How Do You Spell SIX?

Pronunciation: [sˈɪks] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "six" in English uses the IPA phonetic transcription /sɪks/. It is a one-syllable word that begins with the voiceless alveolar fricative "s" sound and ends with the voiceless alveolar stop "k" sound. The vowel sound is the short "i" sound represented by the symbol /ɪ/. This word is essential in numerical sequences and is commonly used in everyday conversation, making it important to know the correct spelling and pronunciation.

SIX Meaning and Definition

Six is a cardinal number that represents the quantity or quantity value of five plus one. It is considered the successor of the number five and the predecessor of the number seven in the base-10 numerical system. Symbolized by the numeral "6" or the Roman numeral "VI," six falls between the numbers five and seven in the number line.

In mathematics, six is an even number, belonging to the set of natural numbers. It is characterized by being a composite number since it can be divided evenly by multiple divisors other than one and itself. The factors of six are one, two, three, and six.

Six holds significance across various cultures, religions, and contexts. For instance, in numerology, six is often associated with harmony, balance, and nurturing energy. Additionally, it is a prominent number in many aspects of human existence, such as the six days of creation in some religious texts, the six primary colors, and the six sides of a cube.

In terms of timekeeping, six can refer to six o'clock, the hour when the minute hand on a clock points directly at the number twelve and the hour hand points towards the number six.

Furthermore, six is a common symbol used to represent quantities, items, positions, or categories in various domains, including sports teams, dice, or a six-pack of beverages.

Top Common Misspellings for SIX *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SIX

Etymology of SIX

The word "six" originated from the Old English word "six", which was derived from the Proto-Germanic word "sekhs". This Proto-Germanic term evolved from the Proto-Indo-European root *sweks, meaning "six". The word has remained fairly consistent throughout several Germanic languages, including German, Dutch, and Swedish, where it is still recognized as "sechs", "zes", and "sex", respectively.

