How Do You Spell SKIN?

Pronunciation: [skˈɪn] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "skin" can be explained using IPA phonetic transcription as /skɪn/. The initial consonant cluster is represented by the "sk" sound, followed by the short vowel "ɪ" and the final consonant "n." The sound of the word can vary depending on accents and regional dialects, but the spelling remains consistent. It is important to learn the proper spelling of common words like "skin" in order to effectively communicate in written language.

SKIN Meaning and Definition

Skin is the largest organ of the body that covers and protects the underlying tissues, muscles, and organs. It is a flexible outer layer that acts as a physical barrier between the body and the external environment, serving to prevent the entry of harmful substances and pathogens.

The skin is composed of three main layers: the outermost layer called the epidermis, the middle layer known as the dermis, and the innermost layer called the subcutaneous tissue or hypodermis. The epidermis is a thin, protective layer that consists of dead skin cells constantly shedding and being replaced by new ones. Beneath the epidermis lies the dermis, which contains hair follicles, sweat and oil glands, blood vessels, nerve endings, and connective tissue. The hypodermis functions to store fat and provides insulation and cushioning to the body.

The skin plays various crucial roles in maintaining overall health. It regulates body temperature by producing sweat when it gets overheated, aiding in cooling down the body. Additionally, the skin helps in the synthesis of vitamin D when exposed to sunlight, contributes to the sense of touch, and provides sensory information to the brain. It also produces melanin, a pigment responsible for determining skin color and protecting against harmful UV radiation.

Furthermore, the skin acts as a medium through which certain substances can be absorbed or excreted by the body. It is a vital avenue for drug delivery since medications can be administered transdermally. Skin health is vital for overall well-being, and any abnormalities or conditions concerning the skin should be promptly evaluated and addressed by healthcare professionals.

Top Common Misspellings for SKIN *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SKIN

Etymology of SKIN

The word "skin" is derived from the Old Norse word "skinn", which in turn has roots in the Proto-Germanic word "skintha". This word ultimately traces back to the Proto-Indo-European root *skei-, which means "to cut" or "to split". The word has been in use since the Old English period, with its meaning referring to the outer covering of an animal or a human being.

