How Do You Spell RUN?

Pronunciation: [ɹˈʌn] (IPA)

The word "run" is spelled with three letters- R, U, N. It is pronounced as /rʌn/ in IPA phonetic transcription. The "r" sound is made by vibrating the tongue against the alveolar ridge, while the vowel "u" is a short rounded vowel sound. The final "n" is pronounced with the tip of the tongue touching the alveolar ridge. The spelling of the word "run" is unique, as it only has three letters, but produces a clear and distinct pronunciation.

RUN Meaning and Definition

The verb "run" has multiple definitions, making it a versatile and commonly used word. It can be defined as the act of moving swiftly on foot, at a faster pace than walking, by lifting and setting down each foot in rapid succession. This definition is also extended to include sprinting or racing at high speed. Additionally, "run" can indicate the action of operating or functioning something, like a machine, business, or organization. For example, a car engine "runs" when it is in motion.

In terms of a path or route, "run" refers to it extending or stretching in a particular direction, often used in expressions like "the road runs parallel to the river." The term can also describe the action of flowing, whether it be a liquid running from a faucet or a river running through a valley.

Moreover, "run" has a financial connotation, indicating a series of transactions or the management of money. It may refer to overseeing a business's financial affairs or being in charge of day-to-day operations. Furthermore, in the context of elections or competitions, "run" denotes being a candidate or participant in a race or contest.

As a noun, a "run" can represent an act or instance of running, a long continuous period of operation, a line of people or objects in single file, or a successful or predictable series or sequence.

Overall, with its multiple meanings and applications in different contexts, "run" is a versatile word that embodies various actions, processes, and states of being.

Top Common Misspellings for RUN *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for RUN

Etymology of RUN

The word "run" can be traced back to Old English and has Germanic origins. It is derived from the Old English word "rinnan" which means "to flow" or "to run". This Old English word is cognate with Middle Dutch "rinnen", Old High German "rinnan", and Gothic "rinnan", all of which mean the same. Ultimately, the word can be linked to the Proto-Germanic root *rinnaną, which also gave rise to related words in other Germanic languages.

