How Do You Spell SET?

Pronunciation: [sˈɛt] (IPA)

The word "set" is spelled with three letters, but its pronunciation can vary greatly depending on context. In IPA phonetic transcription, the word is /sɛt/ with a short e sound for the first letter. However, "set" can have different meanings when combined with other letters, such as in "setting" or "settle." In these cases, the letter "e" may be pronounced as /ɛ/ or /i/ depending on the word. Despite its seemingly simple spelling, the word "set" is a versatile term that can take on diverse meanings in English.

SET Meaning and Definition

Set can be used as a noun or a verb and has a multitude of different meanings depending on the context. As a noun, set refers to a collection or arrangement of objects, for example, a group of related items, a series or range of things, or a fixed collection of utensils or tools. It can also refer to a specific group of people or things forming a collective unit.

As a verb, set has various definitions. It can mean to put or place something in a particular position, to establish or fix something in a certain way, or to arrange in order or readiness for use. It can also mean to adjust or change the settings of a device or instrument, or to put into motion, action, or effect.

In addition to these general meanings, set has many specific uses in different contexts such as music, theater, and sports. In music, it refers to a composition or a group of musical pieces. In theater, it refers to the overall scenery and staging of a play. In sports, it refers to a sequence of games or matches needed to win a competition.

Overall, the definition of set spans a wide range of meanings, reflecting its versatility and flexibility across diverse contexts and disciplines.

Top Common Misspellings for SET *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SET

Etymology of SET

The word "set" has origins in Old English, Germanic, and Proto Indo-European languages. Its etymology can be traced back to the Old English word "settan" or "sittan", which meant "to cause to sit" or "to put in a certain place". These Old English words evolved from the Proto-Germanic word "setjaną" with a similar meaning. Further back, it can be linked to the Proto Indo-European root word "sed-" meaning "to sit".

Over time, the word "set" developed various meanings and uses, extending beyond just placing or causing to sit. It acquired broader senses such as "to place", "to fix", "to establish", and "to arrange". This evolution in meaning led to its usage in contexts like setting objects in place, establishing rules or guidelines, arranging things together, or fixing a desired state.

