How Do You Spell SAY?

Pronunciation: [sˈe͡ɪ] (IPA)

The word "say" is spelled S-A-Y. In International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), it is transcribed as /seɪ/. The first sound is the 's' sound, which is unvoiced and produced by lightly touching the tip of the tongue to the alveolar ridge of the mouth. Followed by the 'ay' diphthong sound, which is made by starting with an open mouth and ending with the tongue slightly raised towards the roof of the mouth, forming a long vowel sound. Together, these sounds combine to create the word 'say'.

SAY Meaning and Definition

The verb "say" is a multifaceted term that encompasses several meanings and applications. Primarily, it refers to the act of expressing something through verbal communication, involving the use of words or sounds. It involves the action of speaking, uttering, or voicing words, opinions, thoughts, or information, either aloud or silently in one's mind.

In a broader sense, "say" can also denote an authoritative declaration or statement made by an individual or a group, which carries weight or validity. It implies that the information or opinion expressed is valid, true, or worthy of consideration.

Furthermore, "say" can be used to indicate a specific message or meaning conveyed through non-verbal means, such as in the case of body language, gestures, or facial expressions. It emphasizes the notion that communication involves more than just words and can be conveyed through various mediums.

Additionally, "say" can suggest an estimate, claim, or opinion about something, often prefaced by phrases like "some people say" or "experts say." It highlights that the statement represents a commonly accepted view, although its accuracy may vary.

Lastly, "say" can function as a transitional or explanatory device in writing or speech, linking or introducing a quote, paraphrase, or example. It emphasizes that the subsequent content is about to reflect or illustrate what somebody else has expressed.

In summary, "say" encompasses the act of verbal expression, authoritative declaration, non-verbal communication, estimation or opinion, and transitional function, making it a versatile verb in various contexts of communication.

Top Common Misspellings for SAY *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SAY

Etymology of SAY

The word "say" originated from the Old English word "sǣg(e)an" or "secgan", which means "to speak, utter, declare, or express in words". This Old English word itself comes from the Germanic root "saganą" and is related to other Germanic languages like Old Norse "segja", Old High German "sagēn", and Gothic "sagjan". Overall, the etymology of the word "say" can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic language.

