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How Do You Spell QUANT?

Correct spelling for the English word "Quant" is [kwˈɒnt], [kwˈɒnt], [k_w_ˈɒ_n_t]] (IPA phonetic alphabet).

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Definition of QUANT

  1. A punting pole with a broad flange near the end to prevent it from sinking into the mud; a setting pole.

Common Misspellings for QUANT

Below is the list of 83 misspellings for the word "quant".

  • q1uant
  • quqnt
  • 1quant
  • quantt
  • quanft
  • quantf
  • 2uant
  • qwuant
  • qusnt
  • quan5
  • quant6
  • uqant
  • q8uant
  • wuant
  • quan6
  • Q5ant
  • Qua.t
  • Qqant
  • qhuant
  • quzant
  • quanjt
  • qiuant
  • quznt
  • q7uant
  • quangt
  • qunat
  • quantg
  • qyant
  • Qeant
  • quabnt
  • qyuant
  • quan6t
  • q2uant
  • quajt
  • puant
  • q8ant
  • qujant
  • quanyt
  • qu7ant
  • quasnt
  • quwant
  • 2quant
  • q7ant
  • quamt
  • quqant
  • q uant
  • quanr
  • quawnt
  • quan t
  • quuant
  • qusant
  • qhant
  • Quanp
  • Quanv
  • qua nt
  • Quan4
  • qauant
  • Quanu
  • quaqnt
  • qu ant
  • qjuant
  • quantr
  • qquant
  • quanht
  • Qucnt
  • quan5t
  • Qtant
  • qjant
  • quwnt
  • 1uant
  • quanmt
  • quant5
  • suant
  • quanbt
  • qu8ant
  • uuant
  • yuant
  • quhant
  • quanrt
  • quatn
  • quaznt
  • quaht
  • quyant

Usage Examples for QUANT

  1. Quant au fond, the whole thing, of course, is a fever dream, and worthy of eternal laughter. - "The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 24 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson Other: Andrew Lang
  2. Quant a moi, I shall henceforth only speak of it as the primum mobile of whatever we venerate and admire, and shall think it the highest compliment I can pay to a man, to tell him he is eminently vain." - "Pelham, Complete" by Edward Bulwer-Lytton Last Updated: March 16, 2009
  3. Quant a moi, je les adore. - "Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker" by S. Weir Mitchell
  4. Pour vos pertes, griefve dueil n'en menez, Fors a raison, a point, et a mesure, Car vous n'aviez riens quant vous fustes nez. - "A Short History of French Literature" by George Saintsbury
  5. I cannot see, as some have done, that it has anything in common with Horace's Tortum digna sequi potius quant ducere funern: 'More worthy to follow than to lead the tightened cord': which is a metaphor taken from a towing line, or any line acting in a similar manner, where one draws and another is drawn. - "Gryll Grange" by Thomas Love Peacock Commentator: George Saintsbury
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