Idioms with the word SET

  • set the scene The idiom "set the scene" means to create or establish the background, context, or surroundings for a particular event, situation, or story. It refers to providing a description or details that help to visualize and understand the setting or atmosphere.
  • set the scene/stage The idiom "set the scene/stage" means to prepare or create the necessary conditions or surroundings for an event or activity to take place. It is often used in reference to providing the context or background information before starting a discussion, presentation, performance, or any other kind of situation where a specific atmosphere or environment needs to be established.
  • the scene/stage is set, at set the scene/stage The idiom "the scene/stage is set" or "set the scene/stage" literally refers to preparing the physical environment or context for a certain situation or event. Figuratively, it means creating the necessary conditions or providing relevant information to establish the background or context for something to occur or be understood. It is often used to suggest that all the necessary elements or factors are in place for an event or situation to unfold.
  • set/put the seal on sth To "set/put the seal on something" means to finalize or confirm something, often in an official or authoritative manner. It refers to an action that completes a process or makes a decision official and binding, similar to sealing a document with a stamp or an official insignia.
  • not set the world on fire The idiom "not set the world on fire" means to not achieve something extraordinary or remarkable; to not make a significant impact or impression. It suggests mediocrity or a lack of exceptional ability or performance.
  • be (dead) set against sth The idiom "be (dead) set against sth" means to strongly oppose or be completely unwilling to accept or support something. It implies a firm, unwavering stance or conviction against a particular idea, action, or decision.
  • be set fair The idiom "be set fair" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position, situation, or condition. It implies that everything is favorable and likely to be successful.
  • be set in your ways The idiom "be set in your ways" refers to a person who is resistant to change and prefers to stick to their established habits, routines, or beliefs. They are often unwilling or reluctant to try new things or consider alternative perspectives.
  • be set on/upon sth The idiom "be set on/upon sth" means to be strongly determined or committed to achieving or obtaining something. It implies a strong desire or intention to pursue a particular goal or objective.
  • set up shop The idiom "set up shop" refers to the act of establishing or starting a business or enterprise, typically in a particular location or industry. It implies the creation and organization of a physical or virtual space for conducting business activities and offering products or services to customers.
  • set an example The idiom "set an example" means to behave in a way that serves as a model for others to follow. It refers to someone demonstrating ideal or admirable behavior that influences or inspires others to behave similarly.
  • set the agenda The idiom "set the agenda" refers to the act of determining and establishing the topics or issues that will be discussed or addressed during a meeting, negotiation, or any other kind of gathering. It denotes having control or influence over the direction and focus of a specific event or situation.
  • get/set to work The idiom "get/set to work" means to start or prepare to engage in a task or activity. It implies a readiness and willingness to begin working and can be used in various contexts, such as in a professional or personal setting.
  • set the fur flying, at make the fur fly The idiom "set the fur flying" or "make the fur fly" means to cause or instigate a heated argument, conflict, or dispute. It suggests a situation where emotions are high and intense confrontation is expected. The expression alludes to a scenario in which fur (as in the hair or fur of animals) is violently disturbed, symbolizing a tumultuous and chaotic situation.
  • put/set sb right The idiom "put/set sb right" means to correct or provide someone with accurate information or advice in order to rectify a misunderstanding, misconception, or error that they have.
  • let/set sth loose The idiom "let/set something loose" means to release or allow something or someone to move or operate freely, without any restraints or restrictions. It typically implies giving freedom or liberation to something or someone that was previously contained, controlled, or restrained.
  • set sth/sb on fire The idiom "set something/someone on fire" commonly means to ignite or cause something or someone to ignite or become very successful, inspiring, or excited. It often implies that the person or thing brings about a lot of enthusiasm, passion, energy, or creativity.
  • set fire to sth/sb The idiom "set fire to sth/sb" can be defined as deliberately causing harm, destruction, controversy, or chaos to someone or something. It implies the act of initiating or instigating a situation that may have significant consequences.
  • set foot in smw The idiom "set foot in" is commonly used to indicate the act of entering or stepping into a place or location. It implies physically being present or visiting a particular area. For example, "I will never set foot in that restaurant again" means the person will not visit or enter the mentioned restaurant in the future.
  • put/set pen to paper The idiom "put/set pen to paper" means to begin writing or start the process of writing something, typically referring to the act of starting to write a letter, essay, story, or any other written work. It implies taking action or initiating the act of putting thoughts and ideas into writing.
  • put/set pencil to paper The idiom "put/set pencil to paper" means to begin writing or to start the process of creating something through writing or drawing. It refers to the act of physically putting a pencil or pen on paper to express one's thoughts, ideas, or plans.
  • set sb's teeth on edge The idiom "set sb's teeth on edge" means to cause someone to feel irritated, annoyed, or uncomfortable, usually as a result of an unpleasant sound, taste, or behavior. It implies a feeling of intense discomfort that can be similar to the sensation of nails scraping against a chalkboard.
  • put/set sth in train The idiom "put/set something in train" means to initiate or start a process or plan. It refers to taking the necessary actions to get something started or underway.
  • put/set sm straight The idiom "put/set someone straight" means to provide accurate information or correct someone's misunderstanding. It typically refers to explaining a concept or situation clearly and in a direct manner, so that the person understands the truth or the correct way of thinking.
  • put/set sth in motion The idiom "put/set something in motion" means to initiate or start a process or action. It refers to beginning a particular course of events or activities.
  • set the wheels in motion The idiom "set the wheels in motion" means to initiate or start a process or plan. It refers to taking the necessary actions to get things moving or progressing towards a desired outcome or goal.
  • set sm's pulse racing The idiom "set someone's pulse racing" means to cause excitement, anticipation, or exhilaration in someone. It suggests that something has stimulated or created intense emotions in an individual, often due to the thrill or excitement of the situation.
  • set/put the record straight To set/put the record straight means to provide accurate information or clarify a situation that has been misunderstood or misrepresented, in order to correct any false notions or misconceptions.
  • set your sights on sth To "set your sights on something" means to establish a clear goal or objective, usually an ambitious one, and focus one's efforts and attention towards achieving it. It implies directing one's aspirations or determination towards a specific target, often with the intention to succeed despite challenges or obstacles.
  • not be set/carved in stone The idiom "not be set/carved in stone" means that something is not fixed or permanent, and can be changed or modified. It implies that a decision, plan, or rule is flexible or open to alteration based on circumstances or new information.
  • on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your marks, get set, go!" is used as a command or phrase often employed at the start of a race or event, to indicate to competitors that they should prepare themselves, be ready, and then start the activity or competition. It serves as a countdown signaling the imminent start of an action or a race, encouraging participants to get ready, prepare themselves mentally and physically, and then commence with full effort.
  • on your mark, get set, go, at on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your mark, get set, go!" is a phrase that is typically used to initiate a race or a competition. It is a countdown or a signal given to participants to prepare themselves and then start the activity simultaneously. It is often used figuratively to encourage someone to begin a task or take action promptly.
  • set/put your mind to sth The idiomatic expression "set/put your mind to something" means to focus one's thoughts, attention, and effort on a particular task, goal, or objective with determination and resolve. It implies dedicating mental energy and concentration towards achieving a desired outcome.
  • clap/lay/set eyes on sb/sth The idiom "clap/lay/set eyes on sb/sth" means to see someone or something, often for the first time, or after a long period of anticipation or desire. It implies a sense of curiosity, excitement, or surprise upon encountering the person or object.
  • start/set/get the ball rolling The idiom "start/set/get the ball rolling" means to initiate or begin an activity or process, often by taking the first step or triggering the initial action. It refers to the act of initiating progress or momentum in a situation or project.
  • put/set the cat among the pigeons "Put/set the cat among the pigeons" is an idiom that means to create chaos, confusion, or disturbance by doing or saying something provocative or controversial. It refers to a situation where a disruptive element or information is introduced into a calm or orderly situation, causing a sudden uproar or commotion.
  • set your heart on sth/doing sth To set your heart on something or doing something means to be determined or passionate about achieving or obtaining it. It implies having a strong desire or ambition towards a particular goal or outcome.
  • set/put sb's mind at rest/ease The idiom "set/put someone's mind at rest/ease" means to alleviate someone's worries or concerns and provide them with a sense of calmness and reassurance. It involves providing information, assurance, or taking action to convince the person that there is nothing to worry about or that their concerns have been addressed.
  • set great, little, etc. store by sth The idiom "set great, little, etc. store by something" means to attach a high or low value or importance to something. It refers to how much significance or worth a person places on a particular thing or matter. The phrase is often used to express one's opinion or attitude towards something, indicating whether they highly value or disregard it.
  • quicken sm's pulse, at set sm's pulse racing The idiom "quicken someone's pulse" or "set someone's pulse racing" means to cause excitement, arousal, or a heightened sense of anticipation in someone. It implies that something or someone has a stimulating or thrilling effect on a person, often in a romantic or thrilling context. It suggests that the person's heart rate increases due to the intense emotions or suspense experienced.
  • not be carved/etched in stone, at not be set/carved in stone The idiom "not be carved/etched in stone" or "not be set/carved in stone" means that something is not permanently fixed or finalized and can still be subject to change or alteration. It implies that a particular decision, plan, or agreement is flexible and can be modified or adjusted as needed.
  • set above The idiom "set above" typically means to elevate or hold someone or something in high regard, often implying a superior position or status. It can also refer to separating or distancing oneself from something or someone perceived as less desirable or significant.
  • set one on feet The idiom "set one on their feet" means to provide support or assistance to someone, often in order to help them regain their financial stability, find employment, or recover from a difficult situation. It refers to helping someone become self-sufficient and independent again.
  • set off alarm bells The idiom "set off alarm bells" means to cause apprehension, suspicion, or concern due to an action, statement, or circumstance that indicates potential danger or trouble. It implies that something has triggered a strong or immediate sense of warning, similar to how an actual alarm bell would alert people to a potentially dangerous situation.
  • set (the) alarm bells ringing The idiom "set (the) alarm bells ringing" is used to describe a situation or event that causes concern, worry, or a sense of impending danger. It implies that something significant has occurred that serves as a warning or indication that there may be serious problems or consequences ahead.
  • Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil The idiom "Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil" means that if someone who is inexperienced or lacking in moral values is given authority or power, they will often misuse or abuse it, leading to negative consequences for themselves and others. It highlights the idea that sudden elevation can corrupt individuals who are unprepared for such responsibilities.
  • set right The idiom "set right" means to correct or rectify a mistake, wrong action, or an injustice. It implies taking necessary steps to resolve a situation or make it better.
  • get ears set out
  • set alarm bells ringing The idiom "set alarm bells ringing" means to cause concern or create a sense of warning or urgency about a situation or issue. It suggests that something has occurred or been revealed that should be taken seriously or is likely to have negative consequences.
  • set the ball rolling The idiom "set the ball rolling" means to initiate or begin an action or series of actions in order to get a process started or a project underway. It refers to taking the first step or making the first move in order to generate momentum or progress.
  • set off sth The idiom "set off something" means to cause something to happen or begin, usually referring to an event or a series of actions that triggers a particular outcome or consequence. It can also indicate the act of causing something or someone to appear more noticeable or prominent by contrasting or highlighting it against its surroundings.
