How Do You Spell SENSE?

Pronunciation: [sˈɛns] (IPA)

The word "sense" is often misspelled as "sence" due to confusion with the pronunciation. The correct spelling reflects the vowel sounds in the word: /sɛns/. The "e" is placed after the "n" to represent the short "e" sound, while the "s" and "c" work together to create the "s" sound. The final "e" is silent, but it signifies that the preceding vowel is pronounced as a long "e". Remembering the correct spelling of "sense" ensures clear and effective communication in written communication.

SENSE Meaning and Definition

Sense refers to a cognitive or perceptive faculty that enables individuals to perceive or understand the world around them. It is a capacity by which the human mind processes information received through the body's sensory organs, such as the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin. Acting as a gateway to knowledge, each of the five senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch, contributes to our overall perception and interpretation of reality.

Senses are fundamental to our existence as they allow us to experience and interact with our environment. They facilitate our ability to gather information from our surroundings and make sense of it. Through our senses, we are able to detect and discern various stimuli, including colors, sounds, textures, smells, and tastes. Additionally, our senses play a vital role in providing feedback on our bodily condition, maintaining balance, and coordinating movement.

Moreover, senses extend beyond the basic five, as humans possess additional sensory abilities such as proprioception (awareness of body position) and nociception (ability to feel pain). These, too, contribute to our understanding of ourselves and the world.

In a metaphorical sense, the term "sense" can also refer to a particular feeling, meaning, or interpretation. This usage denotes a subjective understanding or nuance, often influenced by personal experience, intuition, or context. It implies a deeper comprehension beyond literal perception, as in phrases like "make sense," "common sense," or "sense of purpose." In this sense, "sense" encompasses the ability to extract meaning and significance from situations, ideas, or emotions.

Top Common Misspellings for SENSE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SENSE

Etymology of SENSE

The word "sense" comes from the Latin word "sensus", which is the past participle of the verb "sentire", meaning "to feel, perceive, or experience". The term later evolved in Old French as "sens", and eventually entered Middle English as "sens" around the 14th century, retaining its current spelling and meaning.

