a self-centered and opportunistic behavior.
  • find your own level The idiom "find your own level" means to discover or establish one's own level of ability, expertise, comfort, or suitability in a particular area or situation. It implies that everyone has their own unique strengths and capabilities, and they should determine where they stand without comparing themselves to others.
  • get your own back (on sb) The idiom "get your own back (on sb)" is defined as seeking revenge or retaliating against someone who has wronged or harmed you in some way. It implies taking action to bring harm or justice to the person who has caused you suffering or inconvenience.
  • get/put your own house in order The idiom "get/put your own house in order" is used to encourage someone to address and resolve personal issues or problems before trying to criticize or intervene in the affairs of others. It implies the need for self-reflection, self-improvement, or taking responsibility for one's actions before attempting to judge or control others.
  • hold your (own) ground, at hold your own The idiom "hold your (own) ground" or "hold your own" means to maintain your position, beliefs, or stance, especially in the face of opposition or difficulties. It implies standing firm and not being easily swayed or influenced by others. It can also refer to being able to cope with a difficult situation without assistance or support.
  • take the law into your own hands The idiom "take the law into your own hands" means to bypass legal authorities or institutions and to enforce justice or take revenge independently, often using violence or without following proper legal procedures.
  • on your own head be it The idiom "on your own head be it" is an expression used to indicate that the responsibility and consequences of an action someone has taken rests solely on that person. It serves as a warning or disclaimer that if someone proceeds with a particular decision or course of action, they will have to face the resulting outcomes or consequences without any assistance or support.
  • keep your own counsel The idiom "keep your own counsel" means to keep one's thoughts, opinions, or secrets to oneself, without sharing them with others. It refers to a person being discreet, private, or autonomous in their decision-making or personal matters, rather than seeking advice or guidance from others.
  • know your own mind The idiom "know your own mind" means to have a clear and definite understanding of one's own thoughts, desires, opinions, or intentions, and to be confident in making decisions without being easily influenced by others.
  • take your (own) life The idiom "take your (own) life" refers to the act of intentionally causing one's own death. It usually indicates suicide, where an individual deliberately ends their own life.
  • live your own life The idiom "live your own life" means to prioritize one's own happiness, choices, and personal goals, without being overly influenced by the expectations, opinions, or judgments of others. It emphasizes the importance of staying true to oneself, making independent decisions, and pursuing an individual path that is authentic and fulfilling.
  • make a rod for your own back The idiom "make a rod for your own back" means to create a problem or difficulty for yourself through your own actions or choices. It implies that by choosing a certain course of action or behavior, you are setting yourself up for future consequences or difficulties. It suggests that the individual is responsible for the negative outcomes or troubles they encounter due to their own actions or decisions.
  • of your own making The idiom "of your own making" refers to a situation, problem, or consequence that is a direct result of one's own actions, choices, or decisions. It suggests that the individual is solely responsible for the circumstances they find themselves in, as they have brought it upon themselves through their own volition or behavior.
  • be your own master The idiom "be your own master" means to be independent, self-reliant, and in control of one's own actions and decisions without being influenced or controlled by others. It entails being able to make choices and take responsibility for one's own life and outcomes.
  • make sth (all) your own The idiom "make something (all) your own" means to personalize or customize something in a way that reflects your individuality, preferences, or style. It refers to transforming or modifying something to suit your taste or to create a sense of ownership and identity with it.
  • in your own right The idiom "in your own right" refers to being accomplished or recognized independently, having achieved a certain status or reputation on one's own merit, rather than simply by association with someone else or relying on external factors. It emphasizes individual capabilities and qualities.
  • it's your own lookout The phrase "it's your own lookout" means that a person is responsible for their own actions, decisions, or the consequences that follow, often implying a warning about potential risks or dangers. It suggests that the person should be aware and cautious about the potential outcomes or negative results that might arise from their choices or behaviors because it will be their own responsibility to deal with them.
  • paddle your own canoe The idiom "paddle your own canoe" means to be self-reliant, independent, and responsible for one's own actions and decisions. It suggests that individuals should take charge of their lives and not rely on others to guide or determine their path.
  • not able to call one's time one's own The definition of the idiom "not able to call one's time one's own" is when someone does not have control over their own time or schedule. It implies being constantly occupied or busy with various obligations, responsibilities, or demands, which prevent them from having free or leisurely moments.
  • of sb's/sth's own accord The idiom "of sb's/sth's own accord" means voluntarily or without being forced or coerced. It refers to someone or something acting or behaving independently or without any external influence or direction.
  • of your own accord The idiom "of your own accord" means to do something willingly or voluntarily, without being prompted or forced by someone else. It implies that the action is motivated by one's own decision or inclination.
  • of one's own accord The idiom "of one's own accord" means to do something voluntarily or willingly, without being prompted or influenced by others. It refers to taking action or making a decision independently, based on one's own free will or personal choice.
  • according to one's own lights The idiom "according to one's own lights" means to behave or make decisions based on one's own beliefs, principles, or judgment, regardless of what others may think or advise. It implies acting in accordance with one's own moral or intellectual understanding.
  • on your own account The idiom "on your own account" refers to doing something for one's own personal benefit or interest, rather than for someone else or at their request. It implies acting independently and taking responsibility for one's actions or decisions.
  • be afraid of your own shadow The idiom "be afraid of your own shadow" means to be excessively fearful or timid, to the point of being scared or intimidated by even the most mundane or harmless things. It suggests that someone is constantly on edge or easily frightened, with an exaggerated tendency to perceive threats or danger in ordinary situations.
  • afraid of one's own shadow The idiom "afraid of one's own shadow" refers to someone who is excessively timid, fearful, or easily scared in even the most minor or harmless situations. The phrase suggests that the person's fear is irrational and goes beyond what is reasonable or expected.
  • man after my own heart The idiom "man after my own heart" refers to someone who possesses the same attitudes, values, or preferences as oneself. It implies a strong liking or admiration for someone who shares similar qualities or interests.
  • devil looks after his own The idiom "devil looks after his own" means that it often seems as though evil or wicked people are protected or favored by destiny or luck. It implies that those who engage in deceitful, immoral, or unethical actions sometimes receive positive outcomes or escape negative consequences.
  • after own heart The idiom "after own heart" refers to someone who shares similar opinions, values, or preferences with oneself. They are like-minded and have a similar way of thinking or behaving.
  • a man after own heart The idiom "a man after my own heart" refers to a person who has similar opinions, characteristics, or interests as oneself. It implies admiration or approval for someone who shares the same values, beliefs, or tastes.
  • leave one to one's own devices The idiom "leave one to one's own devices" means to allow someone to act or solve a problem independently and without assistance, usually trusting that they will make their own decisions or find their own solutions.
  • Virtue is its own reward. The phrase "Virtue is its own reward" means that acting morally or doing the right thing is rewarding in itself, regardless of any external recognition or material gains. It suggests that an individual finds personal satisfaction and fulfillment from following moral principles and living a virtuous life. The idiom emphasizes the intrinsic value and inherent goodness of virtuous actions, highlighting that the act itself is its own form of gratification.
  • blow your own trumpet The idiom "blow your own trumpet" means to boast about or praise one's own achievements, abilities, or qualities.
  • blow one's own horn The idiom "blow one's own horn" means to proudly boast or promote one's own abilities, achievements, or talents. It refers to someone who openly and confidently talks about their accomplishments or skills in order to gain recognition or attention.
  • in own right The idiom "in one's own right" means that someone possesses a particular quality, status, or position independently, separate from anyone else or any other affiliation they may have. It emphasizes their individual accomplishments or qualifications rather than being recognized solely because of someone else or external factors.
  • line own pocket The idiom "line one's own pocket" means to dishonestly accumulate wealth or personal advantage, often by exploiting one's position or by engaging in corrupt practices. It suggests that someone is using their power or authority to benefit themselves at the expense of others.
  • hoe one's own row The idiom "hoe one's own row" means to mind one's own business or to attend to one's own responsibilities without interfering in the affairs of others. It suggests focusing on personal tasks or duties rather than getting involved in other people's matters.
  • line your (own) pockets The idiom "line your (own) pockets" means to acquire money or profit in a dishonest or self-serving way, typically by exploiting one's position or authority for personal gain. It implies accumulating wealth for oneself, often at the expense of others or by taking advantage of a situation for personal benefit.
  • line one's own pocket(s) The idiom "line one's own pocket(s)" means to use one's position or authority for personal gain, typically by taking or diverting money or resources for oneself instead of using them for their intended purpose or for the benefit of others.
  • for sth's own sake The idiom "for something's own sake" means doing or valuing something solely because of its inherent importance or value, without considering any other external factors or benefits. It implies that the action or behavior is motivated by a genuine desire to appreciate or prioritize the intrinsic worth or essence of the thing itself.
  • for one's (own) sake The idiom "for one's (own) sake" means to do something primarily or solely for the benefit or advantage of oneself. It implies that the action or decision is taken with self-interest in mind, often to promote personal well-being, preservation, or improvement.
  • save own skin The idiom "save own skin" means to prioritize one's own safety or well-being above others, typically in a difficult or dangerous situation. It implies a self-centered or self-preserving behavior, where an individual seeks to protect themselves without much regard for others.
  • prophet is not without honor save in his own country The idiom "prophet is not without honor save in his own country" refers to the common phenomenon where individuals are often not recognized or appreciated in their own familiar or hometown environment, but gain recognition and respect elsewhere. It suggests that people are more likely to be appreciated, admired, or respected in unfamiliar or foreign settings rather than in their own local community or among their own acquaintances.
  • Every man is the architect of his own fortune. The idiom "Every man is the architect of his own fortune" means that each individual has the ability to shape and determine their own success or fate through their actions, choices, and efforts. It emphasizes personal responsibility and the idea that one's destiny is not solely dictated by external circumstances, but rather influenced by one's own decisions and endeavors.
  • have calluses from patting own back The idiom "have calluses from patting own back" is an expression used to describe someone who excessively praises or congratulates themselves for their own achievements or actions. It implies that the individual constantly seeks validation and recognition for their accomplishments, often disregarding the contributions of others. The idiom conveys a sense of arrogance and self-importance.
  • devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose The idiom "devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose" means that one should be cautious and critical of those who misuse or manipulate religious texts or teachings to suit their own selfish or malicious intentions. It implies that the mere ability to quote religious words or verses does not guarantee someone's righteousness or sincerity.
  • strike out on own The idiom "strike out on own" means to start a new venture or pursue a path independently, typically without the assistance, support, or involvement of others. It involves taking a bold and courageous step to establish oneself or embark on a new journey without relying on external guidance or resources.
  • in one's (own) backyard The idiom "in one's (own) backyard" refers to something that is happening or exists very close to someone, typically in their immediate surroundings or directly within their jurisdiction, sphere of influence, or responsibility. It can also imply that someone is unaware or neglectful of something that is occurring in their own proximity while focusing on issues elsewhere.
  • sign one's own death warrant The idiom "sign one's own death warrant" means to perform an action or behave in a way that will result in severe negative consequences or one's own downfall. It implies taking actions that will inevitably lead to one's own demise or ruin.