Idioms with the word SKIN

  • save your own skin/hide The idiom "save your own skin/hide" means to prioritize one's own safety, well-being, or self-interest above others, often by avoiding harm or negative consequences. It suggests acting in a self-preserving manner, sometimes at the expense of others, in order to protect oneself.
  • skin sb alive The idiom "skin sb alive" means to criticize or reprimand someone severely or ruthlessly.
  • be no skin off sb's nose The idiom "be no skin off sb's nose" means that something does not affect or bother someone at all. It implies that the situation or outcome has no impact on the person's well-being or personal interests.
  • be skin and bone(s) The idiom "be skin and bones" is used to describe someone who is very thin or emaciated, often due to lack of proper nourishment or illness. It suggests that the person has lost so much weight that their body appears to be mostly covered by their skin, with little flesh or muscle remaining.
  • by the skin of your teeth The idiom "by the skin of your teeth" means to narrowly avoid a negative outcome or disaster, usually something difficult or dangerous, by a very small margin or with very little room for error.
  • get under sb's skin The idiom "get under sb's skin" means to bother, irritate, or annoy someone deeply or persistently. It implies that something or someone has managed to affect a person on a personal or emotional level, making them feel uncomfortable or frustrated.
  • jump/leap out of your skin The idiom "jump/leap out of your skin" means to be extremely startled, surprised, or shocked by something. It implies a strong, often involuntary physical reaction to an unexpected or frightening event or situation, similar to the sensation of one's body momentarily leaving their control due to the suddenness or severity of the emotional response.
  • make sb's skin crawl The idiom "make someone's skin crawl" means to cause someone to feel intense discomfort, fear, or revulsion. It typically refers to something or someone that is extremely creepy, disturbing, or unsettling, leading to a physical reaction such as goosebumps or shivers.
  • sister under the skin The idiom "sister under the skin" refers to the fact that two or more people may have different external appearances or characteristics, but internally, they share similar qualities or experiences. It implies that there is a common understanding or bond between individuals, despite their outward differences.
  • beauty is only skin deep The idiom "beauty is only skin deep" means that a person's physical appearance is not a true reflection of their character, personality, or inner qualities. It implies that superficial attractiveness is not as important as the qualities that define someone's true worth or value.
  • be no skin off sb's back/teeth, at be no skin off sb's nose The idiom "be no skin off sb's back/teeth" or "be no skin off sb's nose" is used to express that someone is not affected or bothered by a particular situation or outcome. It implies that the person remains unaffected or unconcerned about the consequences, as if it has no impact on them personally.
  • skin sm alive The idiom "skin someone alive" means to severely punish or reprimand someone. It implies subjecting the person to harsh treatment or a scathing verbal attack.
  • play out of your skin The idiom "play out of your skin" is used to describe an exceptional performance or effort beyond one's usual abilities or expectations, typically in sports or competitive activities. It implies giving an extraordinary performance that surpasses one's usual skill level or surpassing expectations with exceptional effort and skill.
  • save skin The idiom "save skin" means to protect oneself from harm, danger, or negative consequences in a given situation. It refers to taking actions or making decisions with the primary focus of ensuring one's own well-being and self-preservation.
  • save own skin The idiom "save own skin" means to prioritize one's own safety or well-being above others, typically in a difficult or dangerous situation. It implies a self-centered or self-preserving behavior, where an individual seeks to protect themselves without much regard for others.
  • save sb's skin The idiom "save sb's skin" means to protect, rescue, or ensure the safety of someone, especially in a dangerous or risky situation. It implies preventing harm, injury, or negative consequences from befalling the person.
  • save sm's skin The idiom "save someone's skin" means to rescue or protect someone from harm, danger, or a difficult situation. It refers to ensuring someone's safety or preventing them from facing negative consequences.
  • a banana skin The idiom "a banana skin" refers to a situation or object that is seemingly harmless or simple but holds the potential to cause embarrassment, difficulties, or failure. It suggests that something seemingly insignificant can lead to unexpected and unfortunate consequences.
  • no skin off teeth The idiom "no skin off teeth" means that something does not cause any harm, inconvenience, or trouble to a person. It suggests that an action or situation does not affect someone negatively or does not have any adverse consequences for them.
  • it's no skin off nose The idiom "it's no skin off my nose" is used to indicate that something does not bother or affect the person speaking. It suggests that they have no personal stake or concern in a particular situation or outcome.
  • It's no skin off my nose The idiom "It's no skin off my nose" means that something does not personally affect or bother someone. It suggests that the outcome or situation has no negative consequences or impact on the person who says it. It is used to express indifference or lack of concern towards a certain matter.
  • under the skin The idiom "under the skin" refers to deep or profound understanding or knowledge of someone or something. It suggests a thorough understanding that goes beyond appearances or superficial aspects. It implies a level of intimacy and familiarity that allows one to truly comprehend the essence or true nature of a person or situation.
  • There's more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "There's more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple ways to achieve the same goal or solve a problem. It suggests that there are various alternative methods or approaches to accomplish a task, emphasizing the importance of flexibility and creativity.
