How Do You Spell STH?

Pronunciation: [ˌɛstˌiːˈe͡ɪt͡ʃ] (IPA)

The spelling "sth" is an abbreviation for "something." It is commonly used in text messaging and informal writing. The phonetic transcription of "sth" is /sʌmθɪŋ/. The letter "s" represents the /s/ sound, while the letter "t" represents a glottal stop /ʔ/. The letter "h" is used to indicate that the vowel sound in "some" is short /ʌ/ instead of long /oʊ/ as in "so." The use of abbreviations such as "sth" is becoming increasingly common in digital communication.

STH Meaning and Definition

  1. "St" and "h" in combination, commonly abbreviated as "sth," is a common expression found in informal writing to represent the word "something." It is primarily used when referring to a particular object, matter, event, action, or concept whose specific identity or details are either unknown, unimportant, or intentionally left unsaid. This abbreviation allows for brevity and convenience in written communication, particularly in casual settings, online forums, or text messaging platforms.

    The term "sth" functions as a placeholder, enabling the user to convey a generalized reference without providing explicit information about the subject in question. Utilizing this abbreviation allows writers to maintain a level of ambiguity, potentially leaving room for interpretation or emphasizing the universality of their statement. However, its frequent application can lead to vague or imprecise expressions if used excessively or inappropriately.

    For instance, in a sentence like "I need to buy sth for dinner," "sth" represents a specific item but intentionally obfuscates its identity. The reader is left to imagine or infer what that item might be based on the context or assumptions. In this way, "sth" enables communicators to be intentionally non-specific or discrete in their discourse, often relying on shared knowledge or contextual clues for understanding.

    Overall, "sth" is an abbreviation commonly used to represent the word "something" when brevity and informality are desired. Its usage allows for generalized references without providing explicit details, promoting concise communication in various informal written contexts.

Common Misspellings for STH

  • zth
  • xth
  • srh
  • s6h
  • s5h
  • stn
  • stj
  • zsth
  • szth
  • xsth
  • dsth
  • wsth
  • strh
  • sfth
  • stfh
  • stgh
  • styh
  • s6th
  • sthg
  • stbh
  • sthb
  • stnh
  • sthn
  • stjh
  • sthj
  • sthu
  • sthy
  • stth
  • sthh
  • qth
  • s4h
  • svh
  • stx
  • STh-1

Idioms with the word STH

  • tune sth up The idiom "tune something up" refers to the act of carefully adjusting or improving something, typically to maximize its performance, functionality, or efficiency. It is often used in the context of fine-tuning or making adjustments to musical instruments, engines, vehicles, or other mechanical or technical systems to ensure they are operating optimally. Figuratively, it can also mean making enhancements or improvements to a process, strategy, or plan to achieve better results.
  • wind sth up The idiom "wind something up" has multiple definitions depending on the context: 1. To finish or bring something to a conclusion: This can refer to completing a task or project, or ending a conversation or meeting. Example: "Let's wind up this meeting and discuss the next steps." 2. To provoke or tease someone intentionally: This can involve intentionally aggravating or annoying someone for amusement. Example: "He always tries to wind up his little sister by hiding her toys." 3. To tighten or coil something using a twisting motion: This can be applied to winding up a mechanical device, such as a clock or toy, to make it work. Example: "He wound up the old music box and enjoyed the nostalgic tune." In general
  • tie sth up The idiom "tie something up" refers to completing or finishing a task or situation. It implies bringing all loose ends together, resolving any issues or details, and reaching a conclusion or closure.
  • swim with sth The idiom "swim with something" typically means to align with or adapt to a particular situation or group. It suggests going along with the prevailing opinions, ideas, or trends rather than resisting or opposing them.
  • stir sth up The idiom "stir something up" means to provoke or incite trouble, conflict, or controversy. It refers to the act of intentionally creating or causing a disturbance or disruption in a situation or relationship. It can also imply agitating or arousing strong emotions or reactions in others.
  • stop sth up (with sth) The idiom "stop sth up (with sth)" means to block or seal an opening or passage with something, typically in order to prevent air or liquid from getting through. It implies using a material or object to close off a space or opening completely.
  • strike sth up To "strike something up" is an idiomatic expression that means to initiate or begin something, typically a conversation, relationship, friendship, or even a piece of music. It suggests starting or igniting something in a lively or engaging manner.
  • strive toward sth The idiom "strive toward sth" means to make a great effort or work hard in order to achieve a specific goal or objective. It implies a determined and focused approach towards reaching a desired outcome.
  • sum (sth) up The idiom "sum (sth) up" means to give a brief and concise overview or summary of a particular topic, situation, or argument. It refers to the act of condensing and presenting the main points or essence of something in a few sentences or paragraphs.
  • sweep sth up The idiom "sweep something up" typically means to clean or tidy up an area by using a broom or a similar tool to gather and remove dirt, dust, or debris from a surface. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of swiftly or energetically completing a task or gathering and bringing together various elements or factors.
  • swell with sth The idiom "swell with sth" typically means to experience a strong or intense feeling, usually positive, and have that feeling increase or intensify. It can refer to emotions like pride, joy, happiness, love, or even excitement or anticipation. The phrase often implies that the feeling is becoming more overwhelming or pronounced.