Idioms with the word SIX

  • be six feet under The idiom "be six feet under" means to be dead and buried in a grave.
  • six of one and half a dozen of the other The idiom "six of one and half a dozen of the other" means that two choices or options are essentially the same. It implies that neither option is significantly better or worse than the other, so it doesn't matter which one you choose since the outcome will be similar either way.
  • six of the best The idiom "six of the best" typically refers to receiving a punishment or a beating, specifically six strikes or lashes with a cane or whip.
  • knock sb sideways/for six The idiom "knock sb sideways/for six" is a colloquial expression that means to deeply astonish, shock, or surprise someone. It implies a significant impact on the person's emotions or state of mind, leaving them completely taken aback or stunned.
  • It's six of one, half a dozen of another The idiom "It's six of one, half a dozen of another" means that there are two choices or options that are essentially the same in outcome or result. It implies that it doesn't matter which option one chooses because the end result will be equivalent or similar.
  • six feet under The idiom "six feet under" is a colloquial expression that means dead and buried. It refers to the traditional burial depth of six feet in many cultures.
  • knock sb for six To "knock someone for six" is an idiomatic expression that originated in cricket, a sport played mainly in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries. It means to completely surprise, shock, or overwhelm someone, typically by unexpected news, events, or circumstances. The expression refers to hitting the ball out of the cricket field, scoring the maximum number of runs, and leaving the opposing team disoriented or knocked off balance. In a broader context, "knock someone for six" means to greatly astonish or unsettle someone.
  • knock for six The idiom "knock for six" is used to describe a situation in which someone or something is completely overwhelmed, shocked, or surprised by an unexpected event or piece of news. It originates from the sport of cricket, where hitting the ball out of the field for six runs is considered a significant achievement, often leaving the opposition team disheartened and taken off guard. Thus, "knock for six" implies being profoundly impacted or caught off guard by a sudden and powerful blow, be it physical or metaphorical.
  • six of one, half a dozen of the other The idiom "six of one, half a dozen of the other" means that two alternatives or choices being compared are essentially the same or have similar outcomes or consequences. In other words, it implies that the options being considered are equally good or bad, and choosing one over the other would not make a significant difference in the end result.
  • check your six The idiom "check your six" is a phrase commonly used in aviation and military contexts. It originated from the concept of a clock face, where 12 o'clock represents the direction you are facing and 6 o'clock represents directly behind you. In this idiom, "check your six" means to be aware of and monitor what is happening behind you, paying attention to any potential threats or dangers that may approach from behind. It is a reminder to stay vigilant and ensure one's safety by comprehensively assessing the entire situation. This idiom is often used figuratively to encourage individuals to be cautious and aware of their surroundings in any context, not just in aviation or military settings.
  • deep six The idiom "deep six" means to get rid of, discard, or dispose of something, typically in a secretive or unsuspecting manner. It is often used to describe actions taken to eliminate or hide evidence, unwanted items, or undesirable situations. The term "deep six" originates from nautical terminology, referring to the depth of six fathoms (approximately 36 feet or 11 meters), which is considered a safe and effective depth for burying or sinking something at sea.
  • the deep six The idiom "the deep six" refers to the act of discarding or getting rid of something, usually by hiding it or burying it deep underwater. It implies completely and permanently disposing of something or someone, often with the intention of covering up any evidence or traces.
  • it's six of one and half a dozen of the other The idiom "it's six of one and half a dozen of the other" means that two choices or options are essentially the same or have no noticeable difference in terms of outcome or significance. It implies that there is no clear advantage or disadvantage between the two options being compared.
  • six in one, (and) half a dozen in the other The idiom "six in one, (and) half a dozen in the other" is used to convey that two choices or options are essentially the same or have no significant difference in outcome, regardless of which one is chosen. It suggests that both alternatives are equally similar, hence rendering the decision between them pointless or inconsequential.
  • be hit for six The idiom "be hit for six" is a cricket analogy used to indicate that someone has been completely taken aback or emotionally overwhelmed by a surprising or devastating event or statement. It refers to the act of hitting a six in cricket, where the batsman hits the ball powerfully beyond the boundary without it touching the ground, scoring the highest number of runs.
  • get hit for six The idiom "get hit for six" originates from the sport of cricket and is used metaphorically to describe being caught off guard, surprised, or greatly impacted by an unexpected event or situation. In cricket, hitting the ball for six means hitting it outside the boundary without the ball touching the ground, scoring the maximum number of runs. So, "get hit for six" figuratively refers to being completely overwhelmed or stunned by an unforeseen circumstance.
  • hit (one) for six The idiom "hit (one) for six" originates from cricket and is used to describe someone being completely caught off guard or shocked by something unexpected or devastating. It refers to a powerful shot in cricket that sends the ball flying out of the field, which often results in scoring six runs. Therefore, when something hits someone for six, it means that it has a tremendous impact on them, leaving them disoriented or overwhelmed.
  • hit on all six The idiom "hit on all six" is an expression that means to perform exceptionally well or to operate at optimum efficiency. It refers to reaching the highest level of performance or achieving perfect results in a particular task or situation.
  • hit someone for six The idiom "hit someone for six" typically means to greatly surprise, shock, or overwhelm someone, often emotionally or mentally. It derives from the sport of cricket, where hitting the ball over the boundary for six runs is considered a powerful and unexpected move.
  • hit/knock somebody/something for six The idiom "hit/knock somebody/something for six" is derived from the sport of cricket and is often used in informal or colloquial conversations. It means to completely overwhelm or greatly shock someone, causing a significant impact or disruption to their state of mind or circumstances. It refers to the powerful strike of a ball in cricket that sends it out of the field for six runs, leaving the opposition at a disadvantage.
  • knock (one) for six The idiom "knock (one) for six" originates from cricket and is used metaphorically to describe a profound impact or someone being greatly surprised, shocked, or overwhelmed by an event or piece of news. It refers to the powerful hitting movement in cricket, where the ball is hit forcefully and can cause the fielding team to be disoriented or caught off guard.
  • knock someone for six The idiom "knock someone for six" means to greatly surprise, shock, or disorient someone. It is typically used to describe a sudden and unexpected event or news that completely overwhelms or devastates somebody emotionally or mentally, leaving them feeling stunned or speechless. The phrase originated from the sport of cricket, where hitting the ball "for six" means striking it out of the field, symbolizing a powerful and unexpected blow.

