How Do You Spell SAVE?

Pronunciation: [sˈe͡ɪv] (IPA)

The word "save" is spelled with four letters, S-A-V-E. In IPA phonetic transcription, it is represented as /seɪv/. The initial sound is a voiceless alveolar fricative /s/, followed by a diphthong /eɪ/ which represents the long "a" sound. Finally, it ends with a voiced labiodental fricative /v/. This word can be used in different contexts, such as "save your money" or "save the planet". Its spelling and pronunciation are essential for effective communication.

SAVE Meaning and Definition

Save (verb)

1. To rescue or protect someone or something from potential danger, harm, or loss.

Example: The lifeguard jumped into the water to save the drowning swimmer.

2. To prevent the wastage or loss of something by conserving or utilizing it efficiently.

Example: It is important for society to save energy and reduce our carbon footprint.

3. To keep money, goods, or resources for future use rather than spending or consuming them immediately.

Example: She saves a portion of her monthly income to build a retirement fund.

4. To store or preserve data, information, or files electronically for later use or reference.

Example: Remember to save your document before closing the computer program.

5. To keep or maintain something, such as a reputation, honor, or relationship, intact.

Example: He worked hard to save his marriage after realizing his mistakes.

6. To avoid the negative consequences of a situation by taking appropriate action or making wise decisions.

Example: The athlete's quick thinking and reflexes saved him from a severe injury.

7. To accumulate points, goals, or victories in a game or competition.

Example: The team needed one more goal to save the match and qualify for the finals.

As a noun, "save" refers to a conservative action or an instance of preserving someone or something from harm or danger.

Example: The firefighter's brave save of the child trapped inside the burning building made headlines.

Top Common Misspellings for SAVE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SAVE

Etymology of SAVE

The word save originated from the Latin word salvare, which means to rescue, to save from danger or to make safe. This Latin term is derived from the root salvus, meaning safe or unharmed. The word has been present in Old French as savoir and Middle English as saven, which eventually evolved into the modern English term save.