  • to each their own The phrase "to each their own" is an idiom that means everyone is entitled to their own preferences or opinions, and it is subjective as people have different likes, dislikes, or ways of doing things. It expresses the idea that what may be suitable or enjoyable for one person may not be the same for others, and individuals should be allowed to make their own choices without judgment or interference from others.
  • each to his/her own The idiom "each to his/her own" means that every person has their own preferences and opinions, and it is important to respect and accept those differences. It suggests that what may be pleasing or suitable for one person may not necessarily be the same for another.
  • To each his own. The idiom "To each his own" means that different people have different preferences or opinions, and it is acceptable for each person to have their own choices and beliefs, even if others may disagree or have a different viewpoint. It emphasizes respecting individual differences and recognizing that not everyone has the same tastes or perspectives.
  • off your own bat The idiom "off your own bat" means to do something without being prompted or without assistance from others. It refers to acting or taking initiative independently, without relying on external support or instructions.
  • Let every man skin his own skunk The idiom "Let every man skin his own skunk" means that each person should be responsible for dealing with their own problems or issues, rather than relying on others to solve them. It implies that individuals should take ownership of their actions and take care of the consequences themselves, rather than expecting someone else to handle it for them.
  • Mind your own beeswax. The idiom "Mind your own beeswax" is a playful expression that means to mind or focus on your own business and not interfere in other people's affairs or private matters. It is a polite way of telling someone to stay out of something that does not concern them. The phrase "beeswax" is used euphemistically in place of a stronger, more offensive word.
  • It's an ill bird that fouls its own nest. The idiom "It's an ill bird that fouls its own nest" refers to someone who brings harm, damage, or shame upon themselves or their own group or community. It highlights the negative consequences of one's actions when they harm or undermine the very people or things they should be protecting or supporting.
  • can't call one's soul one's own The idiom "can't call one's soul one's own" means that someone is overwhelmed or constantly occupied by external demands or obligations, leaving no time or freedom for personal needs or desires. It implies an intense lack of control over one's own life and a loss of individual autonomy.
  • Men are blind in their own cause. The idiom "Men are blind in their own cause" means that people tend to be biased or lack objectivity when it comes to defending or advocating for their own interests or beliefs. It suggests that individuals may overlook flaws or fail to see the bigger picture when it comes to evaluating their own actions or positions.
  • blow own trumpet The idiom "blow one's own trumpet" means to boast or brag about one's own achievements, abilities, or skills in an arrogant or self-promoting way. It refers to the act of praising oneself excessively, often without any regard for modesty or humility.
  • blow own horn The idiom "blow one's own horn" means to boast or speak highly of oneself, to actively promote or praise one's own abilities, achievements, or qualities.
  • cut one's (own) throat The idiom "cut one's (own) throat" is a figurative expression that means to do something that is likely to cause serious harm or ruin to oneself, typically through one's own actions, choices, or decisions. It implies engaging in self-destructive behavior or making choices that will ultimately result in negative consequences.
  • pull oneself up by one's (own) bootstraps The idiom "pull oneself up by one's (own) bootstraps" means to improve one's situation or achieve success through one's own efforts, abilities, or resources without any external help or support. It implies self-reliance, perseverance, and determination in overcoming challenges or obstacles. The phrase is often used to emphasize the idea of starting from a disadvantaged or challenging position and finding a way to succeed independently.
  • Every tub must stand on its own bottom The idiom "Every tub must stand on its own bottom" is a metaphorical expression that means every individual or entity is responsible for their own success or financial stability. It suggests that each person or organization should be self-sufficient and not rely on others for support or assistance.
  • stand on own two feet The idiom "stand on one's own two feet" means to be self-reliant and independent, able to handle one's own responsibilities and make decisions without relying on others for support or assistance. It implies having personal strength, confidence, and the ability to support oneself both emotionally and financially.
  • stand on own feet The idiom "stand on own feet" means to be self-reliant, independent, and able to take care of oneself without assistance or relying on others. It refers to someone who is capable of making their own decisions, supporting themselves financially, and facing life's challenges without constant support or guidance from others.
  • under one's own steam The idiom "under one's own steam" means to accomplish or do something independently, without assistance or reliance on others. It implies that someone is able to achieve or make progress without any external support.
  • stew in your own juice/juices The idiom "stew in your own juice/juices" means to suffer the consequences of one's actions, often by being left alone or abandoned to deal with the problems or difficulties one has created for oneself. It implies that someone is left to reflect, contemplate, and endure the negative outcomes resulting from their own decisions or behavior, without receiving support or assistance from others.
  • stew in one's own juice The idiom "stew in one's own juice" means to suffer the consequences or unpleasant consequences of one's own actions or decisions without any external intervention or assistance. It implies being left to deal with the fallout or problems caused by one's own mistakes or wrongdoing. It suggests a sense of being trapped or confined in the negative situation, unable to escape or find resolution.
  • play at own game The idiom "play at own game" means to engage in a competition or conflict using the same tactics or strategies as one's opponent, often with the aim of bettering or defeating them. It involves adopting similar methods or approaches to gain an advantage or level the playing field.
  • tell its own story The idiom "tell its own story" means that something is self-evident or speaks for itself, requiring no explanation or further elaboration to understand its meaning or significance.
  • not know one's own strength The idiom "not know one's own strength" refers to a situation where someone is unaware of their own capabilities, power, or potential. It implies that the person underestimates their abilities and may be surprised by their own level of strength or effectiveness in a particular situation.
  • minding my own business The idiom "minding my own business" refers to the act of focusing on and attending to one's own affairs, without interfering, commenting, or getting involved in the affairs or concerns of others. It signifies the attitude of staying attentive to one's own matters and not intruding into or being nosy about the personal or private affairs of others.
  • Mind own business! The idiom "Mind your own business!" is a somewhat impolite or direct way of telling someone to refrain from interfering in matters that do not concern them. It is a reminder or warning for someone to focus on their own affairs and not meddle in others'.
  • I'll thank you to mind your own business The idiom "I'll thank you to mind your own business" is used to politely ask someone to stop interfering or meddling in someone else's affairs. It implies that the person is being nosy or intrusive and requests them to focus on their own matters instead.
  • set one's (own) price The idiom "set one's (own) price" means to determine or establish the price at which something will be bought or sold, usually without considering or being influenced by others' opinions or market factors. It highlights the control or power one has in determining the value of a particular product or service.
  • to call own The idiom "to call your own" means to possess or own something, typically referring to something that is important, personal, or meaningful to an individual. It reflects a sense of ownership, pride, or identification with that particular thing or attribute.
  • not able to call time own The idiom "not able to call time own" means being too busy or preoccupied to have control over one's own time or schedule. It implies a lack of independence or freedom to manage one's time or make personal choices.
  • have a minute to call own The idiom "have a minute to call one's own" means to have a moment of personal time or solitude, free from interruptions or obligations. It implies having some time to relax, reflect, or pursue one's own interests without any external demands or distractions.
  • can't call soul own
  • a place to call own The idiom "a place to call one's own" refers to having a personal and permanent space or residence where someone feels a sense of belonging, ownership, security, and comfort. It signifies finding or creating a home or location that can be uniquely identified as theirs, reflecting their personal taste, choices, and self-expression.
  • have calluses from patting one's own back
  • with own fair hands The idiom "with own fair hands" refers to doing something personally and directly, without the assistance or involvement of others. It emphasizes taking responsibility or taking matters into one's own hands in an independent and individualistic manner.
  • paddle one's own canoe The idiom "paddle one's own canoe" means to independently and self-sufficiently handle one's own affairs or take responsibility for one's own actions without relying on others for help or support. It emphasizes the importance of self-reliance and the ability to navigate through life's challenges on one's own.
  • carry one's (own) weight The idiom "carry one's (own) weight" means to fulfill one's responsibilities, contribute equally to a group or team, or bear one's fair share of the workload or burden. It implies that an individual is pulling their own weight and not relying on others to do their part.
  • tell its own tale
  • talk to hear own voice The idiom "talk to hear own voice" means to engage in a conversation or discussion solely for the purpose of expressing one's own opinions, ideas, or beliefs, rather than genuinely listening to others or considering alternate viewpoints. It implies that the person enjoys the act of speaking and asserting themselves, without being open to or valuing input from others.
  • pay sb back in their own coin The idiom "pay someone back in their own coin" means to retaliate or seek revenge on someone by treating them in the same negative or hurtful manner that they treated you. It implies responding to someone's actions with similar actions, usually negative or unpleasant, as a form of retribution or justice.
  • come into own The idiom "come into own" refers to the process of gaining confidence, competence, or recognition in a particular area, or for a particular skill or talent to reach its full potential or effectiveness. It implies a state of development or success where something or someone begins to shine or excel.
  • chew one's own tobacco The idiom "chew one's own tobacco" refers to someone being self-sufficient and capable of handling their own affairs without relying on others for assistance. It suggests that a person is independent and able to take care of their needs without depending on external help or advice.
  • It is a wise child that knows its own father. The idiom "It is a wise child that knows its own father" means that it is commendable for a child to accurately identify and acknowledge who their biological father is. It implies that paternity should not be taken for granted, as it is important for a child to be aware of their true heritage and not be deceived or misled about their biological parentage. The idiom can also be interpreted more broadly, suggesting that it is wise for individuals to have a clear understanding of their origins and family background.
  • keep one's own counsel The idiom "keep one's own counsel" means to keep one's thoughts, opinions, or feelings to oneself and not share them with others. It implies being discreet, secretive, or reserved.
  • do own thing The idiom "do own thing" refers to someone pursuing their own interests, beliefs, or desires, often in a unique or independent way, without being influenced by others or conforming to societal norms. It implies the act of doing what one truly wants or feels is right, regardless of others' opinions or expectations.
  • Every horse thinks its own pack heaviest The idiom "Every horse thinks its own pack heaviest" means that individuals often believe their own problems or burdens to be more significant or difficult than those of others. It suggests that people tend to exaggerate the challenges they face compared to others due to a subjective bias or narrow perspective.
  • cut your own throat The idiom "cut your own throat" means to intentionally do something that will ultimately harm oneself or ruin one's chances of success or improvement. It refers to self-destructive behavior or actions that result in negative consequences for oneself.
  • on own time The idiom "on own time" typically refers to any activity or task that is done outside of one's regular working hours or designated time for official responsibilities. It implies that the person is willingly undertaking the activity without being compelled or obligated to do so by their job or any external factors.
  • legend in own time The idiom "legend in own time" refers to a person who is highly celebrated, revered, or acknowledged for their exceptional skills, achievements, or contributions while they are still alive. This phrase implies that their remarkable status and reputation are recognized and praised by others during their lifetime.
  • your own woman The idiom "your own woman" typically refers to a self-reliant and independent woman who makes her own decisions, acts in accordance with her own preferences and beliefs, and does not rely on others for validation or direction. It signifies an individual who is assertive, confident, and stands up for herself, often in the face of societal expectations or pressures.
  • be your own man/woman/person The idiom "be your own man/woman/person" means to be independent and self-reliant, making decisions and living life according to one's own principles and values rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes the importance of being true to oneself and not conforming to societal expectations or pressures.