  • set off The idiom "set off" has several meanings and can be used in different contexts, but here are a few common definitions: 1. To start a journey or trip: This meaning suggests beginning a particular trip or embarking on a specific journey. Example: "We will set off on our vacation tomorrow morning." 2. To cause something to explode or ignite: In this context, "set off" refers to triggering or activating an explosion or fire. Example: "He accidentally set off the fireworks, causing a loud noise." 3. To emphasize or highlight a particular feature: This meaning implies drawing attention to a specific aspect or characteristic of something. Example: "The vibrant color of the flowers really set off the beauty of the garden." 4.
  • set sb off The idiom "set sb off" typically means to provoke or trigger a strong emotional or negative reaction in someone, often leading to an outburst or argument.
  • set off (for sth) The idiom "set off (for sth)" typically means to begin a journey or to depart for a particular destination or purpose. It refers to the act of starting a trip or embarking on a specific endeavor.
  • set sth off The idiom "set sth off" means to ignite or cause something to explode or start, to trigger or initiate something, or to cause someone's actions or behavior to become worse or escalate.
  • set sm off The idiom "set someone off" means to trigger or provoke someone into a particular action, behavior, or emotional response. It can also refer to causing someone to become angry, upset, or agitated.
  • set sb/sth apart (from sb/sth) The idiom "set sb/sth apart (from sb/sth)" means to distinguish or differentiate someone or something from others. It refers to the act of making someone or something unique or special, highlighting their individuality or distinctive qualities.
  • set sm apart (from sm else) The idiom "set someone/something apart (from someone/something else)" means to distinguish or differentiate someone or something from others based on their unique or exceptional qualities, characteristics, or attributes. It implies that the person or thing being talked about possesses distinct qualities that make them stand out or different from others in some significant way.
  • set down sth The idiom "set down something" generally means to write or record something in a formal or official manner. It can also refer to the act of establishing or stating something clearly or definitively.
  • set sth down The idiom "set sth down" means to write or record information or ideas in a clear and concise manner. It refers to the act of documenting thoughts, instructions, or details on paper, a computer, or any other medium for future reference or communication.
  • set sm down (on sth) The idiom "set (someone) down (on something)" typically means to physically place or position someone onto a surface or object. It can also be used metaphorically to mean assigning or establishing someone in a particular position or role.
  • set sm or sth down The idiom "set sm or sth down" means to place or put someone or something gently on a surface or in a specific location. It implies careful or deliberate placement rather than simply dropping or throwing.
  • set sail The idiom "set sail" refers to starting a journey, usually by sea, by hoisting the sails of a ship and beginning to move forward. It means to embark on an adventure or undertake a new venture or project.
  • set sail for sm place The idiom "set sail for (some place)" means to embark on a journey, typically involving a real or metaphorical boat or ship, toward a specific destination or goal. It implies the act of starting a new venture or endeavor, often with a sense of adventure, determination, and purpose.
  • set apart from The idiom "set apart from" means to distinguish or separate someone or something from others based on particular characteristics, qualities, or circumstances. It implies that the person or thing is unique or stands out in a distinctive way.
  • set apart The idiom "set apart" means to distinguish or separate someone or something from others, often due to special qualities, characteristics, or abilities. It represents the process of making someone or something distinct or unique in comparison to the rest.
  • set the scene (for sth) The idiom "set the scene" refers to the act of creating an environment or context that enables or prepares for something to happen. It means to provide the necessary background information, atmosphere, or conditions that will influence the events or actions that follow. It is often used in the context of storytelling or describing a situation to give a clear understanding of what is about to happen or to set the tone for the upcoming events.
  • put/set the seal on sth The idiom "put/set the seal on sth" means to finalize or complete something, usually by adding a final touch or making a decisive action that confirms or ensures its success or validity. It refers to the act of affixing a seal or stamp as a formal and official confirmation or endorsement. It can also imply the act of making something official, binding, or irreversible.
  • set sth in motion The idiom "set something in motion" means to initiate or start something, to make it begin or happen. It is often used to describe the act of initiating a process, a project, or a series of actions.
  • set aside The idiom "set aside" means to reserve or keep something for a specific purpose, or to put something aside or out of the way. It can also mean to disregard or ignore something temporarily.
  • set upon The idiom "set upon" typically means to attack or assault someone physically or verbally, often unexpectedly or with great aggression. It can also be used figuratively to describe being targeted or unfairly treated by others.
  • set up shop smw The idiom "set up shop" means to establish a business or start a new enterprise, often referring to a physical location or a particular line of work. When used with "smw," which could stand for "somewhere," it indicates establishing a business or activity in a specific or unspecified location.
  • set up housekeeping The idiom "set up housekeeping" typically refers to the act of establishing a permanent or settled residence, usually by moving into a new home or starting a household. It implies the idea of creating a stable and comfortable living space with all the necessary arrangements and provisions. This phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe someone starting a new phase in their life or undertaking a new endeavor with a sense of permanence and commitment.
  • set up for life The idiom "set up for life" typically means to be in a financial or social position that ensures long-term security and prosperity. It refers to being in a situation where one has amassed enough wealth, resources, or favorable circumstances that they no longer need to worry about basic needs or financial constraints for the rest of their life. It implies a level of comfort and stability that allows for a worry-free and fulfilling existence.
  • set up as The idiom "set up as" means to establish or create someone or something in a specific role, position, or situation. It often refers to positioning or presenting someone in a particular way.
  • set up against The idiom "set up against" typically refers to placing one person or thing in direct opposition or competition against another. It suggests a situation where two entities are positioned or arranged in a way that promotes rivalry, comparison, or conflict between them.
  • set up The idiom "set up" means to arrange or organize something, usually with the intention of achieving a specific purpose or outcome. It can also refer to luring or tricking someone into a situation, often for deceptive or malicious reasons.
  • set type The idiom "set type" refers to the act of establishing or defining someone's character or personality. It implies that a person has a certain fixed or ingrained nature that is difficult or unlikely to change. It also suggests that one's behavior, attitudes, or qualities are consistent and predictable.
  • set tongues wagging The idiom "set tongues wagging" means to cause a lot of gossip or discussion. It refers to the action of making people talk or speculate about something, often due to controversial, interesting, or scandalous information that has been revealed.
  • set to work The idiom "set to work" means to begin working on a task or project with determination, focus, and enthusiasm.
  • set to music The idiom "set to music" refers to the act of composing or adapting a piece of text or lyrics into a musical composition. It involves creating a melody, harmonies, and rhythms that enhance and interpret the words or lyrics, transforming them into a musical form.
  • set to do The idiom "set to do" means to be ready or prepared to do something or to begin an action with determination and purpose. It implies a strong intention and eagerness to start or accomplish a task.
  • set to The idiom "set to" means to begin or start working on a task or project with determination and enthusiasm. It implies being ready and prepared to actively engage in an activity or assignment.
  • set the world on fire The idiom "set the world on fire" typically means to achieve great success or create a significant impact in a particular field, usually accompanied by extraordinary enthusiasm or innovation. It implies creating a remarkable change or revolutionizing something, often through exceptional accomplishments or influential actions.
  • set the tone The idiom "set the tone" refers to establishing a particular atmosphere, mood, or attitude, typically at the beginning of an event, situation, or communication. It involves creating an overall impression or guiding the direction of a conversation, interaction, or environment.
  • set the table The idiom "set the table" means to prepare or arrange things in a certain way, often referring to preparing a table for a meal by placing dishes, utensils, and other necessary items in their proper positions. It can also be used metaphorically to describe making preparations or setting the stage for an event or activity, involving organizing and getting everything ready.
  • set the stage for The idiom "set the stage for" means to create the conditions or circumstances necessary for something to happen or for a particular event or outcome to occur. It implies preparing or arranging the initial or necessary factors that will lead to a particular situation or result.
  • set the scene for To "set the scene for" means to prepare the environment or create the necessary conditions for something to happen or be understood. It involves providing the background information, context, or atmosphere that is required to set the stage or lay the foundation for a particular event, situation, or discussion. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of establishing the initial circumstances or elements that will shape or influence subsequent events or actions.
  • set the record straight The idiom "set the record straight" means to provide accurate and truthful information or clarification about something, in order to correct any misconceptions or misunderstandings that may have been formed. It is often used when addressing rumors, false information, or mistaken beliefs, with the intention of presenting the truth and ensuring that it prevails.
  • set the pace The idiom "set the pace" means to establish the speed or rate at which a task or activity will be carried out. It refers to taking the lead, setting the standard, or determining the tempo for others to follow.
  • set teeth on edge The idiom "set teeth on edge" means to cause a feeling of irritation, discomfort, or annoyance. It is often used to describe a noise, taste, or behavior that is unpleasant or grating.
  • set straight The idiom "set straight" means to correct or clarify someone's misunderstanding, misconception, or false information. It involves providing accurate and truthful information to someone in order to correct their beliefs or understanding of a particular topic.
  • set sights on To "set sights on" means to establish a clear objective or goal and focus all efforts towards achieving it. It implies having a specific target in mind and aiming to reach or attain it with determination and focus. It often relates to ambitious aspirations or personal aims that require dedicated actions and determination.
  • set sights The idiom "set sights" means to establish or determine a specific goal, target, or objective to be achieved. It implies focusing one's efforts on a particular aim or ambition and directing one's actions toward its attainment. It derives from the act of adjusting the sights of a firearm to properly aim at a target.
  • set price The idiom "set price" refers to a fixed and predetermined value or cost assigned to a product or service that is non-negotiable or subject to change. It implies that there is no room for bargaining or haggling over the price.
  • set over The idiom "set over" can have multiple meanings depending on the context, but one common definition is: to appoint or assign someone to a higher position or authority, usually involving transferring them to a different location or role with more responsibility or power.
  • set out to do The idiom "set out to do" means to start or begin a specific action or task with a determined objective or intention in mind. It implies having a clear purpose or goal and actively taking steps to achieve it.
  • set out to The idiom "set out to" means to intentionally start or begin something with a specific goal or intention in mind. It implies a purposeful and determined action towards achieving a particular objective or undertaking a specific task.
  • set out stall The idiom "set out stall" originated from the practice of market traders setting up their stalls to display and sell their goods or services. Figuratively, it means to present or display one's abilities, intentions, or products in a confident and assertive manner, often in order to attract attention or customers. It can also refer to openly stating one's position, objectives, or plans.
  • set out The idiom "set out" typically means to begin a journey, task, or endeavor, often with a specific goal or intention in mind. It can also refer to laying out a plan or strategy before starting something.
  • set one back on heels The idiom "set one back on their heels" means to surprise or shock someone, often in a way that causes them to lose their balance or composure. It refers to the suddenness or unexpected nature of the event or information that catches the person off guard, leaving them momentarily stunned or unsettled.
  • set on fire The idiom "set on fire" means to ignite or become intensely enthusiastic, excited, or passionate about something. It often refers to feeling a great deal of motivation or inspiration towards a particular goal or pursuit.
  • set on The idiom "set on" typically means to be determined or resolved to do something or achieve a particular goal, regardless of obstacles or hindrances. It signifies a strong intent or purpose to pursue a course of action.
  • set off on The idiom "set off on" means to begin a journey or undertaking. It implies starting a new adventure or embarking on a particular path or course of action.
  • set of wheels The idiom "set of wheels" refers to a means of transportation, typically a vehicle such as a car, motorcycle, or bicycle. It is used to describe the mode of transportation that a person owns or is currently using.
  • set of pipes The idiom "set of pipes" refers to someone's voice, particularly their vocal ability or quality. It is often used to describe a person who has a strong or impressive singing voice.