Idioms with the word RUN

  • run rings round sb The idiom "run rings round sb" means to outperform or outsmart someone easily and consistently. It refers to the idea of swiftly and effortlessly surpassing someone in a particular task, skill, or competition.
  • run round in circles The idiom "run round in circles" means to engage in activity or discussion without making any progress or achieving any result. It implies a sense of frustration or being stuck in a repetitive cycle of actions without achieving a desired outcome.
  • go/run round in circles The idiom "go/run round in circles" means to engage in repetitive or pointless activities without making any progress or reaching a conclusion. It implies being stuck in a never-ending loop or cycle without achieving any desired outcome.
  • run round like a headless chicken The idiom "run round like a headless chicken" means to behave or act in a frantic, disorganized, or panicked manner, often without thinking or without having a clear purpose or goal in mind. It implies a state of extreme busyness or agitation, similar to a chicken running around aimlessly after its head has been cut off.
  • run aground/ashore The idiom "run aground/ashore" is used to describe a situation where a ship or boat becomes stranded or stuck on the ground or sandy beach, typically due to low tide, a navigation error, or adverse weather conditions. In a broader sense, it can also be figuratively used to mean encountering an obstacle, setback, or failure in one's plans or progress.
  • run a mile The idiom "run a mile" means to quickly and instinctively avoid or be highly cautious about someone or something because they seem dangerous, untrustworthy, or unfavorable. It suggests that the person would go to great lengths or distance to keep away from the situation or individual.
  • run and run The idiom "run and run" typically means to continue indefinitely or to persist without stopping. It implies that a situation or action is ongoing and there is no foreseeable end or resolution.
  • run sb close The idiom "run sb close" means to give someone a tough competition or come close to defeating them in a competition or contest. It suggests a close or narrow margin between the two competing parties.
  • run errands The idiom "run errands" refers to the act of completing various small tasks or chores, typically outside of one's normal routine or daily activities. This includes going to the bank, grocery shopping, picking up or dropping off items, paying bills, or fulfilling any other necessary or routine obligations.
  • run high The idiom "run high" means that emotions, tension, or intensity are extremely strong or elevated in a particular situation.
  • run in the family The idiom "run in the family" means that a particular trait, characteristic, talent, or tendency is common among several members of a family, and it is often passed down from one generation to another. It implies that the trait or characteristic is inherited genetically or is a result of the shared environment and upbringing within the family.
  • run in/through sb's head/mind The idiom "run in/through someone's head/mind" refers to having thoughts constantly occupying one's thinking or continuously recurring thoughts or ideas in one's mind. It implies that a particular thought or concept is persistently present and revolving around in someone's mental activity.
  • run its course The idiom "run its course" means to continue or develop until something comes to a natural end or conclusion without any interference or intervention. It implies that a particular situation, action, or process will naturally reach its intended outcome over time without needing any external influence.
  • run your eye over sth The idiom "run your eye over something" means to quickly look over or examine something, usually referring to reading or reviewing a written document, such as an article or a report. It suggests a brief and casual inspection rather than a thorough examination.
  • run yourself into the ground The idiom "run yourself into the ground" means to exhaust oneself physically or mentally through excessive work or activities, often leading to a state of extreme fatigue, burnout, or physical/mental breakdown.
  • run sb out of town (on a rail) The idiom "run someone out of town (on a rail)" refers to forcefully and unanimously expelling or driving someone away from a place or community due to their undesirable behavior or actions. The phrase often implies strong disapproval, hostility, or outrage towards the person being targeted. The imagery of being "run out of town on a rail" suggests a public humiliation or ostracism, where the person is forced to leave town in a disgraceful manner, potentially being subjected to ridicule or punishment along the way.
  • run sb ragged The idiom "run someone ragged" means to make someone extremely tired or exhausted by demanding a lot from them or overworking them.
  • run the show The idiom "run the show" means to be in control and have authority or power over a situation or event. It refers to being the person who makes decisions, gives orders, and directs the course of action.
  • run through sb's mind/head The idiom "run through someone's mind/head" refers to thoughts or ideas that constantly occupy someone's thinking or are on their mind throughout a particular period of time. It implies that something is often being thought about or contemplated by an individual.
  • run sb/sth to ground The idiom "run somebody/something to ground" refers to the act of persistently searching for and eventually finding someone or something after a long or exhaustive pursuit. It is often used to describe the process of apprehending or locating a person or thing that has been evasive or difficult to find.
  • run wild The definition of the idiom "run wild" is to behave or act in an uncontrolled or unrestrained manner, often causing chaos or disorder.
  • against the run of play The idiom "against the run of play" typically refers to a situation where something unexpected or contrary to what is expected occurs. More specifically, it is commonly used in sports, particularly in soccer, to describe a goal or a result that happens unexpectedly or goes against the dominant team's performance or momentum in a game. It implies that the outcome does not conform to the usual flow or progression of events.
  • give sb a run for their money The idiom "give someone a run for their money" means to provide strong competition or opposition to someone, usually in a contest or competition. It suggests that the person being referred to is giving their opponent a tough challenge, making them work hard and exert significant effort to succeed. The phrase also implies that the person being challenged is not expected to win easily and might face a possible defeat.
  • have a good run for your money The idiom "have a good run for your money" means to receive or experience a worthwhile, enjoyable, or satisfying experience or challenge in return for one's efforts, investment, or participation. It often refers to situations where one's expectations are met or exceeded, providing a sense of satisfaction or value for the time, money, or effort put in.
  • in the long run The idiom "in the long run" means considering or taking into account the eventual outcome or consequences of a situation, especially over a lengthy period of time. It emphasizes the importance of looking beyond immediate results or short-term benefits and considering the eventual overall outcome or impact.
  • in the short run The idiom "in the short run" refers to a period of time that is relatively brief or immediate, typically referring to a short-term perspective or result, rather than long-term consequences or outcomes. It implies a limited time frame and highlights the temporary nature of a situation or decision.
  • make a run for it The idiom "make a run for it" means to sprint or flee from a place or situation quickly, often in an attempt to escape or avoid capture or trouble.
  • be on the run The idiom "be on the run" means to be actively evading capture or to be continuously moving from place to place in order to avoid being caught by authorities or pursued by someone.
  • on the run The idiom "on the run" means to be in a state of constant motion or to be constantly busy or hurried. It can also refer to someone who is evading capture or trying to avoid being caught by authorities.
  • the run of sth The idiom "the run of something" refers to having unrestricted access or full control over something, typically for a defined period of time. It can also imply having high levels of success or dominance in a particular area or activity.
  • run riot The idiom "run riot" means to act or behave in an uncontrolled, disorderly, or unrestrained manner. It often implies a situation where there is chaos, wildness, or unruliness.
  • run/go deep The idiom "run/go deep" is commonly used in sports, particularly football (American) or soccer (British), to describe a player's movement towards the opponent's goal in order to receive a long pass or make a penetrating run behind the defense. It means to go far into the opponent's territory, usually in an attempt to create scoring opportunities or to position oneself strategically. The phrase can also be figuratively used outside of sports to describe delving deeply into a subject, exploring an idea extensively, or getting involved in something intensely.
  • run the gauntlet The idiom "run the gauntlet" refers to the act of going through a difficult or dangerous situation in which one faces a series of challenges, obstacles, or criticisms from multiple sources. It implies a challenging journey where one must endure and persevere in the face of adversity.
  • run out of steam The idiom "run out of steam" means to lose energy or enthusiasm, to become tired or exhausted, and to no longer have the motivation or ability to continue doing something. It is often used to describe someone or something that starts with great energy or momentum but gradually loses their strength or drive.
  • run away to sea The idiom "run away to sea" refers to the act of escaping or running away, often impulsively, in search of a new and adventurous life at sea, typically as a sailor or crew member on a ship. It implies a desire for freedom, exploration, and a change from one's current circumstances or responsibilities.
  • passions run high The idiom "passions run high" refers to a situation or circumstance where emotions are intense and strong, often leading to heightened excitement, anger, or enthusiasm among people involved. It implies that people's emotions are deeply engaged and may potentially influence their actions or decision-making.
  • run onto the rocks, at run aground/ashore The idiom "run onto the rocks" is equivalent to the idioms "run aground" or "run ashore." It means to experience a failure or setback, typically in a situation or endeavor that was initially promising or successful. It often suggests encountering unforeseen obstacles or complications that result in the disruption or failure of one's plans or progress.
  • run/go like clockwork The idiom "run/go like clockwork" means that something is operating or progressing smoothly and efficiently, without any problems or disruptions. It suggests that everything is happening perfectly and in a well-organized manner, just like the precise workings of a clock.
  • go/be run to ground The idiom "go/be run to ground" means to be pursued or chased relentlessly until caught or captured, or to relentlessly pursue and hunt down someone or something until found or captured. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of thoroughly investigating or solving a complex problem or mystery.
  • still waters run deep The idiom "still waters run deep" refers to a person who appears calm and unassuming on the surface, but possesses great depth, intelligence, or emotions underneath. It suggests that quiet or reserved individuals often have a complex or profound nature that may not be immediately apparent.
  • run sb/sth to earth, at run sb/sth to ground The idiom "run someone/something to earth" or "run someone/something to ground" means to find or discover someone or something that has been difficult to locate or track down. It suggests relentlessly pursuing or investigating until the person or thing is finally found or caught. It often implies a lengthy or challenging search effort.
  • make sb's blood run cold The idiom "make someone's blood run cold" means to cause extreme fear, horror, or shock. It refers to something that is so terrifying that it causes an intense physical reaction, such as a sudden feeling of chilliness or shivers.
  • run the risk of doing sth The idiom "run the risk of doing something" means to engage in an activity or make a decision that could potentially lead to negative consequences or danger. It implies knowingly taking a chance or exposing oneself to possible harm, loss, or undesirable outcomes.
  • rush/run sb off their feet The idiom "rush/run someone off their feet" means to keep someone extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or duties, often to the point of exhaustion. It implies a state of being constantly on the move, rushing from one task to another, unable to catch a break.
  • go to sea, at run away to sea The idiom "go to sea" or "run away to sea" refers to finding escape or seeking a new adventure, often by leaving one's current situation behind and embarking on a journey or taking on a new path in life. It can imply a desire for freedom, independence, or a fresh start.
  • run a red light The idiom "run a red light" means to deliberately ignore or disregard traffic rules and signals, specifically referring to driving through an intersection when the light is red, indicating a stop.
  • run across The idiom "run across" means to encounter or come across someone or something unexpectedly or by chance. It can refer to stumbling upon a person or object while in the process of doing something else.
  • run in place The idiom "run in place" means to exert effort or engage in activity without making any progress or achieving desirable results. It refers to a situation where someone is putting in effort but not moving forward or making any significant advancement towards their goal or objective.
  • run afoul of sb/sth The idiom "run afoul of someone/something" means to come into conflict or opposition with someone or something, often resulting in disapproval, confrontation, or negative consequences. It implies violating or going against established rules, norms, or expectations, leading to a problematic situation.
  • run around after The idiom "run around after" means to continuously and tirelessly attend to someone or something, usually implying that it involves a significant amount of effort or inconvenience. It typically describes the act of constantly taking care of or meeting the needs of someone, often in a subservient or submissive manner.
  • run after The idiom "run after" typically means to pursue or chase someone or something with the intention of catching or reaching them. It can be used both in a literal sense, where someone physically runs after someone, or in a figurative sense, where someone actively seeks or chases after a goal, ambition, or desire.
  • If you run after two hares, you will catch neither The idiom "If you run after two hares, you will catch neither" means that trying to pursue or accomplish two conflicting goals simultaneously often leads to failure. It suggests that by dividing one's attention and efforts, both objectives will ultimately be unattainable. The idiom emphasizes the importance of focus, prioritization, and dedication in order to achieve success.
  • Run that by again The idiom "run that by again" means to ask someone to repeat or explain something that was not fully understood or heard the first time. It is a way of requesting clarification or seeking further information regarding a particular topic or statement.
  • run aground (on sth) The idiom "run aground (on sth)" typically means to encounter an obstacle or difficulty that hinders progress or success. It originates from a nautical term, where a ship running aground refers to it getting stuck on a sandbar or shallow area of water, making it unable to move forward. Figuratively, it implies being unable to proceed due to an unforeseen problem or setback.
  • run one's rhymes To "run one's rhymes" is an idiom that typically refers to the act of reciting or performing one's own written lyrics or poems, especially in a rhythmic and expressive manner. It is commonly used in the context of rap or hip-hop, where artists showcase their skills by delivering their rhymes with precision and flow. It implies displaying confidence, creativity, and lyrical prowess.
  • run rings around To "run rings around" someone means to outperform or outdo them easily, often in terms of speed, skill, or intellect. It implies a significant superiority or effortless dominance over someone else in a particular activity or situation.
  • run circles around The idiom "run circles around" means to outperform or outdo someone in terms of skill, speed, or ability. It implies a significant superiority or advantage over the other person.
  • run a risk (of sth) The idiom "run a risk (of sth)" means to take a chance or to be in a situation where there is a possibility of something negative or undesirable happening. It implies being exposed to potential danger, harm, or negative consequences due to a particular action or decision.
  • run down sm lines The idiom "run down sm lines" means to criticize, belittle, or disparage someone or something. It denotes the act of expressing negative judgments or unfavorable opinions about someone or something in a derogatory manner.
  • time to run "Time to run" is an idiom that refers to a situation or moment when it becomes necessary to quickly leave or escape from a place or situation. It suggests urgency and the need to move swiftly in order to avoid negative consequences or danger.
  • run along The idiom "run along" generally means to go away or leave, usually said in a friendly or informal manner. It is often used to dismiss someone or encourage them to continue on their way, perhaps because they are not needed or are being bothersome.