Idioms with the word SAVE

  • can't do sth to save your life The idiom "can't do something to save your life" is used to express extreme inability or incompetence at doing a particular task or activity. It emphasizes that even if one's life depended on it, they would still be unable to accomplish it successfully.
  • save sb's bacon/neck The idiom "save sb's bacon/neck" refers to rescuing or protecting someone from a dangerous or difficult situation, often at the last minute. It implies that someone's life, reputation, or well-being is at stake, and by intervening or taking action, the person is prevented from experiencing negative consequences or harm.
  • save your breath The idiom "save your breath" means to stop wasting your time and energy by speaking or arguing, as it is unlikely to change the other person's mind or result in a desired outcome.
  • save your own skin/hide The idiom "save your own skin/hide" means to prioritize one's own safety, well-being, or self-interest above others, often by avoiding harm or negative consequences. It suggests acting in a self-preserving manner, sometimes at the expense of others, in order to protect oneself.
  • save the day The idiom "save the day" refers to the act of rescuing a difficult or dangerous situation and bringing about a positive outcome or resolution. It suggests that someone or something has successfully intervened or taken action to prevent a potentially negative or disastrous event from occurring or to turn a hopeless situation into a victorious one.
  • save/keep money for a rainy day The idiom "save/keep money for a rainy day" means to set aside or save money for a future time of need or unexpected circumstances. It advocates for the importance of financial prudence and preparation, urging individuals to save money as a safety net to be used during difficult or unforeseen situations.
  • scrimp and save The idiom "scrimp and save" means to be very frugal and mindful of expenses, often by avoiding unnecessary spending or cutting down on one's usual lifestyle in order to save money or make ends meet.
  • save up The idiom "save up" means to gradually accumulate or set aside money, usually by saving small amounts over time, in order to have a larger sum for a specific purpose or goal.
  • save toward The idiom "save toward" means to set money aside or save with the aim of reaching a specific financial goal. It implies putting aside funds over time in order to accumulate enough money to achieve or acquire something desired, such as a purchase, a trip, or an investment.
  • save skin The idiom "save skin" means to protect oneself from harm, danger, or negative consequences in a given situation. It refers to taking actions or making decisions with the primary focus of ensuring one's own well-being and self-preservation.
  • save own skin The idiom "save own skin" means to prioritize one's own safety or well-being above others, typically in a difficult or dangerous situation. It implies a self-centered or self-preserving behavior, where an individual seeks to protect themselves without much regard for others.
  • save oneself The idiom "save oneself" typically means to rescue or protect oneself from harm, danger, or a difficult situation through one's own actions or decisions. It implies taking proactive steps to ensure one's well-being or to avoid negative consequences.
  • save on The idiom "save on" typically means to reduce or conserve the amount of something, especially in terms of money or expenses. It refers to taking actions or making choices that result in spending less or being more economical.
  • save neck The idiom "save neck" means to prevent harm or danger to oneself, usually by taking precautions, avoiding risks, or making a wise decision in a challenging situation. It implies finding a way to protect oneself from potential negative consequences or trouble.
  • save money up The idiom "save money up" means to set aside and accumulate money over a period of time for future use or a specific purpose. It implies the act of saving a portion of one's income or assets gradually, with the intention of having a reserve for emergencies, investments, or desired purchases.
  • Save it! The idiom "Save it!" is a colloquial expression that is used to tell someone to cease talking or stop making excuses. It conveys a sense of annoyance or disbelief and implies that the speaker is no longer interested in hearing what the other person has to say.
  • save from The idiom "save from" typically refers to the act of protecting or rescuing someone or something from harm, danger, or a negative outcome. It implies preventing someone or something from experiencing a harmful or undesirable situation or condition.
  • save for a rainy day The idiom "save for a rainy day" refers to the act of setting aside money, resources, or provisions for future needs or unexpected circumstances. It emphasizes the importance of being prepared and having a backup plan in case of any unforeseen events or difficulties.
  • save for The idiom "save for" means to reserve or set aside something for a particular purpose or individual. It typically implies keeping something safe or secure until it is needed or used at a later time.
  • save face The idiom "save face" means to take actions or make efforts to avoid embarrassment, humiliation, or the loss of reputation in a difficult or awkward situation. It refers to the act of preserving one's dignity or social standing in order to maintain a positive image.
  • Save breath The idiom "save breath" means to conserve one's energy or effort by refraining from speaking or arguing further, especially when it is unlikely to change or influence a situation or person's opinion. It suggests that engaging in further discussion or persuasion would be a waste of time and effort.
  • save blushes The expression "save blushes" means to prevent embarrassment or humiliation for someone or oneself in a situation. It refers to taking actions to avoid or mitigate any potential embarrassment or awkwardness.
  • save bacon The idiom "save bacon" means to rescue or protect oneself or others from a difficult or dangerous situation, often by taking quick action or making a wise decision. It implies avoiding harm, trouble, or failure and ensuring safety or success.
  • save a bundle The idiom "save a bundle" means to save a significant amount of money or to avoid spending a large sum of money on something. It implies a substantial financial saving or a great deal of expense being avoided.
  • save The idiom "save" can have several meanings, depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To rescue or protect someone or something from harm, danger, or a difficult situation. Example: The lifeguard saved the drowning swimmer. 2. To prevent the loss, waste, or destruction of something. Example: She saved the old family photographs from the house fire. 3. To keep money or resources for future use or emergencies. Example: He saves a portion of his salary every month. 4. To refrain from spending or using something unnecessarily. Example: I'm trying to save electricity by turning off lights when not in use. 5. Sports-related meaning: To prevent the opponent from scoring a point, goal,
  • prophet is not without honor save in his own country The idiom "prophet is not without honor save in his own country" refers to the common phenomenon where individuals are often not recognized or appreciated in their own familiar or hometown environment, but gain recognition and respect elsewhere. It suggests that people are more likely to be appreciated, admired, or respected in unfamiliar or foreign settings rather than in their own local community or among their own acquaintances.
  • can't to save life The idiom "can't do something to save one's life" means that someone is completely unable to do a particular task or activity, even if their life depended on it. It indicates a complete lack of skill, ability, or knowledge in a certain area.
  • save sth up The idiom "save something up" means to accumulate or stockpile something, typically money or resources, over a period of time for future use or a specific purpose. It suggests the act of setting aside or preserving resources for later use, rather than spending or consuming them immediately.
  • save your bacon The idiom "save your bacon" means to rescue or protect someone from a dangerous or difficult situation, usually at the last minute, thereby preventing harm or a negative outcome. It implies the preservation of one's well-being, interests, or reputation.
  • save sb's skin The idiom "save sb's skin" means to protect, rescue, or ensure the safety of someone, especially in a dangerous or risky situation. It implies preventing harm, injury, or negative consequences from befalling the person.
  • save sb's bacon To "save someone's bacon" means to rescue or protect someone from a difficult or dangerous situation. It implies coming to someone's aid or assistance in a critical moment, providing help that prevents them from experiencing harm or failure.