Idioms with the word SAY

  • it's safe to say (that) The idiom "it's safe to say (that)" means that something is highly probable or likely to be true. It is often used to express confidence or certainty about a statement or conclusion.
  • before you can say Jack Robinson The idiom "before you can say Jack Robinson" means that something happens or occurs very quickly or suddenly, without any delay or hesitation. It is used to emphasize the speed of an action or event.
  • have a lot to say for yourself The idiom "have a lot to say for yourself" is used to describe someone who is confident, assertive, and outspoken, often expressing their opinions or thoughts freely and without hesitation. It suggests that the person is not easily swayed or intimidated and is capable of effectively expressing themselves.
  • have nothing to say for yourself The idiom "have nothing to say for yourself" means to be unable or unwilling to provide a satisfactory explanation or justification for one's actions or behavior, often resulting in feelings of guilt, shame, or embarrassment. It implies that someone is unable to defend or explain their position or actions when faced with criticism or scrutiny.
  • I must say The idiom "I must say" is used as an introductory phrase to express one's opinion or emphatic statement. It implies that the speaker is about to share their judgment or view on a particular matter.
  • I wouldn't say no The idiom "I wouldn't say no" means that although one might not necessarily jump at the opportunity or readily express enthusiasm, they are open to accepting or trying something. It implies a willingness to consider or consider accepting a proposition or invitation without outrightly rejecting it.
  • I'll say! The idiom "I'll say!" is a colloquial phrase used to express strong agreement or affirmation with something that has been said or done. It is often used to emphasize one's agreement or reinforce a statement that the speaker considers to be very true or accurate.
  • not say boo The idiom "not say boo" means to be extremely quiet or silent, usually in a situation where speaking up or expressing oneself is expected or appropriate. It implies a complete lack of verbal response or reaction.
  • not to say The idiom "not to say" is used to introduce a stronger or more extreme alternative to a statement or previously mentioned idea. It implies that the existing statement may be true to some extent, but the alternative possibility being suggested is even more accurate or valid.
  • (let's) say The idiom "(let's) say" is used to introduce a hypothetical or imaginary situation for the purpose of illustration, explanation, or argument. It suggests that what follows is not an assertion of fact, but rather a supposition or assumption being made temporarily to make a point or explore a concept.
  • say your piece The idiom "say your piece" means to express one's opinion or viewpoint openly and assertively, especially when given the opportunity to speak or contribute to a discussion or debate. It implies the freedom to share one's thoughts or feelings, regardless of agreement or disagreement with others.
  • say goodbye to sth The idiom "say goodbye to something" means to give up, lose, or have to do without something. It implies a permanent or definite departure or separation from a particular thing. It is often used to indicate that something is coming to an end or will no longer be available.
  • say no more The idiom "say no more" is often used to indicate that something has been understood or that there is no need for further explanation or discussion. It is used to convey that the listener has inferred or grasped the intended message and that no additional elaboration is necessary.
  • say the word The idiom "say the word" means to indicate willingness or readiness to do something if asked or instructed. It implies that one is waiting for a signal or command before taking action or providing assistance.
  • say this/that much for sb/sth The idiom "say this/that much for sb/sth" is typically used to acknowledge a positive or impressive aspect of someone or something, even if there might be negative aspects or criticisms as well. It implies that, despite any shortcomings or criticisms, there is at least one commendable or praiseworthy quality.
  • say uncle The idiom "say uncle" means to surrender, submit, or admit defeat when facing a challenging situation or opponent.
  • say when The idiom "say when" is a phrase used to prompt someone to indicate when they have reached a desired or sufficient amount of something, such as pouring a beverage or adding a particular ingredient to a recipe.
  • that is to say ... The idiom "that is to say ..." is used to clarify or explain something further by providing more specific or detailed information. It is usually used to introduce a clarification, explanation, or example after making a general statement or point.
  • to say nothing of ... The idiom "to say nothing of ..." is used to introduce an additional point, item, or person that is even more significant or important than what has already been mentioned or considered. It implies that the previous point or item was already noteworthy or challenging enough, but there is an even greater one that needs to be addressed or taken into account.
  • to say the least The idiom "to say the least" is used to downplay or understate a statement, implying that the reality or truth is stronger or more extreme than what is being expressed. It indicates that the speaker is intentionally choosing a milder or less explicit description instead of stating the full extent of their opinion or situation.
  • what have you got to say for yourself? The idiom "what have you got to say for yourself?" is an expression used to demand an explanation, justification, or defense from someone for their actions, behavior, or the consequences of their actions. It typically conveys a sense of disappointment, disapproval, or anger towards the person being addressed, implying that they should provide reasons or apologies for their actions.
  • who can say? The idiom "who can say?" is used to express uncertainty or doubt about a particular outcome or answer. It implies that it is difficult or impossible to determine the true or correct response to a certain situation or question. It suggests that there may be various possibilities, or that only time will provide the answer.
  • you can say that again! The idiom "you can say that again!" is an expression used to strongly agree with a statement or to emphasize that something is undoubtedly true. It conveys the speaker's strong conviction and often reinforces or supports the previous statement.
  • you can't say fairer than that The idiom "you can't say fairer than that" means that something offered or proposed is considered to be very reasonable, honest, or favorable and cannot be improved upon.
  • you don't say! The idiom "you don't say!" is a sarcastic, informal expression used to express surprise or disbelief in response to something that should be obvious or well-known. It is often used to emphasize the speaker's ironic or humorous reaction to a statement that is either obvious or surprising.
  • have a, sm, etc. say in sth The idiom "have a say in something" means to have the opportunity or right to express one's opinion or contribute to a decision-making process about a specific matter. It suggests being involved and having influence or control over the outcome or direction of something.
  • say cheese The idiom "say cheese" refers to the instruction given to someone just before taking their photograph, encouraging them to smile for the camera. It is a playful way to elicit a happy or posed expression, as cheese is thought to naturally make people smile.
