How Do You Spell POLE?

Pronunciation: [pˈə͡ʊl] (IPA)

The word "pole" is spelled with four letters and pronounced as /poʊl/. The letter "o" is pronounced as the long vowel sound /oʊ/, whereas the letter "e" is silent. The IPA phonetic transcription for this word gives a precise understanding of how to pronounce it. The combination of the letter "p" and the long vowel sound of "o" produces the initial sound, whereas the letter "l" forms the final sound of the word. Practice pronouncing the word "pole" to ensure accuracy.

POLE Meaning and Definition

Pole can be defined as a long, slender and cylindrical object, typically made of wood, metal, or fiberglass, used for a variety of purposes. It is characterized by its straightness and rigidity, often tapered at one end for easy insertion into the ground or mounting on a base.

One common usage of the term "pole" is in the context of a support structure. For instance, a flagpole is a pole on which a flag is hoisted, displaying a symbol of national or organizational identity. Similarly, a telephone pole is a tall vertical post that supports telephone wires, enabling communication over long distances.

Poles are also extensively employed in sports and recreation. In events like pole vaulting, athletes use flexible poles to propel themselves over a horizontal bar at great heights. Fishing poles are long rods, usually with a reel and line attached, used to catch fish by casting a baited hook into the water. Additionally, skiing and hiking expeditions often require the use of poles to aid balance and provide stability in varied terrain.

Furthermore, one can refer to poles as opposite extremes or contrasting positions. For example, the North and South Poles represent the northernmost and southernmost points on the Earth's axis, respectively. In polarized debates or discussions, opposing viewpoints are colloquially referred to as opposite "poles" of the argument.

In summary, the term "pole" encompasses a range of concepts, from physical support structures to sports equipment, with additional metaphorical usage to denote the ends of Earth's axis or opposing viewpoints.

Top Common Misspellings for POLE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for POLE

Etymology of POLE

The word "pole" has a complex etymology. It ultimately derives from the Latin word "pālus", meaning "stake" or "post". This Latin term was used to denote a wooden pole driven into the ground as a boundary marker. However, in English, the word "pole" took on various meanings and forms over time:

1. In Old English, the word was recorded as "pāl", which referred to a wooden post or stake used for various purposes, such as supporting a structure or marking boundaries.

2. The Old English "pāl" evolved into Middle English "pole" around the 13th century and continued to signify a long, slender piece of wood or metal.

3. In the 15th century, "pole" developed a specific navigational meaning, referring to the end of a mast on a ship.

4.