Idioms with the word SENSE

  • see sense/reason The idiom "see sense/reason" means to start thinking rationally or logically, often implying a shift in perspective towards a more sensible or reasonable understanding or decision. It suggests that someone had initially taken an irrational or unwise position but has now become more reasonable and recognized the validity of a logical argument or viewpoint.
  • talk sense The idiomatic phrase "talk sense" refers to urging someone to speak logically, sensibly, or pragmatically, often when they are being irrational, unrealistic, or delusional. It implies a desire for practicality and a plea for coherent and rational communication.
  • not in the biblical sense The idiom "not in the biblical sense" is typically used to clarify that a statement or action should not be interpreted as having a sexual connotation or intention. It is often employed to humorously express innocence or to dismiss or reject any improper interpretation.
  • knock (sm) sense into sb The idiom "knock (sm) sense into sb" means to force someone to face reality or gain a better understanding of a situation by being harsh or critical. It implies using forceful or drastic measures to help someone become more sensible or rational.
  • be a victory for common sense The idiom "be a victory for common sense" refers to a situation or decision that underscores the importance of logical and practical thinking. It means that a certain outcome or result is considered a triumph because it aligns with what most people would see as reasonable, rational, or sensible. It emphasizes the rejection of excessive complexity, overthinking, or irrational thoughts in favor of practicality and sound judgment.
  • ain't got a grain of sense The idiom "ain't got a grain of sense" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely foolish or lacking in common sense. It implies that the person has no intelligence or understanding whatsoever.
  • lull sb into a false sense of security The phrase "lull someone into a false sense of security" means to make someone feel safe and confident in a situation when, in reality, there may be hidden dangers, risks, or a potential threat lurking. It refers to the act of misleading or deceiving someone into believing that they are secure, often to the point where they let down their guard, unaware of the imminent danger or potential harm.
  • lull sm into a false sense of security The idiom "lull someone into a false sense of security" means to make someone feel safe or confident in a situation where there is actually potential danger or deception. It implies that someone is being deceived or tricked into believing that everything is fine, while in reality, they are not aware of the hidden risks or threats present.
  • talk sm sense into sb The idiom "talk some sense into someone" means to try to persuade or convince someone to think more reasonably, logically, or sensibly about a particular situation or decision.
  • make sense of sth The idiom "make sense of something" means to understand, interpret, or comprehend something that may initially be confusing, unclear, or puzzling. It refers to the act of finding logical meaning or order in a situation, information, or concept.
  • make sense The idiom "make sense" refers to something that is logical, understandable, and coherent. It means that a statement, argument, or situation is comprehensible and reasonable.
  • in the strict sense The idiom "in the strict sense" refers to a precise or narrow interpretation or understanding of a concept, emphasizing its most literal or limited meaning. It implies a departure from any broad or metaphorical interpretation and instead focuses on a very specific definition or understanding of something.
  • in a sense In a sense, an idiom used to indicate that something is partially or somewhat true, but not completely or exactly true. It suggests a certain level of justification or validity, often used to qualify or modify a statement.
  • horse sense The idiom "horse sense" refers to practical intelligence or common sense. It implies the ability to make smart, practical decisions and navigate through life successfully.
  • but not in the biblical sense The idiom "but not in the biblical sense" is used humorously or sarcastically to emphasize that the interpretation or understanding of something is purely figurative or metaphorical rather than in a literal or sexual manner. It suggests that the intended meaning is different from a literal interpretation often associated with sexual connotations found in biblical texts.
  • sixth sense The idiom "sixth sense" refers to an intuitive or instinctive perception or understanding of something, beyond the five traditional senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch). It suggests an innate ability to perceive or sense things that cannot be explained or understood through logical reasoning, often attributed to a heightened level of intuition or awareness.
  • sense of humor The idiom "sense of humor" refers to a person's ability to appreciate and understand what is funny or amusing. It indicates a person's attitude towards humor and their ability to find things humorous and laugh at them.
  • ounce of common sense is worth a pound of theory The idiom "an ounce of common sense is worth a pound of theory" implies that practical knowledge and sound reasoning are more valuable and effective than mere theoretical or intellectual understanding. It suggests that a small amount of practical wisdom and logical thinking can be far more beneficial and productive than a large amount of theoretical knowledge alone.
  • make (sm) sense (out) of sm or sth The idiom "make (sm) sense (out) of sm or sth" means to understand or comprehend something that may initially be confusing, unclear, or nonsensical. It implies the act of finding meaning or logic in a situation, concept, or information that may be difficult to grasp.
  • knock sm sense into sm The idiom "knock some sense into someone" means to try to make someone think more reasonably or sensibly, often through forceful or harsh methods. It implies that the person being addressed lacks good judgment or understanding, and needs to be forcefully made aware of their mistake or misconception.
  • have more luck than sense The idiom "have more luck than sense" refers to someone who consistently experiences favorable outcomes or successes purely due to their luck or fortune, rather than their intelligence, knowledge, or good judgment. It implies that the person's actions or decisions may lack logical reasoning or coherent thinking, yet they still manage to come out ahead.
  • talk sm sense into The idiom "talk some sense into" means to advise or persuade someone to think rationally, logically, or sensibly. It implies trying to change someone's perspective or behavior to a more reasonable or practical approach.
  • knock sm sense into The idiom "knock some sense into someone" means to attempt to make someone understand or realize something through forceful or vigorous means. It implies that the person being addressed is either behaving foolishly, making irrational decisions, or refusing to comprehend a particular situation. The phrase suggests that the individual needs a figurative "knock" or a strongly expressed argument, opinion, or action to help them gain better judgment or awareness.
  • knock sense into The idiom "knock sense into" means to physically or metaphorically force someone to understand or become sensible about a particular situation or viewpoint. It refers to the act of trying to make someone comprehend or realize the truth by using forceful or persuasive means.
  • make sense of The idiom "make sense of" means to understand or comprehend something, especially when it may seem confusing or unclear at first. It implies finding meaning, coherence, or logic in a situation, information, or statement.
  • knock/talk some sense into somebody The idiom "knock/talk some sense into somebody" means to try to make someone see reason or understand something by giving them straightforward advice, criticism, or a reality check. It suggests using persuasive or forceful communication to make the person reconsider their actions or mindset in order to achieve a more rational or sensible perspective.
  • make sense of something The idiom "make sense of something" means understanding or comprehending something that is confusing or unclear. It refers to the act of finding logical or rational meaning or order in a situation, information, or concept.
  • see sense The idiom "see sense" refers to the act of gaining understanding or perceiving reason or logic in a situation. It suggests that someone needs to embrace a logical or sensible course of action or change their perspective to make better decisions.
  • a sense of occasion The idiom "a sense of occasion" refers to the awareness and appreciation of the significance or importance of a particular event, situation, or moment. It involves recognizing that something special or extraordinary is taking place, and behaving accordingly with appropriate decorum, respect, or enthusiasm.
  • know somebody in the biblical sense The idiom "know somebody in the biblical sense" is a euphemism for having sexual relations or being intimately familiar with someone on a deeply personal and physical level. This phrase derives from the Biblical usage of the term "know" to describe the intimate relationship between a man and a woman, typically used in the context of sexual activity. It emphasizes a level of closeness and familiarity that goes beyond simply knowing someone in a superficial or casual manner.
  • ain't got a lick of sense The idiom "ain't got a lick of sense" means someone lacks even a small amount of common sense or intelligence. It suggests that the person being referred to is foolish, clueless, or lacking in basic understanding or reasoning abilities.
  • ain't got the sense God gave geese The idiom "ain't got the sense God gave geese" is a humorous way of saying that someone lacks common sense or intelligence. It implies that the person is so foolish or unintelligent that they do not possess even the basic level of wisdom that would be expected from a creature like a goose, which is often seen as not particularly intelligent.
  • make any sense (out) of (something) The idiom "make any sense (out) of (something)" means to understand or comprehend something that may seem confusing, illogical, or difficult to grasp. It refers to the act of finding logic, meaning, or coherence in a situation, concept, or statement.
  • know (someone) in the biblical sense The idiom "know (someone) in the biblical sense" is an euphemism used to refer to sexual intercourse. It originates from the Bible, specifically from the story of Adam and Eve in the book of Genesis, where "to know" is used as a euphemism for sexual intimacy. Thus, when someone says they "know (someone) in the biblical sense," they are implying that they are familiar with that person in an intimate and sexual way.
  • in the biblical sense The idiom "in the biblical sense" is a humorous or euphemistic expression used to refer to sexual intercourse or any activity with strong sexual connotations. It implies a literal interpretation of the passages found in the Bible regarding sexual relations.
  • have enough sense to pound salt The idiom "have enough sense to pound salt" means to possess basic wisdom or intelligence. It implies that someone is knowledgeable enough to perform even the simplest tasks, as pounding salt is a very straightforward and effortless action.
  • have enough sense to pound sand The idiom "have enough sense to pound sand" means to be intelligent enough or have the common sense to realize that a particular task or action is pointless, futile, or unreasonable. It implies that the person should engage in more meaningful activities instead of wasting their time.
  • in the strict(est) sense The idiom "in the strict(est) sense" refers to interpreting or defining something according to the precise, narrow, or literal meaning. It implies adhering strictly to the original or traditional interpretation of a word, concept, or rule, without allowing for any leniency or broader interpretations.
  • lull (one) into a false sense of security The idiom "lull (one) into a false sense of security" means to deceive or trick someone into feeling safe and secure, often by creating a calm or peaceful situation that masks potential danger or risk. It refers to the act of misleading someone into believing that everything is fine, leading them to drop their guard and become vulnerable to an unexpected or harmful outcome.
  • lull into a false sense of security The idiom "lull into a false sense of security" means to make someone feel safe and reassured, usually through deceptive or misleading actions, causing them to lower their guard or become complacent, unaware of potential dangers or risks. This often leads to a situation where they are unsuspecting and vulnerable to negative consequences or unforeseen circumstances.
  • have more money than sense The idiom "have more money than sense" means that someone has a lot of money but lacks good judgment or common sense when it comes to managing or using their wealth. It implies that the person tends to make extravagant or foolish decisions due to their excessive wealth.
  • knock (some) sense into (one) The idiom "knock (some) sense into (one)" means to forcefully and persuasively make someone understand something or to make them think more rationally or sensibly about a particular situation. This phrase implies that the person being addressed is behaving irrationally or making poor choices and needs intervention or guidance to change their perspective or behavior.
  • know in the biblical sense The idiom "know in the biblical sense" is a euphemism that refers to sexual intercourse. It is often used to describe an intimate or sexual relationship, specifically in a religious or moral context.