  • need I say The idiom "need I say" is used as a rhetorical question to express that something is so obvious or self-evident that it does not require further explanation or elaboration. It implies that the answer is already known or understood by the listener, emphasizing the speaker's opinion or expectation.
  • never say die The idiom "never say die" means to refuse to give up or be discouraged, even in the face of difficulties or failure. It is an expression of determination, resilience, and perseverance, emphasizing the refusal to surrender or admit defeat.
  • needless to say The idiom "needless to say" means that something is self-evident or understood without needing to be explicitly stated, as it is already known or can be easily assumed by the listener or reader.
  • need I say more? The idiom "need I say more?" is a rhetorical question used when the speaker believes that the point they have made is so clear or convincing that no further explanation or evidence is necessary. It implies that the evidence or argument presented should be sufficient to support the speaker's point without the need for further elaboration.
  • suffice (it) to say The definition of the idiom "suffice (it) to say" is: to indicate that the statement or information following is enough or adequate, implying that further details are unnecessary or redundant.
  • breathe/say a word The idiom "breathe/say a word" means to speak or communicate, especially to reveal a secret or share information that may have been held back. It can also imply sharing one's thoughts, opinions, or concerns on a particular matter. For example, "She promised not to breathe a word about their surprise party," means she committed to keeping the event a secret.
  • not say boo to a goose, at not say boo The idiom "not say boo to a goose" or "not say boo" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or quiet. It means that the person doesn't speak up or make any noise, just like how someone might avoid saying anything to frighten or disturb a goose.
  • wave/say goodbye to sth The idiom "wave/say goodbye to sth" means to acknowledge that something is ending, no longer possible, or no longer within reach. It implies accepting the finality or loss of a certain situation, outcome, or opportunity. It often conveys a sense of resignation, disappointment, or regret.
  • not have a civil word to say about sb The idiom "not have a civil word to say about someone" means that one cannot find anything good, positive, or polite to say about that person. It implies a complete lack of respect or appreciation for the individual mentioned.
  • Don't make me say it again! The idiom "Don't make me say it again!" is an expression used to convey frustration or annoyance when someone is being asked to repeat or reiterate something that has already been stated. It implies that the speaker believes the information or instruction should have been understood or remembered the first time it was said, and they are exasperated at having to repeat themselves.
  • (I) can't rightly say. The idiom "can't rightly say" is used when an individual is unsure or unable to answer a question or make a statement with confidence and certainty. It implies a lack of knowledge, information, or ability to give a definite response.
  • say sth in a roundabout way To say something in a roundabout way means to express or convey an idea or message indirectly or indirectly, often using unnecessarily complex or convoluted language. It involves beating around the bush or using a lot of words to express something that could have been said more directly or succinctly.
  • sorry to say The idiom "sorry to say" is an expression used when someone wants to convey that they are regretful or apologetic about a particular statement or information they are about to share. It is often used as a precursor to something disappointing, unpleasant, or unfavorable.
  • wouldn't say boo to a goose The idiom "wouldn't say boo to a goose" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or easily frightened. It implies that the person lacks assertiveness or the ability to stand up for themselves.
  • What would you say if...? The idiom "What would you say if...?" is typically used when someone wants to gauge another person's reaction or opinion regarding a hypothetical scenario or proposition. It prompts the listener to consider their response and express their thoughts on the given situation.
  • What say? The idiom "What say?" is an informal way of asking for someone's opinion or feedback on a particular matter. It is akin to saying "What do you think?" or "What is your viewpoint?" It is often used to initiate a conversation or seek agreement or consensus on a decision.
  • What do you want me to say? The idiom "What do you want me to say?" is often used as a rhetorical question to express frustration or confusion when someone expects a response or opinion, but the speaker either has nothing to add or doesn't know how to respond effectively. It implies a sense of helplessness or inability to express the desired response.
  • What do you say? The idiom "What do you say?" is used as a polite way of making a request or suggestion, seeking agreement or approval from someone. It implies asking for their opinion, response, or decision on a specific matter.
  • What can I say? The idiom "What can I say?" is a rhetorical question used to express a situation or feeling where there are no words sufficient to accurately describe or capture the emotions or thoughts being experienced. It signifies a sense of helplessness, astonishment, or a lack of adequate response.
  • The hell you say! The idiom "The hell you say!" is an expression used to convey disbelief, skepticism, or incredulity towards something that has been said. It could signify surprise, disagreement, or a strong expression of doubt.
  • That's what I say The idiom "That's what I say" is an expression used to convey agreement and endorsement of a statement or opinion previously expressed, emphasizing one's strong support or alignment with it. It signifies that the speaker shares the same viewpoint or belief as the person who made the initial statement.
  • That's easy for you to say The definition of the idiom "That's easy for you to say" is a sarcastic remark made when someone suggests that something is simple or straightforward for another person, while disregarding the difficulties or challenges that the person actually faces.
  • smile when you say that The idiom "smile when you say that" is a sarcastic or ironic remark used to imply that the speaker believes what was just said is either humorous, absurd, or insincere. It suggests that the listener should maintain a sense of humor or light-heartedness about the statement, even if there may be underlying criticism or disagreement.
  • Say what? The idiom "Say what?" is an informal phrase typically used to express surprise or disbelief in response to something unexpected or confusing. It is a way of seeking clarification or further explanation by asking someone to repeat or confirm what was just said.
  • say to oneself The idiom "say to oneself" means to talk or converse silently within one's mind, typically reflecting on a thought, decision, or realization without speaking aloud. It refers to the internal dialogue or self-talk that occurs mentally without verbalizing it.
  • say to face The correct idiom is "face to face," not "say to face." Here is the definition for the idiom "face to face": "Face to face" means encountering or meeting someone in person, having a direct conversation or interaction with them, without any intermediaries or barriers. It signifies a personal, direct, and often intimate encounter between individuals. It can also refer to a situation where people confront each other directly, without hiding behind technology or other forms of communication.