  • have to run along The idiom "have to run along" means that a person needs to leave quickly or abruptly, usually because they have other commitments or tasks to attend to.
  • course of true love never did run smooth The idiom "the course of true love never did run smooth" means that love and relationships are often marked by difficulties, challenges, or obstacles. It suggests that romantic relationships are rarely free of problems, and that obstacles are a natural part of any love story. This phrase is often used to reflect the reality that relationships require effort, perseverance, and compromises in order to be successful.
  • got to run The idiom "got to run" means that someone needs to leave or depart immediately because they have something urgent to attend to or a time constraint. It implies the need to go quickly or without delay.
  • run amok The idiom "run amok" refers to behaving uncontrollably, violently, or in a wild and disorganized manner. It describes a situation where someone or something becomes uncontrolled and goes on a rampage or becomes chaotic.
  • run down sth The idiom "run down something" typically means to briefly summarize or quickly provide information about a particular topic or subject. It can also be used to describe the act of checking or inspecting something in detail.
  • run down sb The idiom "run down sb" typically means to criticize or speak negatively about someone, often in a demeaning or derogatory manner. It involves unfairly or unjustly pointing out a person's flaws, faults, or shortcomings.
  • run down sb/sth The idiom "run down someone or something" has multiple meanings, including: 1. To hit a person or object with a vehicle, causing injury or damage. Example: "He was hospitalized when a car ran him down at the crosswalk." 2. To criticize or speak negatively about someone or something. Example: "The journalist ran down the politician's controversial policies in her article." 3. To provide a detailed and comprehensive description or summary of someone or something. Example: "The report ran down all the different factors contributing to climate change." 4. To gradually worsen or deteriorate in condition or quality. Example: "The old building has been running down for years and needs extensive repairs." Please note that the exact meaning of "run
  • run you down The idiom "run you down" typically refers to physically hitting or colliding with someone or something using a vehicle, usually with the intention of causing harm or injury. It can also be used metaphorically to mean criticizing, attacking, or overpowering someone verbally or emotionally.
  • run down The idiom "run down" typically means to exhaust or weaken physically or mentally, often due to prolonged stress or overwork. It can also refer to a concise summary or critique of something.
  • run sth down The idiom "run something down" can have a few different meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To criticize or belittle someone or something; to speak negatively or disparagingly about someone or something. Example: "She always runs down her colleagues behind their backs." 2. To exhaust the supply, energy, or resources of something. Example: "He has been working long hours and running himself down." Please note that the meaning of an idiom can vary based on its usage in a particular sentence or situation.
  • run sm or sth down To "run something or someone down" typically means to criticize or speak negatively about someone or something in a derogatory manner. It can also refer to providing a detailed commentary or analysis about a particular topic, often highlighting its flaws or shortcomings.
  • run up sth The idiom "run up something" typically means to accumulate or increase something, especially a debt, bill, or expenses, over a period of time. It can also refer to quickly escalating or accumulating something.
  • run up (to sm or sth) The idiom "run up (to someone or something)" typically means to approach or come near someone or something quickly, usually indicating anticipation, excitement, or urgency. It can also refer to accumulating a large amount of debt or expenses.
  • run sth up The idiom "run sth up" refers to accumulating or amassing a large amount of debt, expenses, a bill, or a score quickly or to a high amount. It can be used when someone rapidly incurs or accumulates financial or other obligations.
  • run on The idiom "run on" refers to a sentence or conversation that continues without pause or without proper structure, often resulting in a long, confusing, or incoherent passage of words.
  • We must learn to walk before we can run The idiom "We must learn to walk before we can run" means that one must develop essential foundational skills or knowledge before attempting more advanced or complex tasks. It emphasizes the importance of taking small steps, building a solid base, and mastering the basics before trying to achieve bigger goals.
  • run with the hare and hunt with the hounds The idiom "run with the hare and hunt with the hounds" means to support or sympathize with both conflicting parties or opinions, often for personal gain or to avoid taking a clear stance. It refers to someone trying to be on both sides of an argument or conflict simultaneously.
  • run with it The idiom "run with it" means to take the initiative or responsibility for something without being instructed or guided, and to make the most of an opportunity or idea presented. It implies acting independently, confidently, and decisively, often involving taking the lead and embracing the challenge at hand.
  • run with The idiom "run with" means to take an idea or suggestion and actively pursue or develop it further. It often implies embracing and bringing life to a concept or proposal.
  • run up to sm place The idiom "run up to [someone's] place" means to visit or go to someone's home or residence, typically without any prior notice or invitation. It implies a spontaneous or informal visit, often just dropping by without any specific purpose or agenda.
  • run up the flagpole The definition of the idiom "run up the flagpole" is to propose an idea, plan, or suggestion to gauge others' reactions, feedback, or approval. It often involves presenting the idea to a wider group or higher authority for consideration or evaluation.
  • run up against The idiom "run up against" means to encounter or face difficulties, obstacles, or oppositions while trying to achieve something. It implies the act of coming into direct conflict or collision with an obstacle or opposition that hinders progress or success.
  • run up The idiom "run up" can have several meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To accumulate or accrue a debt or bill: This meaning is often used in financial contexts. For example, if someone constantly spends money on unnecessary purchases, they may run up a large credit card bill. 2. To sprint or race rapidly towards something: When used literally, "run up" means to run quickly towards a certain destination or object. For instance, a child might run up to their parent when they see them after a long time apart. 3. To increase or raise something: This definition is often used in reference to increasing numerical figures, such as prices, statistics, or scores. For instance, a country
  • run to ground The idiom "run to ground" refers to the act of tracking down or locating something or someone after a thorough and extensive search. It is often used to describe the process of finding a fugitive, a hidden object, or solving a complex problem by persistent investigation and pursuit.
  • run to earth The idiom "run to earth" means to track down or find someone or something after a lengthy pursuit or search. It is often used to describe the act of capturing or discovering someone who has been hiding or evading capture.
  • run to The idiom "run to" typically means having enough of something, especially money or resources, to afford or cover a particular expense or situation. It implies that the person or entity has enough or more than enough to handle the requirement or demand.
  • run through The idiom "run through" typically means to quickly review or rehearse something, often a performance, presentation, or procedure. It can also refer to quickly using up or depleting a resource, such as money or time.
  • run the risk The idiom "run the risk" means to face or accept the possibility of experiencing a negative consequence or outcome as a result of taking a particular action or making a certain decision. It implies exposing oneself to the potential dangers or hazards involved in a situation.
  • run the good race The idiom "run the good race" is a metaphorical expression that means to pursue something diligently and with determination, often despite challenges or setbacks. It stems from the idea of running a race, where participants strive to give their best effort and achieve their goals. This idiom is commonly used to encourage someone to persevere and continue striving for success or to maintain a positive attitude in the face of adversity.
  • run the gamut The idiom "run the gamut" means to cover or include a wide range or variety of things or emotions. It implies going through a complete spectrum or series of possibilities.
  • run short The idiom "run short" means to have or consume a limited quantity of something, typically in a depleted or inadequate amount. It suggests that there is not enough of a particular thing to meet the demand or fulfill a purpose.
  • run scared The idiom "run scared" typically means to be filled with fear or anxiety and to act in a hasty or panicky manner, usually due to a perceived threat or danger.
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  • run rampant The idiom "run rampant" means to spread or proliferate in an uncontrolled or unrestrained manner, often causing havoc or chaos. It refers to a situation where something is growing or expanding rapidly and out of control, resulting in widespread and often negative consequences.
  • run ragged The idiom "run ragged" means to exhaust or tire someone out through excessive physical or mental activity, causing them to become extremely tired or weary.
  • run over with The idiom "run over with" typically means to have an excess amount of something or to be overwhelmed by something, often pertaining to emotions, thoughts, or responsibilities. It implies that one cannot handle or manage all that is present or happening.
  • run over to The idiom "run over to" means to quickly or hastily go from one place to another, usually with the intention of accomplishing a specific task or meeting someone briefly. It implies a sense of urgency or promptness in the action of going to another location.
  • run over The idiom "run over" has several meanings based on the context in which it is used. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To hit or collide with someone or something with a vehicle: This meaning refers to physically running over an object or individual with a car, bike, or any other mode of transport. Example: "Be careful when crossing the road, or you might get run over." 2. To exceed a certain time limit or be late: This meaning implies that a scheduled activity or event has lasted longer than expected or planned. Example: "The meeting ran over by 30 minutes." 3. To quickly review or go through something: This meaning indicates briefly reviewing or summarizing a text, document, or presentation. Example
  • run out the clock The idiom "run out the clock" means to deliberately use up or waste time, typically in order to preserve or maintain an advantage, avoid risks, or prevent the occurrence of something unwanted. It is often used in sports when a team is winning and simply aims to consume the remaining time without taking unnecessary risks that could lead to the opposing team scoring. It can also be used in a broader sense to describe any situation where someone avoids action or delays making a decision until time runs out.
  • run out on The idiom "run out on" means to abandon or desert someone or something, often abruptly and without warning or explanation. It implies leaving someone in a difficult or vulnerable situation.
  • run out of time The idiom "run out of time" refers to the situation where the available time for completing a task or accomplishing something comes to an end before it is finished or before the desired result is achieved. It implies that there is a time constraint that prevents the completion of an action.
  • run out of sm place The idiom "run out of (some place)" means to completely use up or deplete the supply of something in a particular location or to exhaust one's presence or effectiveness in a certain place.
  • run out of gas The idiom "run out of gas" typically refers to the situation where someone or something has used up their energy, resources, or motivation, and is no longer able to continue or fulfill a particular task or objective. It can be both literal, referring to a vehicle running out of fuel, or figurative, referring to someone lacking the necessary energy, enthusiasm, or resources to complete a task.
  • run out of The idiom "run out of" means to consume or use up all of a particular resource, thus having none left. It can also refer to running out of time, patience, or any other finite quantity.
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  • run out The idiom "run out" has multiple meanings: 1. To use up or exhaust a supply of something: This can refer to physically depleting a resource, such as running out of water or running out of food. It can also relate to using up a non-physical resource, like running out of time or running out of money. 2. To leave or exit a place hastily or quickly: For example, if someone says, "I have to run out," it means they need to leave promptly or temporarily. 3. To become unavailable or be completely used up: This can describe a situation where something is no longer available, like when a product runs out of stock or when a certain item runs out of production. 4. To
  • run onto The idiom "run onto" typically means to come across or unexpectedly encounter something or someone, often while in the process of looking for or pursuing something else.
  • run on all cylinders The idiom "run on all cylinders" means to operate or function at the highest level of efficiency, effectiveness, or capacity. It is often used to describe someone or something performing at their peak performance or optimal state. It is derived from the analogy of an engine running smoothly and powerfully when all its cylinders are in proper working order.
  • run off with The idiom "run off with" means to elope or leave suddenly with someone, typically without the knowledge or approval of others involved, such as a spouse or partner. It implies an unexpected or secretive departure with another person, often involving an illicit or romantic relationship.
  • run off in all directions The idiom "run off in all directions" means to scatter or disperse in various ways or without a clear focus or direction. It implies a lack of organization or a situation where everyone is going their own way, often causing confusion or ineffectiveness.
  • run off at the mouth The idiom "run off at the mouth" means to talk excessively or ramble on without considering the consequences or the impact of one's words. It implies speaking too much and often saying things that may not be well-thought-out, inappropriate, or without considering the listener's interest.
  • run off The idiom "run off" can have multiple meanings depending on the context, but commonly it refers to the act of escaping or fleeing quickly from a situation or place. It can also refer to the process of making multiple copies of something, usually by using a copying machine or a similar device. Additionally, it can describe the act of producing or printing a particular work or publication, such as running off thousands of copies of a book or a magazine.
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  • run low The phrase "run low" typically refers to the situation where the quantity, level, or amount of something is decreasing or becoming insufficient. It suggests that there is not much of that particular thing left or available.
  • run like the wind The idiom "run like the wind" means to run very fast or move quickly. It is often used to describe someone's speed or agility in running or moving.
  • run like clockwork The idiom "run like clockwork" means that something is functioning smoothly, efficiently, and without any problems or delays. It suggests that the operations or processes are precise, well-organized, and on schedule, similar to the precise and predictable movements of a clock.
  • run it down The idiom "run it down" typically means to provide a thorough and detailed explanation or exploration of a particular topic or issue. It implies delving into the details and giving a comprehensive account or analysis.
  • run into the ground The idiom "run into the ground" means to exhaust or use something excessively until it is no longer functional or valuable. It can refer to physical objects, resources, or even individuals. It suggests misuse or overexploitation resulting in negative consequences.
  • run into a stone wall The idiom "run into a stone wall" means to encounter an insurmountable obstacle or encounter resistance that impedes progress or success. It suggests an inability to make further progress or find a solution due to a formidable barrier.
  • run into The idiom "run into" means to unexpectedly encounter or meet someone or something by chance.
  • run interference The idiom "run interference" refers to the act of intervening or obstructing to hinder or protect someone or something from potential difficulties or obstacles. It typically involves taking action or creating distractions to clear a path or provide support for someone else to achieve their goals or objectives.
  • run in circles The idiom "run in circles" means to be continuously busy or occupied with activities that do not lead to productive results or progress. It indicates a situation in which one is seemingly engaged in constant motion or effort but without making any meaningful or effective advancements. It implies a sense of repetitiveness and lack of direction in one's actions or endeavors.