  • soaked to the skin The idiom "soaked to the skin" means to be completely drenched or wet, usually due to heavy rain or falling into water. It implies that every part of the person's clothing or body is thoroughly wet.
  • soak to the skin The idiom "soak to the skin" refers to someone or something being completely drenched or wet, to the point where the moisture penetrates through and saturates one's clothing or outer layer of skin. It implies being thoroughly soaked and unable to stay dry.
  • skin alive The idiom "skin alive" means to severely criticize or reprimand someone harshly. It refers to the act of figuratively removing someone's skin, which implies a painful and scolding action.
  • nothing but skin and bones and skin and bones The idiom "nothing but skin and bones and skin and bones" is often used to describe someone who is extremely thin or emaciated. It suggests that the person has lost so much weight that they appear skeletal, with their body being devoid of significant muscle or fat.
  • nearly jump out of skin The idiom "nearly jump out of skin" means to be extremely surprised, scared, or shocked to the point where one's immediate reaction is to jump or move involuntarily in a startled manner. It conveys a feeling of being strongly taken aback or experiencing an intense emotional response.
  • make skin crawl To make someone's skin crawl is an idiomatic expression that means to cause a strong feeling of unease, discomfort, or repulsion. It refers to something or someone that induces a physical sensation as if insects are crawling on one's skin, resulting in a strong negative reaction.
  • Let every man skin his own skunk The idiom "Let every man skin his own skunk" means that each person should be responsible for dealing with their own problems or issues, rather than relying on others to solve them. It implies that individuals should take ownership of their actions and take care of the consequences themselves, rather than expecting someone else to handle it for them.
  • knock sm skin
  • jump out of skin The idiom "jump out of skin" is used to describe a reaction or response in which someone is extremely startled, surprised, or scared. It implies a strong and sudden physical or emotional reaction, as if one's whole being is leaping out of their body due to shock or fright.
  • give sm skin
  • get under skin The idiom "get under someone's skin" means to greatly irritate or annoy someone, causing them to feel agitated or upset. It implies that something or someone has affected a person on a deep, personal level, making them feel uncomfortable or frustrated.
  • by the skin of teeth The idiom "by the skin of teeth" means to narrowly escape from a difficult situation or achieve success by a very narrow margin. It implies that the outcome was extremely close and almost did not happen.
  • be soaked to the skin The idiom "be soaked to the skin" means to be completely drenched or wet, typically referring to someone's clothing or body being thoroughly soaked with water. It implies that the person is completely wet from head to toe, with water penetrating through their clothes or the surface of their skin.
  • be skin and bone The idiom "be skin and bone" means to be extremely thin or emaciated, usually due to a lack of proper nutrition or illness. It implies that the person's body has very little flesh or muscle, and that their bones are prominent and visible.
  • a thick skin The idiom "a thick skin" refers to someone having the ability to remain unaffected by criticism, insults, or negative feedback. It implies being resilient and unbothered by negative comments or situations. Having a thick skin means not taking things personally and being able to disassociate oneself from criticism or negative opinions.
  • soak sm to the skin The idiom "soak someone/something to the skin" means to thoroughly wet someone or something, to the point that the liquid penetrates through clothing or fur, leaving them completely drenched.
  • (have) a thick skin The idiom "(have) a thick skin" means to be emotionally resilient or able to handle criticism, insults, or negative remarks without becoming upset or affected. It implies having the ability to remain composed and unaffected by others' opinions or comments.
  • make your skin crawl The idiom "make your skin crawl" means to cause an intense feeling of discomfort, unease, or revulsion. It usually refers to something creepy, frightening, or disturbing that evokes a physical reaction, such as feeling as if insects are crawling on your skin.
  • by the skin of one's teeth The idiom "by the skin of one's teeth" means narrowly or barely escaping a difficult or dangerous situation.
  • nearly jump out of your skin The idiom "nearly jump out of your skin" means to be extremely startled or frightened by something, causing a strong physical reaction such as jumping or experiencing a sudden surge of adrenaline. It implies being caught off guard or surprised to the point where one's body reacts as if it wants to escape from the situation.
  • (almost) jump out of one's skin The idiom "(almost) jump out of one's skin" means to be extremely startled or frightened, causing someone to react suddenly and with great intensity. It can also refer to being startled to the point of feeling a physical sensation as if one's skin is trying to leap off their body.
  • be no skin off someone's nose The idiom "be no skin off someone's nose" means that a particular situation or outcome will have no negative impact or consequence for someone. It suggests that they are unaffected or unbothered by something.
  • get under someone's skin The idiom "get under someone's skin" means to annoy or irritate someone deeply, causing them to feel bothered or upset. It suggests a level of persistence or repeated behavior that gradually wears down a person's patience or peace of mind.
  • have a thick (or thin) skin The idiom "have a thick (or thin) skin" means to either have a resilient and unaffected attitude towards criticism, insults, or negative comments (thick skin) or to be easily hurt, offended, or sensitive to such remarks (thin skin). It refers to a person's ability to handle and withstand criticism or negative feedback without feeling deeply affected or hurt by it.