  • a man/woman after your own heart The idiom "a man/woman after your own heart" refers to someone who shares the same beliefs, values, or interests as you. It typically implies that this person is someone you admire or find compatible with your own preferences.
  • cut own throat To "cut one's own throat" is an idiomatic expression that means to do something that is self-destructive or detrimental to one's own best interests. It refers to actions or decisions that ultimately harm oneself or one's chances of success or progress.
  • sign own death warrant The idiom "sign own death warrant" means to do something that will result in one's own downfall or demise, often through one's own actions or decisions. It refers to a situation where someone essentially seals their own fate or sets themselves up for failure or serious consequences.
  • talk to hear one's own voice The idiom "talk to hear one's own voice" refers to someone who enjoys talking excessively or simply likes to hear themselves speak, often without consideration for others or their opinions. It implies that the person simply wants to talk for the sake of expressing their own thoughts rather than engaging in a meaningful conversation.
  • pay own way The idiom "pay one's own way" means to financially support oneself or bear the expenses of a situation or event independently without relying on others for financial assistance or help. It indicates a sense of self-sufficiency and responsibility for covering one's own costs or obligations.
  • in own way The idiom "in one's own way" refers to doing something in a manner that is unique or distinct to a person's individual style or preferences. It implies that someone approaches a task or situation based on their personal perspective, methods, or characteristics, rather than conforming to predetermined norms or expectations.
  • get own way The idiom "get one's own way" refers to someone who is accustomed to or adept at attaining or obtaining what they desire or prefer, often by using persuasive tactics, manipulation, or determination, even if others have differing opinions or objections.
  • leave you to your own devices The idiom "leave you to your own devices" means to leave someone alone and allow them to handle a situation or task according to their own preferences or methods, without interference or assistance. It implies that the person is responsible for figuring things out independently.
  • die by own hand The idiom "die by own hand" refers to an act of suicide or the act of intentionally causing one's own death, typically by using one's hands or any means within one's control. It implies that the person is responsible for their own demise and takes deliberate action to end their life.
  • dig one's own grave The idiom "dig one's own grave" means to do something that will ultimately lead to one's own destruction, downfall, or failure, often due to one's own actions, choices, or decisions. It refers to metaphorically digging a hole or creating a situation that will result in negative consequences or harm oneself in the long run.
  • in a world of own The idiom "in a world of own" refers to a state or situation in which someone is completely absorbed, preoccupied, or engrossed in their own thoughts, ideas, or imagination, often leading them to be detached from reality or oblivious to their surroundings. It suggests that the person is lost in their own thoughts, creating their own mental universe, and may seem disconnected or unresponsive to external events or interactions.
  • your own worst enemy The idiom "your own worst enemy" refers to a person who consistently acts or behaves in a way that hinders or sabotages their own success or well-being. It implies that the individual's own actions or choices are the primary cause of their problems or failures, as opposed to external factors.
  • have the devil's own luck The idiom "have the devil's own luck" means to consistently have exceptionally good luck or fortune, often in situations that are difficult or seemingly impossible. It implies that the person has a streak of remarkable luck that is almost supernatural, like being favored by the devil himself.
  • have the devil's own job "Have the devil's own job" is an idiom that means to have an extremely difficult or challenging task. It implies that the task is so challenging that it feels like one is facing a powerful and relentless adversary, similar to dealing with the devil himself.
  • find one's own level The idiom "find one's own level" means to determine or establish one's position or ability in a particular situation or environment, based on one's skills, knowledge, or capabilities. It implies the process of finding the most suitable or appropriate level of engagement or participation.
  • of own accord The idiom "of own accord" means to do something willingly or without being prompted or forced by anyone else. It refers to taking the initiative or acting independently, without any external influence or persuasion.
  • hold own To "hold one's own" means to maintain one's position or status in the face of competition or adversity. It implies that a person is able to keep up with others, assert themselves, or demonstrate their abilities effectively. It often suggests the ability to withstand pressure or maintain a level of performance comparable to others.
  • legend in one's own (life)time The idiom "legend in one's own (life)time" refers to someone who is widely renowned, celebrated, or esteemed for their extraordinary achievements, abilities, or influence, even while they are still alive. It suggests that the person has achieved such iconic status and recognition that they are considered legendary during their lifetime.
  • not have a minute to call your own The idiom "not have a minute to call your own" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or obligations, leaving no time for personal activities or relaxation. It signifies a lack of free time or autonomy over one's schedule.
  • as if own the place The idiom "as if own the place" means behaving or acting with extreme confidence, authority, or familiarity, as if one is the owner or in complete control of the surroundings or situation. It implies a sense of entitlement and a lack of regard for others' opinions or rules.
  • in one's (own) (best) interest(s) The idiom "in one's (own) (best) interest(s)" refers to actions or choices made by someone that will benefit them or serve their personal advantage. It implies decision-making that prioritizes individual welfare or long-term benefit.
  • find own level The idiom "find own level" means that a person will eventually reach a position or status in life that suits their abilities, skills, or qualifications. It suggests that individuals will naturally gravitate towards a level of competence or position that aligns with their talents and capabilities.
  • put own house in order The idiom "put own house in order" means to take care of one's personal affairs or responsibilities before attempting to criticize, intervene, or direct others. It suggests prioritizing and rectifying issues within one's own life or situation before involving oneself in the affairs of others.
  • get own house in order The idiom "get own house in order" means to organize or improve one's personal or professional affairs or to address and resolve any internal problems, inconsistencies, or shortcomings before attempting to criticize, judge, or control others. It emphasizes the importance of taking care of oneself before trying to manage or correct the actions or behavior of others.
  • pick on your own size The idiom "pick on your own size" means to not bully, dominate, or challenge someone who is smaller, weaker, or incapable of defending themselves. It suggests that it is unfair or cowardly to target someone who is not an equal or comparable adversary. The phrase encourages individuals to choose opponents or competitors who are similar in strength, ability, or resources.
  • have a mind of own The idiom "have a mind of its own" means that something or someone behaves or acts independently, without being influenced or controlled by others. It implies having strong individuality or personal opinions that may not align with the majority or follow established standards.
  • a mind of own The idiom "a mind of its own" refers to someone or something that has independent thoughts, desires, or actions, and does not always conform to the expectations or wishes of others. It suggests that the person or thing in question acts or thinks independently and does not easily listen to or follow the opinions or instructions of others.
  • pay back in own coin The idiom "pay back in one's own coin" means to retaliate or seek revenge in the same manner or with equal severity as someone has treated you. It involves returning the same negative treatment or behavior that you have received from another person.
  • take matters into own hands The idiom "take matters into own hands" means to assume responsibility or control over a situation without relying on others or waiting for others to act. It signifies the act of taking initiative and making decisions or acting independently to address a problem or situation.
  • foul one's own nest The idiom "foul one's own nest" means to harm or damage one's own environment, situation, reputation, or relationships through one's own actions or behavior. It refers to negatively impacting the very things or people that are essential for one's well-being.
  • your own person The idiom "your own person" refers to someone who is independent and self-reliant, making their own decisions and not being easily influenced by others. It implies having a strong sense of individuality and autonomy.
  • feather one's (own) nest To "feather one's (own) nest" means to accumulate wealth or secure personal advantages, often through selfish or dishonest means, in order to ensure one's own comfort and financial security. It refers to someone who takes advantage of a particular situation or position to gain personal benefits at the expense of others.
  • not know own strength The idiom "not know own strength" refers to a situation where someone is unaware of their own abilities, power, or influence. It implies that the individual underestimates their own capabilities and may therefore unintentionally use excessive force, influence, or energy.
  • own man The idiom "own man" refers to an individual who possesses independence, autonomy, and the ability to think and act in a self-determined manner, free from the influence or control of others. It implies that this person makes their own decisions based on their own convictions and principles, rather than being swayed by external pressures or expectations.
  • be own man The idiom "be your own man" refers to being independent, self-sufficient, and making decisions or taking actions that are true to oneself, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes having one's individuality, autonomy, and the ability to think and act independently.
  • on its (own) merits The idiom "on its (own) merits" means to evaluate or judge something solely based on its inherent qualities, abilities, or characteristics, rather than considering any external factors or circumstances. It suggests making an unbiased assessment, focusing solely on the individual merits or worth of the subject in question.
  • judge one on one's own merits The idiom "judge one on one's own merits" means to assess someone or something based solely on their individual qualities, abilities, or achievements and not on any external factors such as reputation, background, or comparison to others. It emphasizes the importance of fairness, objectivity, and giving equal opportunities to evaluate someone based on their own unique attributes.
  • judge sth on its own merits To judge something on its own merits means to assess or evaluate it based solely on its unique qualities, separate from any external factors or comparisons. In other words, it entails forming an opinion or making a decision about something independent of any context, bias, or preconceived notions.
  • hoist with your own petard The idiom "hoist with your own petard" means to be caught or harmed by one's own plans or actions. It originates from Shakespeare's play "Hamlet," specifically from the scene in which Hamlet plans to trick his enemies with a booby-trapped letter. However, he ends up being caught in his own trap when the plan backfires. Thus, being "hoist with your own petard" implies that someone's actions or schemes have resulted in their own downfall or defeat.
  • be hoist by/with your own petard The idiom "be hoist by/with your own petard" means to be harmed or disadvantaged by the very plan or scheme that was intended to cause harm or disadvantage to others. It suggests that one's own actions or intentions have backfired, leading to their own downfall or misfortune. The term "petard" refers to a small bomb or explosive device used in medieval warfare to breach a castle wall. Thus, being "hoist by your own petard" metaphorically illustrates the concept of facing the consequences of one's own actions.
  • hoist with one's own petard The idiom "hoist with one's own petard" is derived from a line in Shakespeare's play "Hamlet." It refers to a situation where someone's own plans, actions, or devices intended to harm someone else end up causing harm to themselves instead. Essentially, it means to be caught or affected by one's own trap or scheme.
  • at own game The idiom "at own game" refers to the act of defeating or outperforming someone in an activity or competition in which they themselves are usually skilled or dominant. It implies overcoming an opponent by using their own tactics, strategies, or strengths against them, resulting in a victory or success.
  • take the law into own hands The idiom "take the law into own hands" means to take revenge or seek justice for a perceived wrongdoing outside of the established legal system. It refers to the act of bypassing proper authorities or legal processes and assuming the responsibility to enforce one's own sense of justice or retribution.
  • take into own hands The idiom "take into own hands" means to assume responsibility or to manage a situation independently and proactively, often when others have been ineffective or unwilling to take action. It implies the willingness to take control and assert one's own authority or agency to accomplish a task or resolve a problem.
  • an own goal The idiom "an own goal" typically refers to a situation where someone unintentionally and unwittingly harms or sabotages their own interests or goals. It originates from the sport of soccer (football), where an own goal occurs when a player inadvertently scores a point for the opponent's team by mistakenly putting the ball into their own net. Consequently, the phrase has been adopted figuratively to describe self-defeating or counterproductive actions in various contexts outside of sports.