  • swing sth The idiom "swing something" typically means to handle or manage something skillfully or with ease. It can also refer to successfully accomplishing a task or taking control of a situation.
  • tap sth with sth The idiom "tap sth with sth" usually refers to the act of lightly or gently hitting something with another object (typically with the fingers or a tool) in order to produce a light, rhythmic sound, test its quality or durability, get someone's attention, or extract or extract a small amount of liquid or substance.
  • tear sth up The idiom "tear something up" means to shred or rip something into small pieces, often forcefully and with strength. It can be used literally, such as tearing up a document or tearing up old newspapers, or figuratively, such as tearing up a letter or tearing up a contract to show strong disapproval or rejection.
  • temper sth with sth The idiom "temper sth with sth" means to moderate or balance something by adding or incorporating a specific element or quality. It implies the act of adjusting, tempering, or bettering something by introducing a contrasting or complementary element or characteristic.
  • tend toward sth The idiom "tend toward something" means to have a natural inclination or tendency to lean or move in a particular direction or towards a specific outcome or behavior. It implies a general pattern or inclination rather than a strict rule or certainty.
  • cherrypick sth The idiom "cherrypick something" means to selectively choose the best or most favorable option or piece of information while ignoring the rest. It refers to the act of selectively handpicking only the desirable items, facts, data, or elements while neglecting or overlooking the less desirable or unfavorable ones. In essence, it involves deliberately choosing or highlighting the best aspects while disregarding the less attractive or contradictory aspects.
  • trim sth with sth The idiom "trim sth with sth" generally means to decorate or embellish something, typically by adding some kind of additional decorative element or finishing touch. It is often used when describing the act of enhancing the appearance or presentation of something by adding an attractive or ornamental feature.
  • think sth up The idiom "think something up" means to come up with or invent something, especially an idea, plan, or solution, through one's creative thinking or brainstorming process. It refers to the act of generating a new concept or devising something innovative or original.
  • tidy sth up The idiom "tidy something up" means to clean, organize, or arrange something in a neat and orderly manner. It refers to the act of making something neat and presentable by removing clutter, straightening or rearranging items, and ensuring overall cleanliness.
  • tip sth up The idiom "tip sth up" means to turn or overturn something, often quickly or forcefully, causing its contents to spill out or be emptied.
  • toil up sth The idiom "toil up something" means to exert a great deal of effort or labor in order to ascend or climb something, typically a steep or difficult incline. It implies hard work, struggle, and perseverance to reach a higher point or destination.
  • tool sth up To "tool something up" typically refers to the process of equipping or outfitting something with the necessary tools, equipment, or resources for it to function or operate effectively. It can be used in various contexts, such as setting up a factory or workshop with machinery, assembling a team with the right skills and resources for a particular project, or preparing an organization for a specific task or objective.
  • toss sth up The idiom "toss something up" typically means to throw or flip something into the air, but it can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of considering or deliberating between different options or choices.
  • total sth up The idiom "total something up" means to calculate or sum up the total value, amount, or result of something after considering all the relevant factors or components. It can also refer to summarizing or concluding a discussion, argument, or situation by considering all the relevant aspects.
  • tote sth up The idiom "tote something up" refers to the act of calculating or adding up sums or figures to determine a total or overall amount. It is often used when someone is tallying expenses, costs, scores, or any other numerical values.
  • touch sth up The idiom "touch something up" means to make minor improvements, adjustments, or repairs to something, typically to enhance its appearance or performance. It refers to adding final touches or refinements to improve the overall quality or appeal of something.
  • trade up (to sth) The idiom "trade up (to sth)" means to exchange or replace something of lesser value, quality, or importance for something of higher value, quality, or importance. It can refer to both material objects (such as trading up to a more expensive car or a larger house) or non-material aspects (such as trading up to a better job or a higher social status).
  • travel with sth The idiom "travel with sth" typically refers to carrying or bringing something along while journeying or going somewhere. It can involve physical items or abstract concepts.
  • trend toward sth The idiom "trend toward sth" refers to a movement or shift in behavior, preferences, or opinions, indicating a growing inclination or tendency towards a particular thing or concept. It suggests that a pattern is emerging, with more people adopting or showing interest in that specific direction or aspect.
  • true sth up The idiom "true sth up" means to settle or reconcile one's accounts or records by checking them for accuracy, correcting any discrepancies, and ensuring they are in balance or alignment. It often refers to the process of verifying financial documents or reconciling transactions to ensure they are accurate and in accordance with the established norms or expectations.
  • trump sth up The idiom "trump something up" means to fabricate, exaggerate, or create false evidence, information, or charges in order to make something seem more important, serious, or significant than it really is, typically in a negative or misleading way.
  • turn sth up The idiom "turn sth up" means to increase or raise the volume, intensity, or level of something, such as sound, heat, speed, or effort.
  • twinkle with sth The idiom "twinkle with sth" means to have a subtle or slight quality or characteristic of something. It implies that there is a spark, glimmer, or hint of a particular emotion, feeling, or attribute. It can be used to describe a person's eyes, a smile, or any other physical or metaphorical aspect that gives off a small indication of something specific.
  • type sth up To "type something up" means to transcribe or convert handwritten or spoken text into a typed or digital format. It involves manually or electronically typing out the content to create a neat and organized written document.