  • save someone's skin To "save someone's skin" means to rescue or protect someone from a difficult or dangerous situation, usually at personal risk or expense. It implies a selfless act of helping someone avoid harm or trouble.
  • skin someone alive The idiom "skin someone alive" means to criticize, berate, or punish someone severely or cruelly. It is often used figuratively to express intense anger or displeasure towards someone, suggesting the desire to metaphorically "remove their skin" as punishment.
  • skin and bones The idiom "skin and bones" is used to describe someone who is extremely thin or emaciated, with very little flesh or muscle mass on their body.
  • get under somebody’s skin The idiom "get under somebody's skin" means to irritate, annoy, or bother someone deeply or persistently, often by saying or doing something that causes discomfort or frustration. It refers to a situation where someone's actions or words affect another person on a personal or emotional level, leading to a feeling of unease or irritation that is difficult to ignore.
  • have got somebody under your skin The idiom "have got somebody under your skin" means to be deeply affected or emotionally influenced by someone. It suggests that someone has a significant impact on your thoughts, emotions, or behavior, often resulting in intense feelings or preoccupation with that person.
  • it’s no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose The idiom "it's no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose" is used to express that something does not concern or bother the speaker, listener, or a particular person. It implies that whatever is happening or being done will not have any negative impact on the person mentioned. It is often used to show indifference, lack of care, or the absence of personal harm or inconvenience.
  • jump out of your skin The idiom "jump out of your skin" means to be extremely startled or frightened, usually by a sudden or unexpected event. It describes a strong and immediate reaction that can cause someone to physically jump or react as if they were scared.
  • (nothing but/all/only) skin and bone The idiom "(nothing but/all/only) skin and bone" refers to someone or something being extremely thin or emaciated due to lack of flesh or muscle. It implies that the person or object has lost weight to an unhealthy extent, appearing frail and weak.
  • a thin skin The idiom "a thin skin" refers to someone who is easily offended, sensitive, or easily upset by criticism or negative comments. It implies that the person is emotionally fragile and reacts intensely to even minor provocations.
  • there’s more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "there’s more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple methods or approaches to accomplish a task or solve a problem. It emphasizes the idea that there are numerous alternatives or various ways to achieve a desired outcome.
  • all skin and bones The idiom "all skin and bones" is used to describe someone who is extremely thin or emaciated, with very little body fat. It implies that the person appears gaunt, typically due to lack of proper nutrition or a medical condition.
  • be (all) skin and bone(s) To be (all) skin and bone(s) means to be extremely thin or emaciated, usually due to illness, malnutrition, or extreme weight loss. It suggests that a person has lost a significant amount of weight and their body appears gaunt, with very little flesh or muscle remaining.
  • ass in a lion's skin The idiom "ass in a lion's skin" refers to someone who pretends to be or presents themselves as strong, brave, and powerful, but is actually weak, cowardly, or ineffective. It implies that the person is misrepresenting themselves or exaggerating their abilities or qualities.
  • be no skin off (one's) back The idiom "be no skin off (one's) back" means that something does not affect or bother someone, usually implying that it has no negative consequences for them. It suggests that the outcome or situation doesn't bother the person because it doesn't directly involve or impact them.
  • no skin off (one's) back The idiom "no skin off (one's) back" means that something does not personally affect or bother someone. It implies that there are no negative consequences or harm to oneself as a result of a particular situation or action.
  • slip on a banana skin The idiom "slip on a banana skin" refers to someone experiencing a sudden and unexpected mishap or accident, typically resulting in embarrassment or a loss of balance. It is often used figuratively to describe a situation in which someone encounters an unforeseen difficulty or obstacle. The phrase originates from the comedic trope of slipping on a banana skin, which was frequently used in early comedic silent movies to elicit laughter from the audience.
  • be brothers/sisters under the skin The idiom "be brothers/sisters under the skin" means to share a very close bond or similarity with someone, often despite outward differences or appearances. It implies that two individuals may seem different from the surface, but deep down, they have a strong connection or are very alike in their thoughts, feelings, or values.
  • skin and bone The idiom "skin and bone" means extremely thin or emaciated, usually referring to a person or an animal who appears to have lost a significant amount of weight, making their bones visible through their skin.
  • do something by the skin of your teeth The idiom "do something by the skin of your teeth" means to narrowly or barely accomplish or achieve something, often referring to a difficult or challenging situation where success or survival is achieved just in the nick of time and by a very narrow margin or small degree of success.
  • more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple ways or methods to achieve a particular goal or objective. It emphasizes the flexibility and variety of approaches that can be taken to solve a problem or complete a task.
  • there are many ways to skin a cat The idiom "there are many ways to skin a cat" means that there are various different methods or approaches to achieve the same or similar outcome or goal. It emphasizes the existence of multiple solutions, options, or strategies to accomplish something. It is often used to encourage creative thinking or to indicate that there is more than one way to tackle a problem.