  • say to
  • say that The idiom "say that" means to express or state something, often to confirm or elaborate on one's previous statement or to provide further information.
  • say piece The correct term is actually "say one's piece," which means to express one's opinion or viewpoint, especially in a forceful or assertive manner. It refers to speaking one's thoughts or making a statement, typically in a situation where there may be disagreement or conflicting perspectives.
  • say over The idiom "say over" means to repeat or restate something that has been said previously. It usually implies a request to clarify or ensure understanding or to emphasize a point.
  • say out loud The idiom "say out loud" means to speak or express something audibly and clearly, as opposed to merely thinking or whispering it.
  • say in a roundabout way The idiom "say in a roundabout way" means to express something indirectly or ambiguously, often using complex or lengthy explanations instead of being direct and straightforward. It implies that the speaker avoids addressing the topic directly and instead chooses to hint or imply their intended meaning.
  • Say hello to The idiom "Say hello to" means to greet or acknowledge another person or thing, typically by way of conveying well wishes or sending greetings on behalf of oneself or someone else. It is often used as a casual or friendly way of asking someone to send one's regards to another person.
  • say grace The idiom "say grace" refers to the act of offering a prayer or blessing before a meal. It is a way of expressing gratitude and seeking blessings or divine protection for the food and the gathering.
  • say for The idiom "say for" typically means to suggest or propose an example or estimate as a way of illustrating or emphasizing a point. It is commonly used to introduce an approximation or hypothetical scenario.
  • say boo The idiom "say boo" is typically used to describe someone who is extremely shy or timid, to the extent that they are unable to speak up or assert themselves. It implies that the person is so fearful or lacking in confidence that they can't even muster the courage to say a simple word like "boo," which is often associated with surprise or fright.
  • say against
  • say about
  • say a mouthful The idiom "say a mouthful" means to express something significant, insightful, or profound with just a few words or a single statement. It implies that what has been said carries a lot of meaning or truth and may require careful consideration or further discussion.
  • say a lot about The idiom "say a lot about" means that certain actions, behaviors, or characteristics of a person or thing provide significant insight or information about their character, beliefs, qualities, or values. It implies that these actions or traits reveal valuable details or truths about someone or something.
  • one's say The idiom "one's say" means the opportunity or right to express one's opinion or make a decision. It refers to having a voice or influence in a matter.
  • never say never The idiom "never say never" means that one should not dismiss or reject the possibility of something happening in the future, even if it currently seems unlikely or impossible. It emphasizes the idea that circumstances can change and what may seem improbable now might become possible at a later time.
  • let me say
  • just want to say The idiom "just want to say" is a phrase used to express a desire or intention to convey a message or express one's thoughts, often in a straightforward or direct manner. It highlights the speaker's emphasis on sharing their viewpoint or opinion without any additional intentions or motives.
  • I must say good night The idiom "I must say good night" is commonly used as a polite way to end a conversation or to bid farewell before leaving. It implies that the person speaking needs to depart or end the interaction.
  • I dare say The idiom "I dare say" is used to express one's belief or assumption about something, often implying that one is confident in their statement. It's a way of acknowledging a possible truth or making an educated guess without claiming absolute certainty.
  • I can't say fairer than that The idiom "I can't say fairer than that" means that the proposed offer or statement is the most reasonable and justifiable one can make. It conveys the idea that the speaker has been as fair and reasonable as possible in the given situation.
  • have the final say The idiom "have the final say" means to have the ultimate authority or decisive power in making a decision or determining the outcome of a situation. It refers to the ability to make the final and binding decision, often overruling others' opinions or actions.
  • go so far as to say The idiom "go so far as to say" is used to emphasize a strong or extreme statement. It suggests that the speaker is expressing a belief or opinion that may be considered controversial or surprising.
  • Don't say it! The idiom "Don't say it!" is an expression used to caution someone not to verbalize a particular thought, idea, or comment, often because it may be offensive, hurtful, embarrassing, or reveal a secret. It is typically employed to prevent potential negative consequences or to maintain harmony in a conversation or relationship.
  • Do as I say, not as I do The idiom "Do as I say, not as I do" refers to a situation where someone gives instructions or advice to others, but does not follow it themselves. It implies a contradiction in behavior, meaning that the speaker may be aware of the correct course of action but fails to act accordingly.
  • can't say that I have The idiom "can't say that I have" is used to indicate that one does not have any personal experience or knowledge about a specific situation or occurrence. It suggests that the speaker has never encountered or experienced what is being referred to.
  • can't say that I do The idiom "can't say that I do" is typically used as a response to express unfamiliarity or lack of knowledge about a particular topic or experience. It indicates that the person cannot confirm or affirm that they possess the stated knowledge or experience.
  • can't say for sure The idiom "can't say for sure" means that one is uncertain or lacks the necessary information to provide a definitive answer or assertion about something.
  • can't say boo to a goose The idiom "can't say boo to a goose" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or reserved, especially in social settings. It implies that the person lacks the confidence or assertiveness to speak up or assert their opinions.
  • can't say as I do The idiom "can't say as I do" means that the speaker is unable to give a personal example or endorsement of something because they themselves do not engage in that particular behavior or action. It implies that the speaker cannot speak from personal experience or provide a positive affirmation in regard to a certain topic or situation.
  • can't rightly say The idiom "can't rightly say" is typically used to express uncertainty or the lack of knowledge about something. It means that the person speaking is unable to provide a definite answer or make a confident statement about a certain topic or situation.
  • before you can say The idiom "before you can say" means that something happens very quickly or almost instantaneously. It is often used to emphasize the speed or swiftness of an action or occurrence.
