How Do You Spell PATH?

Pronunciation: [pˈaθ] (IPA)

The English word "path" is spelled phonetically as /pæθ/ in the International Phonetic Alphabet. The first sound in this word is a voiceless bilabial plosive, represented by the symbol /p/. The vowel sound is an open front unrounded vowel, represented by the symbol /æ/. The following sound is a voiceless dental fricative, represented by the symbol /θ/. This word is commonly used to describe a way or track that people can follow to reach a particular destination.

PATH Meaning and Definition

Path is a noun that refers to a designated route or track that is meant to be followed or trodden upon for the purpose of reaching a destination. It typically signifies a clear and visible way through which one can travel, whether it is a physical, literal path on the ground or a figurative path in life or thought.

In a literal sense, a path can be a trail, a footpath, or a road that represents a route walked or driven by individuals to arrive at a particular location. It often suggests a marked or established course that guides people, animals, or vehicles from one point to another. Experimentally, it is a route formed by repeated movement or passage, creating a discernible track or worn area on the ground.

In a more abstract or metaphorical sense, a path denotes a specific direction or course of action that someone follows in their personal or professional life. It can represent a chosen life journey, a career trajectory, or a progression in personal development or spiritual growth. Path in this context conveys the idea of charting a course or finding one's way through various challenges and opportunities to reach a desired outcome or destination. It signifies a route that is intentionally chosen or pursued, carrying with it a sense of purpose and direction. Metaphorically, it reflects the idea of navigating through life's complexities, making decisions, and encountering obstacles along the way while striving towards specific goals and objectives.

Top Common Misspellings for PATH *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for PATH

Etymology of PATH

The word "path" originated from the Middle English word "path(e)" which dates back to the 14th century. It was derived from the Old English word "paþ", which means a "path, track, or route". The Old English word itself can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word "*paþaz". Further tracing leads to the Proto-Indo-European root "*pent", which means "to tread" or "to walk". This root is also connected to the Latin word "pandere" and the Greek word "patein", both of which mean "to open" or "to make a passage". Thus, the etymology of the word "path" reveals its connection to the concept of walking or traversing a route.