  • use sth up The idiom "use something up" means to completely deplete or consume all of a particular resource, product, or item, leaving none remaining.
  • vary with sth The idiom "vary with something" means to change or be different depending on or in relation to something. It indicates that the specific quality, quantity, or characteristics of something can correspondingly change or differ based on various factors or circumstances.
  • vomit sth up The idiom "vomit something up" means to forcefully and quickly bring something up or forth, usually in a hasty or uncontrolled manner, similar to how vomiting occurs. It can be used figuratively to describe someone disclosing or revealing information or a situation abruptly and without much thought or consideration.
  • wall sth up The idiom "wall sth up" refers to the act of enclosing or sealing something, usually a room or a space, by building a wall around it. This can be done for various reasons, such as for security, privacy, or to close off a particular area permanently.
  • whip sth up The idiom "whip something up" means to create or make something quickly, often in a hasty or impromptu manner. It is often used to refer to preparing food or a meal rapidly, but can also be used for any task or creation done swiftly.
  • wipe sth up The idiom "wipe sth up" typically means to clean or remove something completely or thoroughly. It can refer to physically cleaning a surface or removing a substance, but it can also be used metaphorically to denote eliminating or eradicating something, such as a problem or a mess.
  • wire sth up The idiom "wire something up" means to connect or install electrical wiring or a system of wires for a particular device or purpose. It can also refer to the process of setting up and connecting various electronic devices or components to function together.
  • work sth up The idiom "work something up" generally means to create, generate, or produce something, typically an idea, plan, or emotion. It can also refer to increasing the intensity or level of something.
  • wrap sth up The idiom "wrap something up" means to finish or complete something, often in a final or conclusive manner. It can refer to concluding a meeting, project, task, or event.
  • write sth up The idiom "write sth up" typically means to document or record something in writing, often in a more detailed or formal manner. It refers to the act of transcribing or summarizing information into a written form.
  • yank sth up The idiom "yank sth up" means to pull or lift something suddenly, forcefully, or with great effort. It often implies that the action is done swiftly and forcefully, causing the item to be removed abruptly.
  • zip sth up The idiom "zip sth up" means to close or fasten something, such as a bag, with a zipper. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of finishing or concluding something, usually in a quick or efficient manner.
  • rearend sth The idiom "rearend something" typically refers to accidentally colliding with or hitting the back end of a vehicle or object with another vehicle. It is commonly used to describe a rear-end collision or accident.
  • talk sth up To "talk something up" means to speak enthusiastically or in a positive manner about something, often with the intention of promoting or emphasizing its importance, value, or success. It involves using persuasive language or exaggeration to create excitement or interest about a particular thing, idea, or event.
  • walltowall (with) sth The idiom "wall-to-wall (with) something" is commonly used to describe a situation or place that is completely filled or covered with a specific thing, typically implying an overwhelming or excessive amount. It suggests that there is no space or gaps left between the items or entities being referred to, emphasizing the extent or abundance of the subject.
  • race up to sm or sth To "race up to someone or something" means to approach or reach someone or something quickly, often with a sense of urgency or excitement. It implies moving rapidly towards a person or object, often in a competitive or eager manner.
  • meet with sth The idiom "meet with something" means to encounter, experience, or face a particular situation or outcome. It usually implies a negative or challenging experience. For example, if someone "meets with failure," it means they have encountered or experienced failure. Similarly, if someone "meets with resistance," it means they are facing opposition or encountering resistance.
  • squabble about sm or sth The idiom "squabble about sm or sth" means to engage in a petty or unproductive argument or disagreement over a particular issue or topic. It refers to a minor dispute or quarrel that often lacks substance or important consequences.
  • wait at sth (for sm or sth) The idiom "wait at something (for someone or something)" means to remain in a particular place or position until someone or something arrives or is ready. It implies patiently staying in one location, often with anticipation or expectation, until the desired event or person arrives.
  • toss sm or sth around The idiom "toss someone or something around" means to discuss or consider someone or something casually or temporarily, without giving much thought or commitment. It typically refers to exchanging ideas or opinions without a serious intention or decision-making process.
  • dictate (sth) to sm To "dictate (something) to someone" means to give orders or commands authoritatively and expect them to be followed without question or discussion. It implies exerting control or authority over someone and is often used to describe a dominating or bossy behavior.
  • stick sm with sm or sth The idiom "stick someone with someone or something" typically means to burden or impose a person with another person or something undesirable, often resulting in a difficult or unpleasant situation for the individual being "stuck." It can also refer to holding someone accountable for a particular task or responsibility that they may not want or may find inconvenient.
  • front for sm or sth The idiom "front for someone or something" refers to the act of concealing or disguising the true nature or purpose of someone or something. It typically involves presenting a false or misleading image to cover up illegal, secretive, or unsavory activities. It can also refer to a person or organization used as a façade or cover-up for a different objective.
  • aim to do sth The idiom "aim to do something" means to have a specific goal or objective in mind and to make efforts to achieve it. It implies that an individual is purposefully directing their actions towards a certain outcome or target.
  • indulge sm with sth The idiom "indulge someone with something" means to satisfy or gratify someone's desires or wishes by providing them with something they enjoy or desire. It typically implies giving in to someone's requests or pampering them in a way that brings them pleasure or happiness.