  • save sm's skin The idiom "save someone's skin" means to rescue or protect someone from harm, danger, or a difficult situation. It refers to ensuring someone's safety or preventing them from facing negative consequences.
  • save/spare sb's blushes The idiom "save/spare sb's blushes" means to prevent someone from being embarrassed or humiliated, usually by avoiding disclosing or acknowledging their mistakes, secrets, or shortcomings in front of others. It involves protecting someone's reputation or dignity by concealing their faults or errors.
  • Save one's breath The idiom "save one's breath" means to refrain from wasting one's time and effort in giving advice or making an argument because it is likely to be ignored or ineffective. It implies that it is pointless to speak because the person being addressed will not listen or cannot be convinced.
  • save a bundle (on sth) The idiom "save a bundle (on sth)" means to save a significant amount of money on something. It refers to obtaining a large discount or paying a lower price than expected for a particular item or service.
  • save (sth) for a rainy day The idiom "save (something) for a rainy day" means to reserve or set aside something, usually money or resources, for a future time or situation when it may be needed or necessary. It implies being prepared for unexpected circumstances or emergencies.
  • save (money) on sth The idiom "save (money) on sth" means to pay less for a particular thing or to avoid unnecessary expenses. It refers to the act of finding ways to spend less money or obtain a discount on a specific item or service.
  • God save the mark! The idiom "God save the mark!" is an expression used to convey disbelief or astonishment towards someone's statement or action. It is often used sarcastically to imply that the person being referred to is naive or foolish. The phrase "God save the mark!" can be interpreted as a plea for divine intervention to protect or enlighten the person in question.
  • save someone's skin To "save someone's skin" means to rescue or protect someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, usually at personal risk or expense. It implies a selfless act of helping someone avoid harm or trouble.
  • spare, save blushes The idiom "spare, save blushes" means to prevent embarrassment or disgrace for someone. It is used when someone is trying to protect another person from feeling shame or humiliation in a particular situation.
  • not be able to do something to save your life The idiom "not be able to do something to save your life" means that someone is completely incapable or incompetent in performing a specific task or activity, even in a life-threatening situation. It emphasizes the extreme difficulty or lack of skill someone possesses in a particular area, suggesting a complete inability to succeed or accomplish the task under any circumstances.
  • save somebody’s bacon/neck The idiom "save somebody’s bacon/neck" means to rescue or protect someone from a dangerous or difficult situation. It implies preventing the person from harm or ensuring their well-being, often in a critical moment.
  • save the day/situation The idiom "save the day/situation" refers to an act or event that resolves a difficult or critical problem, preventing potential disaster or alleviating a tense situation. It implies that someone or something has successfully come to the rescue, bringing a positive outcome and preventing negative consequences.
  • save (somebody’s) face The idiom "save (somebody's) face" means to prevent someone from feeling embarrassed, humiliated, or losing their dignity in a particular situation. It involves taking actions or making efforts to protect someone's reputation or self-esteem, usually within a social or public context.
  • save your (own) skin/hide/neck The idiom "save your (own) skin/hide/neck" means to prioritize one's personal safety or well-being above all else, especially in a dangerous or difficult situation. It implies taking actions that ensure one's own survival or protect oneself from harm, often without regard for others.
  • save someone's ass The definition of the idiom "save someone's ass" is to rescue or protect someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at the last minute, and potentially preventing them from facing negative consequences or harm. It implies coming to someone's aid when they are in trouble or facing a potential failure.
  • save (one's) own bacon The idiom "save one's own bacon" means to rescue or protect oneself from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at the expense of others. It implies taking actions to ensure personal safety, success, or well-being, even if it means sacrificing or betraying others in the process.
  • save (one's) bacon The idiom "save (one's) bacon" means to rescue or protect someone from a dangerous or difficult situation, usually at the last moment or against great odds. It implies preventing oneself or someone else from getting into trouble or experiencing harm or loss.
  • save someone's bacon The idiom "save someone's bacon" means to rescue or protect someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, often at the last moment or through cunning or resourcefulness.
  • can't (do something) to save (one's) life The idiom "can't (do something) to save (one's) life" means that someone is completely incapable of doing a task or activity, even if their life depended on it. It emphasizes a complete lack of skill, ability, or competence in a specific area.
  • can't do something to save your life The idiom "can't do something to save your life" means that a person is extremely incapable or incompetent in performing a certain task or activity, even in critical or life-threatening situations. It emphasizes the lack of proficiency or skill that the person possesses in a particular area, to the extent that they would be unable to accomplish it successfully even under extreme circumstances.
  • save (one's) blushes The idiom "save one's blushes" means to prevent someone from feeling embarrassed or humiliated in a particular situation. It refers to taking action to protect someone's dignity or reputation, often by intervening before something embarrassing or awkward occurs.
  • save someone's blushes The idiom "save someone's blushes" means to protect or spare someone from embarrassment or humiliation. It can refer to taking action in order to prevent someone from feeling ashamed or exposed in a particular situation.
  • save (something) for a rainy day The definition of the idiom "save (something) for a rainy day" is to set aside or save something, such as money or resources, for future use or a time of need or emergency. It implies being prepared for unexpected or difficult circumstances.
  • save someone's face To "save someone's face" means to preserve their reputation, pride, or dignity, especially in a situation where they could have experienced embarrassment, shame, or loss of respect. It involves preventing someone from public humiliation or maintaining their self-esteem.
  • save (one's) own hide The idiom "save one's own hide" refers to someone taking actions to protect or save themselves, often disregarding the well-being or interests of others. It implies that a person is primarily concerned with self-preservation and avoiding any harm or negative consequences, even at the expense of others.
  • save somebody's/your neck/skin/hide To "save somebody's/your neck/skin/hide" means to prevent oneself or someone else from being harmed, injured, or punished in a difficult or dangerous situation. It refers to ensuring someone's safety or avoiding potential consequences. The idiom emphasizes the importance of protecting oneself or others by taking necessary actions or using one's wit.
  • couldn't (do something) to save (one's) life The idiom "couldn't (do something) to save (one's) life" means that someone is completely incapable of doing a specific task or skill, even if their life depended on it. It emphasizes their inability or lack of proficiency in performing the mentioned action.
  • to save life The idiom "to save a life" means to rescue or protect someone from imminent danger or harm, often referring to situations where someone's physical well-being or existence is at risk. It can also be used metaphorically to describe actions that have a significant positive impact on someone's welfare or quality of life.
  • to save one's life The idiom "to save one's life" is used to convey the idea that someone is unable to do something, even with extreme effort or determination. It implies a lack of skill or capability in performing a particular action or task.
  • to save your life The idiom "to save your life" is often used to emphasize the importance or urgency of a situation. It suggests that something is extremely vital or necessary to the extent that it could affect one's survival or overall well-being.