  • comfortable in (one's) own skin The idiom "comfortable in (one's) own skin" refers to a person's ability to feel at ease and confident in their own identity, personality, and body. It implies a sense of self-acceptance, where individuals are unapologetically themselves and are not influenced by societal pressures or the judgment of others. It encompasses a state of emotional well-being, self-assurance, and contentment with who one is, both internally and externally.
  • make (one's) skin crawl The idiom "make (one's) skin crawl" means to experience a strong feeling of disgust, discomfort, or fear, often causing a physical reaction like shivering or goosebumps. It is used to describe something that is deeply unsettling, disturbing, or repulsive.
  • drenched to the skin The idiom "drenched to the skin" means to be completely soaked or saturated with water, to the point where one's clothes or body are thoroughly wet. It implies being heavily wetted or experiencing a significant amount of rainfall or water exposure.
  • skin an eel by the tail The idiom "skin an eel by the tail" means to handle a difficult or delicate situation in a skillful or cautious manner, often involving complex or intricate tasks. It implies navigating through challenges with caution, patience, and expertise, much like the delicate process of skinning an eel while holding onto its slippery tail.
  • it's no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose The idiom "it's no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose" means that something doesn't affect or bother the person in question. It implies that the person is not impacted or concerned about the situation at hand.
  • skin flick The idiom "skin flick" refers to a slang term used to describe a type of film or movie that typically contains explicit sexual content or nudity. It is often used to refer to pornographic or adult-oriented films.
  • have skin in the game The idiom "have skin in the game" means to have a personal stake or financial interest in a particular situation or undertaking. It implies that the individual is directly affected by the outcome and is therefore more motivated and invested in making sure it turns out favorably. It often refers to someone who has contributed their own resources, time, or effort, and is thus liable for the potential risks and rewards associated with the venture.
  • have/put skin in the game The phrase "have/put skin in the game" is an idiom that means to personally invest something of value, often time, money, or effort, in a particular enterprise or activity. It signifies a commitment or involvement in a situation where one stands to win or lose something significant. It implies taking a risk or having a personal stake in the outcome, indicating a higher level of dedication and accountability.
  • skin game The idiom "skin game" refers to a dishonest or fraudulent activity conducted for personal gain or advantage. It typically involves trickery, manipulation, or deception to exploit or deceive others.
  • skin in the game The idiom "skin in the game" refers to being personally invested or taking on a significant stake or risk in a particular venture or situation. It means that someone has something at stake for their actions or decisions, and is not merely a passive participant or observer. It suggests a personal commitment, accountability, and willingness to face the consequences of one's choices.
  • get under (one's) skin The idiom "get under (one's) skin" means to deeply annoy, irritate, or bother someone. It refers to something or someone that affects a person emotionally or mentally, often causing them to become frustrated or agitated.
  • give some skin The idiom "give some skin" is a playful expression that means to shake hands or give someone a high-five, typically to show excitement, camaraderie, or congratulations. It is often used in informal or casual situations.
  • give someone some skin The idiom "give someone some skin" is a slang expression that means to greet someone by slapping their hands in a high-five or another form of hand contact. It typically involves a friendly and informal greeting or celebration.
  • skin a goat The idiom "skin a goat" typically refers to the act of effortlessly or skillfully completing a task, particularly one that may be challenging or complex. It implies that the individual can accomplish the given task with ease, as if effortlessly removing the skin from a goat without encountering any difficulties.
  • have a skin like a rhinoceros The idiom "have a skin like a rhinoceros" means to have a thick or tough skin that is not easily affected by criticism, insults, or negative comments. It implies having a strong ability to remain unaffected by others' opinions or emotions and to tolerate difficult situations without being deeply hurt or offended.
  • have a thin skin The idiom "have a thin skin" refers to a person who is easily offended, sensitive, or easily hurt by criticism or negative comments. Such individuals are more likely to take things personally and feel deeply affected by even minor insults or remarks.
  • be no skin off (one's) nose The idiom "be no skin off one's nose" means not to be a concern or bother to someone, as it does not directly affect or involve them. It implies that the situation or action doesn't have any negative consequences for the person being referred to.
  • jump in (one's) skin The idiom "jump in (one's) skin" typically means to startle or shock someone. It refers to a sudden and strong reaction that causes a person to physically twitch, flinch, or jump due to surprise, fear, or being caught off guard.
  • jump out of (one's) skin The idiom "jump out of (one's) skin" refers to an extreme or sudden reaction to fright, surprise, or excitement. It implies being so startled or overwhelmed that one has an intense physical or emotional response, as if one's body is momentarily leaving or escaping from its own skin.
  • nearly jump out of (one's) skin The idiom "nearly jump out of (one's) skin" means to be extremely startled or frightened and react with a sudden, intense physical or emotional response. It implies a level of shock or surprise that causes a person to feel as if they could literally leave their own body due to the overwhelming sensation.

