How Do You Spell PLAY?

Pronunciation: [plˈe͡ɪ] (IPA)

The word "play" is a commonly used verb and noun that refers to an activity engaged in for enjoyment or to engage in a competitive sport. The spelling of "play" is pronounced as /pleɪ/ which indicates the presence of a diphthong sound in the pronunciation of this word. It consists of the two vowel sounds /eɪ/ that blend into one syllable, giving the word its distinct sound. Correct pronunciation of a word is essential for effective communication, and mastering the phonetic transcription can help improve spelling and pronunciation skills.

PLAY Meaning and Definition

Play can be defined as an activity typically involving fun, amusement, or enjoyment that individuals willingly engage in. It is a form of recreation where people participate voluntarily without any external pressure or obligation. Play often involves physical movement, mental stimulation, or both, making it a multifaceted experience.

In its traditional sense, play is primarily associated with children and their imaginative games. It serves as a means of entertainment, helping them develop cognitive, emotional, and social skills. Playtime encourages creativity, problem-solving abilities, and collaboration among peers. However, play is not limited to childhood; adults can also engage in play as a form of leisure or stress relief.

Play encompasses various forms, including physical play like sports or games, imaginative play that involves make-believe scenarios, and role-playing that allows individuals to take on different identities. Additionally, play can involve the use of objects or materials such as toys, costumes, or sports equipment. It can be structured, with predefined rules and goals, or unstructured, allowing for open-ended exploration.

Furthermore, play is not solely limited to humans but can be observed in other animals as well. It serves as a vital component in the development and survival of many species, facilitating learning, social bonding, and the acquisition of necessary skills.

Overall, play is a fundamental and enjoyable aspect of human life, promoting physical, mental, and emotional well-being. It encourages creativity, cooperation, and learning while providing a break from routine activities and offering moments of relaxation and pleasure.

Top Common Misspellings for PLAY *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for PLAY

  • plave
  • plez
  • plae
  • plaug
  • plainy
  • pealy
  • poay
  • blay
  • plac
  • plety
  • applay
  • ploar
  • pkay
  • pscy
  • plicy
  • plian
  • plasa
  • wlal
  • apliy
  • pelae
  • pully
  • plean
  • pleny
  • polacy
  • ppway
  • plual
  • ppty
  • palty
  • plaqu
  • deplay
  • pular
  • plcae
  • playy
  • alawy
  • oliy
  • plaec
  • plar
  • playn
  • pleaz
  • oplay
  • plasy
  • plade
  • plaer
  • plsy
  • plab
  • plaze
  • plap
  • pleae
  • plax
  • pplan
  • plart
  • plsu
  • plau
  • placa
  • ploan
  • polay
  • pgae
  • playfu
  • pplay
  • playdo
  • aplly
  • plag
  • pleany
  • dleay
  • alwy
  • ptay
  • polcy
  • plam
  • pleasy
  • plany
  • jluy
  • lpay
  • placw
  • diplay
  • toplay
  • plaue
  • playd
  • plzz
  • plaqe
  • glaay
  • siplay
  • pllan
  • plagu
  • plaeyd
  • plair
  • elay
  • plama
  • plya
  • placy
  • playr
  • plaays
  • paley
  • pluar
  • erlay
  • plad
  • pleays
  • eplay
  • plpay
  • plack
  • polan
  • plak
  • splah
  • playwr
  • poliy
  • plabe
  • eply
  • pcae
  • poway
  • ppay
  • pkyy
  • plaeyr
  • polly
  • rplay
  • ppal
  • ilay
  • kla
  • plah
  • plahu
  • plally
  • plao
  • playia
  • pleal
  • pleu
  • pliao
  • plii
  • pily
  • plily
  • ploo
  • plow
  • pluo
  • plw
  • plye
  • pyly
  • plyly
  • pka
  • plla
  • poal
  • pval
  • plail
  • payl
  • paal
  • plal
  • p-al
  • p0al
  • pwal
  • palae
  • palai
  • palaa
  • palaw
  • pala3
  • palaye
  • pwlau
  • palah
  • pala8
  • pala7
  • palayu
  • palauy
  • plaau
  • pilau
  • pelau
  • pala5
  • plale
  • plely
  • plaely
  • palaly
  • plall
  • pwlly
  • paloy
  • plly
  • pilly
  • pelly
  • palhy
  • pal-y
  • paliy
  • palwy
  • pal3y
  • palal
  • palaya
  • paelay
  • paflay
  • pa5lay
  • pa4lay
  • pa2lay
  • pablay
  • pavlay
  • paplay
  • plaul
  • plawl
  • paylay
  • playee
  • p4al
  • p3al
  • pela
  • pelal
  • plel
  • pelaye
  • plew
  • pelaw
  • pely
  • pfal
  • plhi
  • phal
  • plial
  • phloy
  • plia
  • piat
  • pilae
  • pila5
  • pila4
  • pila2
  • pilaey
  • pila5y
  • pila4y
  • pilay
  • pila2y
  • pulau
  • polau
  • p9lau
  • p8lau
  • pilah
  • pilai
  • pila8
  • pila7
  • pilayu
  • pilauy
  • pliau
  • pylau
  • phlau
  • pilaw
  • pulaw
  • polaw
  • p9law
  • p8law
  • pilaa
  • pila3
  • pliaw
  • pylaw
  • phlaw
  • piloy
  • pilal
  • plaae
  • plahe
  • plagr
  • plawe
  • plaoe
  • plaee
  • playue
  • plauey
  • plahuy
  • playuy
  • plauy
  • plawuy
  • plaouy
  • plaeuy
  • plaie
  • plaih
  • plaio
  • plaily
  • plaiy
  • plai6
  • plai5
  • plai4
  • plaiu
  • plaj
  • pla.e
  • plaho
  • pla.o
  • plalo
  • plaoo
  • plaah
  • plaeh
  • plawh
  • pla3h
  • pla6
  • pla5
  • pla4
  • pla6e
  • pla5e
  • pla4e
  • playh
  • pla6h
  • pla5h
  • pla4h
  • plauh
  • playo
  • pla6o
  • pla5o
  • pla4o
  • plauo
  • pla6y
  • pla5y
  • pla4y
  • 0lay
  • plzy
  • plwy
  • plqy
  • pla7
  • lplay
  • p-lay
  • 0play
  • p0lay
  • pklay
  • ploay
  • plzay
  • plsay
  • plway
  • plawy
  • plqay
  • plaqy
  • playg
  • plahy
  • playu
  • pla7y
  • play7
  • play6
  • ply
  • qlay
  • pday
  • phay
  • pnay
  • pmay
  • pliy
  • plcy
  • pla9
  • plaq
  • pl ay
  • pla y
  • playay
  • playel
  • playe5
  • playe4
  • playe2
  • playle
  • plaaa
  • plaa
  • plwa
  • pl4a
  • pl3a
  • pleaw
  • pleaa
  • pleah
  • pleay
  • plea6
  • plea5
  • plea4
  • pleau
  • pleh
  • pliaa
  • ploae
  • plol
  • plo0
  • ploy
  • plo6
  • plo5
  • plo4
  • plou
  • pliw
  • pllw
  • pl0w
  • pl9w
  • ploa
  • plo3
  • plo2
  • ploaw
  • plwo
  • plo7
  • pl0y
  • pl9y
  • ploh
  • poloy
  • plloy
  • p-loy
  • 0ploy
  • p0loy
  • pploy
  • plooy
  • plioy
  • ploiy
  • ploly
  • pl0oy
  • plo0y
  • pl9oy
  • plo9y
  • plohy
  • ployh
  • plouy
  • ployu
  • plo7y
  • ploy7
  • plo6y
  • ploy6
  • plyo
  • ployy
  • plo9
  • plowy
  • pl oy
  • plo y
  • pluh
  • pluy
  • pluw
  • plui
  • plul
  • plu-y
  • pluey
  • pluiy
  • pluoy
  • pluly
  • plu3
  • pluah
  • pluahy
  • pluhy
  • pluyo
  • p-ly
  • 0ply
  • p0ly
  • plhy
  • plyh
  • plyu
  • pl7y
  • ply7
  • pl6y
  • ply6
  • plyy
  • pl y
  • pleyr
  • poley
  • polae
  • pola5
  • pola4
  • pola2
  • plle
  • poleay
  • poliay
  • plio
  • polao
  • plll
  • pllo
  • pula
  • pyla
  • phla
  • p8la
  • p7la
  • pulaa
  • p5la
  • pwla
  • puley
  • plley
  • pullay
  • puloy
  • pul-y
  • pul0y
  • puly
  • pulae
  • pulal
  • puey
  • pualy
  • pelay
  • peplay
  • piley
  • 3play
  • blaay
  • plahi
  • plaea
  • paleay
  • plali
  • plala
  • pallay
  • pllah
  • pwly
  • poaly
  • p-aly
  • p0aly
  • pwaly
  • paluy
  • pal7y
  • pal6y
  • ppaly
  • paaly
  • palyy
  • psapy
  • p4la
  • p3la
  • pelaa
  • pylae
  • phlae
  • plhyz
  • p9al
  • p8al
  • Pyal
  • pilaye
  • pillay
  • pllau
  • plwe
  • p9ly
  • p8ly
  • pilhy
  • piluy
  • pil7y
  • pil6y
  • pilyy
  • Phly
  • pil y
  • pliu
  • playae
  • plaha
  • playa
  • Plawa
  • Plaoa
  • playal
  • plaal
  • plaahy
  • plaehy
  • plawhy
  • Pla3hy
  • plael
  • playly
  • pla6ly
  • pla5ly
  • Pla4ly
  • Plauly
  • poaya
  • plwya
  • plaua
  • pla7a
  • pla6a
  • playw
  • polaya
  • pllaya
  • p-laya
  • 0playa
  • p0laya
  • pplaya
  • ploaya
  • plsaya
  • plwaya
  • plawya
  • plahya
  • playha
  • plauya
  • playua
  • pla7ya
  • play7a
  • pla6ya
  • play6a
  • playwa
  • playaw
  • plyaa
  • plaaya
  • playya
  • playaa
  • Pliya
  • Pleya
  • Pla9a
  • Plaia
  • Playi
  • pl aya
  • pla ya
  • play a
  • playye
  • play6e
  • play5e
  • Play4e
  • pleye
  • pl4y
  • pl3y
  • ple7
  • ple6
  • p-ley
  • 0pley
  • p0ley
  • ppley
  • ploey
  • plwey
  • plewy
  • pl4ey
  • ple4y
  • pl3ey
  • ple3y
  • plehy
  • pleyh
  • pleuy
  • pleyu
  • ple7y
  • pley7
  • ple6y
  • pley6
  • pleey
  • pleyy
  • Phey
  • Ple9
  • pl ey
  • ple y
  • pley5
  • Pluyt
  • Pley4
  • Pleyd
  • pluae
  • polal
  • polaey
  • pola5y
  • pola4y
  • Pola2y
  • polway
  • p9ley
  • polwy
  • pol4y
  • pol3y
  • Poluy
  • Pollay
  • pllly
  • pplly
  • p0lly
  • p9lly
  • Polhy
  • pol-y
  • ulay
  • 8play
  • 7play
  • pulay
  • uplayy
  • pl.a.
  • pl0o
  • pl9o
  • pl o
  • plihy
  • Pli.y
  • ppla
  • Pula3
  • plli
  • puluy
  • pluu
  • pyuy
  • p6la
  • pylaz
  • pylaa
  • P9la
  • p7lae
  • p6lae
  • pyla4
  • pyla3
  • plyae
  • P9lae
  • pwley
  • pal4y
  • plaley
  • plaey
  • Peley
  • Pelah
  • pyley
  • pelai
  • p0la
  • polaa
  • pla5ya
  • Pla4ya
  • pwlayo
  • p4layo
  • p3layo
  • pelayi
  • pelayl
  • pelay0
  • pelay9
  • pelao
  • pleayo
  • pelaoy
  • Pulayo
  • phlly
  • alayh
  • polaye
  • playla
  • plalya
  • pylah
  • pvla
  • peliay
  • pliah
  • pulai
  • pylly
  • pl23
  • Pleys
  • Play3
  • pl 2
  • plialy
  • plea3
  • ploya
  • ploye
  • ployw
  • ploy3
  • plwi
  • glyy
  • plha
  • plhw
  • pll3
  • pl10
  • pl16
  • pl22
  • pl65
  • pla1
  • plho
  • pli1
  • pli2
  • pli3
  • pll1
  • plo1
  • pl21
  • pl12
  • pl11
  • pl 1
  • pl32
  • plw3
  • pl3w
  • ple3
  • pl3e
  • pl43
  • pl34
  • pl33
  • pl 3
  • pl l
  • plwl
  • PL/9
  • PL/5
  • PL/0
  • pl/u
  • pl/8
  • PL/h
  • pl/aye
  • pl9i
  • pli9
  • pl8i
  • pli8
  • pl0a
  • pllu
  • plhu
  • pl8u
  • plu8
  • pl7u
  • plu7
  • p-la
  • 0pla
  • plhh
  • pl8a
  • pl4e
  • ple4
  • llal
  • plyl
  • pllh
  • plqq
  • epeay
  • pfla
  • plh3
  • plwh
  • pl3i
  • PlWW
  • plhe
  • plhl
  • plwu
  • 9pla
  • 8pla
  • PBlA
  • pleao
  • pflah
  • pflay
  • PFLAw
  • PFLAo
  • PFLAe
  • ple5
  • plu5
  • plu4
  • pl2w
  • plw2
  • pl w
  • pl2a
  • plwaa
  • plwaw
  • plwah
  • plzj
  • plih
  • 3ply
  • 2ply
  • plyw
  • plyi
  • pl6i
  • pl5i
  • 2pla
  • phlaa
  • pl52
  • pl57
  • pl77
  • pl25
  • plao2
  • Pl2O
  • pli6
  • pli5
  • pl5a
  • pbly
  • pbluy
  • pll8
  • pll7
  • pllyu
  • plluy
  • pl5u
  • pl4u
  • pl5x
  • tliy
  • PBAl
  • pll0
  • pplai
  • p5al
  • p2al
  • plwal
  • pll9
  • pllaye
  • 9ply
  • 8ply
  • pladgy
  • plaww
  • plyoy
  • plhaa
  • phlaye
  • plhly
  • phlhy
  • phluy
  • phl7y
  • phl6y
  • phlyy
  • phl y
  • plhyl
  • PlLYL
  • plhwy
  • pl4l
  • pl3l
  • plhy1
  • plhy2
  • plhyw
  • plhya
  • PLHYy
  • PLHYu
  • pl5e
  • pl6k
  • pl2y
  • plw7
  • plw6
  • pllwy
  • p-lwy
  • 0plwy
  • p0lwy
  • pplwy
  • pl3wy
  • plw3y
  • pl2wy
  • plw2y
  • plwhy
  • plwyh
  • plwuy
  • plwyu
  • plw7y
  • plwy7
  • plw6y
  • plwy6
  • plwwy
  • plwyy
  • pl wy
  • plw y
  • ply5
  • ply4
  • pVLY
  • pllaa
  • p-laa
  • 0plaa
  • p0laa
  • pplaa
  • ploaa
  • plqaa
  • plaaw
  • pl aa
  • pla a
  • PlW1
  • PlW4
  • plh1
  • plh2
  • pplaye
  • wlawy
  • 3pla
  • pcazy
  • pla2
  • 4pla
  • pfly
  • gplax
  • 9pla2
  • 8pla2
  • 9play
  • pla-h
  • plaao
  • plaei
  • plahh
  • plaii
  • plaoh
  • plaol
  • lpbay
  • pleai
  • plhal
  • pliyo
  • pllai
  • pllal
  • ploah
  • ploal
  • ploao
  • polah
  • pl64
  • plwae
  • plyal
  • plyao
  • plyhy
  • ppla2
  • ple2
  • pplaw
  • 0plaw
  • 9plaw
  • plaai
  • pzagy
  • plahl
  • plai1
  • plai2
  • plaiw
  • plalh
  • plalj
  • plalu
  • plawi
  • poayl
  • playl
  • p-ayl
  • p0ayl
  • pwayl
  • ppayl
  • paayl
  • playll
  • PBlAY
  • pbl-y
  • pblaw
  • pblaa
  • pblae
  • pblgy
  • pblaye
  • pbloay
  • pbolay
  • Pl20
  • Pl50
  • PlHA1
  • pelhy
  • pel5y
  • pel4y
  • pflaa
  • pflhy
  • pfloy
  • pfluy
  • pfl7y
  • pfl6y
  • pflly
  • pflyy
  • pfl y
  • PFlAI
  • Pl-AI
  • PlA-1
  • PlA-L
  • plhah
  • phaly
  • plhau
  • phlah
  • phlay
  • PHLAo
  • phlal
  • phlai
  • pbloy
  • pyloy
  • phliy
  • phl0y
  • phl9y
  • plhoy
  • plhy3
  • PlY3
  • plhyh
  • PIAlY
  • pl-6
  • pl yl
  • pl&4
  • pl0a2
  • pl-a1
  • pl-aw
  • pl-a3
  • p-la2
  • pla-2
  • PL-A6
  • PL-A0
  • PL-yI
  • PL-Iy
  • PL-aL
  • PL0h
  • pll2
  • plo8
  • pl78
  • pl87
  • pl98
  • pl89
  • pl88
  • pla02
  • pla-w
  • pla-3
  • PLA-6
  • PLA-0
  • pola1
  • plla1
  • p-la1
  • 0pla1
  • p0la1
  • ppla1
  • ploa1
  • plwa1
  • plaw1
  • pla21
  • pla12
  • pl1a
  • plaa1
  • pla11
  • PLe1
  • PLA3
  • PLA0
  • plla2
  • 0pla2
  • p0la2
  • ploa2
  • plwa2
  • plaw2
  • pla2w
  • pla32
  • pla23
  • plaa2
  • pla22
  • pla2e
  • pla25
  • pla24
  • pla2a
  • plaa5
  • plaa4
  • plaayo
  • pllae
  • p-lae
  • 0plae
  • p0lae
  • pplae
  • plaew
  • plae4
  • pla3e
  • plae3
  • pl ae
  • plah1
  • play1
  • PLAo1
  • PLAe1
  • p-lal
  • 0plal
  • p0lal
  • pplal
  • plal0
  • pllao
  • p-lao
  • 0plao
  • p0lao
  • pplao
  • plwao
  • plawo
  • pla0o
  • plao0
  • pla9o
  • plao9
  • pl ao
  • plaxi
  • pla8
  • p-lau
  • 0plau
  • p0lau
  • pplau
  • ploau
  • plwau
  • plawu
  • plaui
  • pla8u
  • plau8
  • pla7u
  • plau7
  • plauu
  • pl au
  • pla u
  • plau5
  • plau4
  • pla3o
  • pla2o
  • plaw0
  • plaw9
  • plaow
  • pleyl
  • PLEyI
  • plhaw
  • plh0
  • plh5
  • plh4
  • pl9a
  • playea
  • pliae
  • plia5
  • plia4
  • pl9e
  • pl8e
  • pli4
  • pli0
  • pluyw
  • pl9yw
  • pl8yw
  • pliye
  • pliy3
  • pliy2
  • pliwy
  • PLyYW
  • PLIYu
  • pllaw
  • pl08
  • pl8o
  • PLOAi
  • ployi
  • pl0u
  • pl9u
  • pl01
  • pl2e
  • pl0l
  • pl4i
  • pl6o
  • pl5o
  • plua1
  • plua2
  • pluaw
  • pluaa
  • PLUAy
  • PLUAu
  • pluye
  • plu6
  • pl3h
  • pl2h
  • plw5
  • pl7i
  • ply9
  • ply8
  • pllyi
  • plhyi
  • pluyi
  • pl7yi
  • pl6yi
  • plyyi
  • plyaye
  • ployo
  • ply0
  • Pl14
  • Pl15
  • pl-ah
  • polai
  • plia1
  • pola0
  • pola6
  • pllya
  • pllyo
  • pl13
  • pl17
  • pplah
  • ppla3
  • PPLA6
  • PPLA0
  • ppla5
  • ppluy
  • pplyy
  • p6al
  • p6ly
  • p5ly
  • plu1
  • plu2
  • pvlaw
  • pvlaa
  • pvlah
  • PVLAl
  • PVLAo
  • pvloy
  • pvlhy
  • pvluy
  • pvl7y
  • pvl6y
  • pvlly
  • pvlyy
  • pvl y
  • p2la
  • pwlaw
  • pwlaa
  • pwlah
  • PWLAl
  • PWLAo
  • pylhy
  • pLH-Y
  • pl19
  • pl7a
  • 5pla
  • pBLEY
  • 6pla
  • uplal
  • pl60
  • pl70
  • pl90
  • pl95
  • pl56
  • pl53
  • pl2l
  • pl4h
  • pl47
  • pl40
  • pl45
  • pl38
  • pl35
  • pl31
  • pl30
  • pl27
  • pl28
  • pl2aw
  • pl18
  • p/law
  • p-la0
  • p-flay
  • 4plaw
  • 4plaa
  • playa3
  • ploway
  • pleahy
  • play o
  • pyla5
  • pyla2
  • playey
  • pla6ey
  • pla5ey
  • Pla4ey
  • Plavey
  • playoy
  • plau6
  • playoh
  • playol
  • playoo
  • pe lay
  • pluyh
  • Pluya
  • pliay
  • klayd
  • aplyy
  • playun
  • Upalay
  • RLJY
  • Alayy
  • KRPlay
  • Paawy
  • Plasky
  • ilayt
  • pyayo
  • Plampy
  • Blaym
  • Pyaya