  • run in The idiom "run in" typically refers to the act of detaining or apprehending someone who is suspected of a crime or wrongdoing by the authorities. It can also refer to encountering unexpected problems or challenges while pursuing a particular task or objective.
  • run head against a brick wall The idiom "run head against a brick wall" means to continually face obstacles or difficulties in trying to accomplish something, often without making any progress or achieving the desired result. It refers to the feeling of frustration and lack of success encountered when one's efforts consistently prove futile.
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  • run from The idiom "run from" typically means to avoid or evade a situation or person, usually out of fear, discomfort, or apprehension. It implies a desire to physically or emotionally distance oneself from something or someone.
  • run for life The idiom "run for life" means to run or flee as fast as possible to escape from a dangerous or life-threatening situation. It implies a sense of urgency and desperation in order to preserve one's own safety or survival.
  • run for it The idiom "run for it" means to make a hasty and hurried escape or attempt to escape from a dangerous or challenging situation. It implies that one is running with urgency and speed to avoid consequences or difficulties.
  • run for The idiom "run for" is commonly used to describe the act of competing or participating in a race or election, typically to attain a specific position or office.
  • run fingers through hair The idiom "run fingers through hair" refers to the gesture of running one's fingers from the roots to the tips of one's hair, usually done out of frustration, anxiety, stress, or to express deep thoughtfulness. It can also indicate a display of self-consciousness, nervousness, or a gesture of attraction or flirtation.
  • run feet off
  • run eye over The idiom "run an eye over" means to quickly glance at or scan something, often to get a general idea or to evaluate its content or quality. It can refer to reading through a document or checking the appearance or condition of something in a cursory manner.
  • run dry The idiom "run dry" means to deplete or exhaust completely, typically referring to the exhaustion of a resource, supply, or ideas.
  • run down to The idiom "run down to" typically means to quickly go or travel to a place, usually for a short period of time, often to accomplish a particular task or pick up something.
  • run deep The idiom "run deep" means that something, usually emotions or beliefs, are intense, profound, and firmly rooted within a person or group. It implies that these feelings or convictions are long-lasting and have a significant impact.
  • run counter to The idiom "run counter to" means to be in opposition or conflict with something, to go against a prevailing belief or practice, or to contradict or be incompatible with something.
  • run by The idiom "run by" typically means to present or propose something for approval or consideration, seeking input or feedback. It often implies consulting or informing someone about a plan, idea, or decision before proceeding further.
  • run between
  • run behind The idiom "run behind" typically means to be delayed or be behind schedule in completing a task or meeting a deadline. It can also imply that someone is lacking pace or is unable to keep up with a particular situation.
  • run before can walk The idiom "run before one can walk" means to attempt to do something advanced or complex before mastering the basics or foundation. It implies rushing into a task or activity without the necessary preparation or skills, often leading to mistakes or failure.
  • run back to The phrase "run back to" means to return or retreat to a familiar or comfortable place or person in times of trouble, uncertainty, or need. It suggests seeking refuge or relying on something or someone that provides safety, support, or solace.
  • run back over The idiom "run back over" typically means to ​revisit or review something, often in a hasty or summary manner. It refers to going back and quickly going through the main points or details of a particular topic, event, or situation.
  • run back To "run back" is an idiom that typically refers to the act of returning hastily or quickly to a previous position, place, or situation. It can also imply reversing an action or going back on one's word or decision. Additionally, it can mean retracing one's steps or revisiting a past event or memory. The specific meaning may vary based on the context in which the idiom is used.
  • run away with The idiom "run away with" means to be noticeably influenced or carried away by one's emotions, thoughts, or desires, to the point of losing control or perspective. It can refer to becoming excessively captivated by an idea, an impulse, or a notion, often leading to impractical or extreme actions.
  • run away The idiom "run away" refers to the act of leaving a situation, place, or person suddenly and without permission or warning, typically to escape from a difficult or challenging circumstance.
  • run at The idiom "run at" typically refers to an aggressive or impulsive act of attacking or confronting something or someone. It can also imply approaching a challenge with full force or committing to a course of action without hesitation or restraint.
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  • run around with The idiom "run around with" means to spend time or associate closely with a particular group of people or an individual. It often implies engaging in activities or behavior that may be considered questionable, reckless, or of questionable moral character.
  • run around like a chicken with its head cut off and run in circles The idiom "run around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to behave or act in a frenzied, disorganized, or chaotic manner. It usually implies a state of panic, confusion, or aimlessness. Similarly, "run in circles" refers to going through repetitive, unproductive, or fruitless motions without making any progress or finding a solution. These idioms depict a lack of direction or purpose in one's actions.
  • run around like a bluearsed fly The idiom "run around like a blue-arsed fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely busy or active, often in a disorganized or frenetic manner.
  • run around The idiom "run around" generally refers to aimless or chaotic activity, often involving needless or hasty movement without achieving a specific purpose.
  • run an errand The idiom "run an errand" means to perform a small task or complete a short trip for someone, typically involving delivering or collecting something on their behalf. It refers to the act of taking care of a specific errand or duty for another person.
  • run aground The idiom "run aground" means to become stuck, stranded, or immobilized, usually in reference to a ship or boat that has been grounded or hit a shoal or sandbar, preventing it from moving further. Figuratively, it can also be used to describe a difficult situation where progress or plans are hindered or halted unexpectedly.
  • run against The idiom "run against" typically refers to a situation where a candidate competes in an election against other candidates. It means to stand as a competitor or opponent in an election race, often for a political office. It implies competing with others for votes and seeking to defeat one's opponents in order to win the election.
  • run afoul of The idiom "run afoul of" means to come into conflict or disagreement with someone or something, typically resulting in negative consequences or trouble. It suggests that one has acted contrary to the rules or expectations, leading to an adverse outcome or unfavorable situation.
  • run a tight ship The idiom "run a tight ship" means to manage and control something, such as a business or organization, in a strict, efficient, and disciplined manner. It suggests maintaining order, discipline, and high standards, ensuring that everything operates smoothly and efficiently.
  • run a tab The idiom "run a tab" means to keep a record or account of expenses or bills owed at a bar, restaurant, or other establishment, allowing the customer to pay the total amount owed at a later time. It refers to the practice of tallying up the cost of various items or services consumed over a period of time and settling the payment at a later date instead of paying for each individual item or service immediately.
  • run a risk The idiom "run a risk" means to take a chance or face the possibility of something going wrong or having a negative outcome. It involves engaging in an activity or making a decision that involves uncertainty and potential danger or harm.
  • run a make on
  • run a fever and run a temperature The idiom "run a fever and run a temperature" means to have an elevated body temperature, typically as a result of an illness or infection. It implies being sick and experiencing a feverish condition where the body temperature is higher than normal.
  • run a fever The idiom "run a fever" refers to the act of having an elevated body temperature, typically as a symptom of an illness or infection.
  • run a comb through The idiom "run a comb through" means to quickly or hastily tidy or organize something, particularly when it comes to appearance or organization. It can be used literally, referring to combing or brushing through hair, or figuratively, to describe tidying up or organizing something messy or unkempt.
  • pick up the ball and run The idiom "pick up the ball and run" means to take charge or take over a task or responsibility that someone else has failed to do or neglected. It implies stepping in and successfully continuing or completing what someone else has left unfinished. Similar to the literal meaning of picking up a ball in a game and running with it to advance towards a goal.
  • make blood run cold The idiom "make blood run cold" means to cause extreme fear, horror, or shock, usually by describing or experiencing something gruesomely terrifying or deeply disturbing. It refers to a feeling of literal coldness running through a person's veins or a sudden chilling sensation, provoked by a horrifying or hair-raising situation.
  • make a run at The idiom "make a run at" typically means to attempt or try to achieve something, especially when facing challenges or obstacles. It can be used in various contexts, such as in sports, business, or everyday situations. It implies making a determined effort and giving it one's best shot, even if the outcome is uncertain.
  • hit a home run The idiom "hit a home run" means to achieve a major success or accomplish something extremely impressive. It is often used to describe a significant achievement or an act that exceeds expectations. This phrase originated from baseball, where hitting a home run means hitting the ball out of the field, resulting in the maximum score.
  • have the run of The idiom "have the run of" means to have unrestricted access and freedom to explore or use a particular place or thing. It implies being able to move about or utilize something without limitations or restrictions.
  • have on the run The idiom "have on the run" typically means to be in a state of constantly moving or evading capture, either due to being pursued by someone or facing multiple challenges or issues that require constant attention and action. It implies a sense of being constantly on the move or actively dealing with difficulties.
  • have luck run out The idiom "have luck run out" means to experience a decline or a sudden end of good fortune or favorable circumstances. It implies that a person's or an organization's streak of good luck or success has come to an end, and they may face challenges or less fortunate outcomes in the future.
  • have a run of The idiom "have a run of" means to experience a consecutive or sustained period of success, luck, or good fortune in a particular endeavor or situation. It implies that the person or entity is on a winning streak or fortunate streak for a specific period of time.
  • have a good run for money The expression "have a good run for money" typically means to have a successful or enjoyable period of time in which one's efforts or investments yield good results or returns. It originated from the world of horse racing, where a horse that puts up a strong performance is said to have had a good run for its owner's money. In a broader context, the idiom is often used to describe any situation where someone experiences prosperous or satisfying outcomes in relation to their investments, endeavors, or endeavors.
  • have a good run The idiom "have a good run" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two possible definitions: 1. To enjoy a period of success or prosperity: When someone has a good run, it means they have experienced a favorable sequence of events or achieved a string of positive outcomes in a particular endeavor. This can be related to business, sports, or any other pursuit where favorable circumstances lead to successful outcomes. 2. To engage in an enjoyable or satisfying period of activity: This definition is more casual and can refer to any activity or experience that is enjoyable and fulfilling. It could be going on a vacation, participating in a hobby, or even simply having a good time with friends or family. It's important to note that the meaning
  • hate to eat and run The idiom "hate to eat and run" means that one is reluctant to leave immediately after eating, especially when they would like to spend more time with the people they are dining with or enjoy the surroundings.
  • give a run for money The idiom "give a run for money" means to provide tough competition or challenge to someone in a particular activity, often implying that the person questioned is exceptionally skilled or formidable. It suggests that the person will make others work hard or put in extra effort to match or surpass their abilities.
  • eat and run The idiom "eat and run" refers to a behavior where someone quickly finishes their meal or snack and abruptly leaves the place without any further interaction or engagement. It can be used figuratively to describe someone who takes advantage of a situation or person for their benefit and then hastily moves on without any consideration or regard.
  • dry run The idiom "dry run" refers to a practice or rehearsal of a particular process or procedure without actually carrying it out in a live or real-time situation. It involves going through all the necessary steps, actions, or variables in a simulated or controlled environment to test and familiarize oneself with the process before executing it in its actual context. It is typically done to anticipate and prepare for any potential problems, errors, or challenges that may arise, ensuring a smooth and successful execution when it truly matters.
  • cut and run The idiom "cut and run" means to hastily leave a situation or location, usually in order to escape or avoid trouble. It implies a sudden and often unplanned departure, abandoning responsibilities or commitments.
  • blood run cold The idiom "blood run cold" means to experience intense fear, horror, or a chilling feeling. It signifies a sudden, instinctive reaction to something horrifying or deeply unsettling that causes a physical sensation of coldness running through one's veins.
  • be run off feet The idiom "be run off feet" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks, to the point of feeling physically or mentally exhausted. It implies a sense of being constantly rushed or constantly engaged in various activities without a moment to rest or catch up.
  • a run for money The idiom "a run for money" means a strong or impressive competition or challenge, particularly in a particular activity or field. It suggests that someone or something is giving a tough competition to someone else, requiring great effort or skill to surpass.
  • a dry run The idiom "a dry run" refers to a practice or rehearsal session conducted in advance of a real or important event. It involves going through the motions or procedures without any actual or significant consequences, with the purpose of familiarizing oneself or a group with the process, identifying potential issues or problems, and ensuring a successful outcome when the actual event takes place. A dry run is typically done to refine and improve performance, increase efficiency, and minimize errors or mistakes.
  • run across sth The idiom "run across something" typically means to unexpectedly encounter or come across something or someone, often by chance or accident.
  • run across sb The idiom "run across someone" means to encounter or meet someone unexpectedly or by chance.
  • run away (from sb/sth) The idiom "run away from someone/something" means to escape or flee from a person, situation, or problem, often due to fear, discomfort, or a desire to avoid confrontation or responsibility. It can refer to physically leaving a place, avoiding a particular individual, or evading a difficult or challenging situation.
  • run away (from sm or sth) The idiom "run away (from someone or something)" means to retreat or escape from a person, situation, or problem by physically or metaphorically removing oneself from it. It implies avoiding confrontation or responsibility by fleeing or avoiding contact with the person or situation involved.
  • run sth by sb The idiom "run something by someone" means to inform or consult someone about something, seeking their opinion, approval, or feedback before making a final decision or taking further action. It is usually used when someone wants to get another person's input or approval on an idea, plan, or proposition.
  • run sth by (sm) (again) The idiom "run something by (someone) (again)" means to explain or present something to someone for their approval, input, or feedback, usually after having done so previously and wanting to reiterate or clarify certain points. It implies seeking someone's opinion or seeking a second opinion.