Similar spelling words for SAVE

Plural form of SAVE is SAVES

Conjugate verb Save

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have saved
you would have saved
he/she/it would have saved
we would have saved
they would have saved
I would have save
you would have save
he/she/it would have save
we would have save
they would have save

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been saving
you would have been saving
he/she/it would have been saving
we would have been saving
they would have been saving

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would save
you would save
he/she/it would save
we would save
they would save

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be saving
you would be saving
he/she/it would be saving
we would be saving
they would be saving

FUTURE

I will save
you will save
he/she/it will save
we will save
they will save

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be saving
you will be saving
he/she/it will be saving
we will be saving
they will be saving

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have saved
you will have saved
he/she/it will have saved
we will have saved
they will have saved

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been saving
you will have been saving
he/she/it will have been saving
we will have been saving
they will have been saving

IMPERATIVE

you save
we let´s save

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to save

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was saving
you were saving
he/she/it was saving
we were saving
they were saving

PAST PARTICIPLE

saved

PAST PERFECT

I had saved
you had saved
he/she/it had saved
we had saved
they had saved

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been saving
you had been saving
he/she/it had been saving
we had been saving
they had been saving

PRESENT

I save
you save
he/she/it saves
we save
they save

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am saving
you are saving
he/she/it is saving
we are saving
they are saving

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

saving

PRESENT PERFECT

I have saved
you have saved
he/she/it has saved
we have saved
they have saved

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been saving
you have been saving
he/she/it has been saving
we have been saving
they have been saving

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it save

SIMPLE PAST

I saved
you saved
he/she/it saved
we saved
they saved

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