Etymology of PLAY

The word "play" originated from the Old English word "pleg(i)an" or "plecgan", which meant "to exercise, frolic, or leap for joy". It is derived from the Proto-Germanic root "*pleganą", meaning "to move quickly, dance, or frolic". This root is also related to the Old Norse word "plega", the Middle Dutch word "pleien", the Middle High German word "pleien", and the Old High German word "plegan", all of which carried similar meanings. Over time, the meaning of "play" expanded to include engaging in a game or activity for enjoyment or entertainment.

Idioms with the word PLAY

  • against the run of play The idiom "against the run of play" typically refers to a situation where something unexpected or contrary to what is expected occurs. More specifically, it is commonly used in sports, particularly in soccer, to describe a goal or a result that happens unexpectedly or goes against the dominant team's performance or momentum in a game. It implies that the outcome does not conform to the usual flow or progression of events.
  • play (it) safe The idiom "play (it) safe" means to take cautious and conservative actions in order to avoid risk, harm, or potential negative consequences. It refers to making choices or decisions that prioritize safety and minimize chances of failure or danger.
  • play second fiddle The idiom "play second fiddle" means to have a subordinate or less important role in a particular situation or relationship. It originates from the orchestra, where the second violinist (playing the second fiddle) has a supporting role behind the first violinist (playing the first fiddle or lead).
  • play silly buggers The idiom "play silly buggers" is a colloquial expression that originated in British English. It refers to someone engaging in foolish or mischievous behavior, typically with the intention of causing annoyance or confusion. It implies actions that are childish, silly, or whimsical, often to the detriment of others involved. This idiomatic phrase can also suggest someone being deceitful or playing mind games for their own amusement or to manipulate a situation.
  • act/play the goat To "act/play the goat" means to behave foolishly or mischievously, often in a playful or attention-seeking manner. It refers to someone who is engaging in silly or irresponsible behavior for entertainment or to create a humorous atmosphere.
  • play for time The idiom "play for time" refers to a strategy where someone purposely delays taking action or making a decision in order to gain more time or delay an undesirable outcome. It usually involves stalling, making excuses, or engaging in activities to prolong a situation or delay the progress of an event.
  • play a joke/trick on sb The idiom "play a joke/trick on someone" means to deceive or prank someone in a mischievous or playful manner, often with the intent of causing laughter or amusement.
  • two can play at that game The idiom "two can play at that game" means that if someone engages in a particular behavior or action, then another person can do the same in response. It implies that if someone tries to outsmart or manipulate others, they should be prepared for those others to respond with a similar tactic. It suggests a form of retaliation or a willingness to fight back on equal terms.
  • while the cat's away, the mice will play The idiom "while the cat's away, the mice will play" means that when the person in authority or someone who imposes strict rules and discipline is not present, others will take advantage of the situation and behave more freely or irresponsibly.
  • play to the whistle The idiom "play to the whistle" means to continue with or complete a task or activity until the very end, even in the face of obstacles or challenges. It emphasizes the importance of perseverance, determination, and not giving up until an official signal or indication marks the completion or conclusion of something.
  • play on words The idiom "play on words" refers to a clever and often humorous use of language, involving multiple meanings or similar-sounding words to create a witty effect. It often involves wordplay, puns, double entendres, or any form of linguistic manipulation to produce an amusing or clever outcome.
  • all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy) The idiom "all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy)" means that if someone only focuses on work with no time for leisure or fun activities, they will become boring, uninteresting, or unhappy. It emphasizes the importance of striking a balance between one's professional obligations and personal enjoyment.
  • play both ends against the middle The idiom "play both ends against the middle" refers to a strategy where an individual or group secretly allies with or manipulates multiple parties who are in opposition to each other, in order to benefit themselves. This idiom suggests that the person involved is taking advantage of the conflict or competition between others in order to advance their own interests.
  • bring sth into play, at come into play The idiom "bring something into play" or "come into play" means to introduce or utilize something as a factor or resource in a situation or activity. It refers to the act of bringing or using something that was previously not involved but now plays a role or contributes to the outcome or progress of a specific situation.
  • come into play The idiom "come into play" means to become relevant, active, or influential in a particular situation or event. It refers to something or someone that is being involved or participating in a specific circumstance.
  • play it by ear To "play it by ear" means to handle a situation or make decisions based on the circumstances as they arise, rather than following a predetermined plan. It involves acting spontaneously or improvising according to the current conditions or information available.
  • play (sth) by ear The idiom "play (sth) by ear" means to handle or approach a situation spontaneously, without a specific plan or direction, relying on one's instincts and guidance from the immediate circumstances. It refers to taking things as they come and making decisions or choices as one goes along, adapting to the changing circumstances.
  • play sb at their own game The idiom "play someone at their own game" means to engage or compete with someone using the same tactics, strategies, or methods that they typically employ, usually in an attempt to outperform, outwit, or defeat them. It implies that one is adapting to someone else's style or approach and turning it against them for personal advantage.
  • play the race card The idiom "play the race card" refers to the act of intentionally exploiting or making use of allegations or claims of racism for personal gain or as a manipulative tactic in a given situation. It typically involves accusing someone of racist behavior, regardless of whether there is evidence of such behavior, in order to gain sympathy, deflect criticism, or advance one's own agenda.
  • play your cards right The idiom "play your cards right" means to make the correct decisions or take the right actions in order to achieve success or an advantageous outcome in a particular situation, often with a strategic or calculated approach. It implies being tactful, skillful, and making wise choices to maximize opportunities and potentials.
  • play with fire The idiom "play with fire" means to engage in risky or dangerous behavior, or to involve oneself in a situation that has the potential to cause harm or negative consequences. It implies knowingly taking risks without considering the potential consequences.
  • go play with yourself! The idiom "go play with yourself!" is a vulgar expression used to dismiss or insult someone, usually indicating that the person is annoying or bothersome and should find a way to entertain or amuse themselves without involving others.
  • play games The idiom "play games" refers to engaging in manipulative or deceptive behavior, often with the intention of confusing, outsmarting, or gaining an advantage over another person. It typically implies insincerity, deceit, or the use of calculated strategies in interpersonal relationships or situations.
  • the games (that) people play The idiom "the games (that) people play" refers to the various manipulative tactics or strategies that individuals use to achieve their goals or deceive others. It suggests that people often engage in subtle or deceitful behavior in their interactions with others, particularly when pursuing personal gain or advantage.
  • play cat and mouse The idiom "play cat and mouse" refers to a behavior or situation where one person or group constantly evades or outwits another. It denotes a teasing or elusive interaction, resembling the way a cat chases and plays with a mouse before finally catching it.
  • play chicken The idiom "play chicken" refers to a reckless or dangerous game in which two participants engage in a contest of nerve or bravery, typically involving vehicles (cars, bicycles, etc.). The participants aim to see who can withstand the longest before swerving or yielding to avoid a collision. It is often used metaphorically to describe a situation where two parties engage in a high-stakes showdown or confrontation, pushing each other to the limits to prove their resolve.
  • be child's play The idiom "be child's play" means that something is very easy or requires little effort to accomplish. It implies that the task or activity is as simple as something a child could handle.
  • play it cool The idiom "play it cool" means to remain calm, composed, and collected, especially in a situation where one might be tempted to show excitement, nervousness, or anxiety. It involves maintaining a relaxed and nonchalant demeanor to avoid attracting attention or revealing one's true emotions.
  • play dirty The idiom "play dirty" means engaging in deceitful or unethical tactics to achieve one's goals, often disregarding fair play or moral standards. It typically refers to using dishonest or underhanded methods to gain an advantage over others.
  • give/allow sth full play The idiom "give/allow something full play" means to allow something to happen or develop without any restrictions or constraints, to give it complete freedom or expression. It is often used to describe a situation or activity where there are no inhibitions or limitations imposed, allowing it to reach its maximum potential or impact.
  • give/allow full play to sth, at give/allow sth full play The idiom "give/allow full play to something" means to allow something to develop, expand, or proceed without any restrictions, hindrances, or constraints. It is used to describe giving free rein or full expression to a particular idea, emotion, skill, talent, or activity.
  • play fair The idiom "play fair" means to behave in a just and honest manner, adhering to established rules and principles of fairness and decency. It involves acting in a way that does not manipulate, deceive, or disadvantage others.
  • play fast and loose with sth/sb The idiom "play fast and loose with something or someone" means to behave in a reckless or untrustworthy manner, often disregarding rules, commitments, or the feelings of others. It can imply deceitfulness, inconsistency, or a lack of reliability in one's actions or words.
  • feel like a gooseberry, at play gooseberry The idiom "feel like a gooseberry" or "play gooseberry" is used to describe the feeling of being awkwardly present when two other people, often a couple, are spending time together and you do not have an active role or purpose in the situation. It implies a sense of being unwanted or feeling like a third wheel in a social setting.
  • play the field The idiom "play the field" means to date or have romantic relationships with multiple people simultaneously, without committing to any one person. It often implies exploring various options or keeping one's options open before settling down in a serious relationship.
  • play the game The idiom "play the game" generally means to conform to the rules or standards of a particular situation, usually in order to gain some advantage or achieve a desired outcome. It can refer to engaging in a competitive activity, adhering to social norms, or following a specific approach or strategy in a given context.
  • play hard to get The idiom "play hard to get" refers to the act of intentionally appearing uninterested or unattainable in order to attract or arouse the interest of someone else, typically in a romantic or dating context.
  • play gooseberry The idiom "play gooseberry" refers to the situation when a person accompanies or joins a couple on a date or romantic outing, making it an awkward third wheel. The phrase originates from the practice of eating gooseberries as a fruit associated with romance and love, so the person who accompanies the couple is like an unwanted or unnecessary companion who spoils the intimate atmosphere.
  • play (merry) hell with sth The idiom "play (merry) hell with something" means to cause chaos, disorder, or significant disruption to a situation, plan, or system. It implies that the actions or consequences of something are highly detrimental or destructive, resulting in great difficulty or trouble. The term "merry" is sometimes added to emphasize the extent or intensity of the chaos or disruption caused.
  • make a play for sth/sb The idiom "make a play for sth/sb" means to make an attempt or engage in actions to gain or pursue something or someone, usually in a romantic or competitive context. It implies making a move or showing interest in achieving a particular outcome or acquiring a specific person or object.
  • play in the hole The idiom "play in the hole" refers to a sports tactic, commonly used in baseball or softball. It describes the fielding position that is behind the shortstop but in front of the third baseman. The person playing in the hole is responsible for covering ground balls hit to the left side of the infield, between shortstop and third base. This idiom is mainly used in the context of discussing defensive strategies or positions in these sports.
  • have sth to play with The idiom "have something to play with" refers to having something or someone to engage or occupy oneself with, typically for entertainment or amusement. It implies having a source of enjoyment or diversion.
  • play ball The idiom "play ball" is often used to mean to start or initiate something, typically a project, activity, or negotiation. It is derived from the game of baseball, where the umpire says "play ball" to begin the game.
  • play footsie The idiom "play footsie" refers to a flirty or suggestive behavior where two people discreetly touch each other's feet under a table, typically as a form of flirtation or seduction. It can also be used metaphorically to describe secretive or underhanded actions aimed at achieving a personal advantage or goal.
  • play God The idiom "play God" refers to the act of arrogantly assuming control or power over something or someone, often with consequences that may be negative or unethical. It implies the belief that one has the authority or capability to manipulate situations or people as if they were a deity.
  • play hardball To "play hardball" means to be tough, ruthless and uncompromising in negotiations or interactions, usually to achieve one's goals at any cost or to gain a significant advantage over others. It involves using aggressive tactics, demanding concessions, and showing little willingness to compromise or show mercy. This idiom is often used in business, politics, or any situation where assertiveness and a competitive approach are required.
  • play possum 1 The idiom "play possum" means to pretend to be asleep or dead in order to deceive others or avoid a dangerous or unpleasant situation.
  • play to the gallery The idiom "play to the gallery" means to act or behave in a way that is intended to gain approval or popularity from a particular group of people, usually by putting on a show, showboating, or pandering to their desires or expectations. It involves adopting a style or demeanor that may not necessarily align with one's true beliefs or values, but rather seeks to please or impress the audience for personal gain or recognition.
  • play possum 2 "Play possum" is an idiom that originated in North America, specifically referring to the behavior of an opossum when it feels threatened. The idiom "play possum" means to pretend to be dead or unconscious in order to avoid or deceive someone or to avoid a difficult or uncomfortable situation. It implies feigning ignorance, disinterest, or vulnerability to gain an advantage or to avoid confrontation.
  • play politics The idiom "play politics" refers to engaging in cunning or strategic behavior within an organization or social group to gain power, influence, or achieve personal goals at the expense of others. It typically involves manipulative tactics, such as forming alliances, spreading rumors, or undermining opponents, in order to advance one's own interests within a political or competitive environment.
  • play your ace The idiom "play your ace" means to use your most effective or powerful resource or tactic at the most advantageous moment. It refers to the card game of poker, where the ace is usually the highest-ranking card and can potentially secure victory. Therefore, "playing your ace" metaphorically suggests using your strongest asset or strategy to gain an advantage or achieve success in a given situation.
  • play devil's advocate The idiom "play devil's advocate" refers to the act of taking a contrary position or arguing against someone's viewpoint without necessarily believing in or supporting it. It involves presenting opposing arguments to stimulate critical thinking and promote discussion. The purpose is to challenge, test, or strengthen a particular idea, belief, or proposal.
  • play (the) devil's advocate The idiom "play (the) devil's advocate" refers to the act of taking an opposing viewpoint or arguing against a common or accepted idea, not because one necessarily believes in it, but in order to stimulate constructive discussion and challenge prevailing opinions. It involves presenting arguments that may be viewed as controversial or unconventional in order to encourage critical thinking and explore different perspectives.