Idioms with the word POLE

  • wouldn't touch sth with a tenfoot pole, at wouldn't touch sth with a barge pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something with a ten-foot pole" (or "wouldn't touch something with a barge pole") means to have absolutely no desire or interest in being involved with something or someone. It implies a strong aversion or unwillingness to engage, typically due to the perceived negative aspects or consequences of the matter at hand.
  • wouldn't touch sth with a barge pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something with a barge pole" means that someone wants absolutely no association or involvement with a particular thing or person. It signifies a strong aversion or refusal to be associated due to perceived risk, danger, or undesirability.
  • the low man on the totem pole The idiom "the low man on the totem pole" refers to someone who holds the lowest status or authority in a particular group or organization. It symbolizes being at the bottom of a hierarchy or ranking system, often implying less influence, power, or importance compared to others.
  • I wouldn't touch sb/sth with a barge pole. The idiom "I wouldn't touch sb/sth with a barge pole" is used to express extreme aversion or unwillingness to have any association or involvement with a person or thing. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is considered undesirable, dangerous, or simply not worth the effort. It can also convey a sense of wanting to maintain a significant distance from the subject, indicating a strong negative attitude or perception.
  • not touch sth with a tenfoot pole The idiom "not touch something with a ten-foot pole" means to avoid or refuse to become involved in something because it is considered risky, dangerous, or undesirable. It implies a strong aversion or unwillingness to engage with a particular person, situation, activity, or topic.
  • wouldn't touch sm or sth with a tenfoot pole The idiom "wouldn't touch someone or something with a ten-foot pole" is used to express a strong aversion or complete unwillingness to be associated with or involved in a particular person, thing, or situation. It implies that the speaker finds the mentioned subject highly undesirable, dangerous, or unappealing, to the extent that they would go to great lengths to avoid any association or involvement with it.
  • not touch sm or sth with a tenfoot pole The idiom "not touch someone or something with a ten-foot pole" means to avoid or refuse involvement with someone or something completely. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is viewed as unpleasant, dangerous, or undesirable, and should be avoided at all costs.
  • I wouldn't touch it with a tenfoot pole. The idiom "I wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole" means that one has a strong aversion or hesitation towards something, and would prefer not to be involved or associated with it. It implies a feeling of extreme caution or avoidance.
  • low on the totem pole The idiom "low on the totem pole" is used to describe a person or thing that holds a lower rank or position within a hierarchical system or organization. It implies that the individual or object has less authority, influence, or importance compared to others. The phrase originates from the totem poles created by Native American tribes, where the higher a figure is placed on the pole, the more significance it holds.
  • low man on the totem pole The idiom "low man on the totem pole" refers to a person who holds the lowest position in a group or organization, usually indicating that they have the least authority, influence, or prestige. It suggests that this individual has the least power and is often assigned the most undesirable or menial tasks. The idiom originates from the totem poles, which are artistic structures in some Native American cultures that depict a hierarchy of clan or family members, with the highest-ranking individuals positioned at the top.
  • high man on the totem pole The idiom "high man on the totem pole" refers to someone who holds a position of high authority or importance within a group or organization. It originated from the Native American totem poles, where the figure at the top represents the most significant or respected individual. Therefore, being the "high man on the totem pole" implies being in a position of power or prestige.
  • wouldn't touch with a tenfoot pole The idiom "wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole" means that someone would not want to be associated or involved with a particular thing or person under any circumstances because of its negative aspects, dangers, or potential consequences. It implies a sense of strong aversion or avoidance towards something.
  • not touch with a tenfoot pole The idiom "not touch with a ten-foot pole" means to avoid or steer clear of something or someone completely, usually due to it being unpleasant, dangerous, or associated with negative consequences. It implies a strong aversion or unwillingness to get involved.
  • I wouldn't touch with a barge pole The idiom "I wouldn't touch with a barge pole" is used to express strong aversion or reluctance towards something or someone. It implies that the person would not even consider getting involved or associating themselves with the subject or object in question. It conveys a sense of extreme caution or dislike.
  • be in pole position The idiom "be in pole position" refers to being in the leading or advantageous position in a competition, race, or pursuit. It originates from motorsports, where the driver starting from the first position on the starting grid, known as the pole position, is better positioned to achieve victory. In a broader context, it means to be in the most favorable or advantageous position in any given situation.
  • the greasy pole The idiom "the greasy pole" refers to a situation or competition where individuals vie for career advancement or success, often through cunning or unscrupulous means. It conveys the idea of a struggle to climb the corporate ladder, with the "pole" symbolizing the path to higher positions or achievements. The term "greasy" suggests that the journey is difficult, slippery, and requires calculated effort to overcome obstacles and surpass competitors.
  • up the pole The idiomatic phrase "up the pole" is used to describe someone or something that is misguided, mistaken, or completely wrong. It implies that the individual or idea is so far off track that it has become absurd, irrational, or illogical. It can also suggest being confused or having lost touch with reality.
  • not touch (someone or something) with a barge pole The idiom "not touch (someone or something) with a barge pole" is used to convey a strong aversion or unwillingness to be associated with someone or something. It implies that the person or object in question is considered undesirable, untrustworthy, or too risky to associate with. Essentially, it means avoiding someone or something at all costs.
  • I wouldn't touch (something or someone) with a barge pole The idiom "I wouldn't touch (something or someone) with a barge pole" is used to express a strong aversion or dislike towards something or someone. It implies that the speaker has absolutely no desire or intention to be associated with or involved in any way with the mentioned thing or person. It emphasizes a complete lack of interest or willingness to engage.
  • wouldn't touch something/someone with a barge pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something/someone with a barge pole" means that someone wants absolutely nothing to do with a particular thing or person. It implies a strong aversion or reluctance to be associated with or involved in anything related to the topic or individual in question.
  • wouldn't touch something/someone with a ten-foot pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something/someone with a ten-foot pole" means to have a strong aversion or unwillingness to get involved with something or someone due to the potential risks, danger, or undesirability associated with them. It implies a complete lack of interest or inclination to engage with the mentioned thing or individual.
  • be up the pole The idiom "be up the pole" typically refers to someone being confused, misguided, or entirely wrong about something. It suggests that the person is in a state of misunderstanding or uncertainty, often with no logical basis for their beliefs or actions.
  • pole dancing The idiom "pole dancing" typically refers to a dance form and physical fitness activity in which individuals perform acrobatic movements and dance routines around a vertical pole. It is often associated with strip clubs or adult entertainment establishments, where it has been popularized in that context. However, the idiom can also generalise the activity outside of that specific association to include any form of dancing or exercise performed on a pole.
  • pole dancer The idiom "pole dancer" refers to a person, typically a woman, who performs acrobatic and dance routines using a vertical pole as a prop. It is often associated with exotic dancing or strip clubs.
  • I wouldn't touch (someone or something) with a ten-foot pole The idiom "I wouldn't touch (someone or something) with a ten-foot pole" means that one wants to avoid any involvement or association with a particular person or thing. It implies a strong aversion or reluctance towards being associated with the person or thing in question.
  • I wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole The idiom "I wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole" is a phrase used to convey extreme unwillingness or aversion towards a particular person, situation, or thing. It implies that the speaker wants no association or involvement with the mentioned subject.
  • not touch (someone or something) with a ten-foot pole The idiom "not touch (someone or something) with a ten-foot pole" means to want nothing to do with someone or something, typically due to a sense of danger, dislike, or aversion. It implies an intense desire to keep a safe distance or avoid involvement altogether.
  • not touch with a ten-foot pole The idiom "not touch with a ten-foot pole" is used to describe something that one wants to avoid as it is considered dangerous, risky, or simply undesirable. It implies the unwillingness to come into contact with or be associated with a particular person, thing, place, or situation.
  • wouldn’t touch someone/something with a ten-foot pole The idiom "wouldn't touch someone/something with a ten-foot pole" means to have absolutely no desire or inclination to be associated with a particular person or thing. It suggests strong aversion, often due to a perceived risk, danger, or negative reputation.
  • wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole The idiom "wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole" means to refuse or avoid involvement in something due to it being dangerous, repulsive, or undesirable. It implies strong aversion or a complete lack of interest in something.
  • the longest pole knocks the persimmon The idiom "the longest pole knocks the persimmon" means that the person or thing with the most power, influence, or advantage is likely to succeed or achieve their goals. It implies that having a greater advantage or a stronger position in a situation gives one the upper hand. The persimmon represents the desired outcome or goal, and the longest pole symbolizes the predominant force or the most effective strategy to succeed.