  • before can say Jack Robinson The idiom "before you can say Jack Robinson" is used to emphasize the speed or quickness of an action, indicating that something happens very quickly or immediately.
  • Anything you say The idiom "Anything you say" is a response often used sarcastically or dismissively to indicate that one is not convinced or does not agree with what has been said. It implies that the speaker's words have little or no credibility or impact on the listener.
  • pretend/say that black is white The idiom "pretend/say that black is white" means to deliberately misrepresent or distort reality, often by denying or contradicting well-known facts or evidence. It implies making a false or absurd statement to deceive others or to manipulate a situation for personal gain. It is used to highlight the act of intentionally spreading falsehoods or promoting an alternate reality.
  • I/You can't say fairer than that. The idiom "I/You can't say fairer than that" means that a suggestion or proposal is so fair and reasonable that it cannot be further improved or argued against. It implies that the proposed solution is as equitable and unbiased as possible, leaving no room for dissatisfaction or complaint.
  • (I) can't say for sure. The idiom "(I) can't say for sure" means that the person is unsure or does not have enough knowledge or evidence to provide a definite answer or conclusion to a question or situation.
  • kiss/say/wave goodbye to sth The idiom "kiss/say/wave goodbye to sth" is used to indicate that something is ending or no longer possible, and there is no hope of its return or continuance. It suggests accepting the loss or departure of something and moving on.
  • let me (just) say The idiom "let me (just) say" is a phrase used to preface and emphasize a point or opinion that the speaker is about to express. It signifies a sincere desire to assert or make a statement clearly, often when offering an opinion or adding an important remark to a conversation or discussion. It can also be used to grab the attention of listeners, indicating that the following statement is noteworthy or significant.
  • (I) just want(ed) to say sth. The idiom "(I) just want(ed) to say sth." is a phrase used to preface or introduce a statement or comment one wants to express. It is often used to politely interrupt a conversation or to make a specific point or observation. It implies that the speaker wants to offer their input or opinion on a particular subject.
  • to say nothing of sth The idiom "to say nothing of sth" is used to add an additional point or aspect to a situation, emphasizing that it is even more significant or important than what has already been mentioned. It highlights that there is another factor to consider, usually implying that this additional aspect makes the situation more challenging or significant.
  • to say nothing of sm or sth The idiom "to say nothing of sm or sth" is used to introduce an additional factor that is even more significant or problematic than what has already been mentioned. It emphasizes that the previous issue being discussed is already significant on its own, but there is another point that is equally important or possibly even worse.
  • Say hello to sm (for me). The idiom "Say hello to someone (for me)" is a phrase used to ask someone to convey one's greetings or well-wishes to another person when they see or meet them. It is a way of sending regards to someone indirectly through a third party.
  • say sth out loud The idiom "say something out loud" refers to speaking audibly or vocalizing thoughts, opinions, or information instead of merely thinking or writing it. It involves expressing thoughts or words verbally, typically for others to hear and understand.
  • as who should say The idiom "as who should say" means to express something indirectly or hesitantly, suggesting that one is trying to convey a particular meaning without stating it explicitly. This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is implying or insinuating something, rather than directly stating it.
  • dare say The idiom "dare say" means to express an opinion or estimate about something that is uncertain or speculative. It is commonly used to indicate a belief or supposition without absolute certainty.
  • say someone nay The idiom "say someone nay" means to express dissent or opposition towards someone's ideas, plans, or proposals. It implies refusing or contradicting someone's suggestions or arguments.
  • say one's beads The idiom "say one's beads" means to recite or pray the rosary, a set of prayer beads used in Catholic religious tradition. It refers to the act of going through the prayers, devotedly, one by one, while fingering the beads.
  • before one can say Jack Robinson The idiom "before one can say Jack Robinson" is used to describe something that happens very quickly or suddenly. It suggests that an action or event occurs in such a short time that even before someone has a chance to say the name "Jack Robinson," it is already finished or completed.
  • let us say The definition for the idiom "let us say" is a phrase used to introduce a hypothetical or fictional scenario, suggesting that the following statement or example is not necessarily based on actual facts but is presented for the sake of explaining or illustrating a point.
  • have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself The idiom "have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself" means to have a valid or plausible explanation, justification, or defense for one's actions, behavior, or decisions. It indicates the ability to provide a compelling argument or contribute meaningful input when questioned or criticized.
  • I’ll say! The idiom "I'll say!" is typically used as an exclamation to express strong agreement or emphasis with a previous statement or sentiment. It is often used to reinforce a statement or show enthusiastic agreement or approval.
  • I’m glad to say (that…) The idiom "I'm glad to say (that…)" is a phrase used to express relief or satisfaction in being able to share a positive or pleasing update or outcome about something or someone. It is commonly used to convey a sense of happiness or contentment in the speaker's words or actions.
  • I’m sorry to say
  • I say The idiom "I say" is often used as an expression to introduce a particular opinion, observation, or statement in conversation. It is a way of asserting one's own perspective or viewpoint on a topic. It can also be used to emphasize agreement or disagreement with something that has been said previously.
  • I wouldn’t say no (to something) The idiom "I wouldn't say no (to something)" means that one is open to or interested in accepting an offer, invitation, or opportunity. It indicates a willingness to consider and possibly agree to something, without outright confirming or committing to it.
  • mean to say The idiom "mean to say" is typically used to express that someone wants to clarify or emphasize a particular point that they have previously mentioned. It is often used when the speaker wants to ensure that the listener fully understands their intended message or when they realize they could have expressed themselves more clearly.
  • not have a good word to say for somebody/something The idiom "not have a good word to say for somebody/something" means to be unable to say anything positive or complimentary about a particular person or thing. It implies a complete lack of praise or favorable comments.
  • not say boo to a goose The idiom "not say boo to a goose" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or easily frightened. It implies that the person is so quiet and non-confrontational that they would not even make a sound to startle a goose, which are generally docile birds.