  • play cards right The idiom "play cards right" means to make wise choices or take appropriate actions in order to achieve a desired outcome or benefit. It implies the need for strategic thinking, calculated decisions, and careful planning to maximize one's chances of success.
  • play by ear The idiom "play by ear" means to improvise or make something up as one goes along, without following a predetermined plan or set of instructions. It typically refers to the act of performing music without written sheet music, relying instead on one's ability to listen and adapt in the moment. It can also be used more generally to describe any situation where someone approaches a task or situation without a rigid plan or specific guidelines.
  • allow/give sth full play The idiom "allow/give something full play" means to give complete freedom or expression to something such as an idea, a skill, or a talent without any limitations or constraints. It implies allowing something to be fully utilized or explored to its maximum potential.
  • play along The idiom "play along" means to cooperate or go along with a plan, idea, or situation, even if one does not fully support or believe in it. It involves participating or acting in a way that agrees with others' expectations or desires.
  • play a part in sth To "play a part in something" means to have a role or contribute to an event, situation, or outcome. It suggests that someone or something is involved or influential in a particular context.
  • roll over and play dead The idiom "roll over and play dead" means to passively surrender, give in easily, or yield without putting up a fight or making any effort to defend oneself or one's interests. It implies a lack of assertiveness, resilience, or determination in a challenging situation. This phrase is often used figuratively to describe someone who submits to their circumstances without attempting to take control or overcome obstacles.
  • play Russian roulette The idiom "play Russian roulette" refers to taking a dangerous or risky action without knowing the potential consequences, similar to the deadly game in which a loaded gun is placed against one's head and the trigger is pulled, leaving the outcome to chance. It emphasizes engaging in reckless behavior or making decisions with potentially severe or fatal outcomes.
  • play out of your skin The idiom "play out of your skin" is used to describe an exceptional performance or effort beyond one's usual abilities or expectations, typically in sports or competitive activities. It implies giving an extraordinary performance that surpasses one's usual skill level or surpassing expectations with exceptional effort and skill.
  • play hooky The idiom "play hooky" means to skip school, work, or any scheduled activity without permission or a legitimate reason.
  • play around with The idiom "play around with" means to experiment or casually try different methods or ideas, often in a non-serious or lighthearted manner, to see what results they yield. It typically involves exploring various possibilities and making modifications or changes to something without a specific goal or objective in mind.
  • play around The idiom "play around" typically refers to engaging in casual or non-committal behavior, often involving romantic or sexual relationships. It can also mean to engage in aimless or frivolous activities without taking anything seriously.
  • play second fiddle (to sb/sth) The idiom "play second fiddle (to sb/sth)" means to have a subordinate or less important role, often in comparison to someone or something else. It implies being in a position of lesser influence or importance, while someone or something else takes the leading or dominant role.
  • play second fiddle (to sm) The idiom "play second fiddle (to sm)" means to take on a subordinate or lesser role to someone else, to be in a position of less importance or dominance. It refers to the metaphorical idea of being the second violinist in an orchestra, who has a supporting role to the first violinist.
  • When the cat's away, the mice will play The idiom "When the cat's away, the mice will play" means that when the person in authority or in charge is not present, those under their control or supervision will behave more freely and often engage in activities they wouldn't have if the person was there.
  • play away from home The idiom "play away from home" refers to an individual or a team participating in a competition or event in a location that is not their usual or home base. It suggests venturing into unfamiliar territory or facing new challenges outside of familiar surroundings.
  • play ball with The idiom "play ball with" means to cooperate with or go along with someone or something, especially in a cooperative or team-oriented manner. It commonly refers to actively participating, collaborating, or being receptive to someone's ideas, suggestions, or proposals in a flexible and accommodating manner.
  • play a straight bat The idiom "play a straight bat" originates from the sport of cricket and refers to an approach or behavior characterized by honesty, fairness, and adherence to the rules. In cricket, playing a straight bat means hitting the ball with the middle part of the bat, which is considered to be the correct and proper technique. Consequently, the idiom has evolved to imply conducting oneself ethically and with integrity, without resorting to deceit, dishonesty, or bending the rules. It can be used in various contexts to encourage individuals to act honestly and straightforwardly.
  • play in the big leagues The idiom "play in the big leagues" refers to participating or competing at the highest level or in a major professional field or industry. It implies reaching a significant level of success or recognition in a particular area.
  • play a big part The idiom "play a big part" means to have a significant or influential role in a situation or event. It implies that someone or something has made a meaningful contribution or impact on the outcome or development of something.
  • make great play of The idiom "make great play of" means to emphasize, highlight, or draw attention to something, often in an exaggerated or ostentatious manner. It suggests making a significant show or fuss about a particular issue, action, or event.
  • play a bit part The idiom "play a bit part" refers to having a minor or insignificant role or involvement in something. It usually suggests that the person is not central or important to a situation or event and has a small or inconsequential impact.
  • play a blinder The idiom "play a blinder" is a colloquial expression that means to perform exceptionally well or brilliantly in a task or situation. It is often used to describe a person's outstanding performance or achievement. The phrase "play a blinder" originates from sports, particularly in British English, where it refers to a spectacular and skillful play in a game. However, it has been extended to be used figuratively in various contexts beyond sports.
  • the state of play The idiom "the state of play" is typically used to refer to the current situation or circumstances of a particular event, situation, or activity. It denotes the current progress, development, or condition of something, especially in a competitive context where progress or outcomes are being assessed. It can also imply the overall dynamic, status, or effectiveness of ongoing actions or strategies in a given field or domain.
  • bring into play The idiom "bring into play" means to use or utilize something, such as a skill, ability, or resource, in a particular situation or task. It implies putting something to practical use or applying it effectively.
  • Two can play this game The idiom "Two can play this game" means that if someone tries to deceive or manipulate you, you will respond in kind, showing them that you are capable of playing the same deceitful or manipulative tactics. It suggests that you will not be easily taken advantage of and are willing to engage in the same behavior as a means of defending yourself or gaining an advantage.
  • Turnabout is fair play The idiom "turnabout is fair play" means that if someone treats you in a certain way, it is justifiable and fair to treat them in the same manner. It suggests that an act of retaliation or reciprocity is acceptable and justified when an individual receives the same treatment that they have subjected others to.
  • power play The idiom "power play" refers to a strategic or manipulative maneuver intended to gain an advantage or control in a particular situation, often within workplace or political settings. It involves leveraging one's authority, influence, or resources to assert dominance over others or achieve personal goals.
  • play with a full deck The idiom "play with a full deck" means to be mentally stable, rational, and competent, usually in contrast to someone who is believed to be mentally unstable, irrational, or incompetent.
  • play with The idiom "play with" typically means to engage in an activity or task without seriousness, commitment, or a clear intention of completion. It may also refer to displaying a lack of focus, flippancy, or indecisiveness in dealing with a particular matter or situation. It is often used to convey a sense of toying or experimenting with something rather than approaching it earnestly.
  • play up to The definition of the idiom "play up to" is to behave in a flattering or ingratiating manner towards someone, typically in order to gain their favor or approval. It involves making an effort to elicit positive and favorable responses from others, often by using charm or manipulation.
  • play up The idiom "play up" typically means to exaggerate or emphasize something, often for personal gain or attention. It can also refer to acting out or misbehaving, especially in order to attract attention.
  • play trump card The idiom "play a trump card" means to use a powerful or advantageous action, strategy, or fact as a final move or last resort in order to gain an advantage or achieve success in a challenging situation. It refers to the playing of the most powerful card in a card game with a trump suit, which is known to have a higher value and is often played strategically to win a trick or defeat opponents.
  • play tricks on The idiom "play tricks on" means to deceive or play pranks on someone in order to mislead or confuse them. It involves engaging in activities or behaviors that purposely manipulate or trick someone for amusement or to achieve a desired outcome.
  • play to The idiom "play to" means to cater or appeal to a specific audience or group's tastes, preferences, or interests in order to gain their approval or support. It refers to the strategic act of tailoring one's actions, performance, or behavior to maximize positive reception from a particular target demographic.
  • play through The idiom "play through" typically means to complete or finish playing a game, sport, or musical piece without interruption or breaks. It can also refer to continuing to play or perform despite challenges or difficulty.
  • play the ponies The idiom "play the ponies" refers to the act of betting on horse races, typically done at a racetrack or through off-track betting. It means to engage in gambling by wagering money on horse races for the purpose of potentially winning money.
  • play the market The idiom "play the market" refers to the act of buying and selling stocks, bonds, or other financial instruments in order to make a profit through speculation or investment. It implies actively engaging in the stock market or other financial markets with the aim of taking advantage of price fluctuations and making strategic financial decisions.
  • play the heavy The idiom "play the heavy" refers to the act of assuming or being assigned the role of the antagonist or villain in a particular situation. It means that a person is deliberately representing themselves or behaving in a way that is perceived as harsh, strict, or intimidating, often for the purpose of enforcing rules, discipline, or delivering bad news. The phrase can be used in various contexts, including personal relationships, work environments, or even in entertainment and storytelling.
  • play the fool The idiom "play the fool" means acting in a silly or foolish manner, often as part of a deliberate strategy or to deceive others. It refers to consciously behaving in a way that downplays one's intelligence or seriousness in order to achieve a particular outcome or goal.
  • play the devil with The idiom "play the devil with" means to cause chaos, confusion, or disruption, or to have a damaging or negative effect on something or someone. It implies that someone or something is creating problems or wreaking havoc.
  • play safe The idiom "play safe" means to act cautiously and avoid taking unnecessary risks or making bold decisions. It refers to a mindset of choosing the safe and predictable path instead of the potentially more adventurous or potentially dangerous alternative.
  • play possum The idiom "play possum" refers to a behavior where someone pretends to be asleep, unconscious, or inactive, often with the intention of tricking others or avoiding a difficult or threatening situation. It derives from the defensive behavior of possums, which reflexively submit to predators by feigning death.
  • play part The idiom "play a part" refers to someone's involvement or contribution to a particular situation or event. It means to have a role or responsibility in something, implying that one's actions or presence are necessary or influential in achieving a certain outcome.
  • play over The idiom "play over" typically means to repeat or replay something, often in one's mind. It can refer to going through an event, conversation, or situation again mentally or recalling it for analysis, understanding, or enjoyment.
  • play out The idiom "play out" refers to the process of something happening or developing naturally, usually over a period of time, without any particular intervention or control. It can also imply the completion or resolution of a situation or event.
  • play on heartstrings The idiom "play on heartstrings" refers to a deliberate attempt to elicit strong emotions, especially sympathy or sadness, from someone. It is often used to describe manipulative tactics used by someone to evoke deep feelings in order to get a desired reaction or response.
  • play on The idiom "play on" typically refers to the act of continuing or prolonging a situation, especially in a way that benefits oneself or undermines another person or group. It can also refer to exploiting or taking advantage of a particular circumstance or condition.
  • play off against The idiom "play off against" means to manipulate or take advantage of two opposing parties or individuals to achieve one's own goals or interests. It involves creating a situation where two parties compete or oppose each other, allowing the manipulator to benefit from their rivalry or conflict.
  • play off The idiom "play off" typically refers to a sports competition or series of contests held to determine the ultimate winner or champion. It involves two or more teams or individuals competing against each other in a series of matches or games, with the winners of each match advancing to the next round until a final winner is determined. The idiom can also be used figuratively to describe a situation where two or more parties are competing or vying for a specific outcome or goal.
  • play musical chairs The idiom "play musical chairs" refers to a situation where people move or interchange positions, responsibilities, roles, or locations frequently, often in a competitive or uncertain manner. It implies a state of constant change, movement, or reorganization with limited stability or permanence, similar to the game "musical chairs" where participants quickly switch seats when the music stops playing.
  • play like The idiomatic expression "play like" is a colloquial phrase used to convey the act of pretending, imitating, or acting as if one is someone or something they are not. It suggests a scenario where someone adopts a particular role, behavior, or appearance to deceive or mislead others.
  • play it for all it's worth The idiom "play it for all it's worth" means to take full advantage of a situation or opportunity by using all possible resources, skills, or efforts to benefit oneself. It implies making the most out of a particular circumstance, giving it the utmost importance or value.
  • play into the hands of The idiom "play into the hands of" means to unwittingly or intentionally act or behave in a way that helps or benefits someone else, especially if it was their intent all along. It often implies that one's actions or decisions have inadvertently assisted or served the interests of another person or group, usually to their advantage and your detriment.
  • play into hands The idiom "play into hands" means to act or behave in a way that inadvertently helps or benefits someone else, usually to one's own disadvantage or without realizing the consequences. It implies being easily manipulated or falling into someone else's trap by playing right into their strategy or plans.
  • play innocent The idiom "play innocent" means to pretend or act as if one is unaware, ignorant, or innocent of a particular situation, often for one's own benefit or to avoid responsibility or consequences.
  • play in The idiom "play in" generally refers to participating in a competition or event with the intention to win or succeed. It is often used in sports, games, or other competitive environments where individuals or teams actively engage to achieve a positive outcome.
  • play ignorant The idiom "play ignorant" refers to the act of purposely pretending to not know or understand something, often in order to avoid responsibility, involvement, or revealing knowledge on a particular matter.
  • play hell with The idiom "play hell with" is used to describe a situation or action that creates significant trouble, disorder, or chaos. It implies that something or someone is causing disruptions, complications, or damage to a particular situation or circumstance.
  • play hell The idiom "play hell" is an informal phrase that means to cause trouble or create chaos. It typically refers to someone engaging in disruptive or mischievous behavior, often with a sense of defiance or rebellion.