Similar spelling words for POLE

Plural form of POLE is POLES

Conjugate verb Pole

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have poled
you would have poled
he/she/it would have poled
we would have poled
they would have poled
I would have pole
you would have pole
he/she/it would have pole
we would have pole
they would have pole

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been poling
you would have been poling
he/she/it would have been poling
we would have been poling
they would have been poling

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would pole
you would pole
he/she/it would pole
we would pole
they would pole

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be poling
you would be poling
he/she/it would be poling
we would be poling
they would be poling

FUTURE

I will pole
you will pole
he/she/it will pole
we will pole
they will pole

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be poling
you will be poling
he/she/it will be poling
we will be poling
they will be poling

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have poled
you will have poled
he/she/it will have poled
we will have poled
they will have poled

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been poling
you will have been poling
he/she/it will have been poling
we will have been poling
they will have been poling

IMPERATIVE

you pole
we let´s pole

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to pole

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was poling
you were poling
he/she/it was poling
we were poling
they were poling

PAST PARTICIPLE

poled

PAST PERFECT

I had poled
you had poled
he/she/it had poled
we had poled
they had poled

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been poling
you had been poling
he/she/it had been poling
we had been poling
they had been poling

PRESENT

I pole
you pole
he/she/it poles
we pole
they pole

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am poling
you are poling
he/she/it is poling
we are poling
they are poling

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

poling

PRESENT PERFECT

I have poled
you have poled
he/she/it has poled
we have poled
they have poled

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been poling
you have been poling
he/she/it has been poling
we have been poling
they have been poling

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it pole

SIMPLE PAST

I poled
you poled
he/she/it poled
we poled
they poled

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