  • set mind on The idiom "set one's mind on" means to be determined or highly motivated to achieve a particular goal or objective. It implies a strong focus and dedication towards a specific purpose.
  • set mind at ease The idiom "set mind at ease" means to reassure or calm someone's worries or concerns, providing them with peace of mind or relief from anxiety. It conveys the idea of eliminating doubt or uncertainty by providing assurance or addressing someone's fears or anxieties.
  • set into
  • set in ways The idiom "set in ways" refers to someone who is resistant to change and prefers to stick to their established habits or routines. It describes a person who has become accustomed to doing things in a particular manner and is unwilling or reluctant to adapt or try something new.
  • set in train The idiom "set in train" means to initiate or start a process or series of events. It refers to taking the necessary steps to begin a particular course of action or project.
  • set in stone The idiom "set in stone" means that something is fixed or unchangeable, often referring to a decision, plan, or rule that cannot be altered or amended.
  • set in motion The idiom "set in motion" means to initiate or start something, to get a process or action underway, or to cause something to begin functioning or operating.
  • set in concrete The idiom "set in concrete" refers to something that is fixed, unchangeable, or immovable. It suggests that a decision, plan, or belief has been finalized and cannot be altered or reconsidered. The phrase originates from the idea that concrete hardens and becomes solid once it has been poured and allowed to set.
  • set in a type face The phrase "set in a type face" typically refers to the act of choosing a particular font or style for a written text or document. It originates from the printing industry, where individual metal or wooden types were arranged and set in a specific font for creating printed material. In a broader sense, it can also be used to indicate a specific presentation or aesthetic style for any form of written or displayed content.
  • set in a place The idiom "set in a place" typically refers to placing or fixing something in a specific location or position. It implies the act of physically settling or situating an object or item in a particular place.
  • set in The idiom "set in" refers to a change or a process that begins or establishes itself, typically with a gradual or irreversible nature. It can be used to describe a phase or condition that has become firmly established and is likely to endure or continue.
  • set house in order The idiom "set house in order" means to organize or arrange one's affairs or responsibilities in a proper and efficient manner. It refers to tidying up or resolving any issues or chaos in one's personal or professional life. It can also be used to suggest preparing for the future or making necessary adjustments to improve a situation.
  • set hopes on The idiom "set hopes on" means to have strong expectations or desires for a particular outcome or goal. It implies placing one's trust or belief in the achievement of something.
  • set heart on The idiom "set heart on" means to have a strong desire or determination for something, usually a goal or ambition. It implies being fully committed and devoted to achieving that goal.
  • set heart against The idiom "set heart against" means to make a firm decision or determination to oppose or resist something or someone. It implies the act of mentally and emotionally preparing oneself to confront and defy a particular situation, idea, or individual. It can also suggest a commitment to not be swayed or influenced by opposing views or arguments.
  • set great store by The idiom "set great store by" means to value or place a high importance on something or someone. It implies that the subject holds a significant level of regard, trust, or appreciation for the mentioned thing or person.
  • set free The idiom "set free" means to release someone or something from confinement, restrictions, or bondage, typically granting them freedom or liberation.
  • set forward The idiom "set forward" means to make progress, advance, or move ahead in a positive direction. It implies taking action or initiative to achieve a specific goal or objective.
  • set forth on The idiom "set forth on" means to begin a journey, undertaking, or mission. It implies embarking on a specific path or course of action with a clear intention or purpose. It often refers to starting a new venture or pursuing a goal.
  • set forth The idiom "set forth" means to start or begin a journey, a task, or an endeavor. It refers to the act of presenting or demonstrating something, typically in a clear and organized manner. It can also mean to state or explain something in a detailed manner.
  • set for life The idiom "set for life" typically means to be financially secure for the rest of one's life. It refers to a situation where someone has acquired enough wealth or financial resources to ensure a comfortable and stable future without worrying about financial constraints.
  • set for The idiom "set for" typically means being prepared or ready for something, usually referring to being prepared for a specific event, situation, or outcome.
  • set foot in The idiom "set foot in" means to enter or visit a place, often implying that the person has been avoiding or is reluctant to go there. It can also suggest taking the first step towards a new experience or situation.
  • set fire to The idiom "set fire to" means to deliberately ignite or cause a fire to start. It can also be used figuratively to describe an action or event that causes chaos, conflict, or destruction.
  • set face against The idiom "set face against" means to oppose or be strongly against something. It implies a firm, determined resistance or disapproval towards a particular idea, action, or person.
  • set eyes on The idiom "set eyes on" means to see or lay one's eyes on someone or something for the first time, often implying a sense of anticipation, excitement, or significance.
  • set down as The idiom "set down as" means to classify or categorize someone or something in a particular way, usually based on assumptions or initial impressions. It refers to forming an opinion or judgment without solid evidence or sufficient knowledge.
  • set down The idiom "set down" has different meanings depending on the context. 1. To write or record: It can refer to the act of writing or recording something for future reference. For example, "He set down his thoughts in a journal." 2. To establish or stipulate: It can also mean to establish or specify certain rules or conditions. For example, "The company set down strict guidelines for employee behavior." 3. To place or put something on a surface: Another meaning of "set down" is to place or put something on a surface. For instance, "She set down the books on the table." 4. To land or make a controlled descent: It can also refer to a plane or aircraft making
  • set beside The idiom "set beside" means to compare or contrast something with another thing in order to highlight the similarities or differences between them. It involves putting two or more things together to examine their qualities, characteristics, or features side by side.
  • set before The idiom "set before" means to present or offer something to someone for consideration or judgment. It often refers to presenting an idea, proposal, opportunity, or choice to someone for their decision or opinion.
  • set back from The idiom "set back from" refers to placing something or someone at a certain distance or location away from a particular reference point or point of interest. It suggests that the subject is not directly in front or immediately beside the point of focus, but rather positioned further away or slightly apart.
  • set back The idiom "set back" means to cause a delay, hinder progress, or incur a difficulty or setback in achieving a goal or completing a task. It refers to a situation where one's plans or expectations are disrupted or pushed back, typically due to unforeseen circumstances or obstacles.
  • set at The idiom "set at" typically means to determine or fix a certain value, level, or position for something. It can refer to establishing a specific price, rate, goal, target, or standard. It is often used when discussing quantifiable or measurable aspects of a situation or object.
  • set against The idiom "set against" means to have a strong dislike or opposition towards something or someone. It describes the act of being against or opposed to a certain idea, person, or situation.
  • set about doing The idiom "set about doing" means to begin or start doing something, usually with purpose or determination. It implies taking action and making a deliberate effort towards achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • set about The idiom "set about" means to begin or start doing something with energy, determination, or a specific method or plan.
  • set a trap The idiom "set a trap" means to strategically prepare a situation or take actions in order to deceive or catch someone in a hidden and often harmful or problematic way, often to obtain information or achieve personal gain.
  • Set a thief to catch a thief The idiom "set a thief to catch a thief" means to use someone who possesses the same skills, abilities, or methods as a wrongdoer to counter or apprehend them.
  • set a precedent The idiom "set a precedent" refers to establishing a rule, action, or decision that serves as a standard or example for future similar cases or situations. It means to create a model or a precedent that others are likely to follow or be influenced by.
  • set The idiom "set" has multiple meanings and interpretations depending on the context. Here are a few common definitions: 1. To establish or arrange something: - "Set the table" means to arrange the items necessary for a meal. - "Set a meeting" means to schedule or organize a gathering. 2. To fix or place something in a specific position: - "Set the alarm" means to program the alarm clock. - "Set a trap" means to prepare or position a device to catch someone or something. 3. To become firm, solid, or stationary: - "The cement is setting" means the cement is hardening and becoming solid. - "The sun sets" means the sun moves below
  • one's heart is set on The idiom "one's heart is set on" means having a strong desire or determination to obtain or achieve a particular goal or outcome. It suggests that one's emotions and passions are fully invested in something, and they are committed to pursuing it with unwavering dedication.
  • one's heart is set against The idiom "one's heart is set against" means to have a strong opposition or resistance towards something or someone. It indicates a deep-rooted dislike, disapproval, or unwillingness to accept or support something.
  • on your mark, get set, go The idiom "on your mark, get set, go" is a phrase typically used to start a race or competition. It symbolizes the beginning of an activity or event, with 'on your mark' representing the participants getting ready, 'get set' indicating the final preparations, and 'go' giving the signal to start. This phrase can also be used metaphorically to denote the start of any endeavor or action.
  • not set foot smw The idiom "not set foot somewhere" means to avoid or refrain from going to a particular place or location.
  • have heart set on The idiom "have heart set on" means to have a strong desire or fixed intention to obtain or achieve something specific. It denotes a strong determination or ambition towards a particular goal or outcome.
  • have heart set against The idiom "have heart set against" means to be strongly determined or resolved to oppose or dislike something or someone. It implies having a fixed or unwavering attitude of resistance or refusal.
  • dead set against The idiom "dead set against" means to strongly oppose or be completely unwilling to accept or support something or someone. It implies having a fixed, unchanging and resolute viewpoint against a particular idea, action, or outcome.
  • be set in concrete The idiom "be set in concrete" means that something is fixed, unchangeable, or firmly established. It implies that a decision, rule, belief, or plan is inflexible and cannot be altered or modified. It suggests that the situation or idea is rigid and resistant to any modifications or adjustments.
  • at a set time The idiom "at a set time" refers to something that is arranged or scheduled to happen at a specific predetermined time.
  • set about sth/doing sth The idiom "set about something/doing something" means to begin or start doing something with energy, determination, or enthusiasm. It implies taking action or initiating a task or activity.
  • set sm about sth The idiom "set someone about something" means to assign or instruct someone to accomplish a task or undertake a specific action. It implies giving someone a specific direction or task to complete.
  • set forth sth The idiom "set forth something" means to present or explain something in a clear and organized manner. It often refers to expressing ideas, information, or arguments in a systematic way, typically through writing or speaking. It implies putting forth a specific topic or concept for others to understand or consider.
  • set sth forth The idiom "set something forth" means to present or explain something in a clear and detailed manner, typically in writing or speech. It involves expressing ideas or information in a systematic and organized way, often with the intention of persuading or informing others.
  • set sm or sth free (from sth) The idiom "set someone or something free (from something)" means to release or liberate someone or something from constraints, restrictions, or a particular situation. It often refers to granting freedom or allowing someone or something to escape from a certain condition or environment.
  • set sth (up)on sth The idiom "set sth (up) on sth" typically means placing or arranging something on top of another thing or surface.
  • set (sm or an animal) on (sm or an animal) The idiom "set (someone or an animal) on (someone or an animal)" typically means to cause or enable one person or animal to attack or pursue another person or animal. It implies instigating or commanding someone or something to take aggressive or confrontational action against another.
  • set sm on fire
  • set out sth The idiom "set out something" means to present or explain something in a clear and organized manner, usually in writing or a formal document. It implies putting forth information, details, or arguments in a structured format for others to understand or follow.
  • set out (on sth) The idiom "set out" typically means to begin a journey, task, or endeavor, often with a specific goal or purpose in mind. It implies the act of starting or embarking on something.
  • set sth out (for sm or sth) The idiom "set sth out (for sm or sth)" means to arrange or display something in a particular way, usually for someone or something. It can also refer to preparing or organizing something for a specific purpose or intention.
  • set sth to music The idiom "set something to music" refers to the act of composing or creating a musical composition specifically tailored to fit the words or lyrics of a poem, text, or any other written piece.
  • set up sth The idiom "set up sth" means to establish, arrange, or organize something. This can refer to various contexts, such as setting up a business, event, system, or situation.