  • play havoc with The idiom "play havoc with" is commonly used to indicate causing a great deal of disorder, damage, or disruption to someone or something. It suggests a situation where there is a significant negative impact, often resulting in chaos or destruction.
  • play freezeout The idiom "play freezeout" refers to a situation in which someone is intentionally excluded or ignored by others, usually in a group or social setting. It implies that the individual is being disregarded or left out, making them feel isolated or rejected.
  • play for keeps The idiom "play for keeps" means to engage in an activity or pursue a goal with great seriousness, determination, and with the intention of achieving long-lasting or permanent results. It implies a level of commitment and intensity where there are real or significant consequences involved.
  • play for a sucker The idiom "play for a sucker" refers to the act of manipulating or deceiving someone for personal gain, often by exploiting their naivety or vulnerability. It implies that the person being misled is unaware of the true intentions or ulterior motives of the one engaging with them.
  • play for a fool The definition of the idiom "play for a fool" is to deceive or trick someone by making them appear foolish or gullible. It is used to describe the act of manipulating or taking advantage of someone's trust or naivety.
  • play for The idiom "play for" typically means participating or engaging in a particular activity for a specific purpose, such as achieving a desired outcome or pursuing a specific goal. It is commonly used in the context of sports or games, indicating someone's commitment and dedication to playing on behalf of a particular team or cause.
  • play footsie with The idiom "play footsie with" refers to a covert or flirtatious act of touching someone else's feet or legs with your own under a table, typically done as a gesture of flirtation or seduction. It can also be used metaphorically to describe engaging in secretive or deceptive behavior or engaging in a clandestine relationship or alliance.
  • play first chair The idiom "play first chair" commonly refers to someone's position as the lead or principal performer in a musical group, particularly in an orchestra or a band. Being designated "first chair" means that the individual is considered the most skilled or talented musician in their specific section or instrument and holds a prominent role in setting the tone and guiding the performance.
  • play fast and loose with The idiom "play fast and loose with" means to behave in a deceitful or untrustworthy manner, often by disregarding rules, morals, or commitments. It implies acting recklessly or manipulating situations for personal gain without regard for the consequences or the impact on others.
  • play fast and loose The idiom "play fast and loose" refers to behaving in an unreliable, untrustworthy, or deceitful manner. It can involve taking advantage of others, manipulating situations, or disregarding rules and commitments.
  • play down to The idiom "play down to" means to lower one's standards or abilities in order to meet the level or expectations of others, particularly in a condescending or patronizing manner. It suggests that someone is intentionally underperforming or dumbing down their abilities to fit in or be accepted by a certain group.
  • play down The definition of the idiom "play down" is to minimize or diminish the significance, importance, or seriousness of something, purposely downplaying its impact.
  • play dead The idiom "play dead" means to pretend to be motionless or unresponsive, especially in a threatening or dangerous situation, in order to deceive or escape harm.
  • play cat and mouse with The idiom "play cat and mouse with" refers to a situation where one person or group repeatedly evades or outwits another, typically in a playful or teasing manner. It implies a dynamic where the person being pursued tries to outsmart or stay one step ahead of their pursuer, just like a cat playing with a mouse before eventually catching it.
  • play cards close to chest The idiom "play cards close to chest" means to keep one's thoughts, intentions, or information secret or hidden from others. It implies being cautious or guarded in revealing one's true feelings, plans, or strategies. It is often used to describe a person who is not openly sharing their thoughts or actions.
  • play both ends The idiom "play both ends" refers to someone engaging in a two-faced or deceptive behavior where they try to benefit or gain an advantage from both sides of a situation, often without the knowledge or consent of those involved. It typically implies manipulating or taking advantage of multiple parties or circumstances for personal gain.
  • play back The idiom "play back" refers to the act of repeating or reproducing something, often audio or video recordings, to review or listen to it again. It can also refer to reenacting or restaging a past event or situation.
  • play at own game The idiom "play at own game" means to engage in a competition or conflict using the same tactics or strategies as one's opponent, often with the aim of bettering or defeating them. It involves adopting similar methods or approaches to gain an advantage or level the playing field.
  • play at The idiom "play at" means to engage in an activity or take part in a role or profession casually, without serious commitment or intention. It typically refers to doing something as if it were a game or a temporary endeavor, rather than a serious or dedicated pursuit.
  • play as The idiom "play as" refers to the act of taking on a particular role or character in a game, sport, or performance. It can also imply assuming a certain identity or behaving in a specific manner in a situation.
  • play against The idiom "play against" refers to participating in a competitive activity or game with someone as opponents, usually with the intention to defeat or outperform them. It can be used in various contexts, such as sports, games, or any other form of rivalry or competition.
  • play ace The idiom "play ace" means to use one's most effective or powerful resource, strategy, or skill in order to achieve the desired outcome or gain an advantage. It is often used in the context of competitive situations or endeavors.
  • play a waiting game The idiom "play a waiting game" means to delay taking action or making a decision in order to see how a situation develops before making a move. It involves being patient and observing the progression of events, in order to gain an advantage or make a more informed decision.
  • play a trick on The idiomatic expression "play a trick on" means to deceive, deceive, or fool someone for entertainment or amusement purposes, usually in a playful or light-hearted manner.
  • play a part in The idiom "play a part in" means to have a role or contribute to something, typically referring to one's involvement or influence in a situation, event, or outcome.
  • play a joke on The idiom "play a joke on" means to trick or deceive someone in a playful manner for amusement or entertainment. It involves playing a humorous prank or practical joke on someone with the intention of making them laugh or providing amusement.
  • play a joke The idiom "play a joke" means to engage in an act of mischief or trickery intended to amuse or trick someone. It typically involves setting up a humorous or mischievous situation to surprise or tease someone, often with the intention of causing laughter or amusement.
  • make a play for The idiom "make a play for" means to make an attempt or effort to gain someone's affection, love, attention, or favor, typically in a romantic or competitive context. It is often used when someone knowingly or intentionally tries to attract or pursue another person.
  • make a play The idiom "make a play" typically means to take action or make an attempt to achieve a goal, often in a strategic or calculated manner. It is often used in scenarios where one is trying to pursue an opportunity or advance their position in a competitive situation.
  • in play The idiom "in play" refers to something that is currently active, operational, or participating in a particular situation or event. It often implies that something or someone is involved and having an impact or influence on the outcome or proceedings at hand.
  • If you play with fire, you get burned The idiom "If you play with fire, you get burned" means that if you engage in dangerous or risky behavior, it is likely that you will suffer the negative consequences or face a harmful outcome. It warns against taking unnecessary risks or engaging in activities that are likely to result in trouble, problems, or harm.
  • game that two can play The idiom "game that two can play" refers to a situation or activity in which both parties involved can participate in a similar manner. It suggests that if one person is behaving in a certain way, the other person can also choose to behave in a similar way as a response or defense. It implies that one individual's actions can be mirrored or reciprocated by the other.
  • foul play The idiom "foul play" refers to any illegal or dishonest acts, especially those involving deceit, dishonesty, cheating, or violence in order to gain an advantage or harm others. It often suggests unethical or immoral behavior, particularly in relation to criminal activities or misconduct that involves deception, manipulation, or harm to others.
  • fair play "Fair play" is an idiom that refers to the principle of justice, integrity, and honesty in human interactions. It emphasizes the idea of treating others equitably, abiding by the rules, and refraining from unfair or unethical practices. It often relates to sportsmanship, ethical behavior, and a balanced approach that ensures everyone involved is given a fair and equal opportunity.
  • child's play The idiom "child's play" means that something is very easy to do or accomplish, almost as if it were a game or task suitable for a child. It implies that the action or task requires little effort, skill, or understanding to complete.
  • at play The idiom "at play" typically means actively in action or influencing something. It suggests that something is in operation or having an impact on a situation or outcome.
  • allow full play The idiom "allow full play" means to permit complete freedom or unrestricted expression of something, such as ideas, creativity, actions, or emotions. It implies giving utmost liberty and opportunity for something to develop or be fully realized.
  • all work and no play The idiom "all work and no play" is used to refer to a situation where someone is excessively focused on work and neglecting leisure or recreational activities. It implies a lack of balance or enjoyment in one's life due to an excessive dedication to work.
  • a play on words The idiom "a play on words" refers to the clever and humorous manipulation or manipulation of language, often involving wordplay or puns, to create a clever or witty effect.
  • a part to play The idiom "a part to play" refers to someone's role or responsibility in a particular situation or scenario. It signifies that each individual has a role or function to fulfill in order to contribute to the overall functioning or success of something. Similar to actors having specific roles to portray in a play, this idiom emphasizes the importance of fulfilling one's assigned or expected role.
  • play fast and loose with sth The idiom "play fast and loose with something" means to behave in a careless or deceitful manner, typically regarding rules, regulations, facts, or established protocols. It implies manipulating or disregarding something or someone to one's advantage without concern for the consequences or ethics involved.
  • play fast and loose (with sm or sth) The idiom "play fast and loose (with something or someone)" refers to behaving in a deceitful, reckless, or unreliable manner. It involves not adhering to rules, commitments, or moral principles, often for personal gain or advantage. It can also imply treating something or someone casually or without proper respect.
  • keep/play your cards close to your chest The idiom "keep/play your cards close to your chest" means to be secretive or cautious about revealing information or intentions. It originates from the game of poker, where holding cards close to one's chest prevents opponents from seeing them. In a broader context, it implies being discreet and not disclosing one's thoughts, plans, or strategies to others.
  • play one's cards close to one's chest The idiom "play one's cards close to one's chest" means to keep one's thoughts, plans, or intentions hidden or undisclosed, usually in order to maintain a strategic advantage or to avoid revealing too much information. It is often used when someone is being cautious or secretive about their actions or intentions.
  • play tricks on sm The idiom "play tricks on someone" means to deceive or manipulate someone in a mischievous or playful manner. It involves engaging in cunning or playful behavior to trick or tease someone without causing harm or distress. It typically involves engaging in pranks or practical jokes in a lighthearted or humorous way.
  • play a trick on sm The idiom "play a trick on someone" means to deceive or deceive someone for amusement or to catch them off guard in a playful or mischievous way. It involves setting up a practical joke or engaging in pranks to surprise or fool another person.
  • play one's trump card The idiom "play one's trump card" means to use one's most powerful or effective means or strategy in order to gain an advantage or succeed in a particular situation. It refers to the card game of bridge, where the trump card is the suit chosen to outrank all others, enabling the player to win. Therefore, "play one's trump card" refers to making a decisive move or using a decisive resource to achieve success or gain an upper hand.
  • play sb for a sucker The idiom "play someone for a sucker" means to deceive or manipulate someone, often by taking advantage of their naivety or gullibility. It implies tricking someone into believing something or making them appear foolish for personal gain or amusement.
  • play a/the waiting game The idiom "play a/the waiting game" means to delay taking action or making a decision and instead patiently wait for a situation to develop or change. It often implies a level of uncertainty or anticipation, as one waits for a desired outcome or resolution.
  • play the (stock) market To "play the (stock) market" means to actively participate in buying, selling, and trading stocks or other financial securities with the aim of making a profit. It implies engaging in the speculative nature of the stock market, where individuals anticipate and respond to fluctuations in stock prices to make financial gains.
  • play a joke (on sb) The idiom "play a joke (on someone)" means to prank or deceive someone for amusement or entertainment purposes. It involves setting up a humorous or tricky situation intending to surprise or trick the targeted person.
  • play a joke on sm To "play a joke on someone" means to trick, deceive, or prank someone for amusement or to create a humorous situation. It involves intentionally engaging in actions or making statements that are intended to deceive or fool someone as a form of practical joke.
  • make a play for sb The idiom "make a play for someone" means to express romantic or sexual interest in someone or to actively pursue a romantic or sexual relationship with them. It often involves making flirtatious or overt advances towards the person in an attempt to win their affection or establish a connection.
  • make a play for sth The idiom "make a play for sth" means to make an attempt, often calculated or strategic, to obtain or achieve something. It refers to making a move or taking action in order to pursue a particular opportunity, goal, or desired outcome.
  • play sth over
  • play havoc with sth To "play havoc with something" means to cause a lot of damage, disruption, or chaos to it. It suggests that something is being severely affected or negatively impacted.
  • bring sth into play The idiom "bring something into play" means to utilize or activate something, typically a skill, power, or resource, in order to achieve a desired outcome or to contribute to a particular situation or task. It involves making use of something that was previously dormant, unused, or not considered, and bringing it to the forefront for effective use or incorporation.
  • play games (with sm) The idiom "play games (with someone)" refers to the act of deceiving, manipulating, or toying with someone's emotions or thoughts for personal gain, or simply for amusement. It implies engaging in behaviors that are not sincere or genuine, but rather strategic or calculated.
  • play hardball (with sm) The idiom "play hardball (with someone)" means to act aggressively, assertively, or competitively toward someone, especially in a negotiation or confrontation, without showing any mercy or being willing to compromise. It involves using tough tactics and strategies to achieve one's goals, often by applying pressure or employing aggressive measures.
  • play on sm's heartstrings The idiom "play on someone's heartstrings" refers to intentionally manipulating or exploiting someone's emotions or feelings, usually for personal gain. It involves using sentimental appeals or evoking deep emotions in order to influence or control someone emotionally.
  • play a big part (in sth) The idiom "play a big part (in sth)" means to have a significant role or influence in something or someone's life. It refers to being instrumental, crucial, or essential in a particular event, decision, outcome, or situation.
  • play ball (with sb) The idiom "play ball (with someone)" means to cooperate or work together with someone in a willing and friendly manner, particularly in a team-based or collaborative effort. It originates from the game of baseball where players on opposing teams need to interact and work together to play the game successfully. Figuratively, it implies being open to collaboration, compromise, and being a team player in various situations beyond the realm of sports.
  • play at sth The idiom "play at something" means to engage in a particular activity or pursuit, often in a frivolous or superficial manner, without taking it seriously or committing fully to it. It is often used to imply that someone is not sincerely or genuinely interested in the activity they are participating in.