  • not say boo to anyone The idiom "not say boo to anyone" is used to describe someone who is extremely shy, quiet, or introverted and rarely speaks up or initiates conversation with others. It implies a lack of assertiveness or timidity in social situations.
  • say no (to something) To "say no (to something)" means to refuse or decline something that is being offered or requested. It implies rejecting an opportunity, invitation, or suggestion.
  • say/give the word The idiom "say/give the word" means to give the command or order to begin or take action. It is used when someone is asking for permission or approval to proceed with a plan or task. It implies that the person is ready and waiting for instructions or authorization to start.
  • suffice (it) to say (that)…
  • to say nothing of something The idiom "to say nothing of something" means to mention or consider something as an additional point or factor, typically when addressing a topic that already has other important aspects or issues. It is used to emphasize that the mentioned thing is significant and should not be overlooked or forgotten.
  • what do/would you say (to something/doing something) The idiom "what do/would you say (to something/doing something)" is used to propose or suggest an idea or action to someone. It is often a way of asking for their opinion or reaction regarding a particular situation or proposal. It implies seeking agreement, approval, or consent from the person being addressed.
  • whatever you say The idiom "whatever you say" is a dismissive or sarcastic phrase used to convey a lack of interest, disagreement, or skepticism towards someone's statement or opinion. It suggests a willingness to comply or go along with what someone else says, even if one does not genuinely agree or believe in it.
  • who’s to say (…)? The idiom "who’s to say (…)" is used to express uncertainty or question the validity of a particular statement or judgment. It implies that there is no definitive authority or way to determine an answer or conclusion. It suggests that opinions may differ and there may be no absolute truth or right answer in a given situation.
  • you can’t say fairer (than that) The idiom "you can't say fairer (than that)" is used to express that something is the best or most reasonable option or proposition available. It implies that the current situation or offer is exceptionally fair and cannot be improved upon.
  • you don’t say! The idiom "you don't say!" is an expression used to express surprise or disbelief at what has been said. It is often used sarcastically or ironically to indicate that the information being shared is obvious or known to everyone.
  • have your say To "have your say" means to express your opinion, viewpoint, or thoughts on a particular matter or issue. It refers to the act of sharing your perspective or contributing to a discussion or debate so that your voice is heard and your views are taken into consideration.
  • say something, speak, etc. under your breath To say something under your breath means to speak softly or in a low voice, typically in a way that is not intended to be heard by others or to avoid confrontation. It often implies murmuring or muttering a comment or expression quietly enough that it is not easily audible to others nearby. This idiom is commonly used when someone wants to express their opinion or frustration without drawing attention or causing a direct confrontation.
  • not/never have a good word to say for/about somebody/something The idiom "not/never have a good word to say for/about somebody/something" means to consistently criticize or speak negatively about someone or something, without giving any positive remarks or praises. It implies that the person is always finding fault or expressing dissatisfaction, and is unable or unwilling to acknowledge any positive aspects or qualities.
  • say a lot about (something) The idiom "say a lot about (something)" means to provide significant insight or understanding about a specific subject or topic. It implies that certain words, actions, or qualities express or reveal valuable information about a particular thing, situation, or individual. It indicates that these expressions or indications can be used to draw conclusions, make judgments, or gain a deeper understanding of the matter at hand.
  • say again The idiom "say again" is often used as a request to repeat or clarify something that was said, typically when the listener didn't hear or understand it clearly the first time. It seeks repetition or elaboration in order to grasp the intended message.
  • Say it ain't so, Joe The idiom "Say it ain't so, Joe" is a phrase often used to express disbelief or disappointment upon hearing something shocking or disappointing. It originated from a popular expression attributed to baseball player "Shoeless" Joe Jackson during the 1919 Black Sox scandal, where he was accused of colluding to lose the World Series. The phrase has since evolved to be used more broadly in situations where someone expresses skepticism or hope that a negative or distressing statement or situation is not true.
  • (I) can't say as I do(, can't say as I don't) The idiom "(I) can't say as I do (can't say as I don't)" typically means that a person cannot speak with certainty or make a judgment because they have conflicting or uncertain opinions or experiences regarding the subject being discussed. It emphasizes the absence of a firm stance or clear perspective.
  • as they say The idiom "as they say" is commonly used to introduce a popular saying or cliche expression that is widely known or accepted. It indicates that the following statement or phrase is a common or widely circulated saying. It can also be used when one wants to attribute a commonly held belief or opinion to a group of people, without specifying who these people are.
  • say something behind someone's back The idiom "say something behind someone's back" refers to the act of speaking negatively or gossiping about someone when they are not present.
  • before you can say (something) The idiom "before you can say (something)" means that something happens very quickly or happens before you have time to react or respond. It implies that an action or event occurs so rapidly that it is almost instantaneous, leaving no time for hesitation or delay.
  • before you could say Jack Robinson The idiom "before you could say Jack Robinson" is a phrase used to indicate that something happened very quickly or suddenly, almost instantaneously. It means that someone did or completed an action in an exceptionally short period of time.
  • not say boo to a fly The idiom "not say boo to a fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid or shy, to the point where they are afraid to speak up or confront others. It implies that the person is so harmless and non-confrontational that they wouldn't even say a word to scare away a harmless fly.
  • say goodbye to (something) The idiom "say goodbye to (something)" means to accept or come to terms with the fact that something is ending or no longer possible. It implies letting go of a particular situation, outcome, or expectation.
  • (I) can't say that I do The idiom "(I) can't say that I do" is used as a response when someone is asked if they have a certain experience or knowledge but they actually do not. It means that the person being asked does not possess the attribute or experience in question.
  • (I) can't say that I have The idiom "(I) can't say that I have" is used to express that the speaker has not experienced or done the thing being mentioned. It indicates that the speaker does not have personal knowledge or experience regarding the subject matter.