  • run for sth The idiom "run for sth" typically means to compete or campaign in an election or contest in order to obtain a specific role, position, or title. It implies actively seeking a position or office through participation in the election or contest.
  • run into sth The idiom "run into something" means to encounter or come across something unexpectedly or by chance. It can refer to unexpected difficulties, problems, or even meeting someone unexpectedly.
  • run into sb The idiom "run into someone" means to unexpectedly meet or encounter someone, often by chance or accident.
  • run into sm or sth The idiom "run into someone or something" means to encounter or meet someone or something unexpectedly or by chance. It typically implies a coincidental or unplanned meeting.
  • run sm or sth into sth The idiom "run sm or sth into sth" means to collide or crash one thing into another, causing damage or destruction. It can also refer to the act of driving a vehicle or object into a particular location or destination.
  • run low (on sth) The idiom "run low (on sth)" means to have very little or an insufficient amount of something remaining. It suggests that the quantity of a particular item is dwindling and may soon be exhausted.
  • run off sth The idiom "run off something" means to quickly or hastily produce or create something, often in large quantities or without careful consideration or planning. It can also refer to making a quick copy or printing of something.
  • run sb off The idiom "run someone off" refers to the act of causing or forcing someone to leave or go away by using some kind of pressure, force, or intimidation.
  • run off (with sm) The idiom "run off (with sm)" means to leave unexpectedly or hurriedly with someone, usually taking them away from a current situation or relationship without permission or consultation. It suggests a sense of impulsive behavior or elopement.
  • run sth off The idiom "run sth off" has multiple meanings depending on the context: 1. To print or reproduce something: It refers to producing copies of a document, text, or image using a printer or photocopier. For example, "Can you please run off a few copies of this report?" 2. To quickly complete or execute a task: It means to do something quickly or efficiently. For instance, "I need to run off some errands before the stores close." 3. To force someone or something to leave or flee: It describes making someone or something leave or go away. For example, "The loud noise ran off the animals from the farm." 4. To write or compose something quickly: It refers to creating a
  • run sm or sth off (of) sth The idiom "run sm or sth off (of) sth" typically means to derive or obtain something from a particular source or resource. It can also refer to using or operating something based on the power generated from a specific source.
  • run out (of sth) The idiom "run out (of sth)" means to exhaust or consume the entire supply or quantity of something, resulting in none remaining. It implies that there is no more of the particular item available.
  • run out (on sm) The idiom "run out on (someone)" means to abandon or leave someone without warning or explanation, usually in a time of need or during a difficult situation. It implies betrayal, irresponsibility, or neglecting one's duties or obligations towards another person.
  • run over sb/sth The idiom "run over sb/sth" typically refers to physically hitting someone or something with a vehicle, causing injury or damage.
  • run over sm or sth The idiom "run over someone or something" can have a couple of different meanings depending on the context: 1. To hit or collide with someone or something while driving: This is a literal meaning where "run over" refers to accidentally hitting someone or something with a vehicle. 2. To exceed a specified time limit: This meaning is often used in the context of an agenda or schedule. If you "run over" a specific time, it means you have exceeded the allotted time for a particular task or event. 3. To briefly review or summarize something: This meaning is often used in the context of quickly going through a list, plan, or set of instructions. If you "run over" something, it means you are quickly reviewing the
  • run over (sth) The idiom "run over (sth)" can have multiple definitions depending on the context: 1. To hit, collide, or drive a vehicle over something or someone. Example: The car accidentally ran over a rock in the road. 2. To exceed or surpass a given time, limit, or deadline. Example: The meeting ran over by 15 minutes. 3. To quickly review or summarize something. Example: Let's run over the key points before the exam. 4. To go through or repeat something quickly or briefly. Example: I'll run over the main details of the project in our next meeting. 5. To unintentionally spill or pour something over an object or surface. Example: Be careful not to run over the paint while
  • run short (of sth) The idiom "run short (of sth)" means to use up or consume all of something, so that there is not enough of it remaining. It implies that the supply or quantity of something is insufficient to meet the current or future needs or demands.
  • be run/rushed off your feet To be "run/rushed off your feet" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities, often to the point of being unable to keep up or handle everything efficiently.
  • run around/rush around etc. like a bluearsed fly The idiom "run around/rush around like a blue-arsed fly" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely busy or constantly moving in a hectic and frenzied manner. It implies that the person is in a state of chaos or disarray, much like a buzzing fly in constant motion.
  • go/run to seed The idiom "go/run to seed" refers to a person, place, or thing that is in a state of decline or deterioration. It originates from the image of a plant or garden that has stopped being taken care of and is allowed to grow wild, producing seeds instead of flowering or producing desired fruits. In a figurative sense, it suggests neglect, lack of maintenance, or falling into a state of disrepair. It can also refer to a person who has lost their former vitality or usefulness.
  • (It's) time to run. The idiom "(It's) time to run" refers to the moment when it is necessary or advisable to leave or escape from a situation quickly. It implies a sense of urgency or danger that requires immediate action to avoid potential trouble or harm.
  • run one's head against a brick wall The idiomatic expression "run one's head against a brick wall" means to repeatedly try to solve a problem or accomplish something without making any progress or achieving success. It implies a futile or frustrating attempt to overcome an obstacle or challenge that seems insurmountable. The phrase emphasizes the feeling of hitting a solid barrier and experiencing a lack of progress despite one's efforts.
  • run around like a chicken with its head cut off and run (around) in circles The idiom "run around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to behave in a frenzied, chaotic, or aimless manner, often due to feeling stressed, panicked, or disorganized. It suggests a lack of control or direction in one's actions and highlights a state of confusion or agitation. Similarly, the idiom "run (around) in circles" conveys a similar meaning of engaging in pointless or repetitive activities without making any progress or achieving a desired outcome. It implies a cycle of futile actions or efforts, often resulting in frustration or a sense of being stuck. Both idioms emphasize the idea of ineffective or purposeless behavior.
  • run circles around sm The idiom "run circles around someone" means to outperform or outwit someone easily. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is clearly superior and capable of surpassing the abilities or achievements of someone else effortlessly.
  • go/run/work like clockwork The idiom "go/run/work like clockwork" means that something is functioning smoothly and perfectly, without any problems or interruptions. It refers to the precision and regularity of a well-made clock that keeps accurate time.
  • run a comb through sth The idiom "run a comb through something" means to quickly or briefly inspect or tidy something up. It often refers to checking or straightening out details, plans, or ideas.
  • turn tail (and run) The idiom "turn tail (and run)" means to abruptly flee or escape from a dangerous or threatening situation, often out of fear or cowardice. It refers to the instinct of some animals to quickly change direction and retreat when they feel endangered. In a figurative sense, it implies a hasty retreat or abandonment of a difficult task or challenging circumstance.
  • run counter to sth The idiom "run counter to sth" means to be in opposition or contradiction to something, directly or indirectly. It suggests that something goes against or contradicts a particular belief, expectation, principle, or trend.
  • make sm's blood run cold The idiom "make someone's blood run cold" is used to describe a situation or statement that causes extreme fear, horror, or dread in someone. It implies that the person's blood becomes cold due to the chilling effect of the fright or shock they experience.
  • run sth into the ground The idiom "run something into the ground" means to overuse or exhaust something, typically to the point of causing damage or deterioration. It refers to the act of poorly managing or taking care of something, leading to its decline or eventual ruin. This can be applied to various aspects such as businesses, relationships, or physical objects.
  • run sth up the flagpole The idiom "run something up the flagpole" means to propose an idea or concept to see how others react to it or gather opinions and feedback. It originates from the practice of hoisting a flag on a flagpole to see how it looks before making a final decision.
  • run sb to earth The idiom "run someone to earth" refers to the act of finding and locating someone who has been difficult to find or trace. It is often used to describe the process of meticulously searching for and ultimately discovering or locating someone who has been evading or hiding from others.
  • run sm or sth to earth The idiom "run someone or something to earth" means to find and capture or locate someone or something after a long pursuit or search. It implies a relentless and determined effort to track down the person or thing in question.
  • run sm ragged To "run someone ragged" means to exhaust or tire someone out completely by making them work excessively or demanding too much from them. It implies overworking someone to the point where they become physically and mentally exhausted.
  • go/run deep The idiom "go/run deep" refers to something that has a significant or profound influence, impact, or history. It implies that there are underlying layers or depths that contribute to the overall understanding, importance, or complexity of a person, situation, or concept. It suggests that something has a strong and enduring foundation or has been established over a long period, often implying a level of intensity, authenticity, or significance.
  • (I) hate to eat and run. The idiom "I hate to eat and run" is usually used when someone needs to leave a gathering or social event right after eating. It expresses regret or unwillingness to depart so swiftly after enjoying a meal with others.
  • in the long/short run The idiom "in the long/short run" refers to a future period of time, either a long or short duration, during which the consequences or outcome of a particular action or decision might be observed or realized. It highlights the understanding that outcomes or results may not be immediately evident, but will become apparent over time.
  • run after sb The idiom "run after sb" refers to pursuing or chasing someone, either literally or figuratively, in an attempt to catch up to them, get their attention, or be in a relationship with them.
  • run after sm The idiom "run after someone" typically means to pursue or chase after someone, often in a romantic or infatuated manner. It can also imply that someone is constantly seeking someone's attention or approval, often to the point of becoming obsessive or desperate.
  • run sth out of sth The idiom "run something out of something" generally means to deplete or exhaust the supply or amount of something. It refers to using up or consuming all of a particular resource or substance.
  • run sm or sth out of sth The idiom "run someone or something out of something" means to force someone or something to leave or be removed from a place or situation by using persuasive or aggressive tactics. It implies getting rid of someone or something, typically because they are unwanted or causing trouble.
  • run around after sm or sth To "run around after someone or something" is an idiom that means to constantly be busy or occupied with taking care of or managing someone or something. It implies engaging in a lot of running, chasing, or attending to the needs or demands of the mentioned person or thing. It can also suggest being overly dutiful or submissive in the process.
  • run around with sb The idiom "run around with someone" refers to spending a significant amount of time with a particular person in a social or romantic context. It suggests that the person is closely associated or involved with another individual, often implying a romantic or close relationship.
  • run around with sm The idiom "run around with someone" typically refers to spending time with or being in the company of a particular person, often implying a romantic or questionable involvement. It suggests that the person is involved in a relationship or association with someone, often implying disapproval or a lack of seriousness.
  • run away with sth The phrase "run away with something" means to become excessively or uncontrollably excited or carried away by something, often causing disregard for others' opinions or rational thinking. It can also refer to acquiring or keeping something without permission or by dishonest means.
  • run away with sm The idiom "run away with sm" can mean two different things depending on the context: 1. To run away or escape with someone: This refers to leaving a place or situation together with someone, often in secret or without permission. It typically implies a romantic or adventurous connotation, suggesting a spontaneous act of elopement or escaping from a mundane routine. Example: "Sarah and Tom ran away together, leaving their lives behind to explore the world." 2. To allow one's imagination or enthusiasm to carry them away: This means to become excessively involved or obsessed with a particular idea, thought, or imagination. It often implies losing touch with reality or becoming overly enthusiastic about something, often to the point of distraction or neglecting other important matters
  • run off with sth The idiom "run off with something" generally means to take something away quickly and usually secretly, often implying a theft or escape.
  • run off with sb The idiom "run off with someone" is used to describe the act of leaving a current partner, spouse, or significant other to be with another person, often implying that the departure is sudden or unexpected.
  • run off with sm or sth The idiom "run off with someone or something" means to leave or elope with someone or something unexpectedly and often without permission or prior notice. It can refer to a romantic partner leaving a relationship for someone else or to stealing or taking something that belongs to someone and fleeing with it.
  • run out on sb The idiom "run out on sb" means to abandon or leave someone suddenly or without warning, especially in a difficult or challenging situation, typically causing harm or disappointment to the person being left behind.
  • run to sth The idiom "run to something" typically means to have the financial means or capability to afford or obtain that particular thing. It implies having an adequate amount of money or resources to cover or participate in a specific expense or action.
  • run to sm or sth The idiom "run to someone or something" typically means seeking or turning to someone or something for help, support, or assistance. It implies relying on someone or something to fulfill a need or address a problem or issue. It can also refer to approaching or consulting someone or something in order to gain advice or guidance.
  • run sm or sth to sth The idiom "run sm or sth to sth" typically means to convert or change something into a particular state or condition. It implies transforming or altering something with a specific purpose or goal in mind.
  • run up against sb/sth The idiom "run up against someone or something" means to encounter difficulties, obstacles, or opposition while trying to achieve something. It implies a collision or a confrontation with a person or a situation that poses a challenge or hinders progress.
  • run interference (for) The idiom "run interference (for)" means to intervene or take action in order to protect or assist someone else, usually by creating a barrier or distraction that hinders potential problems or opposition. It can often involve smoothing the way, handling obstacles, or deflecting attention or criticism from others, in order to help someone achieve their goals or objectives.
  • run (jog, etc.) in place The idiom "run (jog, etc.) in place" typically means to engage in physical activity like running or jogging, while remaining stationary and not making any progress or moving forward. It is often used metaphorically to describe a situation or activity that seems busy or active but lacks any real progress or development.
  • make someone's blood run cold The idiom "make someone's blood run cold" means to cause extreme fear, horror, or terror in someone. It refers to a situation or statement that is so chilling or disturbing that it sends a shiver down one's spine.
  • run the blockade The idiom "run the blockade" typically refers to the act of successfully evading or bypassing a blockade, usually imposed by a military force or authorities. It often involves sneaking past barriers, avoiding detection or capture, and reaching a destination that is otherwise inaccessible due to the presence of the blockade.