  • give sth a new lease of life The idiom "give something a new lease of life" means to revitalize or improve something, often by giving it new purpose, energy, or a fresh start. It refers to making something that was previously old, dull, or stagnant become lively, active, or exciting again.
  • think sth out The idiom "think sth out" means to carefully consider or plan something in a detailed and thoughtful manner before taking any action. It emphasizes the importance of thoroughly analyzing the situation and considering all possible options and consequences before making a decision or solving a problem.
  • scrape sth away (from sth) The idiom "scrape something away (from something)" means to remove something from a surface by applying pressure and friction, typically using a tool or one's own effort. It implies the act of physically separating one substance or material from another, often requiring force or persistence.
  • fluctuate with sth The idiomatic expression "fluctuate with sth" means to change or vary in response to another factor or condition. It refers to the tendency of something, such as a value, quantity, or behavior, to rise and fall in synchronization with the fluctuations or changes in something else, often a specific factor or condition.
  • set off (for sth) The idiom "set off (for sth)" typically means to begin a journey or to start going somewhere, usually with a clear destination or purpose in mind.
  • smuggle sm or sth across sth The idiom "smuggle sm or sth across sth" refers to the act of secretly or illegally moving something or someone across a border or through a restricted area without being detected or inspected by authorities or border control. It typically involves transporting prohibited or contraband items such as drugs, weapons, or illegal immigrants through smuggling routes or hidden methods to avoid detection.
  • play havoc with sth The idiom "play havoc with something" means to cause disorder, confusion, or destruction to something, often resulting in serious negative consequences. It implies that the actions or events have a disruptive and damaging impact on the normal functioning or order of something.
  • sympathize with sm (about sm or sth) The idiom "sympathize with someone (about something)" refers to understanding and sharing the feelings, emotions, or experiences of another person regarding a particular situation or topic. It often involves showing empathy, compassion, or support to someone who is going through a difficult or challenging circumstance.
  • fall on(to) sm or sth The idiom "fall on(to) someone or something" typically means to rely heavily on a person or thing for support or assistance, especially in a time of need or difficulty. It implies seeking help or support from someone or something.
  • squeeze sm or sth into sth The idiom "squeeze someone or something into something" means to fit or insert someone or something tightly into a confined or limited space. It refers to the act of trying to make something or someone fit when there is not enough room or time available.
  • relocate sm or sth in sth The idiom "relocate [someone or something] in [something]" refers to the act of moving or transferring someone or something to a different place or position within a given context or situation.
  • crash course (in sth) The idiom "crash course (in sth)" refers to a short and intense period of learning or instruction in a specific subject or skill. It implies that the learning process is condensed and accelerated, typically to acquire essential knowledge or skills in a timely manner.
  • pry sth from sm To pry something from someone refers to the act of extracting, obtaining, or getting something from someone who is reluctant to give it away or keeping it private. It can be used metaphorically and implies that the object or information requires effort, persistence, or persuasion to be acquired.
  • make allowances for sb/sth The idiom "make allowances for sb/sth" means to consider someone's or something's limitations or specific circumstances when judging their actions or behavior. It involves being understanding, lenient, or forgiving in order to account for the realities or constraints that might affect a person or situation.
  • sketch sth out To "sketch something out" means to provide a rough or basic outline or plan of something. It refers to quickly drawing or describing the main points or structure of an idea, concept, or design without going into extensive details. It is often used in creative or problem-solving contexts when trying to communicate a general direction or concept before diving into the specific details.
  • listen for sm or sth The idiom "listen for (someone or something)" means paying attention, staying alert, or being watchful for the presence, sound or occurrence of someone or something specific. It implies keenly focusing one's ears or attention to perceive a particular sound or indication.
  • take pains over sth The idiom "take pains over something" means to make a conscious effort to complete or do something with great care, diligence, and attention to detail. It indicates that someone is going to great lengths or making extra efforts to ensure the task or activity is done thoroughly and accurately.
  • come within a whisker of sth/doing sth The idiom "come within a whisker of sth/doing sth" means to come extremely close to achieving or experiencing something, but ultimately falling just short of it. It implies that a person or thing missed the desired outcome by a very small margin or narrow margin.
  • attribute sth to sb The idiom "attribute something to someone" means to assign or give credit to someone for a certain action, quality, skill, or characteristic. It can be used to acknowledge that a particular thing or trait is a result of someone's efforts, contributions, or influence.
  • brag about sm or sth The idiom "brag about someone or something" means to boast or excessively praise someone or something, often to gain attention or make oneself appear better or superior. It is used when a person or group constantly talks about their achievements, possessions, or qualities in order to impress or gain admiration from others.
  • transfer sth (from sm) (to sm else) The idiom "transfer something (from somewhere) (to somewhere else)" means to move or relocate something from one place to another. It usually refers to the physical act of moving an object or resource, but can also be used metaphorically for transferring responsibilities, skills, or ideas from one person or organization to another.
  • wait sth out To "wait something out" means to remain patient and endure a difficult or challenging situation until it improves or comes to an end. It implies staying steadfast or persistent in the face of uncertainty or adversity with the expectation that the circumstances will eventually change for the better.
  • look like sth the cat brought/dragged in The idiom "look like something the cat brought/dragged in" is used to describe someone's disheveled or unkempt appearance. It implies that the person looks messy, untidy, or worn out – as if they have been through a lot or have just experienced something unpleasant.