  • set sb up To "set someone up" typically means to arrange or facilitate a situation or plan in order to deceive or trick someone, often leading to their downfall or incrimination. It can also refer to assisting someone in securing an advantageous position, whether it be in a job, relationship, or social setting. The specific meaning of the idiom depends on the context in which it is used.
  • set sth up (with sm) The idiom "set sth up (with sm)" means to arrange or organize something, often involving another person. It could refer to setting up a meeting, an appointment, a rendezvous, or an event with someone. It implies establishing a plan or arrangement with the other party involved.
  • set sth up The idiom "set something up" typically means to arrange, establish, or organize something, usually for a specific purpose or goal. It can refer to creating a system, initiating a plan, or preparing something in a way that it is ready to be used or operated.
  • set sm up (in business) The idiom "set someone up (in business)" means to provide someone with the necessary resources, support, or financial backing to start and establish their own business venture. It can involve acquiring premises, equipment, funding, or any other necessities to assist someone in launching and developing their business.
  • set sm up To "set someone up" is an idiomatic expression that means to arrange a situation, often deceptively or with ill intentions, in order to make someone fall into a trap or be falsely implicated in something. It can also refer to preparing the necessary circumstances for someone's success or advantageous position.
  • set upon sb/sth The idiom "set upon sb/sth" typically refers to the act of attacking or assaulting someone or something. It implies a sudden, aggressive action against a person or object.
  • set upon sm or sth The idiom "set upon someone or something" typically means to attack, assault, or aggressively confront someone or something. It can imply a sudden and intense attack or aggression towards the subject of the action.
  • set the stage for sth The idiom "set the stage for something" means to create the necessary conditions or circumstances that make something possible or likely to happen. It refers to the preparation or arrangement of the situation in a way that leads to or enables a particular outcome or event.
  • set out your stall The idiom "set out your stall" means to display or present one's goods, services, skills, or intentions in a clear and organized manner, typically with the aim of attracting attention, gaining customers, or stating one's position. It can also refer to asserting oneself or making one's intentions known openly and confidently. This expression is often used in business or negotiation contexts but can also be applied to personal situations.
  • set great/much store by sth The idiom "set great/much store by sth" means to attach significant value, importance, or importance to something. It implies that one considers something to be valuable, significant, or worthy of attention and therefore places a lot of importance on it.
  • set great store by sm or sth The idiom "set great store by someone or something" means to place a high value, importance, or significance on someone or something. It implies that the person considers the mentioned person or thing to be extremely valuable, significant, or essential. It suggests a deep appreciation or attachment towards the person or thing in question.
  • set one's (own) price The idiom "set one's (own) price" means to determine or establish the price at which something will be bought or sold, usually without considering or being influenced by others' opinions or market factors. It highlights the control or power one has in determining the value of a particular product or service.
  • be carved/set in stone The idiom "be carved/set in stone" typically means that something is fixed, permanent, and cannot be changed. It refers to the notion of engraving or carving information onto stone, which is not easily altered or erased. Therefore, when something is "carved/set in stone," it implies that it is firm and unchangeable.
  • put/set the record straight The idiom "put/set the record straight" means to provide accurate information or clear up any misconceptions about a particular situation or topic. It involves correcting any false or misleading ideas and ensuring that the truth is known.
  • lay/set eyes on sb/sth The idiom "lay/set eyes on someone/something" means to see someone or something for the first time.
  • set the tone (for sth) The idiom "set the tone (for sth)" means to establish or create a particular atmosphere, mood, or expectation for something. It refers to the act of initiating or influencing the overall character or attitude of a situation, event, conversation, or relationship.
  • set sth in a type face The idiom "set something in a type face" refers to the act of formally and permanently recording or documenting something. It originally comes from the practice of using movable type printing, where individual metal type blocks were manually arranged and locked into a frame to create printed materials. Therefore, "setting something in a type face" symbolizes the process of preserving or memorializing information in a written or printed form.
  • set/start tongues wagging The idiom "set/start tongues wagging" means to cause gossip or speculation by saying or doing something that catches people's attention and prompts them to talk and spread rumors. It refers to the act of triggering conversations and discussions among people, usually in a manner that attracts attention or raises curiosity.
  • set tongues (a)wagging The idiom "set tongues (a)wagging" means to cause people to gossip or spread rumors, typically by doing or saying something controversial or arousing public interest.
  • set in one's ways The idiom "set in one's ways" refers to a person who is resistant to change or tends to maintain their habits, opinions, or beliefs, often remaining stubborn or inflexible in their way of living or thinking.
  • get one's ears set out
  • set sm's mind at ease (about sm or sth) The idiom "set someone's mind at ease (about someone or something)" means to alleviate or reduce someone's concerns, worries, or anxieties regarding a particular person or situation. It implies providing reassurance or offering information that restores comfort and calmness to someone's thoughts or emotions.
  • set fire to sm or sth The idiom "set fire to someone or something" means to intentionally cause harm, chaos, or destruction to someone or something. It is often used metaphorically to describe actions that cause significant damage or disruption.
  • set sth right The idiom "set something right" means to correct, fix, or remedy a situation or problem that is wrong or incorrect. It refers to taking action to resolve an issue and restore something to its proper or desired state.
  • set sth beside sth The idiom "set sth beside sth" typically means to compare two things or ideas side by side in order to examine their similarities or differences. It involves analyzing and evaluating the characteristics, qualities, or aspects of two entities or concepts.
  • set forth on sth The idiom "set forth on something" means to begin a journey, task, or endeavor. It involves embarking on a new path or taking the initial steps towards a specific goal or destination.
  • set you back sth The idiom "set you back something" means to cost or require the payment of a specified amount of money. It indicates the price or expense that one needs to pay to obtain or achieve something.
  • set sb/sth back The idiom "set sb/sth back" means to cause a delay or setback, usually in terms of progress, development, or a scheduled plan. It implies that an individual or something is pushed back or hindered from achieving its goals or advancing as planned.
  • set sth back The idiom "set sth back" means to cause a delay in the progress or development of something. It refers to an action or event that hinders or puts something behind schedule.
  • set sm back (sm amount of money) The idiom "set (someone) back (some amount of money)" means that an item or service costs a specific amount of money, often a large or unexpected sum. It implies that the person or entity purchasing or paying for something will experience a financial setback or spend a significant portion of their budget on that particular item or service.
  • set sb/sth straight The idiom "set sb/sth straight" means to correct or clarify someone or something, especially in terms of providing accurate information or dispelling misunderstandings. It involves providing facts or explanations to ensure that someone or something is understood correctly.
  • set sth straight The idiom "set something straight" means to correct or clarify a misunderstanding, misconception, or incorrect information. It is often used to describe the act of providing accurate or truthful information to rectify a situation or to make it right.
  • set sm straight The idiom "set someone straight" means to correct or clarify someone's misunderstanding, misconception, or mistaken beliefs about a particular issue or situation. It involves providing accurate information or explaining the truth to someone who is mistaken or misinformed.
  • set to work (on sm or sth) The idiom "set to work (on someone or something)" means to begin working on someone or something in a diligent and focused manner. It implies that a person is ready and eager to start a task or project, displaying a strong determination and commitment to completing it.
  • set sm or sth to work The idiom "set someone or something to work" means to start employing or utilizing someone or something for a particular task or purpose. It implies initiating an action or putting someone or something into productive operation.
  • set eyes on sm or sth The idiom "set eyes on someone or something" means to see or observe someone or something for the first time. It refers to the act of laying one's eyes on a particular person, object, or place, often implying a strong desire, curiosity, or astonishment upon encountering it.
  • set sb/sth against sb/sth The idiom "set sb/sth against sb/sth" means to cause or provoke a conflict, disagreement, or hostility between two people or groups, or to turn people against someone or something. It refers to creating a division or animosity and causing opposition between individuals or entities.
  • set sth against sm or sth The idiom "set something against someone or something" means to compare, juxtapose, or contrast one thing with another in a way that highlights their differences or creates a negative effect on someone or something. It can also imply using something as evidence or an argument against someone or something.
  • of set purpose The idiom "of set purpose" refers to doing something intentionally or with a clear motive or objective in mind. It implies that a particular action or decision was made deliberately and purposefully, often indicating a focused mindset or determined intention to achieve a specific outcome.
  • set one's cap for The idiom "set one's cap for" means to be determined to attract or pursue the romantic interest of someone, typically with the intention of forming a romantic relationship or getting married to them.
  • set one's house in order The idiom "set one's house in order" means to organize or make necessary arrangements in one's personal or professional life, often indicating the need to prioritize and resolve any outstanding issues or problems. It implies taking control and ensuring that everything is well-managed and in a satisfactory state.
  • set someone's heart at rest The idiom "set someone's heart at rest" means to calm or reassure someone, relieving their worries or anxieties.
  • set one's heart on The idiom "set one's heart on" means to have a strong desire or ambition to achieve or obtain something. It refers to a deep emotional attachment or determination to pursue a particular goal.
  • set loose The idiom "set loose" means to release, free, or allow someone or something to roam or move about freely without restrictions or control. It can also refer to the act of liberating or unleashing something from confinement or restraint.
  • set one's seal to The idiom "set one's seal to" means to officially approve, authorize, or endorse something. It originates from the practice of using seals as a means of authentication or validation.
  • set on its ear The idiom "set on its ear" means to radically or dramatically disrupt or overturn established norms, traditions, or expectations. It implies a major change that challenges the existing order or conventional thinking, often resulting in surprise or shock.
  • all set The idiom "all set" means that everything is prepared or arranged and ready to go. It suggests that all necessary actions or preparations have been completed, indicating a state of readiness or completion.
  • set one's mind on The idiom "set one's mind on" means to be determined or resolved to achieve or obtain something. It implies having a strong focus or determination towards a specific goal or objective.
  • set one's sights on The idiom "set one's sights on" means to choose or determine a specific goal or target to focus on or pursue ambitiously. It implies setting one's intentions and aspirations towards a particular objective.
  • set someone's teeth on edge The idiom "set someone's teeth on edge" means to cause someone to feel irritated, uneasy, or annoyed.
  • set one's face against The idiom "set one's face against" means to firmly or resolutely oppose or disapprove of something or someone. It implies a determined stance or unwillingness to accept or support a particular situation or person.
  • set store by The idiom "set store by" means to value, attach importance to, or have high regard for something or someone. It implies placing great significance or considering something or someone as valuable or reliable.
  • set someone straight To "set someone straight" means to correct or clarify someone's understanding or perception of a situation, usually by providing accurate information or correcting mistaken beliefs or assumptions. It can also imply guiding someone towards a more appropriate or morally upright behavior or mindset.
  • set one's teeth The idiom "set one's teeth" means to brace oneself or prepare mentally and emotionally to endure a difficult or challenging situation with determination and resolve. It implies the act of clenching one's teeth together as a sign of determination or readiness.
  • set at naught The idiom "set at naught" means to disregard, ignore, or show no respect for something or someone. It indicates the act of considering something or someone as worthless, insignificant, or unworthy of attention or value.
  • set or put the cat among the pigeons The idiom "set or put the cat among the pigeons" means to create a disturbance or cause chaos by introducing a controversial or provocative element into a situation. It refers to the act of causing unrest or upsetting the established order, often by revealing previously hidden information, airing grievances, or stirring up conflict.
  • set light to something The idiom "set light to something" means to ignite or start a fire in something intentionally. It can also figuratively refer to initiating a conflict, controversy, or a series of events with potentially negative consequences.