  • play sm off against (sm else) The idiom "play (someone) off against (someone else)" refers to the act of manipulating or using the differences or conflicts between two people or groups to one's advantage. It involves pitting one person or group against another in order to create a sense of rivalry or competition, often for personal gain or to achieve a desired outcome.
  • play on sth The idiom "play on something" refers to exploiting or manipulating a particular situation, event, or emotion for one's own advantage or amusement. It involves using something to create a desired effect, often in a cunning or skillful manner.
  • play sth on sm or sth The idiom "play something on someone or something" means to deceive, manipulate, or take advantage of someone or something for personal gain or amusement. It can refer to tricks, lies, pranks, or any action that is intended to mislead or harm someone or something.
  • play (up)on sth The idiom "play (up)on something" refers to the act of emphasizing, exploiting, or manipulating a situation or a specific aspect to one's advantage, often for personal gain or to create a desired effect. It involves using a particular factor or circumstance to influence others, evoke emotions, or achieve a specific outcome. It can also refer to using someone's weakness or vulnerability to exert control or gain an advantage in a given situation.
  • play up to sb/sth The idiom "play up to sb/sth" means to behave or perform in a way that seeks to gain favor, approval, or attention from a specific person or group. It involves acting towards someone or something in a flattering or ingratiating manner for personal gain or advantage.
  • play up to sm The idiom "play up to someone" means to behave in a way that makes someone like or admire you, often by flattering or ingratiating oneself to gain favor or advantage.
  • play with sth The idiom "play with sth" can have a couple of different definitions depending on the context: 1. To handle or manipulate an object or idea without any serious intention or purpose. Example: She sat at her desk, playing with her pen while thinking about the problem. 2. To experiment or explore something without completely committing to or fully engaging in it. Example: He played with the idea of starting his own business but ultimately decided against it. 3. To engage in an activity or pursue a hobby for enjoyment or as a form of recreation. Example: They loved playing with their new video games after school.
  • play with sm or sth The idiom "play with someone or something" means to casually interact with or handle someone or something without any serious intentions or commitment. It often implies a lack of seriousness or engagement in the situation, similar to a child playing with a toy.
  • play sth with sm or sth The idiom "play something with someone or something" can have different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Generally, it implies the act of manipulating or handling something or someone in a strategic or skillful manner, often for personal gain or advantage. It can also refer to engaging or interacting with someone or something in a playful or light-hearted manner.
  • play (a game of) cat and mouse The idiom "play (a game of) cat and mouse" refers to a situation where one person or entity repeatedly tries to outwit or deceive another by continually changing tactics or strategies. It is based on the behavior observed between a cat and a mouse, where the cat tries to catch the mouse while the mouse tries to avoid being caught.
  • play cat and mouse with sm The idiom "play cat and mouse with someone" refers to a situation where two parties engage in a game of deception or manipulation, with one party taking on the role of a cat and the other as a mouse. It implies a situation where one person is continuously chasing or pursuing the other, trying to catch or control them, while the other person skillfully evades or outwits their efforts. It often suggests a contest of wits or strategies where one party tries to outsmart or outmaneuver the other.
  • play along (with sb/sth) The idiom "play along (with somebody/something)" means to act in agreement or go along with someone or something, even if one does not necessarily agree or fully understand the situation. It involves participating or complying for the sake of maintaining harmony, avoiding conflict, or achieving a particular outcome.
  • play back sth The idiom "play back something" refers to the act of reproducing or replaying something, typically audio or video recordings. It involves returning to a specific section or segment of a recording and allowing it to be heard or watched again. It can also imply reviewing or revisiting previous actions, statements, or events for further analysis or clarification.
  • play sth back (to sm) The idiom "play something back (to someone)" refers to the act of repeating or reenacting a past event or conversation for someone's benefit or to clarify something. It can involve replaying a recording, recounting a story, or recreating a scenario to provide a better understanding or reference for the person.
  • play down sth The idiom "play down something" refers to minimizing or downplaying the importance, significance, or seriousness of something, typically in order to make it seem less significant or problematic than it actually is.
  • play sm or sth down To "play something down" means to minimize the importance or significance of something, typically in order to downplay its impact or make it seem less serious or significant than it actually is. This can be done through subtle language or gestures to dismiss or diminish the significance of a situation, event, or statement.
  • play sth off To "play something off" means to minimize or downplay the significance or severity of something, often in order to avoid negative consequences or to make it seem less important. It can also refer to manipulating a situation or event in a way that benefits oneself or someone else.
  • play out sth The idiom "play out something" refers to the act or process of unfolding or happening in a particular way, usually referring to a situation or scenario. It implies that a particular event, plan, or situation is developing or being executed according to a predetermined plan or course of action.
  • play sth out The idiom "play something out" refers to carrying out or allowing a situation or event to develop naturally without interference or interruption. It suggests allowing events to unfold without actively manipulating or controlling them.
  • play up sth The idiom "play up something" means to emphasize, highlight, or exaggerate a particular aspect, issue, or problem. It can also refer to making something more noticeable or drawing attention to it.
  • play sth up To "play something up" means to emphasize or exaggerate the importance, impact, or effect of something in a way that may be excessive or dramatic.
  • play sm or sth up The idiom "play something up" means to exaggerate or emphasize the importance, value, or significance of something or someone, often for the purpose of gaining attention, praise, or approval. It can also imply promoting or highlighting aspects in order to create a certain impression or perception.
  • play politics (with sth) The idiom "play politics (with sth)" refers to the act of manipulating or strategizing in order to gain personal advantage or support, often within a group or organization. It involves using tactics such as lobbying, scheming, or engaging in power struggles to achieve desired goals or outcomes, typically at the expense of others.
  • bring (or come) into play The idiom "bring (or come) into play" means to actively involve or utilize something or someone in a particular situation, activity, or game to create an impact or influence the outcome. It suggests the act of making use of available resources, skills, or factors to contribute to an objective or to affect the result.
  • in (or out of) play The idiom "in play" refers to something being actively involved or engaged in a particular situation or activity, typically with the intention of having an impact or influence. It can also indicate that something is currently valid, applicable, or usable. On the other hand, "out of play" refers to something being removed or excluded from a given situation or activity. It suggests that something is no longer relevant, effective, or eligible to participate.
  • play catch-up ball The idiom "play catch-up ball" refers to a situation where someone is attempting to make progress or regain lost ground after falling behind or being at a disadvantage. It is often used to describe efforts to recover from being behind in a competition, race, or any other endeavor.
  • play favorites The idiom "play favorites" refers to the act of showing preferential treatment to certain individuals over others, often based on personal biases or preferences, rather than objective criteria. It implies that someone is unfairly giving privileges, attention, or opportunities to a select few instead of treating everyone equally.
  • play into someone's hands The idiom "play into someone's hands" means to inadvertently assist or enable someone's plans or strategies, often to one's own disadvantage. It implies falling victim to manipulation or being easily influenced, ultimately advancing someone else's objectives unintentionally.
  • play it The idiom "play it" typically means to behave cautiously, reservedly, or in a restrained manner during a particular situation or interaction. It can imply avoiding risks, not taking a strong stance, or refraining from making bold moves.
  • play one's cards well The idiom "play one's cards well" means to handle a situation or make strategic decisions in a skilful and effective manner. It refers to being clever, shrewd, and making wise choices to achieve the desired outcome.
  • play with oneself The idiom "play with oneself" is considered vulgar and has a sexual connotation. It typically refers to engaging in self-pleasure or masturbation.
  • play (it) close to the vest The idiom "play (it) close to the vest" means to be secretive, cautious, or discreet about one's thoughts, information, or intentions, especially in a strategic or competitive situation. It refers to the behavior of a card player who keeps their cards held closely against their chest to prevent opponents from seeing them.
  • play house The idiom "play house" is typically used to describe a situation where two people, often children, engage in activities that mimic the roles and responsibilities of adults within a household. It involves pretending to be parents, taking on different family roles, and performing household tasks and routines. It can also be used more broadly to describe adults engaging in activities that simulate domestic life in a playful or non-serious manner.
  • play hob with The idiom "play hob with" means to cause disruption or chaos, to cause serious problems or difficulties, or to have a detrimental effect on something. It suggests that an action or situation has a negative impact and disrupts the smooth functioning of something.
  • play a part The idiom "play a part" means to actively contribute or participate in something, typically in a role or capacity that has a significant impact or influence. It refers to one's involvement in a particular situation or event, and implies that the individual's actions or presence are crucial or necessary for the desired outcome.
  • play someone false The idiom "play someone false" means to deceive or betray someone, often through dishonest or deceitful actions. It implies a breach of trust or an act of betrayal towards the person being played false.
  • child’s play The idiom "child's play" refers to something that is very easy or effortless to accomplish, just as a task or activity would be for a child. It implies that the task is simple, requiring little skill, effort, or thought.
  • play duck and drakes The idiom "play duck and drakes" refers to the act of making reckless or irresponsible use of money or resources, often by throwing it away frivolously or thoughtlessly. It can also carry the meaning of wasting opportunities or acting irresponsibly without considering the consequences.
  • play fast and loose (with somebody/something) The idiom "play fast and loose (with somebody/something)" means to behave in an irresponsible or unreliable manner, often disregarding rules or commitments. It refers to someone acting without care or concern for the consequences and manipulating situations for their benefit, without considering the impact on others.
  • play by somebody’s (own) rules The idiom "play by somebody’s (own) rules" refers to the act of disregarding the established rules or conventions and choosing to follow one's own set of guidelines. It suggests that someone prefers to act independently or differently from others, often to achieve personal goals or to express their unique style or perspective. It can imply nonconformity, individualism, or a desire to be autonomous.
  • play by the rules The idiom "play by the rules" means to act in accordance with established guidelines, laws, or regulations. It involves following the prescribed rules and not taking shortcuts or engaging in dishonest or unethical behavior.
  • play (silly) games (with somebody) The idiom "play (silly) games (with somebody)" typically refers to engaging in manipulative or deceitful behavior towards someone in order to achieve personal gain or amusement. It implies that the person is not being sincere or straightforward in their actions or intentions.
  • play second fiddle (to somebody/something) The idiom "play second fiddle (to somebody/something)" means to have a subordinate or inferior role to someone or something else. It implies being in a position of lesser importance, influence, or power compared to another person, group, or thing. It suggests that one is not the primary focus or leader in a particular situation.
  • play it straight The idiom "play it straight" means to behave honestly, sincerely, or in a sincere and genuine manner, without trying to deceive or manipulate others. It refers to being straightforward and not engaging in any form of deceit or trickery.
  • play ball (with somebody) The idiom "play ball (with somebody)" typically means to cooperate or engage in a joint effort with someone, usually to achieve a common goal or outcome. It originates from baseball, where "play ball" is used to start a game, suggesting the metaphorical idea of teamwork and collaboration.
  • be child’s play The idiom "be child's play" means that something is very easy to do or accomplish, similar to how children's tasks or games tend to be simple and straightforward.
  • call something into play The idiom "call something into play" means to use or bring something into action or use it as a strategy or resource in a particular situation. It refers to the act of utilizing a skill, method, asset, or factor that is relevant or advantageous in a given context or circumstance.
  • play the… card The idiom "play the... card" refers to using a specific strategy, approach, or attribute to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome in a situation. It often implies that the person is exploiting a particular characteristic or circumstance to influence others or manipulate the situation in their favor. The "card" in this context represents the tactic or advantage being used. For example, "playing the race card" means using one's race as a means of persuading others or advancing one's own interests.
  • play (a game of) cat and mouse with somebody The idiom "play (a game of) cat and mouse with somebody" refers to a situation where one person or group is constantly pursuing and trying to outwit or deceive another person or group, who is attempting to evade or elude them. It generally implies a strategic, often prolonged, interplay between the two parties involved. The term is derived from the behavior of a cat, which typically toys with and chases a mouse before capturing it.
  • play a cat-and-mouse game with somebody The idiom "play a cat-and-mouse game with somebody" refers to engaging in a manipulative or strategic interaction where one person, usually the dominant or cunning party, constantly outwits or tricks the other person, who is typically considered the weaker or less cunning party. It often implies a cycle of teasing, pursuit, evasion, and psychological manipulation.
  • when the cat’s away the mice will play The idiom "when the cat's away, the mice will play" means that when the person in charge or the authority figure is absent or not present, people will often engage in behavior that they normally wouldn't, take advantage of the situation, or behave in a more relaxed and uninhibited way. It suggests that without supervision or someone to keep them in check, individuals tend to become more independent and indulge in activities that they might otherwise refrain from doing.
  • play catch-up The idiom "play catch-up" means to try to reach the same level or make progress as others, especially after falling behind or being late in doing something.
  • play about The idiom "play about" typically means to engage in aimless or unproductive activity, often in a playful or leisurely manner. It implies spending time without any specific purpose or goal, merely passing the time in a casual or carefree manner.
  • play (one's) ace (card) The idiom "play one's ace (card)" refers to the action of using one's most powerful or effective strategy or resource in a particular situation, especially as a final move or as a means to gain an advantage over others. Similar to playing the highest-ranking card (ace) in a card game, it suggests employing the best possible option or approach to achieve success or surpass opponents.
  • play both sides against the middle The idiom "play both sides against the middle" means to manipulate or exploit opposing parties or individuals in order to benefit oneself. It involves engaging with multiple parties and instigating conflict or disagreements between them while maintaining a neutral position to profit from the situation.