  • take own life The idiom "take one's own life" refers to the act of committing suicide. It is a euphemistic expression to describe someone intentionally causing their own death.
  • take on a life of own The idiom "take on a life of its own" refers to something that starts to develop or function independently, often becoming more prominent or influential than originally anticipated. It describes situations where an idea, project, or situation gains momentum and evolves beyond its initial control or intention.
  • on your own hook The idiom "on your own hook" means to act or decide independently and without assistance from others. It implies taking responsibility for one's actions and decisions without relying on anyone else's input or support.
  • on one's own hook The idiom "on one's own hook" refers to someone taking responsibility for their own actions or decisions, without relying on or seeking assistance from others. It implies independent action or self-reliance.
  • live on own
  • leave to own devices The idiom "leave to own devices" means to let someone work or act independently, without interference or assistance from others. It suggests allowing someone to rely on their own abilities or resources to achieve a goal or solve a problem.
  • leave one to own devices The idiom "leave one to own devices" means to allow someone to be alone or independent and to use their own skills and resources to figure things out or solve a problem without any assistance or intervention from others.
  • be of your own making The idiom "be of your own making" means that the situation or problem someone finds themselves in is a result of their own actions, choices, or behavior. It implies that the individual is responsible for creating the circumstances that led to the current outcome.
  • hold one's own The idiom "hold one's own" means to maintain one's position, status, or ability to succeed, often in the face of competition or challenge. It implies that someone is able to stay at the same level as others or withstand a difficult situation without giving in or being outperformed.
  • after someone's own heart The idiom "after someone's own heart" is used to describe a person or thing that perfectly aligns with someone's preferences, interests, or values. It signifies that the person or thing is especially pleasing or ideal for that particular individual.
  • come into one's own The idiom "come into one's own" means to reach a point of self-discovery, confidence, or fulfillment where one's abilities, talents, or qualities can be fully recognized and utilized. It denotes a stage where an individual flourishes, excels, or achieves success in their own right.
  • get one's own back The idiom "get one's own back" means to retaliate or seek revenge against someone who has wronged or hurt you in some way. It refers to the act of getting even or getting one's revenge on the person who has caused harm.
  • of one's own The definition of the idiom "of one's own" is something that belongs to or is characteristic of a specific person, typically emphasizing independence, uniqueness, or personal choice. It implies individual ownership or personal preference in relation to something.
  • on one's own The idiom "on one's own" means to be independent or self-reliant, not depending on anyone else for support or assistance. It refers to the ability to handle or accomplish something alone, without the help of others.
  • own up (to) The idiom "own up (to)" means to confess or admit to something, typically a mistake, wrongdoing, or fault. It involves taking responsibility for one's actions or decisions, usually when faced with consequences or when confronted with the truth.
  • in one's own right The idiom "in one's own right" refers to someone's ability or status that is independent and not reliant on anyone else. It implies that the person has achieved recognition, success, or authority based on their own merits and accomplishments, rather than as a result of their connection to someone else.
  • stand in one's own light To "stand in one's own light" means to hinder or obstruct one's own progress or success, typically due to one's own actions or decisions. It refers to situations where individuals unwittingly make choices or behave in a way that works against their own interests, goals, or advancement. Essentially, it suggests that someone is inadvertently sabotaging themselves.
  • take one's own life The idiom "take one's own life" refers to the act of intentionally causing one's own death, typically by suicide.
  • leave someone to his own devices The idiom "leave someone to his own devices" means to allow someone to handle a situation or problem independently and without interference, assistance, or guidance. It implies stepping away and giving someone autonomy to figure things out on their own.
  • be one's own man The idiom "be one's own man" typically means to be independent, self-reliant, and not easily influenced or controlled by others. It suggests that an individual has a strong sense of individuality and autonomy, making their own decisions and taking responsibility for their actions without being swayed by external pressures or opinions.
  • know one's own mind The idiom "know one's own mind" means to have a clear and confident understanding of one's thoughts, desires, preferences, or intentions, and being able to make decisions accordingly. It implies being self-assured and decisive, not easily influenced or swayed by others' opinions or external factors.
  • stand on one's own (two) feet The idiom "stand on one's own (two) feet" means to be independent and self-sufficient, both financially and emotionally. It refers to the ability to take care of oneself without relying on others for support or assistance.
  • on one's own time The idiom "on one's own time" refers to the period of time when someone is not officially working or obligated to perform specific tasks for someone else or the organization they are affiliated with. It typically denotes personal or leisure time.
  • on one's own ground The idiom "on one's own ground" refers to a situation where someone is in a familiar or comfortable environment, where they have expertise, knowledge, or control. It signifies being in a situation where one feels confident, empowered, or at an advantage due to their familiarity with the surroundings or the subject matter.
  • beam in one's own eye The idiom "beam in one's own eye" is a variation of the biblical phrase "Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?" (Matthew 7:3). It refers to the tendency of individuals to criticize or judge others for their faults or shortcomings while being oblivious to their own significant flaws or mistakes. It highlights the importance of self-reflection and recognizing one's own faults before pointing out those of others.
  • dig own grave The idiom "dig own grave" means to engage in actions or behave in a way that leads to one's own downfall or negative consequences. It refers to someone who is unknowingly or intentionally putting themselves in a disadvantageous or harmful situation through their own decisions or actions.
  • keep own counsel The idiom "keep one's own counsel" means to keep one's thoughts, opinions, or intentions to oneself and not share them with others. It implies maintaining silence or discretion in order to avoid potential conflict, judgment, or interference.
  • own accord The idiom "own accord" means to do something willingly or without being forced or influenced by others; to act independently or spontaneously.
  • paddle own canoe The idiom "paddle your own canoe" means to be independent and self-reliant, taking responsibility for one's own actions and decisions without relying on or seeking assistance from others. It implies the ability to navigate through life's challenges and obstacles independently, without relying on others for help.
  • taste of own medicine The idiom "taste of own medicine" refers to experiencing the same negative treatment or consequences that one has previously inflicted on others. It implies that someone is being treated in a way that mirrors their own actions or behavior towards others.
  • do something at your own risk The idiom "do something at your own risk" means that a person is being warned or cautioned that they are taking full responsibility for any potential negative consequences or dangers that may arise from their actions. It suggests that the person should proceed with caution as they are venturing into something uncertain or potentially risky, and any adverse outcomes or harm will be solely their responsibility.
  • be your own man/woman The idiom "be your own man/woman" means to be independent, self-reliant, and make decisions based on one's own judgment and principles, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It suggests taking ownership of one's actions and beliefs, and not conforming to societal expectations or yielding to external pressures.
  • be your own master/mistress The idiom "be your own master/mistress" refers to the act of being independent, self-reliant, and in control of one's own actions and decisions. It means having the freedom to make choices without being dependent on others, and being responsible for one's own success or failure. It implies being in charge of one's own destiny and not being subservient to anyone else.
  • a taste/dose of your own medicine The idiom "a taste/dose of your own medicine" means experiencing the same negative treatment or situation that one has previously inflicted upon others. It implies that the person is being treated in the same way they have treated others, serving as a form of retribution or a lesson to learn from their own actions.
  • be frightened/nervous/scared of your own shadow The idiom "be frightened/nervous/scared of your own shadow" is used to describe someone who is excessively fearful or easily frightened. It implies that the person is timid and lacks confidence, often overreacting or panicking in situations that pose little or no actual threat. Comparing someone to being afraid of their own shadow emphasizes their heightened sensitivity and irrational fears.
  • have a mind of your own The idiom "have a mind of your own" means to be independent and strong-willed, to think and act independently, rather than being easily influenced or controlled by others. It refers to someone who isn't swayed by external opinions or trends and who confidently follows their own beliefs and desires.
  • like, etc. the sound of your own voice The idiom "like, etc. the sound of your own voice" means that someone enjoys hearing themselves speak or talk excessively, often without considering the interests or opinions of others. It implies that the person may be self-centered or lacks awareness of their behavior.
  • by your own account The idiom "by your own account" means to rely on or judge a situation or narrative based on the information or testimony provided by the person themselves. It suggests that the information and perspective being shared come directly from the individual involved.
  • let somebody stew in their own juice The idiom "let somebody stew in their own juice" means to allow someone to suffer the consequences of their actions or decisions without offering them assistance or intervention. It implies allowing the person to experience the negative outcomes of their own choices or behavior, instead of helping or interfering to alleviate their troubles.
  • behave/act as if you own the place The idiom "behave/act as if you own the place" means acting with a sense of entitlement or confidence, often disregarding rules or norms that others would typically follow. It implies behaving in a way that suggests you have the authority or ownership of a particular location or situation, even though you may not actually possess such authority or ownership.
  • think you own the place The idiom "think you own the place" means to behave arrogantly, rudely, or presumptuously as if one has the authority or control over a particular location or situation. It implies that someone acts as if they have the right to dominate or make decisions as if they were the owner.
  • fight your own battles The idiom "fight your own battles" means to face and resolve one's own challenges, difficulties, or conflicts without relying on or expecting assistance or support from others. It suggests taking responsibility for one's actions and decisions, dealing with problems independently, and not depending on others for assistance.
  • beat somebody at their own game The idiom "beat somebody at their own game" means to outperform or outwit someone by using the same tactics, strategies, or skills as them, often surpassing their level of expertise or ability. It implies gaining an advantage or achieving success by adopting the same methods as one's opponents or competitors.
  • blow/toot your own horn The idiom "blow/toot your own horn" means to boast or promote one's own achievements, abilities, or virtues, often in an exaggerated or self-aggrandizing manner. It refers to someone who proudly and openly talks about their accomplishments to gain recognition or admiration.
  • on (one's) own account "On one's own account" is an idiom that means doing something for one's personal benefit or advantage, without being influenced or motivated by others. It implies acting independently and taking responsibility for one's actions or decisions without relying on others' support or involvement.
  • on own account The idiom "on own account" typically refers to doing something for oneself, without the involvement or assistance of others. It means taking personal responsibility or acting independently in a certain situation or pursuit.
  • afraid of your own shadow The idiom "afraid of your own shadow" refers to someone who is excessively fearful or easily scared, even by things that are harmless or insignificant. It implies that the person is extremely apprehensive or paranoid, often jumping to conclusions or exhibiting irrational fears.
  • afraid of (or frightened of) your own shadow The idiom "afraid of (or frightened of) your own shadow" means to be excessively fearful or easily startled. It suggests that someone is extremely timid or nervous, constantly on edge, and reacts even to the slightest perceived threat or danger.
  • a man, woman, etc. after your own heart The idiom "a man, woman, etc. after your own heart" is used to describe someone who shares the same opinions, values, or interests as you do. It signifies a person who is like-minded and whose qualities you admire or relate to.
  • after (one's) own heart The idiom "after (one's) own heart" means that something or someone is very pleasing or appealing to someone's personal preferences or characteristics. It implies a strong affinity or compatibility between the person and the thing or person being discussed.
  • man after (one's) own heart The idiom "man after (one's) own heart" refers to a person who shares similar interests, qualities, or values with another person. It suggests that the individual being referred to is highly favored or admired by the speaker because of their resemblance or compatibility in some way.