  • set sail (from/for…) The idiom "set sail (from/for…)" means to begin a journey by water, especially on a ship or boat. It is often used metaphorically to indicate starting a new adventure or undertaking.
  • set the seal on something The idiom "set the seal on something" means to finalize or complete something, often in a decisive or authoritative manner, by adding the final important element or action. It symbolizes the act of officially approving or confirming a matter, making it legally binding or effectively finished.
  • be (dead) set against something/against doing something When someone is "dead set against something" or "dead set against doing something," it means they have a firm and unwavering opposition or resistance to it. They hold strong negative feelings or a deep conviction against it and are unwilling to change their stance.
  • be set on something/on doing something The idiom "be set on something/on doing something" means to have a strong determination or desire to achieve or pursue a particular goal or objective. It implies being committed and unwavering in the pursuit of one's chosen course of action.
  • set your mind on something The idiom "set your mind on something" means to have a strong determination or focus on achieving a particular goal or desire. It implies that someone is committed and resolute in their thoughts and intentions regarding a specific matter.
  • set your sights on something/on doing something To "set your sights on something/on doing something" means to establish a specific goal or aim, and to dedicate your efforts and intentions towards achieving it. It implies focusing one's attention and determination on a particular objective, often with a sense of ambition and commitment.
  • set somebody’s teeth on edge The idiom "set somebody's teeth on edge" means to irritate or annoy someone greatly, causing a feeling of discomfort or displeasure.
  • set the stage for something The idiom "set the stage for something" means to create the conditions or circumstances that make it likely for a certain event or situation to happen. It generally implies that certain actions or preparations are being made in order to lay a foundation for a particular outcome or development.
  • set your face against somebody/something To "set your face against somebody/something" means to express strong disapproval or opposition towards someone or something. It implies that you are firmly and openly against their ideas, actions, or beliefs. It usually involves showing a determined resistance or refusal to support them or their cause.
  • set fair (to do something/for something) The idiom "set fair (to do something/for something)" means to have a favorable or promising outlook or situation, especially regarding the likelihood of success in a particular task or event. It implies that conditions are favorable, and everything is in order for something to happen smoothly or successfully.
  • set the world alight The idiom "set the world alight" means to achieve great success or create a strong impact on a global scale. It describes someone or something that generates a significant and widespread level of interest, admiration, or attention.
  • set foot in/on something The idiom "set foot in/on something" means to enter or visit a place. It implies physically stepping into a location or territory, often emphasizing that it is the first time doing so.
  • set somebody/something on their/its feet The idiom "set somebody/something on their/its feet" means to help someone or something regain stability or success after a difficult or challenging time. It refers to providing support or assistance to ensure their/its recovery or progress.
  • set the bar The idiom "set the bar" means to establish a standard or expectation for others to meet or surpass. It refers to defining a level of achievement, quality, or performance that others are expected to reach or exceed.
  • be set aback The idiom "be set aback" means to be surprised, taken aback, or caught off guard by something unexpected or shocking. It refers to the feeling of being startled or temporarily at a loss due to an unforeseen event or situation.
  • set (someone) aback The idiom "set (someone) aback" means to surprise, shock, or astonish someone, often resulting in a momentary pause or hesitation. It implies that something unexpected or unforeseen has caught someone off guard, leading to a temporary state of disbelief or confusion.
  • set about (doing something) The idiom "set about (doing something)" means to begin or start a task or activity with determination and purpose. It implies taking action and getting involved in the process of completing a specific action or objective.
  • set afire The idiom "set afire" generally refers to the act of igniting or causing something to catch fire. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation or person being filled with passion, excitement, or enthusiasm.
  • be dead set against something The idiom "be dead set against something" means to strongly oppose or be completely unwilling to accept or support something. It implies a firm, unwavering stance of disagreement or resistance.
  • be set against something/against doing something The idiom "be set against something/against doing something" means to strongly oppose or have a strong disapproval towards a particular idea, action, or proposition. It implies a firm stance or unwillingness to accept or support something.
  • dead set against (someone or something) The idiom "dead set against (someone or something)" means to have a strong and unyielding opposition or resistance towards someone or something. It implies being completely determined and unwavering in one's disapproval or refusal.
  • set (one) against (someone or something) The idiom "set (one) against (someone or something)" means to cause someone to be in opposition or conflict with someone or something else. It refers to creating a disagreement or animosity between two parties.
  • set (one's) face against (something) The idiom "set (one's) face against (something)" means to strongly oppose or disapprove of something. It indicates a determined and unwavering resistance or rejection of a particular idea, action, or proposition.
  • set (something) against (something) The idiom "set (something) against (something)" generally means to compare or contrast two things, usually in order to highlight their differences or to make a judgment or decision. It can also refer to the act of opposing or pitting something or someone against another.
  • set your face against The idiom "set your face against" means to strongly oppose or be strongly against something or someone. It implies showing clear disapproval or resistance towards a particular idea, action, or person.
  • set your face against something The idiom "set your face against something" means to strongly oppose or be determined to resist something or someone. It suggests taking a firm or unwavering stance against a particular idea, action, or situation.
  • set the/(one's) clock(s) ahead To "set the/(one's) clock(s) ahead" is an idiom that means to adjust the time on a clock to be ahead, usually by moving it forward by one hour. It is commonly done during the transition from standard time to daylight saving time to ensure that the clock displays the correct time. In a figurative sense, it can also refer to making preparations or getting ahead of schedule in order to be prepared for future events or situations.
  • set the cat among the pigeons The idiom "set the cat among the pigeons" means to create a disturbance or cause chaos by doing or saying something that upsets or agitates people. It refers to a situation where a disruptive element is introduced into a calm or orderly environment, resulting in widespread turmoil or commotion.
  • set (one) apart (from someone) The idiom "set (one) apart (from someone)" means to distinguish or differentiate someone from others, highlighting their unique qualities, skills, or characteristics. It implies that the person being discussed possesses something special or extraordinary that separates them from the rest.
  • set (something) apart (for something) The idiom "set (something) apart (for something)" means to designate or reserve something for a specific purpose or use, typically separating it from other things. It implies the act of setting something aside or keeping it distinct from others in order to organize or allocate it differently.
  • set (something) aside The idiom "set (something) aside" means to put something aside or out of the way, typically for a later time or for future consideration. It refers to the act of physically or mentally removing or storing something temporarily.
  • set (one) back The idiom "set (one) back" typically means to cause someone to experience a delay or setback in terms of progress, achievement, or financial cost.
  • set (one's) back up The idiom "set one's back up" means to become angry, agitated, or provoked. It refers to the act of causing someone to become defensive or irritated due to a remark, action, or situation.
  • set (something) back The idiom "set (something) back" means to cause a delay or a setback in the progress, development, or completion of something. It implies hindering or impeding the normal course of action or expected outcome.
  • set back on one's heels The idiom "set back on one's heels" means to surprise or astonish someone, often causing them to become uncertain or off-balance. It refers to a situation where something unexpected happens that catches a person off guard, causing them to be momentarily taken aback.
  • set back the clock The idiom "set back the clock" means to revert or return to an earlier, less advanced, or less progressive state. It often refers to reversing progress or undoing changes that have been made. It can also imply going back to a previous time or point in history.
  • set one back on one's feet The idiom "set one back on one's feet" means to help someone recover or regain stability after a difficult situation or setback. It often implies providing support, assistance, or resources to help someone overcome challenges and become self-sufficient again.
  • set someone back The idiom "set someone back" means to cost someone a significant amount of money or time for a particular purchase or endeavor. It implies that the expense or delay involved in obtaining or achieving something is substantial and may have a negative impact on the person's finances or schedule.
  • set someone back on their heels The idiom "set someone back on their heels" means to surprise or shock someone, usually with unexpected or challenging information or actions. It describes a situation where someone's confidence or certainty is abruptly undermined, often causing a brief disorientation or confusion.
  • set the/(one's) clock(s) back The idiom "set the/(one's) clock(s) back" refers to the act of changing the time on a clock to an earlier hour, typically in relation to the end of daylight saving time. It is commonly used to remind someone to turn their clocks backward by one hour, thus adjusting to standard time.
  • set you back on your heels The idiom "set you back on your heels" means to surprise or shock someone, often as a result of unexpected or challenging information or events. It refers to a sudden setback or interruption that catches someone off guard, causing them to lose their balance or composure.
  • set a high/low bar The idiom "set a high/low bar" refers to establishing an expectation or standard, which can be either exceptionally challenging (high bar) or very low (low bar). It implies the level of difficulty or quality that is anticipated or required for a particular task, goal, or performance.
  • set the bar (high/low) The idiom "set the bar (high/low)" means to establish an expectation or standard that is either very challenging or very easy to achieve. It refers to setting the level of difficulty or quality that others should strive to reach or surpass.
  • set the heather alight The idiom "set the heather alight" is typically used to describe someone or something that is causing a great sensation or excitement, or having a remarkable impact on a situation or event. It suggests that the person or thing is making a significant and noticeable impression, just like when a fire spreads rapidly across a field of heather.
  • set the Thames alight The idiom "set the Thames alight" is a phrase often used to describe an extraordinary or monumental achievement or event that captures widespread attention and admiration. It signifies an accomplishment that is remarkable enough to astonish even the city of London and its inhabitants, with the River Thames metaphorically being set on fire out of sheer excitement and fervor.
  • not set the world alight The idiom "not set the world alight" means that something or someone fails to generate great excitement, enthusiasm, or interest. It suggests mediocrity or a lack of exceptional performance.
  • set the world alight (or on fire) The idiom "set the world alight" or "set the world on fire" means to achieve great success or create a significant impact that captures widespread attention and admiration. It implies doing something remarkable or outstanding that leaves a lasting impression and generates significant excitement or enthusiasm.
  • all set to go The idiom "all set to go" means that someone or something is fully prepared, organized, or ready to proceed with a task, journey, or plan.
  • get (all) set The idiom "get (all) set" means to prepare or get ready for something, typically an upcoming event or activity. It suggests that the necessary arrangements or preparations have been made in order to be fully prepared and ready to go.
  • be set to rights The idiom "be set to rights" means to be corrected or fixed, usually referring to a situation or problem that has been resolved or improved.
  • set something beside something The idiom "set something beside something" generally means to compare or contrast two things or to place them side by side for observation, analysis, or evaluation. It implies examining the similarities and differences of two entities.
  • set (one's) cap at (someone) The idiom "set one's cap at someone" means to decide or determine to win someone's affection or attraction, typically with the intention of pursuing a romantic relationship with that person. It implies showing special interest and making efforts to woo or impress the individual in question.
  • set (one's) cap for (someone) The idiom "set one's cap for someone" means to work deliberately towards capturing the romantic interest or affection of a particular person. It implies that one is determined to pursue a romantic relationship with someone and is actively making efforts to win their love or attention.
  • set cap for The idiom "set cap for" means to establish a goal or target to be reached. It is often used to express the act of determining one's ambition or aspiration.
  • set her cap The idiom "set her cap" typically refers to a woman's intentional pursuit or attempt to attract a particular man as a potential romantic partner. It implies that the woman is making a deliberate effort to capture the attention or affection of the desired individual.
  • set your cap at The idiom "set your cap at" is typically used to express someone's romantic interest or desire for a specific person. It means to have a romantic or amorous intention towards someone and to actively pursue a relationship with them. The phrase originated from the practice of women in the 19th century who would wear their caps in a specific manner to indicate their interest in a potential partner.