  • snap sth back The idiom "snap sth back" typically means to quickly and forcefully return something to its original position or state. This can refer to physical objects being bent or twisted and then swiftly brought back to their normal shape, or to situations where a person or thing is pushed out of alignment or balance and subsequently restored abruptly.
  • request sth of sm The idiom "request something of someone" means to ask someone to do or provide something. It implies seeking a favor, assistance, or specific action from the person being asked.
  • succeed in sth The idiom "succeed in sth" means to achieve a desired outcome or goal in a specific activity, endeavor, or field. It implies being able to accomplish something effectively or with positive results.
  • rebuke sm for sth The idiom "rebuke someone for something" means to criticize or reprimand someone sternly and disapprovingly for a particular action, behavior, or mistake that they have made.
  • puzzle sth out The idiom "puzzle something out" means to understand or solve something through careful thought, examination, or investigation. It refers to the act of trying to figure out or unravel a problem, mystery, or complex situation.
  • sell sth off The idiom "sell something off" refers to the act of selling a large quantity or all of something, usually assets, inventory, or possessions, often at a discounted price or in a rush. It implies the disposal of items quickly or forcefully, possibly due to the need for immediate cash, liquidation, or the desire to get rid of something in a swift manner.
  • peer in(to sth) To "peer into something" means to look into or examine something with great curiosity or care, often in order to gain a better understanding or to see more clearly. It implies a close and focused scrutiny of the subject being looked into.
  • fall in with sth The idiom "fall in with sth" typically means to accept or agree with something, often referring to adopting a particular opinion or behavior. It implies that one joins or aligns themselves with a specific viewpoint, group, or course of action.
  • lead with sth The idiom "lead with sth" means to begin or start something with a particular characteristic or action. It implies taking the initiative or forefront in a situation and setting the tone or direction for others to follow.
  • do sth off your own bat To do something off your own bat means to take action or make a decision without being told or influenced by others. It refers to acting independently and based on one's own initiative or instincts.
  • exhort sm to do sth The idiom "exhort someone to do something" means to strongly encourage, urge, or advise someone to take a particular action or behave in a certain way. It implies a persuasive or passionate appeal for someone to do something.
  • open doors (to sb/sth) The idiom "open doors (to sb/sth)" means to create opportunities or provide access to someone or something. It implies giving someone a chance, allowing them entry or granting them privileges. It can also refer to creating possibilities for the success or acceptance of something.
  • rest (up)on sth The idiom "rest (up)on sth" means to rely or depend heavily on something for support, assistance, or success. It suggests that the particular thing is crucial or pivotal for achieving a desired outcome.
  • pop back (for sth) The idiom "pop back (for sth)" means to quickly return to a place or location in order to retrieve or acquire something. It refers to a short, brief visit or detour taken for a specific purpose and then returning promptly.
  • get to first base (with sm or sth) The idiom "get to first base (with someone or something)" is usually used in a romantic or sexual context. It refers to making initial or modest progress towards achieving a goal, or establishing a basic level of understanding or closeness with someone. The expression is derived from the game of baseball, where advancing to first base indicates the beginning of forward progression.
  • with an eye to sth The idiom "with an eye to something" means to have a particular goal or intention in mind, often while considering or taking into account a specific thing or situation. It implies that someone is being attentive, aware, or mindful of a future objective or purpose when making decisions or taking actions.
  • sneeze on sm or sth The idiom "sneeze on someone or something" refers to the act of unintentionally spreading germs or negative consequences onto a person or thing. It is often used metaphorically to describe the unintended negative impact one has on others or their plans.
  • count sth out The idiom "count something out" means to exclude or eliminate something when making a calculation, decision, or selection. It implies disregarding or not including a particular option, possibility, or factor.
  • bring sm or sth out in droves The idiom "bring someone or something out in droves" means to attract or gather a large number of people or things. It implies that there is a significant, overwhelming, or enthusiastic response or turnout for a person, event, or product.
  • call sth down (to sm) The idiom "call something down to someone" typically means to request or summon something to a specific location or person. It can also refer to asking for someone's attention or involvement in a situation.
  • plow sth back into sth The idiom "plow something back into something" means reinvesting profits or earnings back into a business, project, or venture for further development or growth. It refers to the practice of using the money that would otherwise be distributed as dividends, salaries, or bonuses to finance and expand the existing operation. It is a strategic decision to allocate resources towards future endeavors instead of immediate financial gain.
  • be for sm or sth The idiom "be for someone or something" means to support, approve, or be in favor of someone or something. It indicates agreement or endorsement towards a person, idea, action, or proposal.
  • on the cusp (of sth) The idiom "on the cusp (of sth)" refers to being at the brink or a point of transition between two different states or situations. It implies being on the verge of something significant, usually implying being on the verge of success or major change.
  • dabble in sth The idiom "dabble in something" means to participate in or try one's hand at something without fully committing to it. It implies engaging in an activity or pursuing a hobby or interest without becoming deeply involved or gaining expertise in it. It often suggests a superficial or casual involvement rather than a serious or dedicated pursuit.
  • tear at sth The idiom "tear at something" generally means to grab or pull something vigorously or aggressively, often resulting in damaging or destroying it. It can also be used metaphorically to describe actions or behaviors that cause emotional or mental distress or agitation.