  • play each end against the other The idiom "play each end against the other" means to manipulate or exploit two opposing parties or groups for one's own benefit by pitting them against each other or by taking advantage of their differences or conflicts. It involves creating a situation where both parties are in competition or disagreement, allowing the manipulator to gain advantage, control, or favor.
  • play each side against the other The idiom "play each side against the other" means to purposely manipulate or exploit two or more opposing parties in order to gain an advantage for oneself. It involves fostering conflict or competition between the different sides involved to achieve personal or strategic goals.
  • play one against another The idiom "play one against another" refers to a tactic or strategy where someone manipulates or exploits two or more individuals or groups in order to gain an advantage for themselves. It typically involves creating conflict, competition, or rivalry between the parties involved to weaken their overall position or achieve a desired outcome.
  • play one end against the other The idiom "play one end against the other" means to exploit or manipulate two rival parties or individuals by pitting them against each other in order to benefit oneself or gain an advantage. It involves creating division or conflict between the two parties and taking advantage of the resulting tensions or competition.
  • play one off against another/each other/the other The idiom "play one off against another/each other/the other" refers to a situation where someone manipulates or takes advantage of two or more people or parties by pitting them against each other for personal gain. It often involves encouraging conflict or rivalry between these individuals in order to achieve a desired outcome or establish dominance.
  • play one side against the other The idiom "play one side against the other" refers to a manipulative strategy used by someone to create conflict or competition between two parties in order to gain an advantage. It involves deliberately pitting two opposing individuals, groups, or organizations against each other, often by manipulating information or exaggerating differences, in order to achieve personal gain or to advance one's own agenda.
  • play (all) the angles The idiom "play (all) the angles" refers to a strategic and cunning approach in a situation, aiming to consider every possible perspective or opportunity for personal gain. It suggests using clever tactics, manipulation, or a shrewd mindset to achieve one's objectives.
  • don't play (around) with me The idiom "don't play (around) with me" is an expression used to warn or assert that someone should not deceive, manipulate, or take advantage of the speaker. It implies a demand for sincerity, honesty, or respectful behavior, indicating that the speaker expects to be taken seriously and not treated lightly.
  • play around with (something) The idiom "play around with (something)" means to experiment or explore something without any specific goal or purpose. It refers to trying out different things, ideas, or methods in a casual or playful manner, often for the purpose of learning or entertainment rather than achieving a particular outcome.
  • play around with someone The idiom "play around with someone" typically means to flirt or engage in casual romantic or sexual activities with someone without any serious commitment or intention of a long-term relationship. It suggests engaging in temporary or non-committal behavior.
  • play (something) back The idiom "play (something) back" typically refers to the action of replaying or reviewing a recorded audio or visual material. It can be used in contexts where someone listens to a recording of conversations, music, or speeches, or watches a video or movie again. It involves the act of going back to the starting point of the recording and listening or watching it from there.
  • allow (something) full play The idiom "allow (something) full play" means to give complete freedom or unrestricted expression to a particular thing, idea, or activity. It suggests giving ample opportunity or scope for something to develop or unfold without any hindrances or limitations.
  • if there's grass on the field, play ball The idiom "if there's grass on the field, play ball" is a colloquial saying usually used in a sport or sexual context. It suggests that if a person is physically mature or available, one should take advantage of the opportunity. It implies that if the necessary conditions are met or if someone is of a certain age, it is appropriate to proceed with a particular activity or pursue a romantic interest. However, it is important to note that this expression is often considered crude or inappropriate and should be used with caution.
  • if there's grass on the pitch, play ball The idiom "if there's grass on the pitch, play ball" is a colloquial expression used to imply that if someone is physically or sexually mature, it is appropriate or permissible to engage in certain activities or pursue romantic or sexual relationships. This idiom typically refers to relationships or interactions that might be considered controversial or morally questionable due to age or power dynamics.
  • play ball with someone The idiom "play ball with someone" means to cooperate or work together with someone in order to achieve a common goal or objective. It suggests willingness to engage in teamwork, collaboration, or negotiation.
  • when the band begins to play The idiom "when the band begins to play" refers to a moment or situation when a crucial or important event is about to begin or when something significant is about to happen. It often implies a sense of anticipation or excitement before the start of something exciting or momentous.
  • make (a) big play of (something) The idiom "make (a) big play of (something)" refers to the act of drawing extensive attention or importance to something, often in an exaggerated or ostentatious manner. It implies that someone is emphasizing or highlighting something to make it seem more significant or remarkable than it actually is.
  • bring (something) into play The idiom "bring (something) into play" typically means to introduce or use something in a specific situation or context, often to gain an advantage or to resolve a problem. It refers to actively using or implementing a particular resource, skill, strategy, or factor that was previously unused or irrelevant in order to influence the outcome or contribute to a particular outcome.
  • bring/call/put something into play The idiom "bring/call/put something into play" refers to the act of initiating or activating something, putting it into action or operation. It suggests using something effectively or incorporating it into a situation or process to achieve a desired outcome or advantage.
  • If you play with fire, you get burnt The idiom "if you play with fire, you get burnt" means that if you engage in risky or dangerous behavior, you are likely to suffer negative consequences or harm as a result. It serves as a warning against taking unnecessary risks or dabbling in activities that can lead to undesirable outcomes.
  • play by somebody's rules The idiom "play by somebody's rules" means to obey or follow the established guidelines or expectations set by someone else, often in a particular situation or context. It refers to conforming to the prescribed standards or regulations determined by an authority figure or an established system.
  • play something by ear The idiom "play something by ear" refers to approaching a situation or task without a predetermined plan or method, instead relying on one's instincts, improvisation, or adaptability to make decisions or execute actions as the situation unfolds.
  • two can play that game The idiom "two can play that game" means that if someone is engaging in a deceitful, manipulative, or aggressive tactic, the other person is capable of doing the same in response. It implies that both parties have the ability to employ similar strategies and retaliate or compete on an equal footing.
  • play (one's) cards close to (one's) vest The idiom "play (one's) cards close to (one's) vest" means to be secretive or cautious about revealing one's thoughts, intentions, or plans. It derives from the game of poker, where players keep their cards hidden by placing them close to their chest (vest). It suggests that someone is being reserved and not readily disclosing information.
  • play (one's) cards right To "play (one's) cards right" means to make wise and strategic decisions or take correct actions in order to achieve a desired outcome or advantage. It implies using one's intelligence, foresight, or skill to navigate a situation or pursue a goal in the most advantageous way possible.
  • play cards The idiom "play cards" refers to an activity of playing card games, usually for entertainment or recreation purposes. It can also imply engaging in deceit or manipulation to gain an advantage, as in the phrase "playing one's cards right."
  • play it close to one's chest The idiom "play it close to one's chest" means to keep one's thoughts, intentions, or plans secret or hidden, not revealing them to others. It refers to a cautious and guarded approach to sharing information.
  • play the gender card The idiom "play the gender card" refers to the act of exploiting or using one's gender as a strategic advantage in a situation, often for personal gain or to gain sympathy, recognition, or favorable treatment. It implies manipulating or leveraging gender stereotypes or biases to influence the outcome of a situation or to sway public opinion.
  • play your cards close to your chest The idiom "play your cards close to your chest" means to keep your plans, thoughts, or intentions secret or hidden. It typically reflects a cautious or strategic approach in order to maintain an advantage or to avoid revealing too much information to others.
  • musical chairs, play The idiom "musical chairs, play" refers to a situation in which people are constantly changing positions, roles, or jobs, typically because there are limited resources or opportunities available. It implies a sense of uncertainty, competition, and instability, as individuals are constantly trying to secure a better position or opportunity while others may lose out.
  • play (something) close to (one's) chest The idiom "play (something) close to (one's) chest" means to keep one's thoughts, plans, or intentions secret or hidden from others. It suggests a level of guardedness or discretion in order to maintain a strategic advantage or avoid revealing too much information. The phrase is often used in contexts involving competition, negotiations, or situations where it is advantageous to withhold information.
  • play your cards close to the vest The idiom "play your cards close to the vest" means to keep one's intentions, plans, or thoughts hidden or secret. It refers to the way players in card games hold their cards close to their chest, revealing them only when necessary or advantageous. In a broader sense, it suggests being cautious and not revealing too much information, especially in competitive or strategic situations.
  • close of play The idiom "close of play" refers to the end of a specified period of work or business activities, typically at the conclusion of the working day or an agreed-upon time. It is commonly used in professional and business contexts to indicate when something must be completed or resolved before the end of the day or a set deadline.
  • play to the crowd The idiom "play to the crowd" means to behave or perform in a way that is intended to please or gain support from a specific group of people, often by adopting their opinion, values, or preferences. It involves tailoring one's actions or words to cater to the expectations or desires of the audience, sometimes without sincerity or genuine conviction.
  • play the hand (one) is dealt The idiom "play the hand (one) is dealt" means to accept and work with the circumstances or situations that one has been given, instead of complaining or wishing for something different. It implies making the best use of the resources and opportunities available, without dwelling on what cannot be changed. It often refers to adapting and finding solutions within the limitations and challenges present in one's life.
  • play hell with someone/something The idiom "play hell with someone/something" means to cause severe or disruptive damage, trouble, or chaos. It is typically used when describing a situation that has a significant negative impact on a person or thing, often resulting in difficulties, complications, or disorder.
  • play the devil with (something) The idiom "play the devil with (something)" means to cause mischief, disruption, or chaos with regards to a particular situation or thing. It suggests that someone or something is causing significant trouble or problems, often with the intention of causing confusion or making things difficult.
  • play the devil with someone/something The idiom "play the devil with someone/something" is used to describe the act of causing chaos, trouble, or disruption to someone or something. It implies that someone is intentionally causing harm or creating difficulties. It can also refer to manipulating someone or something for one's own benefit or amusement.
  • play with loaded dice The idiom "play with loaded dice" means to manipulate or rig a situation in one's favor, especially by using dishonest or unfair tactics. It refers to someone cheating or deceiving others to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome.
  • play at (doing something) The idiom "play at (doing something)" means to engage in an activity or engage in a behavior in a casual, unserious, or insincere manner. It implies that the individual is not fully committed to or serious about whatever they are doing and may just be pretending or going through the motions.
  • play the dozens The idiom "play the dozens" refers to engaging in a form of verbal sparring, usually between two individuals, where they exchange witty and often insulting remarks about each other or each other's family and friends. It is a lighthearted and humorous way of bantering or teasing, typically done in a friendly or playful manner.
  • play ducks and drakes with "Play ducks and drakes with" is an idiom that means to squander or misuse something recklessly and irresponsibly. It originated from the game of ducks and drakes, which involves throwing flat stones across the surface of water in a skipping manner. The idiom implies treating something valuable or important with little regard or care, often leading to wastefulness or neglect. It can also refer to manipulating or toying with a situation or someone's emotions for personal gain.
  • play ducks and drakes with someone The idiom "play ducks and drakes with someone" means to take advantage of someone or treat them in a careless, frivolous, or insensitive manner. It implies treating someone as a mere source of amusement or entertainment without considering their feelings or needs.
  • a draw play The idiom "a draw play" refers to a strategic move or tactic, commonly used in sports, particularly in American football. It involves deceiving the opposing team by making them believe that a forward pass or an offensive play is happening, while in reality, the play is a running play intended to gain short yardage.
  • play dumb The idiom "play dumb" means to pretend to be ignorant or uninformed about something, usually in order to avoid responsibility, avoid answering a question, or deceive others.
  • end of play The idiom "end of play" generally means the conclusion or end result of a situation or event. It is often used in contexts that involve business, sports, games, or any situation where there is a clear ending or outcome.
  • have money, time, etc. to play with The idiom "have money, time, etc. to play with" means to have an extra or surplus amount of a particular resource, such as money or time, that can be used or spent freely and with flexibility, without any immediate burden or stress. It implies having enough of the resource to comfortably enjoy or utilize it for leisure or non-essential activities.
  • make great, much, etc. play of/with something The idiom "make great, much, etc. play of/with something" means to greatly emphasize, exaggerate, or boast about something. It suggests that someone is celebrating or reveling in a particular thing, often by making it the focus of attention or exaggerating its significance. It can also convey the idea of taking pleasure in showcasing or publicizing something to a large extent.
  • play kissy-face The idiom "play kissy-face" refers to behaving in a flirtatious or affectionate manner, especially through excessive displays of physical affection or exchanging kisses repeatedly. It often implies that the behavior is perceived as insincere, superficial, or done solely for attention or to manipulate a situation.
  • fair play (to you) The idiom "fair play (to you)" is an expression used to acknowledge and commend someone for their honesty, integrity, and adherence to the principles of fairness and justice. It implies that the person in question has acted in a just and ethical manner, deserving respect and appreciation.
  • fair play to someone The idiom "fair play to someone" is a common expression used to acknowledge or commend an individual for their fair, just, or admirable actions or behavior. It is a way of giving credit or showing appreciation for someone's honesty, integrity, or good sportsmanship.
  • play fair/straight The idiom "play fair/straight" refers to acting or behaving honestly, ethically, and according to the rules or principles of fair play. It implies being straightforward, not cheating or taking advantage of others, and adhering to moral standards in any given situation.
  • play false The idiom "play false" means to deceive, cheat, or act dishonestly in a situation, typically for personal gain or advantage. It is often used when someone breaks their promises, betrays trust, or acts in a duplicitous manner.
  • play fast and loose with (someone or something) The idiom "play fast and loose with (someone or something)" refers to behaving in a careless, unpredictable, or deceptive manner towards someone or something. It indicates ignoring rules, principles, or established moral standards with little regard for the consequences. This phrase suggests a lack of responsibility, honesty, or loyalty in one's actions or treatment of a person or thing.