  • can't say fairer than that The idiom "can't say fairer than that" means that the proposed offer or suggestion is as reasonable, just, or fair as it could possibly be. It implies that no further improvements or compromises can be made to make the situation more favorable or equitable.
  • faster than you can say Jack Robinson The idiom "faster than you can say Jack Robinson" is used to describe something happening very quickly or abruptly, without any delay or hesitation. It implies that the action or event takes place so rapidly that it cannot even be verbalized in the time it occurs.
  • quicker than you can say Jack Robinson The idiom "quicker than you can say Jack Robinson" is used to indicate an action or event that happens very rapidly or abruptly. It implies that something occurs so quickly that it is almost instantaneous, leaving little time for comprehension or reaction.
  • you can't say fairer The idiom "you can't say fairer" means that something is as fair or just as it possibly can be. It implies that no better or more reasonable option or situation is available or possible.
  • say (that) black is white The idiom "say (that) black is white" means to assert or claim something that is completely false or contrary to reality. It implies making an intentionally false statement or denying an obvious truth.
  • cry (or say or yell) uncle The idiom "cry uncle" or "say uncle" is used to indicate surrendering or admitting defeat. It refers to the act of giving up or submitting, often in a playful or informal manner. It can be used in various contexts or situations where someone concedes or acknowledges the superiority or triumph of another person or entity.
  • let's not and say (that) we did The expression "let's not and say (that) we did" is an idiom used to indicate a desire to avoid participating in an activity or situation, while still wanting to give the appearance of having done so. It suggests a preference for avoiding potential consequences, responsibilities, or obligations associated with the said action.
  • do as I say The idiom "do as I say" means to follow someone's instructions or commands without questioning or disobeying. It implies that the speaker expects complete obedience or compliance from others.
  • strange to say The idiom "strange to say" is used to express surprise or astonishment about something that is unusual, unexpected, or peculiar.
  • he, she, etc. wouldn't say boo to a goose The idiom "he/she wouldn't say boo to a goose" refers to someone who is extremely shy, timid, or easily frightened. It implies that the person lacks assertiveness or the ability to confront or contend with others. The phrase "not saying boo" suggests that the person does not possess the confidence to even utter a harmless sound like "boo" in the presence of a goose, which is generally considered non-threatening.
  • say a few words The idiom "say a few words" means to make a short speech or to speak briefly about a particular topic or in a specific context, typically during a gathering or formal event.
  • get a say (in something) The idiom "get a say (in something)" means to have the opportunity to express one's opinion or have a voice in a matter or decision. It implies being given a chance to contribute, influence, or make decisions about a specific situation or issue.
  • never have a good word to say about (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say about (someone or something)" means to consistently speak critically or negatively about someone or something, without ever finding anything positive or praiseworthy to say. It implies a persistent habit of being uncomplimentary or disparaging.
  • never have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say for (someone or something)" refers to someone who consistently speaks negatively or critically about a specific person or thing, never offering any positive comments or praise. This person habitually finds faults, flaws, or shortcomings in others or certain matters without acknowledging any commendable aspects.
  • not have a good word to say about (someone of something) The idiom "not have a good word to say about (someone or something)" means that someone consistently speaks negatively or critically about a person, group, or thing. It indicates a complete lack of positive remarks or opinions towards that particular entity.
  • not have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "not have a good word to say for (someone or something)" means that a person has nothing positive or complimentary to say about the mentioned person or thing. It implies that there is a complete lack of praise or favorable opinion.
  • say goodbye to (someone or something) The idiom "say goodbye to (someone or something)" typically means to have a final farewell or to accept that someone or something is no longer present or available. It implies acknowledging that a person, thing, or situation will no longer be a part of one's life.
  • say a great deal about (someone or something) The idiom "say a great deal about (someone or something)" means that certain actions, qualities, or characteristics provide a significant amount of information or insight about a person or thing. It suggests that these outward expressions or behaviors reveal a lot about the individual or object being discussed and can be used to make judgments or form opinions.
  • have (one's) say The idiom "have (one's) say" means to have the opportunity or right to express one's opinion or make one's views known about a particular matter or issue. It implies the ability to actively participate in a discussion, decision-making process, or any situation where one's input is taken into consideration.
  • have a say (in something) The idiom "have a say (in something)" means to have the right or ability to express one's opinion or contribute to a decision or outcome regarding a particular matter. It suggests having influence, power, or a voice in determining or influencing a situation.
  • have the last say The idiom "have the last say" means to have the final decision or the final word in a discussion or argument. It refers to the ability to make the final judgment or to have the ultimate authority in a particular matter.
  • have the say The idiom "have the say" means to have the authority or power to make a decision or have the final opinion on a matter. It refers to being in a position of influence or control, particularly in making choices or having the final say in a situation or discussion.
  • not say a dicky bird The idiom "not say a dicky bird" means to say nothing at all or remain silent about something.
  • Say hello to someone (for me). The idiom "Say hello to someone (for me)" is a phrase used to request that the speaker's greetings or regards are conveyed to a person they know. It is commonly used when the speaker is unable to personally meet or talk to the person themselves, so they ask someone else to pass on their message of greetings.
  • have nothing to say for (oneself) The idiom "have nothing to say for oneself" means to be unable or unwilling to contribute to a conversation or provide any meaningful input or response. It implies an awkward or uncomfortable silence due to a lack of opinions, information, or participation in the discussion.
  • have something/anything to say for (oneself) The idiom "have something/anything to say for oneself" means to have a valid or compelling statement or explanation to defend oneself or justify one's actions or behavior in a given situation. It implies that the person is able to effectively communicate their thoughts, opinions, or arguments in their favor.