Similar spelling words for SKIN

Plural form of SKIN is SKINS

Conjugate verb Skin

CONDITIONAL

I would skin
you would skin
he/she/it would skin
we would skin
they would skin

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be skinning
you would be skinning
he/she/it would be skinning
we would be skinning
they would be skinning

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have skin
you would have skin
he/she/it would have skin
we would have skin
they would have skin

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been skinning
you would have been skinning
he/she/it would have been skinning
we would have been skinning
they would have been skinning

FUTURE

I will skin
you will skin
he/she/it will skin
we will skin
they will skin

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be skinning
you will be skinning
he/she/it will be skinning
we will be skinning
they will be skinning

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have skinned
you will have skinned
he/she/it will have skinned
we will have skinned
they will have skinned

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been skinning
you will have been skinning
he/she/it will have been skinning
we will have been skinning
they will have been skinning

IMPERATIVE

you skin
we let´s skin

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to skin

PAST

I skinned
you skinned
he/she/it skinned
we skinned
they skinned

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was skinning
you were skinning
he/she/it was skinning
we were skinning
they were skinning

PAST PARTICIPLE

skinned

PAST PERFECT

I had skinned
you had skinned
he/she/it had skinned
we had skinned
they had skinned

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been skinning
you had been skinning
he/she/it had been skinning
we had been skinning
they had been skinning

PRESENT

I skin
you skin
he/she/it skins
we skin
they skin

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am skinning
you are skinning
he/she/it is skinning
we are skinning
they are skinning

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

skinning

PRESENT PERFECT

I have skinned
you have skinned
he/she/it has skinned
we have skinned
they have skinned

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been skinning
you have been skinning
he/she/it has been skinning
we have been skinning
they have been skinning
I would have skinned
we would have skinned
you would have skinned
he/she/it would have skinned
they would have skinned

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