  • make application (to sm or sth) (for sth) The idiom "make application (to someone or something) (for something)" means to formally request or apply for something from a person or an organization. It involves submitting an official request or application in order to obtain or be considered for a particular thing or position.
  • gallop through sth The idiom "gallop through sth" typically means to complete or go over something rapidly or quickly, often without paying much attention to detail or without fully understanding it. It implies a fast and superficial approach to a task or subject.
  • come in for sth The idiom "come in for sth" generally means to receive or experience something, often in a negative or undesired sense. It refers to someone facing or undergoing a particular situation, outcome, consequence, criticism, or punishment.
  • make light of sth The idiom "make light of something" means to downplay or minimize the importance or seriousness of something. It refers to treating a matter as less significant or trivial than it actually is.
  • farm sth out The idiom "farm something out" means to delegate or send work or tasks to someone else, usually to an external or secondary party, rather than doing it oneself. It involves outsourcing or subcontracting certain activities to a different entity.
  • play along (with sb/sth) The idiom "play along (with sb/sth)" means to agree to participate or cooperate with someone or something, even if you may not fully believe or support it. It involves going along with someone's ideas, plans, or actions without openly disagreeing or challenging them. It can be used in social situations, games, or any other context where one person follows another's lead.
  • fall in (to sth) The idiom "fall in (to sth)" typically means to inadvertently or unintentionally begin or become involved in a situation or circumstance. It implies a lack of intention or control over the occurrence.
  • turn sth to one's advantage The idiom "turn something to one's advantage" means to use a situation or circumstance effectively in order to benefit oneself. It involves making the most out of a particular event or condition for personal gain or advantage.
  • hound sth out of sm The idiom "hound something out of someone" means to persistently and aggressively question, pressure, or intimidate someone until they disclose or reveal information or a particular outcome. It implies the use of relentless and dogged pursuit, similar to a hound (a type of dog) chasing its prey.
  • stow sth away The idiom "stow something away" refers to the act of hiding, storing, or packing something carefully in a designated place, often with the intention of keeping it safe or out of sight. It can also imply keeping something for future use or as a reserve.
  • curl sth up The idiom "curl sth up" means to position or make something into a tight, rounded, or curved shape. It can refer to physically making something curl or wrapping it around itself, or metaphorically referring to a process or action that leads to a compact or condensed form.
  • put sb/sth on a pedestal The idiom "put sb/sth on a pedestal" means to regard someone or something as perfect, flawless, or superior. It often describes the act of placing someone or something on an idealized level, attributing them with qualities or abilities that exceed reality.
  • groan sth out The idiom "groan something out" means to express something, usually a statement or words, with a deep, low, and disgruntled sound of complaint or dissatisfaction. It implies that the person is struggling or reluctant to vocalize their thoughts, often due to frustration, exhaustion, or annoyance.
  • barter for sth The idiom "barter for something" refers to the act of exchanging goods or services without the use of money. It typically involves negotiating and trading one item or service for another, relying solely on the value and agreement between the parties involved. It reflects a more traditional and direct mode of commerce, where items of equal perceived worth are swapped or traded, rather than using currency as a medium of exchange.
  • set about sth/doing sth The idiom "set about something/doing something" means to begin or start a task or action in a determined or organized manner.
  • leave oneself wide open for sth The idiom "leave oneself wide open for something" means to make oneself vulnerable, accessible, or exposed to a negative outcome or criticism. It implies that one is not taking necessary precautions or measures to protect oneself from potential harm or negative consequences.
  • have a clue (about sth) The idiom "have a clue (about sth)" means to possess knowledge or understanding about something, or to be aware of or informed about a particular topic or situation. It implies having the necessary information or insight to make sense of or navigate through a given circumstance. It can be used to indicate whether someone is knowledgeable or has any understanding regarding a specific subject matter.
  • come through sth (with flying colors) The idiom "come through something (with flying colors)" means to successfully complete or endure a challenging situation or task with great success or distinction. It implies a resounding victory or achievement, often exceeding expectations or standards.
  • sluice sth out The idiom "sluice sth out" means to flush or cleanse something vigorously by using a rush of water or a similar liquid. It typically refers to removing dirt, debris, or unwanted substances from an object or a space by washing or rinsing it thoroughly.
  • nurse sth along The idiom "nurse something along" means to carefully and patiently assist or support the progress, development, or recovery of something. It involves giving constant attention, care, or assistance to ensure the successful outcome or continuation of a project, task, or situation.
  • jump at sm or sth The idiom "jump at something" means to eagerly accept or seize an opportunity or offer without any hesitation. It implies a quick and enthusiastic response to a favorable situation or proposition.
  • rail at sm (about sth) The idiom "rail at someone (about something)" means to angrily and vehemently criticize or complain about something to someone. It involves expressing strong emotions and frustration towards the person being addressed.
  • scour sth out of sth The idiom "scour sth out of sth" refers to the act of removing, cleaning, or washing something thoroughly from a specific source or material. It suggests the use of intense effort, meticulousness, or diligence to completely and effectively eliminate the target substance or object.
  • put your back into sth The idiom "put your back into sth" means to make a great physical effort, exertion, or apply oneself vigorously to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies giving maximum effort, often involving physical strength or energy.