Similar spelling words for SAY

Plural form of SAY is SAYS

Conjugate verb Say

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have said
you would have said
he/she/it would have said
we would have said
they would have said

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been saying
you would have been saying
he/she/it would have been saying
we would have been saying
they would have been saying

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would say
you would say
he/she/it would say
we would say
they would say

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be saying
you would be saying
he/she/it would be saying
we would be saying
they would be saying

FUTURE

I will say
you will say
he/she/it will say
we will say
they will say

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be saying
you will be saying
he/she/it will be saying
we will be saying
they will be saying

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have said
you will have said
he/she/it will have said
we will have said
they will have said

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been saying
you will have been saying
he/she/it will have been saying
we will have been saying
they will have been saying

IMPERATIVE

we Let´s say

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was saying
you were saying
he/she/it was saying
we were saying
they were saying

PAST PARTICIPLE

said

PAST PERFECT

I had said
you had said
he/she/it had said
we had said
they had said

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been saying
you had been saying
he/she/it had been saying
we had been saying
they had been saying

PRESENT

I say
you say
he/she/it says
we say
they say

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am saying
you are saying
he/she/it is saying
we are saying
they are saying

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

saying

PRESENT PERFECT

I have said
you have said
he/she/it has said
we have said
they have said

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been saying
you have been saying
he/she/it has been saying
we have been saying
they have been saying

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it say

SIMPLE PAST

I said
you said
he/she/it said
we said
they said