  • a run for one's money The idiom "a run for one's money" means to face or experience a challenging or competitive situation, typically where one's abilities, skills, or strengths are put to the test. It suggests encountering tough competition or opposition that pushes one to their limits, providing them with a stimulating or worthwhile experience despite the difficulties faced.
  • run on empty The idiom "run on empty" is used to describe a situation where someone or something continues to operate despite having little or no energy, resources, or motivation left. It can refer to physical exhaustion, emotional fatigue, or simply lacking the necessary means to continue.
  • run one's eye over The definition of the idiom "run one's eye over" means to quickly scan or glance at something, often in order to get a general idea or overview of it. It implies a casual or cursory examination rather than a detailed or thorough analysis.
  • run foul of The idiom "run foul of" means to come into conflict or disagreement with someone or something, often resulting in negative consequences or consequences that are against one's favor. It implies encountering problems, opposition, or getting into trouble with someone or something.
  • run the gantlet The idiom "run the gauntlet" or "run the gantlet" refers to an individual going through a difficult or dangerous situation while facing a series of challenges, obstacles, or criticism. It suggests enduring a barrage of criticism, scrutiny, or physical challenges from multiple sources in order to reach a desired outcome. The term originated from the military practice of forcing a person to run between two lines of soldiers who would strike them with weapons or objects as a form of punishment or initiation. In a more figurative sense, it describes a challenging situation where one must face scrutiny or criticism from others.
  • learn to walk before you run The idiom "learn to walk before you run" means that one should first master the basic or fundamental elements of a task or skill before attempting more advanced or complex aspects. It emphasizes the importance of taking incremental steps and acquiring foundational knowledge before trying to accomplish greater achievements.
  • run for cover The idiom "run for cover" means to rapidly seek shelter or protection, usually in response to a threatening or dangerous situation. It often implies a sense of urgency or an imminent threat that requires immediate action to ensure safety.
  • run amok (amuck) The idiom "run amok" or "run amuck" means to behave in a crazy, frenzied, or out-of-control manner, causing havoc or causing harm to oneself or others. It implies a loss of self-control and a reckless, unruly behavior.
  • the course of true love never did run smooth The idiom "the course of true love never did run smooth" means that love relationships are often filled with obstacles, challenges, and difficulties. It suggests that love is rarely easy or without hardships, and that facing obstacles is a natural part of any romantic relationship.
  • run a risk (of something/of doing something) The idiom "run a risk (of something/of doing something)" means to take a chance or gamble on something, knowing that it could lead to a negative outcome or harm. It indicates being aware of the possible consequences but proceeding regardless.
  • run the risk (of something/of doing something) The idiom "run the risk (of something/of doing something)" means to take a chance or expose oneself to the possibility of experiencing something negative or undesirable. It typically implies the possibility of encountering a potential harm, danger, or negative outcome. It suggests a willingness to accept the consequences or potential repercussions of certain actions or decisions.
  • run risks The idiom "run risks" means to take chances or expose oneself to potential danger, harm, or negative consequences in pursuit of a desired outcome.
  • a close-run thing The idiom "a close-run thing" typically means a situation or event where the outcome is narrowly decided or determined, often implying that it was a close call or a near miss. It suggests that the result could have easily gone either way and highlights how precarious or uncertain the situation was.
  • the common, general, ordinary, usual run (of something) The idiom "the common, general, ordinary, usual run (of something)" refers to the typical or average type or quality of something. It signifies the standard or usual form or condition that is commonly encountered or expected.
  • give somebody a (good) run for their money The idiom "give somebody a (good) run for their money" means to pose a strong challenge or competition to someone, often unexpectedly or surpassing initial expectations. It suggests that the person or team being challenged will face difficulty or have to work hard to achieve victory or superiority over their opponent.
  • give somebody/get/have the run of something The idiom "give somebody/get/have the run of something" means to allow someone to have unrestricted access or control over a place or thing. It implies giving someone the freedom to move around, use, or explore something without any limitations or restrictions.
  • run somebody/something to earth/ground The idiom "run somebody/something to earth/ground" means to track down or find someone or something after an extensive and determined search. It implies the act of pursuing relentlessly until the desired objective or target is located and apprehended.
  • run afoul of something To "run afoul of something" means to come into conflict, opposition, or disagreement with something, such as a rule, law, policy, or a person in a position of authority. It suggests that someone has violated or disobeyed the stated boundaries or regulations, often resulting in negative consequences or repercussions.
  • pick up/take the ball and run with it The idiom "pick up/take the ball and run with it" means to accept a task or responsibility with enthusiasm and initiative, often taking the lead in furthering the progress or success of the project or idea. It implies being proactive and taking charge of a situation without waiting for others to do so.
  • make somebody’s blood run cold The idiom "make somebody's blood run cold" means to cause someone to feel extreme fear, terror, or dread. It describes a situation or event that is so shocking or horrifying that it creates a chilling effect, making the person experience a sudden sensation akin to cold blood pumping through their veins.
  • run around like a headless chicken The idiom "run around like a headless chicken" refers to someone who is behaving in a very busy, disorganized, and frantic manner, often without achieving any significant progress or purpose. It suggests that the person is acting without direction or control, similar to how a headless chicken would run around aimlessly.
  • run down/out the clock The idiom "run down/out the clock" refers to a situation where someone deliberately delays or stalls, usually in a sporting context, to ensure that time runs out before something unfavorable or challenging occurs. It means to effectively use up remaining time without making any significant progress or taking unnecessary risks. This idiom is often used in reference to strategies employed in games or competitions to secure a victory, prevent the opposing team from scoring, or avoid a potential setback.
  • run about The idiom "run about" means to move quickly or energetically in different directions, often without a specific purpose or goal. It can also refer to engaging in various activities or tasks in a haphazard or scattered manner.
  • run afoul of (someone or something) The idiom "run afoul of (someone or something)" means to come into conflict, disagreement, or opposition with someone or something, often resulting in negative consequences or repercussions. It implies going against the wishes, rules, or expectations of another person or entity, and facing their disapproval or wrath as a result.
  • run after (one) The idiom "run after (one)" means to pursue or chase someone in order to catch up with them or get their attention. It can be used both in a literal sense of physical pursuit, as well as a metaphorical sense of trying to gain someone's interest, approval, or companionship.
  • Run that by me again The idiom "Run that by me again" is an informal expression used to request someone to repeat or explain something that was either missed, not understood, or needs further clarification. It is often said when someone wants a second chance to comprehend the information being presented.
  • run against (someone or something) The idiom "run against (someone or something)" typically refers to participating in a competition, election, or contest where one is competing directly against another person or entity. It implies being a candidate who challenges or opposes someone else's candidacy or a team that competes against another team. The "run" in this context implies engaging in a competitive race or contest.
  • run up against (something) The idiom "run up against (something)" means to encounter a problem or obstacle that hinders progress or success. It refers to facing a difficult situation or barrier that requires overcoming or finding a solution.
  • run amuck The idiom "run amuck" (also spelled "run amok") means to behave uncontrollably, disorderly, or wildly, often resulting in chaotic or destructive actions. It refers to a person or thing going out of control, causing mayhem or wreaking havoc without any restraint or consideration for consequences.
  • an end run The idiom "an end run" refers to a strategic move or action taken to avoid obstacles, bypass resistance, or achieve a goal indirectly instead of facing a direct confrontation or going through the usual channels. It derives from American football, where an end run is a play when the ball carrier runs around the end of the line, avoiding potential tackles and taking a different route to reach the desired destination. In a non-literal context, "an end run" suggests creatively circumventing established procedures, norms, or opposition to achieve success or gain an advantage.
  • run something up The idiom "run something up" means to accumulate or produce a large amount of something, especially a debt, bill, or expense, often quickly or unexpectedly. It can also refer to creating or making something, such as a flag or clothes, through sewing or stitching.
  • run up (to someone or something) The idiom "run up (to someone or something)" generally means to approach someone or something quickly, often with enthusiasm or excitement. It implies moving swiftly to meet or interact with someone or something.
  • run (a)round in circles The idiom "run (a)round in circles" means to engage in futile or aimless activities that do not lead to any progress or solution. It refers to being caught in a repetitive and unproductive cycle, often experiencing confusion or frustration.
  • run around in circles The idiom "run around in circles" means to engage in activity or discourse that is aimless, repetitive, or goes nowhere. It refers to a situation or behavior where a person or a group expends effort and energy but fails to achieve any meaningful or productive outcome.
  • run around like a blue-arsed fly The idiom "run around like a blue-arsed fly" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is extremely busy, frantic, or constantly moving about in a disorganized and chaotic manner. It implies that the person is rushing around with great energy and urgency, similar to the erratic movement of a fly.
  • run around with (someone) The idiom "run around with (someone)" generally means to spend time with, socialize with, or have a romantic relationship with someone. It implies frequent or consistent interaction, often in the form of accompanying someone or engaging in activities together.
  • run circles around someone The idiom "run circles around someone" means to outperform or outclass someone in terms of skill, intelligence, or ability. It implies that one is significantly more capable, efficient, or proficient than the other person.
  • run rings around (someone) The idiom "run rings around (someone)" means to outperform or outmaneuver someone easily or consistently, often by demonstrating superior skill, intelligence, or agility. It suggests that the person doing the "running" is far more competent or adept than the other person, and the latter is unable to keep up or compete effectively.
  • run rings around/round somebody/something The idiom "run rings around/round somebody/something" means to outperform or outmaneuver someone or something in a way that is very easy or effortless. It suggests being highly skilled, proficient, or superior in comparison.
  • run away (from someone or something) The idiom "run away (from someone or something)" means to escape or flee in order to avoid a person, situation, or responsibility. It suggests avoiding confrontation or eluding something undesirable by physically or metaphorically removing oneself from the situation.
  • run away with the idea/notion The idiom "run away with the idea/notion" means to become excessively or overly enthusiastic or excited about a particular idea or notion, often to the point where one loses focus or perspective. It suggests that one's imagination or enthusiasm has taken control or gone beyond reason or boundaries.
  • run of luck The idiom "run of luck" refers to a period of either exceptionally good or bad luck experienced by an individual or a group of people. It implies a consecutive sequence of fortunate or unfortunate events that occur over a period, which may determine one's overall success or failure during that time.
  • (all) great minds run in the same channel The idiom "(all) great minds run in the same channel" refers to the notion that exceptionally intelligent or creative individuals tend to think or engage in similar ways. It suggests that brilliant minds often have similar ideas or perspectives, emphasizing the commonality and shared understanding among exceptional thinkers.
  • pick up the ball and run with it The idiom "pick up the ball and run with it" means to take responsibility or control of a situation or task that someone else has started or left unfinished and proceed with it energetically and effectively. It implies taking initiative and showing determination to accomplish the given task or continue the progress.
  • take the ball and run (with it) The idiom "take the ball and run (with it)" means to take an opportunity or a task and make the most of it by seizing control, taking charge, and running with it in a proactive and determined manner. It implies taking on a responsibility or a project with enthusiasm, initiative, and confidence, often going above and beyond expectations to achieve success.
  • be run off (one's) feet The idiom "be run off one's feet" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a lot of work or tasks. It implies being rushed or having a heavy workload that keeps someone constantly occupied, leaving them with little or no leisure time.
  • run before you can walk The idiom "run before you can walk" means to attempt or try to do something that is too advanced or complicated without first acquiring the necessary basic skills or knowledge. It refers to being too hasty or impatient in attempting tasks or activities without having the proper foundations.
  • walk before you can run The idiom "walk before you can run" means that one should learn or master the basic or fundamental aspects of something before moving on to more complex or advanced aspects. It advises against trying to do or accomplish something beyond one's current skill level or knowledge without proper preparation or foundation.
  • run (something) by (one) To "run (something) by (one)" means to present or propose an idea, plan, or suggestion to someone for their opinion or approval. It implies seeking someone's input or seeking their authorization or consent before moving forward with something.
  • run by (some place) The idiom "run by (some place)" typically means to quickly visit or stop by a location briefly, often to convey or gather information, seek approval, or seek clarification.
  • run by someone To "run something by someone" means to present or explain an idea, plan, or proposal to someone for their input, feedback, or approval. It implies seeking their opinion or validation before making a decision or taking further action.
  • Run that by me one more time The idiom "Run that by me one more time" means to ask someone to repeat or explain something because you did not fully understand or hear it the first time.
  • Run that by one more time The idiom "Run that by one more time" means to ask someone to repeat or explain something, typically because you didn't fully understand it or want to ensure you grasp the information correctly. It implies the need for further clarification or repetition.
  • you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds The idiom "you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds" means that one cannot support or be loyal to two opposing sides or groups at the same time. It conveys the idea that it is impossible to simultaneously have conflicting interests or maintain a double allegiance.
  • make (one's) blood run cold The idiom "make (one's) blood run cold" means to cause intense fear, horror, or deep concern. It refers to something that shocks or terrifies a person to the point where they physically feel a loss of warmth or a chilling sensation in their body.
  • make somebody's blood run cold The idiom "make somebody's blood run cold" means to cause intense fear, horror, or extreme discomfort to someone. It describes a situation, statement, or event that creates an overwhelming feeling of dread or terror.
  • make your blood run cold The idiom "make your blood run cold" is used to describe something that is extremely frightening or shocking. It refers to a situation or event that causes one to feel a sudden chill or shiver down their spine due to a strong sense of fear or horror.