  • play fast and loose with someone/something The idiom "play fast and loose with someone/something" means to treat someone or something in a careless, untrustworthy, or irresponsible manner. It implies behaving in a way that disregards rules, commitments, or the well-being of others for personal gain or amusement.
  • play favourites The idiom "play favorites" refers to the act of showing preferential treatment or bias towards a particular person or group, while disregarding others who may deserve equal consideration or treatment.
  • play (someone) like a fiddle The idiom "play (someone) like a fiddle" means to manipulate or control someone easily and skillfully, often for personal gain or advantage. It implies that the person being played is easily and completely influenced or deceived by the manipulator, just as a skilled musician can control the sound of a fiddle effortlessly.
  • play first fiddle The idiom "play first fiddle" means to have the most important or prominent role in a particular situation or to be in a position of leadership or control. It refers to the first violin, or concertmaster, in an orchestra who has the principal role and leads the other musicians. Therefore, "playing first fiddle" indicates being at the forefront or taking the lead in a given scenario.
  • play second fiddle to The idiom "play second fiddle to" means to be in a subordinate or less important position compared to someone else, or to be seen as less significant or influential. It derives from the orchestral hierarchy, where the first violinist (or concertmaster) holds the most prominent position, and the second violinist is considered of lesser importance.
  • play (one) for a fool The idiom "play (one) for a fool" means to deceive or trick someone, often by making them look or feel foolish or naive.
  • play someone for a fool The idiom "play someone for a fool" means to deceive or manipulate someone, taking advantage of their trust or naivety for personal gain or amusement. It implies treating someone as if they are stupid or easily fooled.
  • play footsie (with someone) The idiom "play footsie (with someone)" refers to a playful and flirtatious behavior between two people where they discreetly touch each other's feet under a table or in a public setting, usually with romantic or sexual implications. It can also metaphorically represent the act of engaging in a secretive or indirect form of flirting or manipulation.
  • play a good knife and fork The idiom "play a good knife and fork" means to possess good table manners or to eat with etiquette and proper decorum. It refers to someone who behaves well and knows how to handle cutlery and conduct themselves properly while dining.
  • play freeze-out The idiom "play freeze-out" can have different meanings depending on the context. It can refer to a situation where individuals or groups intentionally exclude or ignore someone, making them feel isolated or left out. It could also refer to a poker term where players try to force one another to fold their hands by exuding a strong, intimidating presence.
  • give (something) full play The idiom "give (something) full play" means to allow or give complete freedom, expression, or opportunity for something to develop, unfold, or be expressed without any restrictions, hindrances, or limitations. It implies allowing a particular activity, idea, talent, or emotion to fully manifest or have its desired effect.
  • not play that game The idiom "not play that game" means to refuse to engage in a particular activity, strategy, or behavior, often due to the belief that it is manipulative, dishonest, or unfair. It implies rejecting involvement in a situation that one perceives as unjust or deceitful.
  • play (one) at (one's) own game The idiom "play (one) at (one's) own game" means to compete or engage in a particular activity, typically using the same strategy or tactics as someone else, in order to have an equal chance of success or to outdo them in their own area of expertise. It involves matching or surpassing someone by using their own methods or skills against them.
  • play (someone's) game The idiom "play (someone's) game" refers to the act of participating or engaging in someone else's set of rules or strategies, often in a competitive or manipulative context. It implies adapting one's behavior or approach to suit the desires or expectations of another person in order to gain an advantage or achieve a particular goal.
  • play a losing game The idiom "play a losing game" means to engage in an activity or pursue a strategy that is destined to fail or result in a loss. It implies that the individual is making efforts or investments that are ultimately futile or unlikely to yield a positive outcome.
  • play games (with one) The idiom "play games (with one)" means to deceive or manipulate someone, often by being dishonest or misleading in order to gain an advantage or control over them. It can also imply toying with someone's emotions or leading them on without any genuine intentions.
  • play somebody's game The idiom "play somebody's game" means to engage in someone else's preferred strategies, tactics, or approach in order to be successful or gain an advantage in a situation. It refers to adapting one's behavior or actions to conform to another person's set of rules, desires, or expectations.
  • play someone at their own game The idiom "play someone at their own game" means to use someone's own strategies, tactics, or methods against them in order to outsmart or defeat them. It involves matching or surpassing someone's abilities or actions by adapting to their style of play or behavior.
  • play the percentage game The idiom "play the percentage game" means to approach a situation or make decisions based on calculated risks or the most likely, favorable outcome. It involves considering the probabilities and opting for the option with the highest chance of success or benefit. It suggests making choices that increase the likelihood of positive results rather than taking unnecessary risks.
  • play the waiting game The idiom "play the waiting game" means to stay patient, endure delays or uncertainty, and not take immediate action while waiting for a desired outcome or resolution. It involves exercising restraint, remaining passive, and tolerating the passage of time in the hope that things will eventually fall into place or a favorable situation will arise.
  • play the goat The idiom "play the goat" refers to someone behaving foolishly, acting silly, or engaging in playful mischief, often to seek attention or entertain others. It is similar to "playing the fool" or "acting like a clown."
  • play (or act) the (giddy) goat The idiom "play (or act) the (giddy) goat" refers to someone who is behaving foolishly, acting silly, or behaving in a mischievous manner. It often implies that the person is causing trouble or making a spectacle of themselves.
  • grandstand play The idiom "grandstand play" refers to a showy or exaggerated action or behavior intended to impress or gain approval from an audience, often at the expense of the overall objective or true purpose. It is commonly used to describe actions that prioritize self-promotion or theatrics over substance or genuine accomplishment.
  • make a grandstand play The idiom "make a grandstand play" refers to an action or behavior that is done solely for show or attention, rather than for practical reasons or with genuine intention. It often involves behaving in an exaggerated or dramatic manner to impress or amaze others, rather than focusing on the true purpose or outcome of the action.
  • make (a) great play of (something) The idiom "make (a) great play of (something)" means to emphasize or highlight something, often through exaggerated or dramatic actions or expressions. It refers to giving a lot of attention or importance to a particular event, situation, or object for the purpose of drawing attention, impressing others, or creating a spectacle.
  • make great play of something The idiom "make great play of something" means to emphasize, showcase, or draw attention to something, often with a sense of exaggeration or showmanship. It implies putting a significant amount of effort or emphasis on an activity, action, or event for the purpose of making it seem impressive or important.
  • have (something) to play with The idiom "have (something) to play with" means to possess or have something available to use or enjoy casually, often implying that there is extra or surplus of that thing. It can refer to having an abundance of resources, options, or opportunities that one can explore or experiment with for leisure or entertainment purposes.
  • have a part to play The idiom "have a part to play" means to have a role or responsibility in a particular situation or event. It implies that someone is expected to contribute to an outcome or fulfill a specific function. It originated from the language of theater, where actors have assigned roles to portray in a play or performance.
  • play (right) into (one's) hands The idiom "play (right) into (one's) hands" means to unintentionally do something that benefits or helps someone, especially an opponent or adversary, by doing exactly what they want or expect. It refers to acting in a way that aligns with another person's strategy or desires, ultimately giving them an advantage.
  • play (right) into the hands of (one) The idiom "play (right) into the hands of (one)" means to inadvertently do something that benefits or advances someone's interests or agenda, usually someone who is in a position of advantage or with ulterior motives. It refers to behaving or acting in a way that plays directly into someone's strategy, allowing them to achieve their goals or take advantage of a situation.
  • play into somebody's hands The idiom "play into somebody's hands" means to unknowingly or unintentionally do exactly what someone else wanted or expected, often to one's disadvantage. It refers to acting in a way that benefits or allows someone else to achieve their goals or desires effortlessly. It implies being manipulated or falling into a trap set by another person.
  • play hardball (with one) The idiom "play hardball (with one)" typically means to act with ruthlessness, aggression, or assertiveness in order to achieve one's goals or gain an advantage in a situation. It often entails employing tough or uncompromising tactics, particularly when dealing with negotiations, conflicts, or competitive environments.
  • play hardball (with someone) The idiom "play hardball (with someone)" refers to a forceful or aggressive approach to dealing with someone or a situation, usually involving tough negotiation tactics, strict policies, or uncompromising actions in order to achieve one's goals or assert dominance. It involves being firm and unyielding, often without considering the other person's perspective or showing empathy.
  • play Old Harry with (something) The idiom "play Old Harry with (something)" means to cause chaos, disorder, or destruction to a situation or thing. It refers to behaving mischievously, causing trouble, or wreaking havoc.
  • play havoc with (someone or something) The idiom "play havoc with (someone or something)" means to cause significant harm, damage, or disorder to someone or something, often resulting in chaos or a state of disarray.
  • play havoc The idiom "play havoc" means to cause a great amount of chaos, damage, or disruption to a situation, system, or a person's plans. It implies creating a state of disorder or turmoil. Example: The storm played havoc with the town, leaving destruction in its wake.
  • play (one's) heart out The idiom "play (one's) heart out" means to put forth one's maximum effort, enthusiasm, or passion into something, especially in a performance or competition. It suggests giving one's all and leaving nothing behind, displaying intense dedication and skill. This phrase is commonly used in the context of sports, music, acting, or any other field that requires intense expression or performance.
  • play on someone's heartstrings The idiom "play on someone's heartstrings" refers to emotionally manipulating or evoking strong and poignant emotions in someone. It often involves intentionally appealing to a person's emotions, particularly sympathy or empathy, in order to influence or manipulate their actions or decisions.
  • play (merry) hell with (someone or something) The idiom "play (merry) hell with (someone or something)" typically means to cause chaos, disorder, or havoc to someone or something. It implies disruptive or destructive behavior that creates a lot of trouble or difficulties.
  • play hell with somebody/something The idiom "play hell with somebody/something" refers to causing severe trouble, disruption, or damage to someone or something. It implies creating a chaotic or difficult situation that negatively affects the person or object in question.
  • play hell with something The idiom "play hell with something" means to have a disruptive or damaging effect on something, causing chaos, difficulties, or significant problems. It implies that the situation becomes disorderly or goes awry due to certain actions or factors.
  • play merry hell The idiom "play merry hell" means to cause chaos, create a disturbance, or make a lot of noise and commotion in a disruptive or unruly manner. It typically refers to an individual or a group of people behaving recklessly or causing trouble without any regard for the consequences or rules.
  • play (oneself) in The idiom "play (oneself) in" refers to the act of acquainting or familiarizing oneself with a new environment, situation, role, or group. It involves gradually adjusting and adapting to the particular dynamics, rules, or expectations in order to become comfortable or proficient.
  • play hide and seek The idiom "play hide and seek" refers to a popular children's game in which one person closes their eyes and counts while others hide, and then searches for them. In a broader sense, the idiom signifies a situation in which someone is actively trying to evade or conceal themselves, either physically or metaphorically.
  • play hob (with someone or something) The idiom "play hob (with someone or something)" means to cause disorder or trouble, or to have a negative impact or disrupt someone or something. It implies creating chaos or interfering with the smooth functioning of a person, situation, or thing.
  • play (or raise) hob The idiom "play (or raise) hob" means to cause trouble, chaos, or disruption. It refers to engaging in mischief or wild behavior that disrupts the normal functioning of something or creates commotion. It implies acting rebelliously or irresponsibly, often resulting in negative consequences.
  • play tonsil hockey The idiom "play tonsil hockey" refers to engaging in a passionate or intense French kissing session, typically involving lots of tongue movement.
  • play hookey The idiom "play hookey" refers to the act of intentionally and secretly skipping school, work, or any other obligation without permission or excuse. It implies avoiding responsibilities or duties without legitimate reasons.
  • play a hunch The idiom "play a hunch" refers to taking a risk or making a decision based on a gut feeling or intuition rather than solid evidence or logical reasoning. It involves relying on one's instincts or intuition to make a judgment or take action.
  • play (one's) hunch The idiom "play (one's) hunch" means to act or make a decision based on a feeling or intuition, rather than relying on concrete evidence or logical reasoning. It involves trusting one's instincts or gut feeling in a particular situation.
  • play a (or your) hunch The idiom "play a (or your) hunch" means to act or make a decision based on one's intuition or gut feeling, even if there is limited evidence or logical reasoning to support it. It refers to following one's instincts and taking a chance or risk based on a strong intuitive belief.
  • play a joke (on one) The idiom "play a joke (on one)" refers to the act of tricking or deceiving someone for the sake of amusement or entertainment. It involves setting up a situation or creating a scenario that is intended to be funny or comical, often causing the person being pranked to feel confused or surprised momentarily. This idiom typically suggests a harmless and light-hearted prank that is not intended to cause any harm or offense.
  • play kissy-face (with someone) The idiom "play kissy-face (with someone)" refers to engaging in excessive or exaggerated acts of affection, typically through kissing or other displays of romantic interest. It implies indulging in overtly affectionate behavior, often in a playful or insincere manner.
  • play kissy-kissy (with someone) The idiom "play kissy-kissy (with someone)" is an informal phrase that means to behave in a overly friendly or affectionate manner towards someone, often with insincerity or for personal gain. It can also refer to someone's attempt to reconcile or make amends by showing false warmth or affection.
  • play kissy-face (or kissy-kissy) The idiom "play kissy-face" (or "kissy-kissy") refers to engaging in exaggerated or insincere displays of affection, often involving excessive kissing or physical contact. It is typically used to describe actions that are meant to manipulate or win favor from someone, rather than genuinely expressing affection or love. The term can also be used sarcastically to highlight someone's excessive public displays of affection.
  • play a large part The idiom "play a large part" means to have a significant role or influence in something. It refers to being actively involved or contributing significantly to a particular situation, event, or outcome.
  • play for laughs The definition of the idiom "play for laughs" means to deliberately act or perform in a humorous or comedic manner in order to amuse or entertain others. It typically refers to the intentional use of jokes, funny actions, or witty delivery to provoke laughter from an audience.
  • play something for laughs The idiom "play something for laughs" refers to intentionally performing or presenting something, such as a joke, story, or situation, in a humorous or comedic manner with the goal of making people laugh or generating amusement.