  • the devil looks after his own The idiom "the devil looks after his own" means that seemingly wicked or evil people often seem to have good luck or protection, suggesting that the devil or evil forces are favoring or taking care of them. It implies that wrongdoing can sometimes lead to personal benefits or success.
  • woman after (one's) own heart The idiom "woman after (one's) own heart" is used to describe a woman who closely shares or embodies one's personal preferences, values, or interests. It suggests that the person being described is extremely fond of or impressed by this woman, as she reflects their own desires and beliefs.
  • (one's) own flesh and blood The idiom "(one's) own flesh and blood" refers to someone who is closely related to oneself, usually a family member such as a sibling, child, or parent. It emphasizes the strong emotional connection and sense of kinship shared with the person mentioned.
  • be (one's) own man/woman/person The idiom "be one's own man/woman/person" means to be independent and self-reliant, making one's own decisions and not being influenced or controlled by others. It implies that the person is confident and assertive in their choices, ideals, and actions, without being swayed by external pressures or opinions.
  • be (one's) own worst enemy The idiom "be (one's) own worst enemy" means that a person's actions, choices, or behavior harm themselves more than any external factors or adversaries can. It refers to a situation where an individual's self-destructive tendencies or negative traits hinder their progress or success, often leading to their downfall or failure.
  • as if you own the place The idiom "as if you own the place" is used to describe someone who behaves confidently and assertively in a certain setting, as if they have complete authority or ownership over it, even if that may not be the case. This expression is often used to convey a sense of entitlement, dominance, or self-assuredness in a particular environment.
  • at (one's) own game The idiom "at (one's) own game" is used to describe a situation where someone is successfully competing or defeating someone else in their own area of expertise or specialty. It implies that the person is able to outmatch or outperform their opponent in a particular skill or activity that the opponent is known for or considered skilled in.
  • at (one's) own peril The idiom "at (one's) own peril" means to proceed with a particular action or decision despite the potential dangers or negative consequences that may result. It implies that the individual will bear the full responsibility for any harm or negative outcomes that arise as a result of their actions.
  • at (one's) own risk The idiom "at (one's) own risk" refers to a statement or warning that suggests someone will be responsible for any potential harm, loss, or consequences resulting from their own actions or decisions. It implies that there is a level of danger or uncertainty involved, and the individual engaging in the activity or making the choice assumes all liability and should proceed with caution.
  • beat (one) at (one's) own game The idiom "beat (one) at (one's) own game" means to defeat or succeed over someone by using their own strategies, methods, or skills against them. It implies outsmarting or outperforming someone in their area of expertise or preferred activity.
  • beat someone at his or her own game The idiom "to beat someone at his or her own game" means to outperform or outwit someone in a particular activity or skill that they typically excel at or are known for. It implies that one has successfully used tactics or strategies similar to their opponent's, but has managed to outdo them.
  • beat someone at their own game The idiom "beat someone at their own game" means to outdo or defeat someone by using their own tactics, strategies, or skills against them. It refers to achieving success or victory against someone who is typically skilled, experienced, or dominant in a particular area or activity.
  • eat (one's) own dog food The idiom "eat (one's) own dog food" refers to the practice of using or consuming one's own product or service to demonstrate belief in its quality or effectiveness. It implies that a person or company should have confidence in their offering by utilizing it themselves, just as a dog food manufacturer would prove the quality of their product by feeding it to their own dogs.
  • get your own back The idiom "get your own back" means to seek revenge or to retaliate against someone who has previously wronged or harmed you. It refers to taking action to harm or hurt someone in order to get even or seek justice for a past offense.
  • make a rod for (one's) own back The idiom "make a rod for (one's) own back" means to unnecessarily create difficulties or problems for oneself through one's own actions or decisions. It refers to the idea that one's own actions can result in negative consequences or self-imposed burdens.
  • pay (someone) back in (their) own coin The idiom "pay (someone) back in (their) own coin" means to retaliate or give someone a taste of their own medicine. It refers to responding to someone's negative actions or behavior by treating them the same way they treated you.
  • save (one's) own bacon The idiom "save one's own bacon" means to rescue or protect oneself from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at the expense of others. It implies taking actions to ensure personal safety, success, or well-being, even if it means sacrificing or betraying others in the process.
  • off (one's) own bat The idiom "off (one's) own bat" means to do something without being prompted or encouraged by others, acting independently and on one's own initiative.
  • be (one's) own master The idiom "be one's own master" refers to the state of being independent and having control over one's own actions, decisions, and life, without being subject to the authority or influence of others. It implies having the freedom and autonomy to make choices and take responsibility for the consequences without needing approval or guidance from others.
  • be your own man (or woman or person) The idiom "be your own man (or woman or person)" means to be independent and make decisions based on one's own principles, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes the importance of individuality, self-reliance, and the ability to think and act independently.
  • march to (one's) own beat The idiom "march to (one's) own beat" means to act or behave in a way that is independent and unique, unconcerned with what others think or do. It refers to a person who is not influenced or swayed by societal norms or expectations and follows their own principles or desires, regardless of popular opinion.
  • march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum To "march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum" means to behave or act independently, disregarding societal norms and expectations. It implies that someone chooses to pursue their own path, make their own decisions, and follow their own unique style or beliefs, rather than conforming to the ideas and opinions of others. It suggests a sense of individuality, self-assuredness, and nonconformity.
  • pull (or drag) yourself up by your own bootstraps The idiom "pull (or drag) yourself up by your own bootstraps" means to improve or succeed through one's own efforts without any external assistance. It implies relying solely on one's own resources, determination, and hard work to overcome obstacles or achieve success. The phrase is often used to emphasize self-reliance and personal responsibility.
  • mind (one's) own business The idiom "mind (one's) own business" means to concentrate on one's personal affairs and not interfere or meddle in the matters or concerns of others. It suggests staying out of situations or conversations that do not directly involve or concern oneself.
  • be hoist by (one's) own petard The idiom "be hoist by (one's) own petard" means to be harmed or defeated by one's own actions or schemes. It refers to a situation where someone's plans or strategies backfire on them, causing them to suffer the consequences they had intended for someone else. The phrase originates from Shakespeare's play "Hamlet," where "petard" refers to a small explosive device used to breach walls during warfare.
  • be hoist/hoisted by/with your own petard The idiom "be hoist/hoisted by/with your own petard" originates from a quote by William Shakespeare in his play "Hamlet." It means to be harmed or affected by one's own plans or actions, the consequences of which were intended for others. The word "petard" referred to a small bomb or explosive device used in warfare during Shakespeare's time. So, being "hoist by/with your own petard" metaphorically expresses the idea of a person being caught, hurt, or defeated by the very device or strategy they intended to use against someone else.
  • by (one's) own hand The idiom "by one's own hand" refers to the action of causing harm, death, or destruction to oneself deliberately or intentionally. It commonly implies suicide or self-inflicted harm.
  • die by (one's) own hand The idiom "die by (one's) own hand" refers to intentionally causing one's own death, usually through suicide or self-harm. It implies that the person responsible for their own demise acted deliberately and intentionally.
  • hoist by your own petard The idiom "hoist by your own petard" means to be harmed or defeated by one's own plan, action, or device. It refers to being caught or damaged by something that was originally intended to harm others.
  • hoist by/with (one's) own petard The idiom "hoist by/with (one's) own petard" is derived from Shakespeare's play Hamlet. It means to be harmed or defeated by one's own plan or actions. The word "petard" refers to a small explosive device used to breach gates or walls during warfare. So, being "hoist by/with one's own petard" metaphorically illustrates the idea of someone being blown up or affected negatively by their own scheme or intentions.
  • make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand The idiom "make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand" means to create or accomplish something using your own personal effort or skills. It emphasizes the idea of doing the task manually or without assistance, showcasing one's own abilities and craftsmanship.
  • pull yourself up by your own bootstraps The idiom "pull yourself up by your own bootstraps" means to improve one's situation or accomplish something difficult or challenging through one's own efforts and resources, without any external help or assistance. It implies self-reliance, perseverance, and the ability to overcome obstacles independently. However, the phrase is often used ironically or sarcastically because it suggests an impossible task, as it is physically impossible to lift oneself off the ground by pulling on one's bootstraps.
  • call (one's) own The idiom "call (one's) own" refers to possessing or owning something, typically used when someone can claim something as their personal possession or accomplishment. It implies a sense of pride and ownership over a particular object, achievement, or attribute.
  • call something your own The idiom "call something your own" means to possess or claim something as belonging to oneself. It implies a sense of ownership and personal connection to the item or concept in question.
  • call your own The idiom "call your own" means to possess or own something. It can refer to having personal belongings or resources that one can claim as their own. Additionally, it can imply independence and autonomy in terms of decision-making or taking responsibility for one's actions.
  • not have a minute to call (one's) own The idiom "not have a minute to call one's own" means to be extremely busy or occupied, having no free time or personal space. It implies that the person is constantly engaged in various activities or responsibilities and is unable to find any time for oneself.
  • place to call (one's) own The idiom "place to call (one's) own" refers to a particular location, space, or home that one considers as their personal and comfortable domain. It implies a sense of ownership, security, and belonging. It emphasizes the significance of having a physical or metaphorical place where one can feel truly at ease and establish their identity.
  • the devil can quote scripture for his own purpose The idiom "the devil can quote scripture for his own purpose" means that someone can manipulate or misuse religious scripture or teachings to support their own immoral, deceptive, or evil intentions. It highlights the idea that simply knowing or reciting religious texts does not necessarily make a person righteous or trustworthy.
  • no one should be judge in his own cause The idiom "no one should be judge in his own cause" means that a person should not be allowed to make a decision or judgment about a matter in which they have a personal interest or stake. It emphasizes the importance of impartiality and objectivity when resolving disputes or making decisions, as self-interest can cloud judgment and lead to unfairness or bias.
  • blow (one's) own trumpet The idiom "blow one's own trumpet" means to boast about one's own achievements or abilities in a self-promoting manner. It refers to someone who confidently and excessively speaks highly of themselves, often seeking attention or recognition.
  • blow one’s own horn The idiom "blow one's own horn" means to boast or brag about one's own abilities, achievements, or qualities in an exaggerated or self-promoting manner. It refers to someone praising and drawing attention to themselves.
  • blow your own horn The idiom "blow your own horn" means to boast about one's own abilities, achievements, or talents; to speak highly of oneself.
  • chew own tobacco The idiom "chew own tobacco" typically means to handle or manage one's own matters or affairs without any external assistance or interference. It implies being self-reliant and handling situations independently.
  • in a class of (one's)/its own The idiom "in a class of (one's)/its own" is used to describe someone or something that surpasses all others in its category or field, standing out from the rest due to its exceptional qualities, characteristics, or performance. It implies unrivaled excellence, uniqueness, or dominance.
  • be in a class of your, its, etc. own The idiom "be in a class of your, its, etc. own" means to be superior or exceptional in comparison to others, often referring to having a unique or unparalleled level of excellence or distinction. It implies that something or someone stands out from the rest and cannot be easily compared or matched by others.
  • come into its own The idiom "come into its own" means to reach a level of success, usefulness, or effectiveness after a period of development or maturation. It refers to a situation or thing that finally shows its true value or potential.