Similar spelling words for SENSE

Plural form of SENSE is SENSES

Conjugate verb Sense

CONDITIONAL

I would sense
you would sense
he/she/it would sense
we would sense
they would sense

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be sensing
you would be sensing
he/she/it would be sensing
we would be sensing
they would be sensing

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have sense
you would have sense
he/she/it would have sense
we would have sense
they would have sense

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been sensing
you would have been sensing
he/she/it would have been sensing
we would have been sensing
they would have been sensing

FUTURE

I will sense
you will sense
he/she/it will sense
we will sense
they will sense

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be sensing
you will be sensing
he/she/it will be sensing
we will be sensing
they will be sensing

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have sensed
you will have sensed
he/she/it will have sensed
we will have sensed
they will have sensed

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been sensing
you will have been sensing
he/she/it will have been sensing
we will have been sensing
they will have been sensing

IMPERATIVE

you sense
we let´s sense

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to sense

PAST

I sensed
you sensed
he/she/it sensed
we sensed
they sensed

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was sensing
you were sensing
he/she/it was sensing
we were sensing
they were sensing

PAST PARTICIPLE

sensed

PAST PERFECT

I had sensed
you had sensed
he/she/it had sensed
we had sensed
they had sensed

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been sensing
you had been sensing
he/she/it had been sensing
we had been sensing
they had been sensing

PRESENT

I sense
you sense
he/she/it senses
we sense
they sense

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am sensing
you are sensing
he/she/it is sensing
we are sensing
they are sensing

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

sensing

PRESENT PERFECT

I have sensed
you have sensed
he/she/it has sensed
we have sensed
they have sensed

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been sensing
you have been sensing
he/she/it has been sensing
we have been sensing
they have been sensing
I would have sensed
we would have sensed
you would have sensed
he/she/it would have sensed
they would have sensed

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