  • come down to (sth) The idiom "come down to (sth)" means that something ultimately depends on or is determined by a specific factor or set of circumstances. It implies that after considering various aspects, arguments, or situations, the final outcome or decision hinges on a particular element or consideration.
  • not have a monopoly on sth The idiom "not have a monopoly on sth" means that someone or something does not have exclusive control or ownership over a particular thing or idea. It implies that multiple individuals or entities have the ability or right to possess or utilize the same thing. It suggests a lack of monopoly or dominance in a specific area or field.
  • rant against sm or sth The idiom "rant against sm or sth" means to vehemently express one's opinions, frustrations, or criticisms about someone or something in an intense, exaggerated, and often lengthy manner. It involves passionately venting or complaining about a particular subject with little regard for logical arguments or counterpoints.
  • tunnel under sm or sth The idiom "tunnel under someone or something" means to sneak or bypass someone or something, typically in a secretive or deceptive manner. It implies finding an alternative route or method to avoid confrontation, detection, or interference. It can also be used metaphorically to describe finding a way to evade or overcome obstacles or challenges.
  • screw sm or sth up The idiom "screw someone or something up" means to ruin or make a mess out of someone or something. It implies making a mistake, causing damage, or causing a situation to become chaotic or dysfunctional.
  • vote sth into law The idiom "vote something into law" means to formally pass or approve legislation through a voting process in a legislative body, such as a parliament or congress, for it to become a binding law. It involves casting votes in favor of a proposed bill or statute, thereby granting it legal status and enforcement power.
  • knuckle under (to sm or sth) The idiom "knuckle under (to someone or something)" means to yield or submit to someone or something, often under pressure or coercion. It implies giving in or surrendering one's will or resistance.
  • be in no mood for sth/to do sth The idiom "be in no mood for something/to do something" means to not feel like doing or participating in something at a particular moment. It implies a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or willingness to engage in a specific activity or conversation due to various reasons such as being upset, tired, or uninterested.
  • chatter about sm or sth The idiom "chatter about" refers to the act of talking in an unimportant or casual manner, often without a specific purpose or deep understanding. It indicates informal conversation or gossip about someone or something.
  • chuck sm or sth away The idiom "chuck sm or sth away" means to throw something or someone away without concern, usually in a reckless or careless manner. It implies getting rid of something without considering its worth or value.
  • prepare sm or sth for sth The idiom "prepare sm or sth for sth" means to make someone or something ready or suitable for a particular purpose or event. It involves taking necessary actions or gathering necessary resources to ensure readiness or suitability in relation to a specific situation or requirement.
  • retail for sth The idiom "retail for sth" refers to the price at which a product or item is sold to the general public, typically through a retailer or store, as opposed to bulk or wholesale prices. It signifies the cost at which consumers can purchase the product individually, often including a markup from the manufacturer or distributor's cost.
  • muster out of sth The idiom "muster out of sth" refers to the process of formally leaving or exiting something, typically a military or organizational service. It often implies the completion of a specific time limit or commitment, such as the end of a military enlistment period, and incorporates the idea of mustering, or assembling, the necessary paperwork or formalities to officially leave the service.
  • flick sth off sm or sth The idiom "flick something off someone or something" means to remove or get rid of something, typically with a quick, light movement or gesture. It implies casually or dismissively dismissing or discarding something.
  • steam across sth The idiom "steam across something" typically means to move swiftly or energetically through a task, obstacle, or situation. It expresses the idea of advancing forcefully and making progress in a determined manner.
  • keep sth to a minimum The idiom "keep something to a minimum" means to control or limit something, often an undesirable situation or behavior, to the lowest possible extent or amount. It implies the action of reducing or restraining something from reaching a higher or excessive level.
  • moan with sth The idiom "moan with something" typically means to express dissatisfaction, complaint, or unhappiness about something. It implies that a person is audibly expressing their discontent or frustration with a particular situation or issue. The word "moan" in this context refers to a low, prolonged sound of complaint or dissatisfaction.
  • gaze around (at sm or sth) The idiom "gaze around (at sm or sth)" means to look or observe one's surroundings, usually in a slow, deliberate manner, with a sense of awe, curiosity, or interest. It suggests taking in the sights and details of the surroundings while being entirely engaged in the act of looking around.
  • get sm in(to) sth The idiom "get someone in(to) something" means to convince or persuade someone to participate or engage in a particular activity or situation. It can also refer to someone successfully gaining access or entry to a specific place or organization.
  • muck sth up The idiom "muck something up" means to spoil, ruin, or make a mess of something. It refers to causing errors, mistakes, or complications that lead to a failure or undesirable outcome.
  • scoop sth up The idiom "scoop something up" means to quickly grab or gather something, typically with a scooping motion or in a hasty manner. It is often used figuratively to describe the action of swiftly collecting information or gaining an advantage.
  • drink to sm or sth The idiom "drink to someone or something" means to raise a glass, typically filled with an alcoholic beverage, in honor or celebration of someone or something. It is a traditional and ceremonial act done to express good wishes, respect, or to commemorate a specific occasion.
  • lash at sm or sth The idiom "lash at someone or something" refers to the act of criticizing, attacking, or verbally assaulting someone or something fiercely and aggressively. It often implies using harsh words or strong language to express anger, frustration, or disapproval towards the target.