  • set your cap at someone To "set your cap at someone" means to show romantic interest or pursue someone with the intention of establishing a romantic relationship with them.
  • be carved (or set or written) in stone The idiom "be carved (or set or written) in stone" means that something is unchangeable or permanent. It refers to a decision, plan, or agreement that cannot be easily altered or modified. Just like words carved or set in stone cannot be easily erased or changed, something that is "carved in stone" is fixed and cannot be easily revised or undone.
  • be set in cement The idiom "be set in cement" means that something is firmly established or fixed and cannot be changed or altered. It refers to a situation, plan, or decision that is considered final and unchangeable. The phrase alludes to the permanent and immovable nature of concrete that has been set, indicating that there is no room for negotiation or modifications.
  • set in cement The idiom "set in cement" means that something is fixed or permanent and cannot be changed or easily altered. It suggests a sense of finality or irrevocability.
  • set (something) in concrete The idiom "set (something) in concrete" refers to the act of making a decision or plan that is final and cannot be changed or altered. It implies a sense of permanence and irreversibility. It is often used to express the idea of firmly establishing or committing to a certain course of action or conclusion.
  • be dead set on something The idiom "be dead set on something" means to be extremely determined or resolute about achieving or obtaining a particular goal, outcome, or desire. It implies unwavering and unyielding determination.
  • make a dead set at The idiom "make a dead set at" means to make a determined and unwavering effort or attempt to achieve something. It signifies a strong commitment and focus in pursuing a particular goal or objective.
  • set (up)on (doing something) The idiom "set (up)on (doing something)" typically means to enthusiastically or determinedly start or initiate a particular course of action or activity. It portrays a strong intention or commitment towards accomplishing a task or goal.
  • set to work (doing something) The idiom "set to work (doing something)" means to begin or start doing a task or activity with determination, focus, and effort. It implies getting actively engaged and dedicated to accomplishing the task at hand.
  • set your heart/mind on something/on doing something To set your heart/mind on something/on doing something means to be very determined or dedicated to achieve or obtain a particular thing or goal. It implies a strong desire or commitment towards a specific objective.
  • set (someone) by the ears The idiom "set (someone) by the ears" means to cause or initiate a conflict, disagreement, or quarrel between two or more people. It implies stirring up trouble or provoking a dispute between others, often intentionally or accidentally.
  • set by the ears The idiom "set by the ears" means to cause or provoke a dispute, conflict, or disagreement between two or more people. It suggests that the individuals involved are engaged in a heated argument or quarrel.
  • set (one's) mind at ease The idiom "set one's mind at ease" means to alleviate or eliminate someone's worries or anxieties, providing them with reassurance or comfort. It involves making someone feel more secure or relaxed about a particular situation or concern.
  • set (one's) teeth on edge The idiom "set (one's) teeth on edge" means to cause irritation, annoyance, or discomfort. It is commonly used to describe a sound or taste that is unpleasant and induces a strong negative reaction. It can also refer to a situation or behavior that causes frustration or agitation.
  • set somebody's teeth on edge To "set somebody's teeth on edge" means to annoy, irritate, or cause discomfort to someone. It refers to a feeling of irritation that causes a slight jarring or tension in one's teeth, similar to the sensation of scraping nails on a chalkboard.
  • set your teeth on edge The idiom "set your teeth on edge" is an expression used to describe when something causes a feeling of extreme annoyance, irritation, or displeasure. It refers to a sensation that makes one's teeth feel uncomfortable or gives a shuddering feeling similar to the sound of teeth grinding against each other.
  • be, look, etc. set The idiom "be, look, etc. set" means to be prepared, organized, or ready to proceed with a particular action, task, or plan. It implies that all the necessary arrangements have been made, and one is in the proper position to move forward.
  • not set the Thames on fire The idiom "not set the Thames on fire" is used to imply that someone or something is not particularly impressive or remarkable. It suggests that the person or thing under discussion has not achieved anything extraordinary or has failed to meet high expectations. It originates from the notion that if someone were to set the Thames River in London on fire, it would be an extraordinary event, hence not doing so implies a lack of exceptional achievement.
  • not set the woods on fire The idiom "not set the woods on fire" generally means someone is not doing anything extraordinary or impressive. It implies that the person in question is not accomplishing exceptional or remarkable feats, but rather doing something ordinary or mundane.
  • not/never set the world on fire The idiom "not/never set the world on fire" means to not achieve anything outstanding or to fail to make a significant impact or impression. It implies a lack of exceptional talent, skills, or achievement in a particular field or endeavor.
  • set something on fire The idiom "set something on fire" typically means to ignite or ignite something, usually in a literal sense, by lighting it with fire. However, it can also be used metaphorically to mean to energize, stimulate, or provoke excitement or enthusiasm.
  • set the heather on fire The idiom "set the heather on fire" refers to someone's ability to create enthusiasm, excitement, or success through their actions or achievements. It implies that the person is able to ignite motivation, drive, or inspiration in others, leading to remarkable accomplishments or positive changes in a specific area or situation.
  • set the Thames on fire The idiom "set the Thames on fire" is an expression typically used in British English. It means to achieve or accomplish something remarkable or extraordinary, often used when describing someone's exceptional abilities, skills, or accomplishments. It implies that the individual is capable of doing something so remarkable that it could even ignite the River Thames, which flows through London.
  • not set foot somewhere The idiom "not set foot somewhere" means to not physically go or enter a particular place. It implies a strong refusal or avoidance of going to that specific location.
  • set foot The idiom "set foot" means to go or enter a particular place, often implying starting a new experience or journey.
  • set foot in (some place) The idiom "set foot in (some place)" means to physically enter or step into a particular location or area. It often implies that the person is visiting or experiencing a place for the first time or after a long absence.
  • set foot on The idiom "set foot on" means to physically step onto or enter a particular place or location. It implies the act of putting one's foot down on a specific area or area for the first time. It often conveys the notion of initiating a new experience or journey, marking the beginning of one's presence in a particular place.
  • set foot somewhere The idiom "set foot somewhere" means to enter or step into a particular place, often emphasizing the significance or importance of that action. It implies physically arriving at or visiting a specific location.
  • set (something) forth The idiom "set (something) forth" means to present or introduce something, particularly in a clear and detailed manner. It implies the act of explaining or describing something in a systematic or organized way.
  • set a great deal by (someone or something) To set a great deal by someone or something means to value or hold them in high regard. It implies that the person or thing is highly respected, cherished, or considered to be of great importance.
  • set great store by (something or someone) The idiom "set great store by (something or someone)" means to place considerable importance or value on something or someone. It signifies holding someone or something in high regard, believing them to be significant, worthy, or influential.
  • set (one's) hand to The idiom "set one's hand to" means to begin or start working on something in a determined or focused manner. It signifies taking the initiative and devoting oneself to a task or project.
  • set your hand to The idiom "set your hand to" usually means to begin working on a task or to undertake a responsibility. It implies taking action and applying effort towards accomplishing a task or carrying out a duty.
  • (one's) sun has set The idiom "(one's) sun has set" refers to the decline or diminishing of someone's career, power, or influence, often indicating that their prime or successful period in life is over. It implies that the person's achievements or abilities are no longer at their peak and that they may be past their prime.
  • have (one's) heart set on (something) The idiom "have (one's) heart set on (something)" means to have a strong desire or determination to achieve or obtain a particular goal or thing. It implies that one's emotions and passion are deeply invested in that specific desire.
  • set (one's) heart at rest The definition of the idiom "set one's heart at rest" is to find peace, comfort, or reassurance regarding a particular concern or worry. It means to alleviate anxiety or fears by resolving any doubts or uncertainties.
  • set (one's) heart on (something) The idiom "set one's heart on (something)" means to have a strong desire or determination to obtain or achieve something. It implies a deep emotional attachment or longing for a particular goal or object.
  • set your heart on The idiom "set your heart on" means to be determined or fully committed to achieving or obtaining something. It implies having a strong desire or an unwavering resolve towards a particular goal or aspiration.
  • set your heart on something The idiom "set your heart on something" means to have a strong determination or desire to obtain or achieve something. It implies being focused and dedicated towards attaining a specific goal.
  • set (one) back on (one's) heels The idiom "set (one) back on (one's) heels" means to surprise or shock someone so much that they are caught off guard and temporarily unable to respond or react. It refers to the suddenness or unexpectedness of the situation, causing the person to lose their balance metaphorically and become momentarily speechless or stunned.
  • be dead set against (someone or something) The idiom "be dead set against (someone or something)" means to strongly oppose or be firmly resistant to someone or something. It implies having a fixed and unwavering position against a person, idea, or action.
  • set (oneself) up for a letdown The idiom "set (oneself) up for a letdown" refers to the act of creating high expectations or unrealistic hopes for a situation or outcome, often leading to disappointment or disillusionment when those expectations are not met. It suggests that someone has built up anticipation or set unrealistic standards for something, ultimately preparing themselves for a disappointment or failure.
  • set (one's) sights high The idiom "set one's sights high" means to have ambitious goals or aspirations, typically aiming for something extraordinary or challenging. It refers to aiming for a high level of achievement or success, often beyond the expectations or norms.
  • set your sights high/low The idiom "set your sights high/low" means to establish ambitious or humble goals or aspirations. It refers to consciously aiming for challenging or modest objectives depending on the context, indicating the level at which someone sets their expectations or standards.
  • be set in (one's) ways The idiom "be set in (one's) ways" means to have established, fixed, or ingrained habits, preferences, or routines that one is unwilling or resistant to change. It describes a person who is typically resistant to new ideas, approaches, or experiences and is set in their own established patterns of behavior.
  • set up home The idiom "set up home" refers to the act of establishing and organizing a place to live, such as an apartment or house, typically involving arranging furniture, personal belongings, and household necessities to create a comfortable living space. It implies the process of making a new residence suitable and functional for oneself or one's family.
  • set up house/home The idiom "set up house/home" typically refers to the act of establishing or creating a new living arrangement or household. It can mean moving into a new residence, organizing and decorating a place to live, or starting a new family or domestic situation.
  • set (one's) (own) house in order The idiom "set (one's) (own) house in order" refers to taking the necessary steps to organize and rectify one's personal affairs or problems. It suggests the need to prioritize and address issues within one's own life before trying to solve problems for others or becoming involved in external matters.
  • set up house The idiom "set up house" refers to the act of establishing a new residence or home, typically involving the process of moving in, organizing the living space, and making it functional and comfortable.
  • be (all) set (to do something) The idiom "be (all) set (to do something)" means to be fully prepared or ready to do something, often implying a strong determination or eagerness.
  • the jet set The idiom "the jet set" refers to a group of wealthy and fashionable individuals who regularly travel by private jet, typically engaging in leisure activities and attending high-profile events. It is often associated with a glamorous and exclusive lifestyle.
  • set forth on something The idiom "set forth on something" typically means to start or begin a particular task, journey, or endeavor. It implies taking the initial steps or actions towards accomplishing a certain goal or embarking on a specific path.
  • set eyes on (someone or something) The idiom "set eyes on (someone or something)" means to see or perceive someone or something for the first time. It suggests laying eyes on or noticing someone or something distinctly, often with a sense of wonder, curiosity, or surprise.
  • set (one) up for life The idiom "set (one) up for life" means to provide someone with financial security or stability for the rest of their life. It implies that someone is given a significant amount of money, resources, or opportunities that can ensure their well-being and eliminate the need to worry about financial matters in the future.
  • set little by (someone or something) The idiom "set little by (someone or something)" means to have very little regard or value for someone or something. It implies that the person or thing is considered insignificant or unimportant.