Similar spelling words for PLAY

Plural form of PLAY is PLAYS

Conjugate verb Play

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have played
you would have played
he/she/it would have played
we would have played
they would have played
I would have play
you would have play
he/she/it would have play
we would have play
they would have play

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been playing
you would have been playing
he/she/it would have been playing
we would have been playing
they would have been playing

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would play
you would play
he/she/it would play
we would play
they would play

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be playing
you would be playing
he/she/it would be playing
we would be playing
they would be playing

FUTURE

I will play
you will play
he/she/it will play
we will play
they will play

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be playing
you will be playing
he/she/it will be playing
we will be playing
they will be playing

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have played
you will have played
he/she/it will have played
we will have played
they will have played

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been playing
you will have been playing
he/she/it will have been playing
we will have been playing
they will have been playing

IMPERATIVE

you play
we let´s play

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to play

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was playing
you were playing
he/she/it was playing
we were playing
they were playing

PAST PARTICIPLE

played

PAST PERFECT

I had played
you had played
he/she/it had played
we had played
they had played

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been playing
you had been playing
he/she/it had been playing
we had been playing
they had been playing

PRESENT

I play
you play
he/she/it plays
we play
they play

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am playing
you are playing
he/she/it is playing
we are playing
they are playing

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

playing

PRESENT PERFECT

I have played
you have played
he/she/it has played
we have played
they have played

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been playing
you have been playing
he/she/it has been playing
we have been playing
they have been playing

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it play

SIMPLE PAST

I played
you played
he/she/it played
we played
they played

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