  • come into its/your own "Come into its/your own" is an idiomatic expression that means to reach a stage of maturity, fulfillment, or success, where something or someone starts to demonstrate their true ability, potential, or value. It refers to the moment when something or someone becomes recognized, appreciated, or utilized for what they truly are or can offer.
  • come into your/its own The idiom "come into your/its own" means to reach a stage of development or maturation where someone or something's true potential, abilities, or characteristics are fully recognized or utilized. It implies the realization or emergence of greatness, success, or effectiveness after a period of uncertainty, insignificance, or underutilization.
  • comfortable in (one's) own skin The idiom "comfortable in (one's) own skin" refers to a person's ability to feel at ease and confident in their own identity, personality, and body. It implies a sense of self-acceptance, where individuals are unapologetically themselves and are not influenced by societal pressures or the judgment of others. It encompasses a state of emotional well-being, self-assurance, and contentment with who one is, both internally and externally.
  • cut one’s own throat The idiom "cut one's own throat" means to do something that ultimately harms or undermines oneself, often due to one's own actions or decisions. It refers to engaging in self-destructive behavior or making choices that have negative consequences for oneself.
  • be cutting your own throat The idiom "be cutting your own throat" means to do something that will ultimately harm or ruin oneself or one's own best interests. It refers to engaging in actions or making decisions that have negative consequences or self-destructive outcomes.
  • be left to (one's) own devices The idiom "be left to (one's) own devices" means to be allowed to do something or address a situation in one's own way, without any interference or guidance from others. It implies being self-reliant or independent in handling a task or problem.
  • leave to someone's own devices The definition of the idiom "leave to someone's own devices" is to allow someone to do something in their own way without interference or assistance. It means giving someone freedom or independence to handle a situation or problem on their own, without any guidance or intervention from others.
  • left to your own devices The idiom "left to your own devices" means to be given the freedom or independence to handle a situation or problem using your own resources, abilities, or methods. It implies that one is not being supervised or guided and has to rely on their own wits and initiative to figure things out.
  • leave someone to their own devices The idiom "leave someone to their own devices" means to allow or leave someone to act or think independently and without assistance or interference. It refers to giving someone the freedom and autonomy to handle a situation or problem in their own way, without offering any guidance or involvement.
  • leave to (one's) own devices The idiom "leave to one's own devices" means to allow someone to do something according to their own judgment or preference, without interference or help from others. It implies giving someone freedom, autonomy, or independence to handle a situation or solve a problem on their own.
  • the devil’s own time The idiom "the devil's own time" refers to a situation or task that is extremely difficult, challenging, or troublesome. It implies that the experience or endeavor is like wrestling with or being tormented by the devil himself. It often implies that the process is exceptionally prolonged or arduous, causing frustration or distress.
  • the devil's own luck The idiom "the devil's own luck" refers to someone who consistently experiences extremely good luck or consistently manages to avoid bad luck, often in a situation where others would not be so fortunate.
  • do one’s own thing The idiom "do one's own thing" means to pursue one's own interests, goals, or activities in a way that is independent of others' opinions or expectations. It implies having the freedom and confidence to follow a personal path and make choices that align with one's individuality or passion.
  • do something at your own pace The idiom "do something at your own pace" means to perform a task or activity at a speed or rate that is comfortable and suitable for one's own abilities, preferences, or individual timing, without feeling pressured or rushed by others. It suggests that individuals have the freedom to work, learn, or accomplish something at a speed that suits them best, allowing for a more personalized and relaxed approach.
  • do something in your own sweet time/way To do something in your own sweet time/way means to take as much time as you need or to do something at your own pace, without feeling rushed or pressured by others. It implies that you have the freedom to do things on your own terms, without conforming to external expectations or deadlines.
  • a dose of (one's) own medicine The idiom "a dose of (one's) own medicine" means that someone is being treated or dealt with in the same negative or harsh manner that they have typically treated or dealt with others. It refers to someone experiencing the consequences or punishment similar to what they have previously inflicted on others.
  • give (one) a dose of (one's) own medicine The idiom "give (one) a dose of (one's) own medicine" means to treat someone in the same negative or harmful way that they typically treat others. It refers to retaliating against someone by subjecting them to the same actions, behaviors, or treatment that they often inflict on others. This idiom conveys the idea of teaching someone a lesson or making them experience the consequences of their own actions.
  • dose of one's own medicine The idiom "dose of one's own medicine" refers to experiencing the same negative treatment or consequences that one has inflicted upon others. It suggests that the person is receiving the same treatment they have given out, often as a form of retribution or justice.
  • give someone a taste of their own medicine The idiom "give someone a taste of their own medicine" means to respond or treat someone in the same negative or harmful way that they have treated or behaved towards others. It is often used to suggest that the person deserves to experience the same negative consequences or treatment that they have inflicted upon others.
  • give someone a dose of their own medicine The idiom "give someone a dose of their own medicine" means to treat someone in the same negative or unpleasant way that they have treated others, as a form of retaliation or retribution. It implies that the person should experience firsthand the consequences of their own actions or behavior.
  • a dose (or taste) of your own medicine The idiom "a dose (or taste) of your own medicine" refers to experiencing or receiving the same treatment or actions that one has previously inflicted upon others. It is often used to indicate that someone is experiencing the consequences or repercussions of their own behavior.
  • each to his/her/their own The idiom "each to his/her/their own" means that everyone is entitled to their own preferences, opinions, or choices, even if others may not agree with or understand them. It expresses the understanding that people have different tastes and perspectives, and it is acceptable for each individual to follow their own path and make their own decisions.
  • (one's) own worst enemy The definition of the idiom "(one's) own worst enemy" is someone who unintentionally causes themselves the most harm or difficulty. It refers to an individual who sabotages their own success, either by making poor choices, engaging in self-destructive behavior, or possessing self-doubt or negative thoughts that hinder their progress.
  • be, live, etc. in a world of your own The idiom "be, live, etc. in a world of your own" refers to someone who is often lost in their thoughts or preoccupied with their own ideas, fantasies, or emotions, oblivious to what is happening around them or the opinions of others. It implies that the person is mentally detached or disconnected from their immediate environment, choosing to focus more on their own inner world.
  • like, love, etc. the sound of your own voice The idiom "like, love, etc. the sound of your own voice" refers to someone who greatly enjoys hearing themselves speak and often talks excessively, disregarding the interest or input of others in a conversation. It implies that the individual is self-centered or overly self-assured, satisfying their own ego by incessantly expressing their opinions or ideas.
  • with (one's) own fair hands The idiom "with one's own fair hands" refers to the act of personally completing a task or accomplishing something by using one's own skills, effort, or physical labor, rather than relying on others for assistance. It implies the individual's direct involvement and willingness to take responsibility for their actions.
  • stand on one's own feet The idiom "stand on one's own feet" means to be independent and self-sufficient, capable of making decisions and taking care of oneself without relying on others for support or assistance. It refers to the ability to be financially, emotionally, or socially independent, without needing constant aid or guidance.
  • stand on your own feet The idiom "stand on your own feet" means to be independent and self-sufficient, relying on oneself rather than depending on others for support or assistance. It implies the ability to manage one's own affairs and make decisions without needing constant help or guidance from others.
  • a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client The idiom "a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client" suggests that individuals who represent themselves in legal matters are often perceived as foolish or unwise. It implies that it is generally better to seek professional help or advice rather than attempting to handle complex legal issues without proper knowledge or expertise.
  • foul your own nest The idiom "foul your own nest" means to engage in behavior that harms oneself or one's own reputation, interests, or environment. It refers to the act of causing damage, distress, or negativity within one's own personal or professional life.
  • of your own free will The idiom "of your own free will" refers to doing something voluntarily or willingly, without pressure or coercion from others. It implies that an individual makes a conscious decision or choice without any external influence or obligation.
  • play (one) at (one's) own game The idiom "play (one) at (one's) own game" means to compete or engage in a particular activity, typically using the same strategy or tactics as someone else, in order to have an equal chance of success or to outdo them in their own area of expertise. It involves matching or surpassing someone by using their own methods or skills against them.
  • play someone at their own game The idiom "play someone at their own game" means to use someone's own strategies, tactics, or methods against them in order to outsmart or defeat them. It involves matching or surpassing someone's abilities or actions by adapting to their style of play or behavior.
  • give (one) a taste of (one's) own medicine The idiom "give (one) a taste of (one's) own medicine" is used to describe a situation where someone treats another person in the same negative or hurtful manner that they themselves have been treating others. It implies that the person is being subjected to the same unpleasant experience or behavior that they have previously inflicted on someone else, often as a form of retribution or to make them understand the consequences of their actions.
  • score an own goal The definition for the idiom "score an own goal" is when someone unintentionally or inadvertently does something that harms their own interests or goals. This phrase often originates from the sport of football (soccer), referring to a player unintentionally kicking the ball into their own team's goal, consequently giving the opposing team a point. The idiom is now commonly used in a broader context beyond sports, to describe self-sabotaging or detrimental actions.
  • in (one's) own good time The idiom "in (one's) own good time" means that someone will do something at their own pace or at the time they believe is best, without being rushed or forced by others. It implies that the person knows what is best for themselves and will act accordingly when they are ready.
  • in your own good time The idiom "in your own good time" means that someone is taking their own desired and comfortable amount of time to do something, without being rushed or pressured by others. It implies that the person is independent and will complete the task at their own pace for their own benefit or satisfaction.
  • on own ground The idiom "on own ground" means to be in a familiar or comfortable environment where one is knowledgeable or experienced. It refers to being in a situation or context where one feels confident and capable.
  • on your own ground The idiom "on your own ground" refers to being in a familiar or advantageous position, often in terms of knowledge, expertise, or territory. It signifies being on territory or in a situation where one has confidence, experience, or control, allowing them to operate with ease or authority.
  • by (one's) own fair hand(s) The idiom "by (one's) own fair hand(s)" refers to something that has been done or created personally and directly by the speaker or a specific individual, often emphasizing the skill, effort, or artistry involved in the action or outcome.
  • make something with (one's) own fair hand(s) The idiom "make something with (one's) own fair hand(s)" means to create or produce something using one's own skills, abilities, or efforts. It emphasizes personal involvement and craftsmanship in the making of something rather than relying on others or external resources. It connotes a sense of pride and ownership in the work accomplished.
  • take (something) into (one's) own hands The idiomatic expression "take (something) into (one's) own hands" means to assume control or responsibility for a situation oneself, rather than relying on others to handle it. It implies taking decisive action and showing initiative or leadership in dealing with a problem, task, or decision.
  • take matters into (one's) own hands The idiom "take matters into one's own hands" means to independently address or deal with a situation instead of relying on or waiting for someone else to do it. It implies that the person is assuming control and responsibility for resolving an issue or achieving a desired outcome.
  • take the law into (one's) own hands The idiom "take the law into (one's) own hands" means to personally act or assume authority in order to seek justice or take revenge, typically without legal authorization or proper procedure. It implies that an individual is bypassing the established legal system and deciding to exercise their own judgment and actions.