  • run in the blood The idiom "run in the blood" means that a particular characteristic, trait, or behavior is inherited or innate in someone because it is a common or strongly established trait in their family or ancestry. It implies that the characteristic is deeply rooted and likely to be passed on to future generations as well.
  • run down the clock The idiom "run down the clock" means to intentionally delay or use up time in order to ensure that an activity or situation ends without any significant change or progress. It is often used in sports or competitive situations, where one team or individual tries to waste time in order to protect their lead or secure a victory. However, it can also be used in other contexts to refer to purposely using up time, often to avoid taking action or making a decision.
  • run the clock down The idiom "run the clock down" means to purposely take actions or make decisions that waste time in order to delay an outcome or prevent an opponent from gaining an advantage. It is often used in sports contexts, referring to a team deliberately using up as much time as possible before the game ends. In a broader sense, it can also refer to procrastinating or deliberately slowing progress to delay a final decision or outcome.
  • run somebody/something close The idiom "run somebody/something close" means to be close in comparison or competition to someone or something. It suggests a close and often intense competition or resemblance between two entities.
  • run someone close The idiom "run someone close" means to be a strong competitor or to come very close to achieving the same level of success or excellence as someone else. It indicates a close competition or challenge to someone's position, status, or accomplishment.
  • run hot and cold The idiom "run hot and cold" means to vacillate or fluctuate between extreme opposite emotions, opinions, or attitudes, or to alternate between being enthusiastic and indifferent about something.
  • run a comb through something The idiom "run a comb through something" typically means to quickly or casually examine or review something. It is often used when referring to going over information, plans, or details in a cursory or superficial manner. It implies a rapid or superficial inspection similar to running a comb through one's hair to quickly tidy it up.
  • the common/general run The idiom "the common/general run" refers to the average or usual type or group of people or things in a particular category. It suggests the majority or typical representation within a specific context.
  • run counter to (something) The idiom "run counter to (something)" means to go against or contradict something. It represents behavior or actions that are in direct opposition to a particular belief, principle, or expectation.
  • well's run dry, the The idiom "well's run dry, the" refers to a situation where a previously abundant or reliable resource or supply is depleted or exhausted. It implies that something that was once plentiful or readily available is no longer accessible or available.
  • a test run The idiom "a test run" refers to the act of trying or practicing something on a trial basis before its official or final implementation. It usually involves conducting a preliminary test or trial to assess the functionality, efficiency, or suitability of a system, process, product, or an idea.
  • dummy run The idiom "dummy run" refers to a practice or trial run that is carried out to ensure that something will be done correctly or effectively in the future. It involves simulating or replicating a situation in order to identify any potential issues, test procedures, or evaluate performance before the actual event or task takes place.
  • a dummy run The idiom "a dummy run" refers to a practice, trial, or test that is done in order to prepare for a real or more important event. It involves simulating or mimicking the actual situation in order to identify and resolve potential issues or problems before the actual event takes place. It is often used when there is a need to ensure that everything runs smoothly and efficiently when it truly matters. The purpose of a dummy run is to gain familiarity, make necessary adjustments, and build confidence before the main event.
  • run (someone or something) to earth The idiom "run (someone or something) to earth" means to find and capture or locate them, usually after a long pursuit or search. It is often used to describe the act of finding and capturing a person or an animal that has been evading capture or hiding.
  • run someone to earth The idiom "run someone to earth" means to find or track down someone who has been difficult to locate or find. It often implies that the person being sought after was actively avoiding being found or was in hiding.
  • end run The idiom "end run" refers to a strategic or indirect approach to bypass obstacles or opposition in order to achieve a goal. It typically involves avoiding the usual channels or established protocols to accomplish a task. It can also imply finding an alternative route or solution to reach an objective.
  • run in the/(one's) family The idiom "run in the/(one's) family" refers to a trait, characteristic, behavior, or talent that is common among members of a specific family or passed down through generations. It signifies that certain patterns or tendencies tend to be shared by relatives due to genetics or upbringing.
  • run to fat The idiom "run to fat" refers to someone or something becoming overweight or gaining excessive weight. It typically implies a lack of control or discipline when it comes to maintaining a healthy weight or lifestyle.
  • be run off your feet To be run off your feet means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities, to the point of feeling rushed or unable to keep up with the workload. It suggests being so occupied that one is constantly on the move, running from one thing to another.
  • run (one) off (one's) feet The idiom "run (one) off (one's) feet" means to keep someone extremely busy or occupied. It implies that a person has so much work or activities to attend to that they are constantly on the move and barely have time to rest.
  • run (something) up the flagpole The idiom "run (something) up the flagpole" means to propose an idea or suggestion to test its reception or popularity. It often involves presenting the idea to a group of people or decision-makers for feedback or evaluation before making a final decision or taking action.
  • a run for your money The idiom "a run for your money" means to offer a good or strong competition or challenge, typically in a situation where there is uncertainty about the outcome. It implies that the person or team facing the competition or challenge is not easily defeated and has a fair chance of success.
  • run to form The idiom "run to form" refers to someone or something behaving or performing in a predictable or expected manner. It indicates that a person follows their usual behavior or a situation progresses as anticipated. It implies that there are no surprises or deviations from the norm.
  • run foul of (someone or something) The idiom "run foul of (someone or something)" means to come into conflict, disagreement, or noncompliance with someone or something. It suggests encountering opposition, disfavor, or a negative consequence due to a person's actions, behaviors, or decisions.
  • run on fumes The definition of the idiom "run on fumes" is to continue to operate or function with very little energy, resources, or fuel remaining. It often refers to someone or something barely managing to keep going despite being depleted or exhausted. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • run the gamut of (something) The idiom "run the gamut of (something)" means to encompass or experience a wide range or variety of things, often referring to a wide range of emotions, experiences, or situations. It suggests going through the entire spectrum or extent of something.
  • run someone or something out of something The idiom "run someone or something out of something" means to force someone or something to leave or be expelled from a place or situation. It implies a strong, often confrontational action taken against the person or thing being removed.
  • run something out of something The idiom "run something out of something" refers to depleting or exhausting the supply or quantity of something, often unintentionally or excessively. It means using up or consuming all of a particular resource, product, or substance.
  • run the gauntlet of something/someone The idiom "run the gauntlet of something/someone" means to go through a difficult or hazardous experience where one is subjected to criticism, scrutiny, or various challenges. It is derived from the historical practice of punishment or initiation where a person would be forced to run between two rows of people who would strike or attack them with various objects, such as sticks or whips. In a figurative sense, it refers to enduring a challenging or intimidating journey or situation.
  • give (one) a run for (one's) money The idiom "give (one) a run for (one's) money" means to provide someone with a challenging or competitive experience, often unexpected or surpassing their expectations. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to is able to compete or perform at a level equal to, or even better than, the person or thing with whom they are being compared.
  • the common run of (something) The idiom "the common run of (something)" refers to the average or typical type or quality of something. It describes the majority or usual standard of a particular thing or group. It suggests that the thing being referred to is not exceptional or outstanding, but rather falls within the normal range.
  • the general run (of something) The general run (of something) refers to the typical or average quality, type, or character of something. It denotes the most common or prevalent form or kind of a particular thing. It implies the usual or ordinary standard or pattern.
  • get the run of (some place) The idiom "get the run of (some place)" refers to having the freedom or permission to freely move around and have unrestricted access to a particular place. It implies that someone has the ability to explore, roam, or utilize a space without any limitations or restrictions.
  • give (someone or something) the run of (some place) The expression "give (someone or something) the run of (some place)" means to allow someone or something complete freedom or unrestricted access to a particular area or location. It implies granting full control or permission to move around freely and do as one pleases within that space.
  • give someone a run for their money The idiom "give someone a run for their money" means to provide someone with strong competition or challenge them in a particular situation, usually in terms of skills, abilities, or achievements. It suggests that the person being challenged may not have an easy victory and will have to work hard to outperform or outdo their competitor.
  • run to seed The idiom "run to seed" typically refers to something or someone that has deteriorated or declined in quality or appearance over time. It originates from the image of plants or crops that have stopped growing or producing flowers or fruits, and instead start producing seeds, indicating a lack of care or maintenance. Figuratively, it suggests the idea of neglect or allowing something to deteriorate to a less desirable state.
  • have a good run for (one's) money The idiom "have a good run for (one's) money" means to receive an enjoyable or worthwhile experience in exchange for the effort, time, or money one has invested. It implies that the person has obtained good value, satisfaction, or enjoyment from a particular activity, event, or situation.
  • run (oneself or something) into the ground The idiom "run (oneself or something) into the ground" means to exhaust or wear out oneself or something by excessive use, work, or activity. It suggests that someone or something has been pushed to the point of complete exhaustion or deterioration due to overuse or overwork.
  • run (someone or something) to ground The idiom "run (someone or something) to ground" refers to the act of searching for someone or something until they are found or located. It implies a determined effort to track down or catch someone/something after an extended or relentless pursuit.
  • run somebody/something into the ground The idiom "run somebody/something into the ground" has two main definitions: 1. To exhaust or tire out someone or something by continuous or excessive work or activity. This could refer to physical, mental, or emotional exhaustion caused by overworking or overusing something or someone. Example: The demanding workload ran him into the ground, and he eventually suffered from burnout. 2. To criticize, ridicule, or belittle someone or something excessively or relentlessly, often to the point of causing damage, loss of reputation, or failure. Example: The media ran his political opponent into the ground with relentless negative coverage, ultimately causing her to lose the election.
  • run someone to ground The idiom "run someone to ground" means to pursue or search for someone until they are found or caught, typically after a long or exhausting effort. It implies the determination and persistence in finding or apprehending an individual.
  • run something into the ground The idiom "run something into the ground" means to exhaust or ruin something, usually by using it excessively or carelessly, so that its original value or quality is greatly diminished. It refers to the act of continuing to use or exploit a resource or an idea to the point of complete wear and tear or ineffective use.
  • have (one) on the run The idiom "have (one) on the run" means to cause someone to be constantly busy or preoccupied, making it difficult for them to keep up or respond effectively. It suggests that the person is being overwhelmed or pressured by various tasks or challenges.
  • have the run of (some place) The idiom "have the run of (some place)" means to have unrestricted access or control over a particular place. It implies that a person has the freedom to move around, use or explore the entire area as they please, without any limitations or restrictions.
  • hold with the hare and run with the hounds The idiom "hold with the hare and run with the hounds" means to try to remain on good terms with both sides of a conflict or issue, even though they may have opposing opinions or interests. It suggests that someone is attempting to please everyone involved, but ultimately may end up causing more harm than good by not taking a clear stance or making a decision.
  • run with someone or something The idiom "run with someone or something" means to collaborate, cooperate, or work closely with another person or group towards a common goal. It implies forming a partnership or joining forces to pursue a particular endeavor or idea. It suggests a willingness to support and contribute to the success of that person or thing.
  • run with something The idiom "run with something" means to take an idea, suggestion, or opportunity and enthusiastically pursue it or act upon it. It implies a sense of enthusiasm, initiative, or taking charge to make the most of a situation or idea.
  • run around like a chicken with its head cut off The idiom "run around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to act in a frenzied or chaotic manner, often due to being extremely busy, panicked, or disoriented. It implies a lack of focus, rationality, or direction in one's actions.
  • run (oneself or someone) ragged The idiom "run (oneself or someone) ragged" means to exhaust or tire oneself or someone out by making them work or go through a demanding or strenuous routine, often resulting in physical or mental fatigue. It implies pushing someone to the limit or overworking them excessively.
  • run for the hills The idiom "run for the hills" means to flee or escape quickly and urgently, especially in the face of danger or a highly menacing situation. It implies a strong desire to get away from a threatening or perilous circumstance.
  • home run The idiom "home run" refers to a remarkable success or achievement, especially in sports or life, where one accomplishes something significant or impressive. It is derived from baseball, where hitting a ball out of the playing field and running all the bases results in scoring a run for the team.
  • run away with the idea To "run away with the idea" means to become excessively excited or carried away with a particular thought or notion, often to the point of obsession or exaggeration. It implies losing one's perspective and allowing the idea to dominate one's thoughts or actions.
  • over the long run The idiom "over the long run" refers to a period of time that is relatively lengthy or extensive. It implies considering the outcome or results of something in the context of a long-term perspective, rather than focusing solely on short-term or immediate outcomes. It emphasizes the importance of considering the cumulative effects and trends that emerge over a prolonged period.
  • in the long run (or term) The idiom "in the long run (or term)" means considering or analyzing something over a significant period of time, especially when looking at the final outcome or overall impact. It refers to a perspective that takes the future into account rather than focusing solely on the short-term consequences or immediate results.
  • you have to (learn to) walk before you (can) run The idiom "you have to (learn to) walk before you (can) run" implies that before attempting complex or advanced tasks, it is necessary to first master the foundational skills or basics. This idiom emphasizes the importance of starting with simple steps and gradually progressing towards more challenging or ambitious goals.
  • you must (learn to) walk before you (can) run The idiom "you must (learn to) walk before you (can) run" means that in order to succeed or achieve something, it is necessary to start with the basics and gradually build up one's skills, knowledge, or experience before attempting more advanced or complex tasks. It emphasizes the importance of taking small steps and mastering the fundamentals before attempting larger or more challenging goals.