Idioms with the word PATH

  • beat a path to sb's door The idiom "beat a path to someone's door" means that a lot of people are frequently going to or visiting someone because they are seeking their expertise, assistance, or advice. It implies that the person is highly sought-after or renowned in a specific field or for a particular reason.
  • off the beaten path, at off the beaten track The idiom "off the beaten path" or "off the beaten track" refers to going on a less popular or unconventional route, away from mainstream or well-known areas. It indicates the act of exploring places or taking alternative courses that are not commonly traveled by others. This phrase often implies a desire for novel experiences or a preference for unique and undiscovered destinations.
  • steer a course/path The idiom "steer a course/path" means to carefully plan and navigate one's way through a particular situation or set of circumstances. It refers to making deliberate choices and strategies to reach a desired goal while avoiding obstacles or difficulties along the way.
  • follow/steer/take the middle course/way/path The idiom "follow/steer/take the middle course/way/path" refers to choosing a moderate or balanced approach in a given situation. It signifies avoiding extremes and finding a practical and reasonable middle ground between two opposing perspectives, actions, or options. This idiom emphasizes the virtue of not being excessively extreme or radical and instead advocating for compromise and harmony.
  • cross sb's path/cross paths with sb The idiom "cross sb's path/cross paths with sb" means to encounter or meet someone unexpectedly or by chance, often used to describe a negative or unpleasant encounter.
  • lead sb up the garden path The idiom "lead someone up the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone by giving them false information or leading them in the wrong direction, typically with the intention of causing confusion or frustration for personal gain.
  • the path of least resistance The idiom "the path of least resistance" refers to a tendency or choice to pursue the easiest or most convenient course of action, which requires the least effort or encounters the fewest obstacles.
  • the line of least resistance, at the path of least resistance The idiom "the line of least resistance" or "the path of least resistance" refers to the easiest and most convenient approach or course of action to take in a particular situation, where there is minimal effort or opposition involved. It implies choosing the option that requires the least amount of work, resistance, or conflict. This expression is often used to describe people who tend to choose the simplest or least demanding way to achieve their goals or solve a problem, rather than putting in more effort or facing potential challenges.
  • the primrose path The idiom "the primrose path" is used to describe a tempting, appealing, or seemingly easy way of life or a path that leads to pleasure, enjoyment, or indulgence, but which may ultimately lead to negative consequences, moral decay, or disaster. It implies that the path may initially seem pleasant and alluring, but it can eventually lead to a downfall or undesirable consequences.
  • take the line/path of least resistance The idiom "take the line/path of least resistance" means to choose the easiest or most convenient course of action, avoiding any difficulties or conflicts. It implies opting for the path that requires the least effort, opposition, or confrontation.
  • path of least resistance The idiom "path of least resistance" refers to the easiest or most convenient course of action that requires the least effort or confrontation. It implies choosing the simplest or least challenging option to avoid any difficulties, obstacles, or conflicts.
  • beat a path to door The idiom "beat a path to (someone's) door" is used to describe a situation where many people frequently come to visit or seek something from a particular person or place. It implies that numerous individuals are eager or desperate to approach or request something from someone.
  • off the beaten path The idiom "off the beaten path" refers to straying from the usual or well-known route or course. It indicates going or exploring in a less common or unconventional direction or location, away from the mainstream or popular choices.
  • cross path The idiom "cross paths" refers to the encounter or interaction between two or more people. It suggests that the individuals involved, who might have different goals, backgrounds, or intentions, come together unexpectedly or coincidentally.
  • lead up the garden path The idiom "lead up the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone with false promises or assurances, typically to manipulate or exploit them for personal gain. It denotes the act of intentionally leading someone astray or causing them to have false expectations or hopes.
  • lead down the garden path "Lead down the garden path" is an idiom that means to deceive or mislead someone, often by providing false or misleading information, leading them to a wrong conclusion or course of action. It implies manipulating or tricking someone into believing something that is not true.
  • lead sb down the garden path The idiom "lead someone down the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone by providing false information, false promises, or false hope. It implies manipulating someone into believing something that may not be true or leading them to an undesirable outcome or situation.
  • lead sm down the garden path To lead someone down the garden path means to deceive or mislead them, often by creating false hopes or expectations.
  • primrose path The idiom "primrose path" refers to a life or course of action that appears pleasant and enjoyable, but is ultimately deceptive, dangerous, or leads to negative consequences. It suggests the idea of a path covered in beautiful primrose flowers that initially seems appealing, but may then lead one astray or into difficulties.
  • the straight and narrow (path) The idiom "the straight and narrow (path)" refers to a way of living that is honest, moral, and law-abiding. It represents a metaphorical path that one follows, free from deviant or unethical behavior. It implies leading a righteous and responsible life, adhering to societal norms and values.
  • cross your path The idiom "cross your path" typically refers to encountering or meeting someone unexpectedly or by chance.
  • cross sb's path To "cross someone's path" means to encounter or come into contact with someone, often by chance or unexpectedly. It implies that the person has unexpectedly crossed your way or entered your life, and usually refers to either a notable or potentially significant interaction.
  • beat a path to sm's door To "beat a path to someone's door" is an idiomatic expression that means a large number of people are consistently seeking out or coming to someone for a specific reason, such as seeking their advice, help, or expertise. It implies a high level of demand or popularity for that person's assistance.
  • cross someone's path The idiom "cross someone's path" means to unexpectedly encounter or meet someone, often by chance or by accident.
  • cross somebody’s path To "cross somebody's path" means to encounter or meet someone, often by chance or unexpectedly. It suggests the idea of crossing paths with someone figuratively, as if their lives intersect or come together momentarily.
  • beat a path to somebody’s door The idiom "beat a path to somebody’s door" means that many people are eagerly and continuously seeking someone's attention, advice, or assistance. It suggests that people are actively seeking out and visiting a particular person or place frequently.
  • beat a path to (one's) door The idiom "beat a path to (one's) door" refers to a situation where many people are eager to visit or seek out a particular person or place. It conveys the idea that individuals are flocking to someone or something due to its appeal, skill, or expertise.
  • beat a path to somebody's door The idiom "beat a path to somebody's door" means that a large number of people are eager to seek someone's attention, advice, or assistance. It implies that the person is highly sought after and frequently approached by others.
  • beat a path to someone's door The idiom "beat a path to someone's door" means that many people are trying to visit or communicate with someone, usually because they are seeking help, guidance, or an opportunity. It implies that the person being sought after is highly sought-after or in high demand by others.
  • be off the beaten path The idiom "be off the beaten path" refers to doing, visiting, or taking a route that is unconventional, lesser-known, or less frequently chosen. It suggests venturing away from the main or popular places, exploring something unique or avoiding the usual or well-trodden options.
  • cross (one's) path The idiom "cross (one's) path" means to encounter or come into contact with someone or something unexpectedly or by chance.
  • cross somebody's path The idiom "cross somebody's path" means to encounter or meet someone unexpectedly, often by chance or accident.
  • cut a path The idiom "cut a path" typically means to create a route or make progress in a determined or forceful manner, often in the face of obstacles or resistance. It can refer to physically clearing a way through dense vegetation or metaphorically clearing obstacles in order to achieve a goal or accomplish something significant.
  • lead (one) down the garden path The idiom "lead (one) down the garden path" means to deceive, mislead, or trick someone into believing something that is not true or into taking a course of action that is ultimately detrimental. It implies manipulation or the intentional misleading of another person.
  • lead (one) up the garden path The idiom "lead (one) up the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone, often with the intention of causing confusion or creating false hope. It suggests that the person is being guided towards a pleasant or desirable outcome, but in reality, they are being fooled or taken advantage of.
  • lead someone down the garden path The idiom "lead someone down the garden path" means to deceive, mislead, or manipulate someone intentionally, often by providing false information or promising something that is not true, in order to achieve personal gain or to confuse and distract them.
  • lead someone up the garden path The idiom "lead someone up the garden path" means to deceive, mislead, or trick someone by providing false or misleading information. It suggests intentionally luring someone into a situation or belief that is ultimately unproductive, confusing, or false.
  • lead down garden path The idiom "lead down the garden path" refers to the act of deceiving or misleading someone by enticing them with false information or promises. It implies leading someone in the wrong direction or into a situation that is ultimately fruitless or disappointing.
  • choose the path of least resistance The idiom "choose the path of least resistance" means to opt for the easiest or most convenient course of action, usually avoiding any effort, conflict, or hardship. It refers to selecting the option that requires the least amount of energy or resistance to achieve a desired outcome.

Similar spelling words for PATH

Plural form of PATH is PATHS

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