  • have a mind of (one's)/its own When someone or something "has a mind of its/one's own," it means that they act or behave in an independent and unpredictable manner, disregarding external influences or commands. It suggests that the person or thing has its own desires, preferences, or intentions that may not necessarily align with those of others.
  • talk to hear one’s own voice The idiom "talk to hear one’s own voice" refers to a situation where someone speaks excessively and mainly for the purpose of enjoying the sound of their own voice, rather than conveying meaningful information or engaging in meaningful conversation. It implies that the person talks incessantly without considering if others are interested or if their words are relevant or meaningful.
  • a man after (one's) own heart The idiom "a man after (one's) own heart" means that someone shares the same views, preferences, or characteristics as the person expressing the idiom, and is therefore highly liked or admired by them. It indicates a strong sense of approval and finding someone who embodies qualities that resonate with one's own values or desires.
  • a woman after (one's) own heart The definition of the idiom "a woman after (one's) own heart" is a phrase used to describe a woman who shares similar interests, qualities, or values as the person speaking. It indicates that the woman is an ideal match or someone with whom the speaker feels a deep connection or admiration.
  • (one's) own man/woman/person The idiom "(one's) own man/woman/person" refers to someone who is independent and self-reliant, not easily influenced or controlled by others. It suggests that the person makes their own decisions, follows their own values, and does not conform to societal norms or expectations. They have a strong sense of individuality and autonomy.
  • (one's) own person The idiom "(one's) own person" refers to someone who is independent, has their individuality and assertiveness, and does not allow others to influence or control their thoughts, actions, or decisions.
  • a legend in (one's) own lifetime The idiom "a legend in (one's) own lifetime" refers to a person who is widely recognized or famous during their lifetime for their exceptional abilities, skills, or achievements. They possess remarkable qualities or talents that make them highly respected and renowned, often earning them a legendary status among their peers and society.
  • a legend in (one's) own lunchtime The idiom "a legend in (one's) own lunchtime" refers to a person who is overly self-important or self-recognized for their achievements, skills, or abilities, but is not widely recognized or respected by others. It implies that the person's reputation or fame is limited only to a small or insignificant circle, often exaggerating their own importance.
  • a legend in (one's) own mind The idiom "a legend in (one's) own mind" refers to someone who believes themselves to be much more important, talented, or exceptional than they actually are, often lacking the recognition or admiration they think they deserve. This phrase suggests a sense of inflated self-importance or an exaggerated perception of one's abilities or achievements.
  • a legend in (one's) own time The idiom "a legend in (one's) own time" refers to a person who is widely recognized or renowned for their exceptional talents, achievements, or influence while they are still alive. It implies that their status as a legend or highly respected figure has been established during their lifetime, rather than after their death.
  • be cutting (one's) own throat The idiom "be cutting (one's) own throat" refers to a situation where someone's actions are working against their own best interests or bringing about their own downfall. It implies that the individual is acting in a self-destructive manner, often by undermining themselves or making choices that are detrimental to their own success or well-being.
  • save (one's) own hide The idiom "save one's own hide" refers to someone taking actions to protect or save themselves, often disregarding the well-being or interests of others. It implies that a person is primarily concerned with self-preservation and avoiding any harm or negative consequences, even at the expense of others.
  • be in a class of (one's)/its own The idiom "be in a class of (one's)/its own" refers to something or someone being unique, unparalleled, and superior to others in terms of quality, skill, or excellence. It implies that it stands out and cannot be compared to anything else.
  • be in a world of (one's) own The idiom "be in a world of (one's) own" means to be completely absorbed in one's thoughts, daydreams, or imagination, disregarding the surrounding reality or the people around them. It refers to a state of being mentally disconnected from the external world, often associated with a sense of isolation or detachment.
  • be left to (one's) own resources The idiom "be left to (one's) own resources" means to be in a situation where one must rely on their own abilities, skills, or available materials to accomplish something, usually due to a lack of help, support, or assistance from others.
  • be of (one's) own making The idiom "be of (one's) own making" means that a situation or problem someone is facing is a result of their own actions, decisions, or choices. It implies that they are responsible for their current circumstances, whether positive or negative.
  • hoist with (or by) your own petard "Hoist with (or by) your own petard" is an idiom that refers to someone being harmed or disadvantaged by their own actions or plans. It stems from a line in William Shakespeare's play, Hamlet. "Hoist" means to be lifted or thrown upwards, while a "petard" is a small explosive device used for breaching gates and walls. Therefore, being "hoist with your own petard" implies being blown up or affected by the very device or scheme you intended to harm others with. The idiom is often used to convey poetic justice or irony, where one's intentions result in unintended consequences that backfire on themselves.
  • be hoist with one's own petard The idiom "be hoist with one's own petard" is a phrase from William Shakespeare's play "Hamlet" and it means to be harmed or defeated by one's own plan or actions. The term "hoist" refers to being lifted up or thrown upwards, while a "petard" is a small explosive device used in warfare. Hence, the idiom implies that someone's own scheme or plot ends up backfiring on them.
  • on one’s own hook The idiom "on one's own hook" means that someone is acting or operating independently, without relying on or needing assistance from others. It suggests taking personal responsibility and solving problems or accomplishing tasks without help or support.
  • toot (one's) own horn The idiom "toot one's own horn" means to boast about one's own achievements or abilities, usually in an excessive or self-promoting manner. It implies someone is seeking attention or recognition for their accomplishments.
  • toot one’s own horn The idiom "toot one’s own horn" means to brag about one's own achievements, skills, or abilities in order to gain attention or admiration from others. It refers to the act of self-promotion or self-praise.
  • a legend in their own lifetime The idiom "a legend in their own lifetime" refers to an individual who becomes widely renowned and revered for their accomplishments or extraordinary abilities while they are still alive. It suggests that the person's reputation and influence are remarkable enough to earn them legendary status even during their lifetime.
  • on (one's) own initiative "On (one's) own initiative" means to take action or make a decision without being prompted or instructed by someone else. It refers to a self-driven or independent effort to accomplish or address something without being obligated or directed to do so.
  • a life of its own The idiom "a life of its own" refers to something that has become so independent, active, or influential that it seems to have a separate existence or will of its own, often beyond the control of the person or organization originally associated with it. It suggests that the thing or concept has developed unexpected or unmanageable qualities or achievements that are beyond its initial conception or purpose.
  • a mind of its own The idiom "a mind of its own" refers to an object or situation that behaves in an unpredictable or independent manner, often deviating from the way it is expected or intended to function. It can also describe a person's thoughts or actions that are difficult to control or influence.
  • in a league of (one's)/its own The idiom "in a league of (one's)/its own" means to be superior or exceptional compared to others in a particular category or group. It implies that someone or something stands out because of their exceptional skills, qualities, or achievements, making them incomparable or unrivaled.
  • judge on its own merits The idiom "judge on its own merits" means to evaluate or assess something based solely on its own qualities, without being influenced by external factors, biases, or comparisons to other similar things.
  • mind of (one's) own The idiom "mind of one's own" refers to someone who has their own independent thoughts, opinions, desires, or actions, often disregarding the influence or expectations of others. It implies that the person is strong-willed, assertive, and prefers to make their own decisions rather than conforming to external pressure.
  • stand on (one's)/its own The idiom "stand on (one's)/its own" means to be independent or self-sufficient without requiring assistance or support from others. It implies that something or someone can function or succeed independently, without any external help or influence.
  • take on a life of its own The idiom "take on a life of its own" refers to a situation or phenomenon that becomes independent, self-sustaining, or more significant than originally intended or anticipated. It implies that something develops spontaneously, evolves, or grows beyond the control or influence of its originator, often with unintended consequences.
  • tell its own tale/story The idiom "tell its own tale/story" means that a situation or object is so self-evident or noticeable that it requires no further explanation or clarification. It implies that the truth or outcome of a situation is apparent and can easily be understood or interpreted without any additional information.
  • judge something on its own merits The idiom "judge something on its own merits" means to evaluate or form an opinion about something based solely on its inherent qualities or specific merits, without being biased or influenced by external factors. It suggests making a fair and objective assessment, considering the attributes, characteristics, or worth of a subject independently, rather than being swayed by personal opinions, prejudices, or comparisons to other things.
  • leave (one) to stew in (one's) own juice(s) The idiom "leave (one) to stew in (one's) own juice(s)" refers to leaving someone to deal with the consequences or troubles of their actions without offering any assistance or intervention. It implies allowing someone to suffer the consequences of their own decisions or behavior without offering any help, guidance, or interference. It can signify leaving someone to their own devices or leaving them to face the difficulties they have brought upon themselves.
  • let (one) stew in (one's) own juice(s) To "let (one) stew in (one's) own juice(s)" means to leave someone alone to deal with the consequences of their actions or decisions, often when they have caused their own problems or when they need to reflect on their behavior. It implies that the person is left to suffer or experience the negative outcomes without any interference or assistance from others.
  • let someone stew in their own juice The idiom "let someone stew in their own juice" means to allow someone to suffer the consequences of their actions or decisions without intervening or providing help. It implies leaving someone to deal with the negative outcomes they have caused themselves, often as a way of teaching them a lesson or making them realize their mistakes.
  • stew in (one's) own juice(s) The idiom "stew in (one's) own juice(s)" means to suffer the consequences of one's own actions or decisions without any external intervention or help. It refers to being left alone to face the negative outcomes or consequences of one's own choices or mistakes, without any outside assistance or sympathy. It implies that one should reflect and learn from their own mistakes or misfortunes rather than seeking aid or blaming others.
  • stew in own juice The idiom "stew in own juice" means to suffer the consequences of one's own actions or decisions without any external interference or intervention. It refers to the experience of being left alone to deal with the negative outcomes or problems that have arisen as a result of one's own behavior or choices.
  • pay (one) back in (one's) own coin The definition of the idiom "pay (one) back in (one's) own coin" is to retaliate or seek revenge upon someone using the same methods, actions, or behavior that they used against you. It refers to giving someone a taste of their own medicine or responding to their actions by treating them in a similar manner.
  • leave somebody to their own devices The idiom "leave somebody to their own devices" means to allow someone to act or think independently without interference or supervision. It implies giving someone the freedom to make their own decisions and handle things on their own without providing guidance or assistance.
  • according to own lights The idiom "according to own lights" means behaving or acting based on one's personal understanding, beliefs, or judgment. It signifies an individual's subjective perspective or interpretation of a situation, rather than adhering to external influences or following conventional wisdom.
  • like the sound of (one's) own voice The idiom "like the sound of (one's) own voice" refers to someone who is excessively fond of hearing themselves speak and often talks at length without considering or valuing other people's opinions or thoughts. It implies that the person enjoys hearing the sound of their own voice so much that they do not realize or care if they are dominating a conversation or coming across as self-centered.
  • in one's own world The idiom "in one's own world" refers to a state where someone is completely absorbed or preoccupied with their own thoughts, ideas, or imagination, often oblivious to the surrounding reality or the perspectives of others. It suggests that the person is detached from their immediate environment and emotionally invested in their own internal world.
  • live in a world of (one's) own The idiom "live in a world of (one's) own" refers to someone who is detached from reality or seems to have their own unique perspective or understanding of the world. It implies that the person may have eccentric or unconventional thoughts, beliefs, or behavior that sets them apart from others. They are often seen as being absorbed in their own thoughts, imagination, or interests, disregarding the norms or expectations of society.