Similar spelling words for RUN

Plural form of RUN is RUNS

Conjugate verb Run

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have run
you would have run
he/she/it would have run
we would have run
they would have run

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been running
you would have been running
he/she/it would have been running
we would have been running
they would have been running

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would run
you would run
he/she/it would run
we would run
they would run

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be running
you would be running
he/she/it would be running
we would be running
they would be running

FUTURE

I will run
you will run
he/she/it will run
we will run
they will run

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be running
you will be running
he/she/it will be running
we will be running
they will be running

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have run
you will have run
he/she/it will have run
we will have run
they will have run

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been running
you will have been running
he/she/it will have been running
we will have been running
they will have been running

IMPERATIVE

you run
we let´s run

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to run

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was running
you were running
he/she/it was running
we were running
they were running

PAST PARTICIPLE

run

PAST PERFECT

I had run
you had run
he/she/it had run
we had run
they had run

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been running
you had been running
he/she/it had been running
we had been running
they had been running

PRESENT

I run
you run
he/she/it runs
we run
they run

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am running
you are running
he/she/it is running
we are running
they are running

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

running

PRESENT PERFECT

I have run
you have run
he/she/it has run
we have run
they have run

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been running
you have been running
he/she/it has been running
we have been running
they have been running

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it run

SIMPLE PAST

I ran
you ran
he/she/it ran
we ran
they ran

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