Similar spelling words for SIX

  • SXI,
  • SIECUS,
  • SEQS,
  • six-ton,
  • SCFES,
  • Scruze,
  • CZX,
  • SXA,
  • scows,
  • Sikhs,
  • SCR3S,
  • SWCS,
  • SCBS,
  • SSECKS,
  • siege,
  • SIQS,
  • ZZXAA,
  • SOCCS,
  • CIKS,
  • siccus,
  • HSIX,
  • CECSS,
  • WZXX,
  • ZOX,
  • SEACS,
  • sieg,
  • CICCAS,
  • SUCS,
  • CZX-S,
  • CEGS,
  • ZKS,
  • SACOSS,
  • CICS,
  • CEEX,
  • CEQ'S,
  • SOCS-2,
  • SCCSA,
  • Sacs,
  • Sachs,
  • SWECAS,
  • SAWCS,
  • SECS,
  • SCTS,
  • SSQS,
  • SXH,
  • SSXX,
  • CICSW,
  • HSCTS,
  • SOGS,
  • SACSA,
  • SCAHS,
  • CECSA,
  • sacks,
  • SZX,
  • SACSS,
  • SOCS-3,
  • SACCOS,
  • xix,
  • CIGS,
  • sioux,
  • XXW,
  • SCPS-SP,
  • SIGGZ,
  • SCMS,
  • SAECS,
  • CEKS,
  • SWYX,
  • SAXO,
  • LC-SAX,
  • xxxi,
  • SCMAS,
  • SCRZ,
  • Zax,
  • CIGSS,
  • SQZ,
  • SCQS,
  • SAX-MV,
  • WZCS,
  • SCWZ,
  • size,
  • CEXC,
  • XOXO,
  • SCUAS,
  • SOCOS,
  • CEECS,
  • SACAS,
  • WCZX,
  • XOX,
  • SCLHS,
  • ZZCAZ,
  • SQS,
  • XXEEU,
  • SKYSE,
  • SJCSO,
  • SQS-53,
  • SGAS,
  • CYXC,
  • SOCS-1,
  • CICWS,
  • S6KS,
  • WSEX,
  • xxi,
  • WSAX,
  • SJEX,
  • SCEX,
  • SEOCS,
  • CEX,
  • SCOCE,
  • XXH,
  • CYXH,
  • SCOSA,
  • CYXU,
  • SXC,
  • SCVHS,
  • HSWCS,
  • PSX,
  • SICUS,
  • SCMSE,
  • squeeze,
  • SCFS,
  • Sagas,
  • Seiks,
  • SWICS,
  • SIGACE,
  • CIACS,
  • WT-XXX,
  • Sekes,
  • xxiii,
  • saxe,
  • xxx,
  • ZZCCS,
  • SCLS,
  • WSXC,
  • SQOS,
  • SQSS,
  • CIIX,
  • SISK,
  • SJCHS,
  • SOIX,
  • SCUSA,
  • sikh,
  • SCNHS,
  • SEQSU,
  • CZCS,
  • WSOCS,
  • SCASS,
  • SCCAS,
  • SXE,
  • CECOS,
  • succos,
  • SKZ,
  • SOCS1,
  • skews,
  • swags,
  • squeez,
  • SEIX,
  • SCGES,
  • SCKS,
  • HSCAS,
  • CEACS,
  • SOKSI,
  • SSECCS,
  • SIXX,
  • PSGS,
  • SKHSY,
  • ZECSY,
  • SSX/VSE,
  • SUQS,
  • SIKOS,
  • SQES,
  • ZXW,
  • SAOCS,
  • SECOS,
  • SWKS,
  • SEGAS,
  • SSAX,
  • SKHS,
  • scuzzy,
  • CYCS,
  • squaws,
  • SCGIS,
  • SOX404,