Similar spelling words for SET

Plural form of SET is SETS

Conjugate verb Set

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have set
you would have set
he/she/it would have set
we would have set
they would have set

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been setting
you would have been setting
he/she/it would have been setting
we would have been setting
they would have been setting

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would set
you would set
he/she/it would set
we would set
they would set

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be setting
you would be setting
he/she/it would be setting
we would be setting
they would be setting

FUTURE

I will set
you will set
he/she/it will set
we will set
they will set

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be setting
you will be setting
he/she/it will be setting
we will be setting
they will be setting

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have set
you will have set
he/she/it will have set
we will have set
they will have set

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been setting
you will have been setting
he/she/it will have been setting
we will have been setting
they will have been setting

IMPERATIVE

you set
we let´s set

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to set

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was setting
you were setting
he/she/it was setting
we were setting
they were setting

PAST PARTICIPLE

set

PAST PERFECT

I had set
you had set
he/she/it had set
we had set
they had set

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been setting
you had been setting
he/she/it had been setting
we had been setting
they had been setting

PRESENT

I set
you set
he/she/it sets
we set
they set

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am setting
you are setting
he/she/it is setting
we are setting
they are setting

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

setting

PRESENT PERFECT

I have set
you have set
he/she/it has set
we have set
they have set

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been setting
you have been setting
he/she/it has been setting
we have been setting
they have been setting

SIMPLE PAST

he/she/it set

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