Similar spelling word for OWN

Conjugate verb Own

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have owned
you would have owned
he/she/it would have owned
we would have owned
they would have owned
I would have own
you would have own
he/she/it would have own
we would have own
they would have own

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been owning
you would have been owning
he/she/it would have been owning
we would have been owning
they would have been owning

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would own
you would own
he/she/it would own
we would own
they would own

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be owning
you would be owning
he/she/it would be owning
we would be owning
they would be owning

FUTURE

I will own
you will own
he/she/it will own
we will own
they will own

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be owning
you will be owning
he/she/it will be owning
we will be owning
they will be owning

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have owned
you will have owned
he/she/it will have owned
we will have owned
they will have owned

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been owning
you will have been owning
he/she/it will have been owning
we will have been owning
they will have been owning

IMPERATIVE

you own
we let´s own

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to own

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was owning
you were owning
he/she/it was owning
we were owning
they were owning

PAST PARTICIPLE

owned

PAST PERFECT

I had owned
you had owned
he/she/it had owned
we had owned
they had owned

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been owning
you had been owning
he/she/it had been owning
we had been owning
they had been owning

PRESENT

I own
you own
he/she/it owns
we own
they own

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am owning
you are owning
he/she/it is owning
we are owning
they are owning

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

owning

PRESENT PERFECT

I have owned
you have owned
he/she/it has owned
we have owned
they have owned

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been owning
you have been owning
he/she/it has been owning
we have been owning
they have been owning

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it own

SIMPLE PAST

I owned
you owned
he/she/it owned
we owned
they owned

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