  • sissy,
  • sieck,
  • HSX,
  • SCOSSI,
  • xxxii,
  • SWACS,
  • SCFCI,
  • SKU'S,
  • SGSI,
  • SCDSS,
  • SSCHS,
  • XXAAU,
  • SAIX,
  • SKEYS,
  • sic,
  • ZQS,
  • sex,
  • ZCHS,
  • SCSS,
  • XOXC,
  • WSCCCE,
  • SIGSA,
  • SECHS,
  • XXXWH,
  • sigh,
  • ZQZ,
  • SYCHS,
  • SCDES,
  • XXAOA,
  • WWSX,
  • SYX,
  • SCMHS,
  • HSCDS,
  • SCNZ,
  • SCUS,
  • SCCHS,
  • PSIX,
  • XOXCU,
  • SGSA,
  • SCLSI,
  • sizz,
  • XXIA,
  • CZGS,
  • SSACCS,
  • SAQAS,
  • SACWIS,
  • SCASSU,
  • PSCDS,
  • CECSE,
  • SECOSS,
  • XXXWE,
  • WZXI,
  • SUGS,
  • SAHCS,
  • SIACS,
  • CYX,
  • HSGS,
  • XXAYE,
  • soaks,
  • SOCS,
  • WSCSS,
  • ZGS,
  • SCPSO,
  • psychs,
  • CEHCS,
  • SCCIS,
  • SCFOS,
  • siss,
  • SGHS,
  • SOICS,
  • SEXI,
  • SXW,
  • ZUXC,
  • XGS/16,
  • SCPS-FP,
  • SSX,
  • CYGZ,
  • SXU,
  • PSWCS,
  • SXO,
  • SCYX,
  • SOQAS,
  • SCCYS,
  • XEGS,
  • SGS/AC,
  • screes,
  • SKS,
  • SECCS,
  • SICSA,
  • sexy,
  • PSOCS,
  • Saccus,
  • PSOX,
  • SWIGS,
  • Sagus,
  • XXOUA,
  • SCOZ,
  • SAX-PM,
  • ZWX,
  • HCECS,
  • XUX,
  • sex-,
  • SWCAS,
  • CIGAS,
  • segues,
  • SIEX,
  • SKEWSY,
  • CIX,
  • CIXX,
  • WSKZ,
  • XIOX,
  • SIWCS,
  • SCPSA,
  • SK8S,
  • squiz,
  • xxy,
  • SOEX,
  • SOCS2,
  • CIEGS,
  • SCASE,
  • SCACI,
  • SOCKS,
  • SCOSS,
  • SCNS,
  • PSQS,
  • sax,
  • SCDHHS,
  • XICS,
  • SCGS,
  • WSSX,
  • SYXCY,
  • SSHEX,
  • XKS,
  • SCSAS,
  • sakes,
  • SKYS,
  • SGSS,
  • sisco,
  • SWGS,
  • Skies,
  • XCCS,
  • SUCKS,
  • SGZ,
  • SOGS-RA,
  • succus,
  • sigeh,
  • WJZX,
  • SCDHS,
  • xxxiii,
  • cycas,
  • SCUHS,
  • SJX,
  • SWECS,
  • SUAWACS,
  • SCSSS,
  • PS-SCLS,
  • xxii,
  • SIXI,
  • XQS,
  • CYQS,
  • SGSE,
  • XEX,
  • SKWS,
  • SGSOY,
  • XCHS,
  • SCWS,
  • SCBAS,
  • SCPS-NP,
  • SQAS,
  • CYXY,
  • XKISS,
  • SAECGS,
  • CECHS,
  • CECS,
  • skis,
  • XOCS,
  • six-gun,
  • Xuxa,
  • SCTIS,
  • SKES,
  • ZZCOZ,
  • ZUX,
  • screws,
  • CYXX,
  • XGS/32,
  • SAXOY,
  • SICS,
  • SICOS,
  • siquis,
  • SCJS,
  • ZCS,
  • SGOS,
  • PSAXE,
  • sick,
  • sise,
  • Squesy,
  • CYGSE,
  • XXAAY,
  • SCVS,
  • XWX,
  • SECSI,
  • WSOX,
  • SGAES,
  • WSSXA,
  • SEICS,
  • DE-CIX,
  • SEGZ,
  • XXAAI,
  • SCAWS,
  • SIXY,
  • SGS,
  • SSGS,
  • XAX,
  • PSACS,
  • XXC,
  • CYUX,
  • SJGS,
  • SEGS,
  • Czechs,
  • WSCWSAI,
  • PSSQS,
  • SSACS,
  • XXE,
  • SIGG,
  • SCRAS,
  • CICS/TS,
  • XXOUE,
  • CEXY,
  • ZEKES,
  • XCS,
  • succuss,
  • SECAAS,
  • SXEI,
  • SCOS,
  • Squeasy,
  • SCSIS,
  • WSQS,
  • xxo,
  • SSCS,
  • CYKZ,
  • SCDSA,
  • SCPS-TP,
  • SCGSS,
  • SCPS,
  • ZIXI,
  • ZXA,
  • ZZEGS,
  • XXHHE,
  • SJCS,
  • SKSA,
  • XCWZ,
  • CYXE,
  • WSGS,
  • 476SX,
  • XXXWI,
  • SCAS,
  • HZX,
  • SCCOOS,
  • SAWX,
  • SCEGGS,
  • SOCSO,
  • un-sex,
  • SIGS,
  • PSUCS,
  • SCFZ,
  • Siska,
  • SWQS,
  • WSKS,
  • SCOZA,
  • SAQS,
  • SKOS,
  • SXX,
  • sexier,
  • sis,
  • ZCSU,
  • SOCSS,
  • SEC'S,
  • scuz,
  • SQSW,
  • CYQZ,
  • ZCOS,
  • SECSY,
  • CEWX,
  • SACCS,
  • SCCS-R,
  • XGZ,
  • XXEEH,
  • HSCLS,
  • Sykes,
  • SKIZ,
  • WSSCSW,
  • SCFAS,
  • SECAS,
  • ZYX,
  • sags,
  • XXEEI,
  • SXY,
  • scuzz,
  • SUX,
  • ZXH,
  • SCCS,
  • SOWEX,
  • CYAX,
  • WZACS,
  • XXCEA,
  • SCVUHS,
  • CIOCS,
  • SAGSI,
  • SGSSA,
  • WSIX,
  • SCBUS,
  • XXAAO,
  • SCBSA,
  • SEACASS,
  • CICAS,
  • ZEX,
  • SUCSA,
  • WZZX,
  • ZOOX,
  • SAC'S,
  • FR-SSCS,
  • SAEX,
  • CICS/VS,
  • SACGHS,
  • XXAAA,
  • SOCS3,
  • sika,
  • XGS,
  • CICSA,
  • WSYX,
  • WZQZ,
  • sissu,
  • SKAZE,
  • PSAX,
  • XXAIA,
  • SKAS,
  • SSIX,
  • CEOX,
  • SAGAES,
  • ZIX,
  • SCASW,
  • SSCSS,
  • SCRSY,
  • WSXX,
  • SIXA,
  • WSX,
  • SCDS,
  • SC2S,
  • SOX,
  • seeks,
  • XXA,
  • SICA,
  • SYXI,
  • SCCSO,
  • SEAGAS,
  • SCIX,
  • CIGOS,
  • SGGHS,
  • Sauks,
  • SGCI,
  • SSCCS,
  • SACOS,
  • SCRS,
  • SIAS,
  • WZKZ,
  • SWX,
  • scouse.

Plural form of SIX is SIXES