  • commit oneself on sth To commit oneself on something means to make a firm decision or promise to participate, support, or engage in a particular activity, cause, project, or idea. It implies a dedication or determination to pursue or invest in that specific thing.
  • dig sth out The idiom "dig sth out" means to search for and locate something that may be buried or hidden, often requiring effort and perseverance. It can be used both in a literal sense, such as digging through a pile of objects, as well as in a figurative sense, such as finding old or forgotten information or memories.
  • dish the dirt (on sb/sth) The idiom "dish the dirt (on sb/sth)" means to reveal or share embarrassing, sensitive, or scandalous information about someone or something. It refers to providing details or gossip that may tarnish someone's reputation or uncover secret details.
  • splatter sm or sth up The idiom "splatter sm or sth up" means to cause something, such as liquid or dirt, to be spread or scattered in a messy or random manner. It implies a violent or forceful action that results in a disorganized and messy outcome.
  • tear/rip sb/sth to shreds The idiom "tear/rip sb/sth to shreds" means to criticize or attack someone or something forcefully and relentlessly. It implies subjecting someone or something to severe criticism or harsh treatment, often resulting in a complete dismantling or destruction of their reputation, argument, or physical form.
  • hit sm up (for sth) The idiom "hit sm up (for sth)" typically means to ask someone for something, usually in a direct or straightforward manner. It refers to approaching someone with a request, often involving a favor, help, or assistance. The term "hit up" implies seeking or contacting someone, while "for sth" indicates the purpose or intention behind the contact. Overall, it means to approach someone and ask for something straightforwardly.
  • ornament sth with sth The idiom "ornament something with something" means to adorn or decorate something with additional embellishments or decorative elements. It implies adding something visually appealing or enhancing the beauty or appearance of something by adding ornamental details.
  • scoot over to sm or sth The idiom "scoot over to sm or sth" means to move or shift one's position in order to make room for someone or something. It is often used when there is limited space available and the speaker is asking or suggesting someone to make space by moving aside or making room.
  • rush sth into print The idiom "rush something into print" means to quickly publish or release something without careful consideration or review, often resulting in errors or incomplete information being disseminated. It implies hasty or impulsive actions in sharing or publicizing something, usually in written or printed form.
  • lose sight of sth 2 The idiom "lose sight of something" can mean to forget or neglect something, especially when one becomes too focused on other matters or distracted. It suggests a lack of attention or disregard for something important.
  • (a) nail in the coffin of sth The idiom "(a) nail in the coffin of sth" refers to an action or event that causes or contributes to the complete failure or demise of a particular thing, idea, or situation. It usually emphasizes the final, decisive factor leading to the end or downfall of something. It can be used metaphorically to describe a detrimental act or development that seals the fate of a particular matter.
  • rattle around in sth The idiom "rattle around in something" refers to the sound or sensation of something loosely moving or knocking about inside a space. It can be used both literally and figuratively. Literally, it denotes an object moving or bouncing within a container. Figuratively, it suggests that something is feeling out of place or uncomfortable in a particular setting or situation.
  • form from sth The idiom "form from sth" can have different interpretations depending on the context. One possible definition of this idiom could be: - To originate or come into existence as a result of something. For example: - "The idea for the new product formed from feedback received from customers." - "Their friendship formed from their shared interests and hobbies." In these instances, the idiom implies that something new or a specific outcome has developed or originated due to the influence or impact of something else.
  • bail sm or sth out The idiom "bail someone or something out" refers to the act of providing financial assistance or support to help someone or something in a difficult situation, typically involving crisis or financial troubles. It can also involve rescuing someone or something from a problematic or unfavorable circumstance.
  • set sth to music The idiom "set something to music" means to compose or create a musical work that accompanies or enhances a particular written piece, such as lyrics, words, or a poem. It involves the process of creating a melody, harmonies, and possibly adding instrumentation to give musical expression to a piece of literature or text.
  • fair game (for sth) The idiom "fair game (for sth)" means that someone or something is considered permissible or suitable to be targeted or treated in a particular way, often in a competitive or confrontational context. It implies that the person or thing is open to being pursued, criticized, or harmed without any restrictions or objections.
  • amuse sm with sth The idiom "amuse someone with something" means to entertain or provide enjoyment to someone through a particular thing or activity. It implies engaging or diverting someone's attention in a way that brings pleasure or lightheartedness.
  • dress sm or sth up The idiom "dress something up" or "dress something/someone up as something" means to make something or someone appear more attractive, special, or fancy than they actually are by adding extra decorations, accessories, or embellishments. This can apply to physical objects, ideas, or individuals. It often implies putting effort into making something or someone appear better, often for a specific purpose or occasion.
  • regale sm with sth The idiom "regale someone with something" means to entertain, delight, or captivate someone with something, usually by providing something enjoyable, fascinating, or amusing. It can also imply sharing or offering something special or extravagant to someone.
  • pay sth up The idiom "pay sth up" means to pay the full amount owed for something, especially in one payment or installment. It refers to settling a debt or making a complete payment for goods or services.
  • scratch sm or sth up The idiom "scratch sm or sth up" means to damage, mar, or make surface imperfections on something or someone. It can also refer to hastily producing or creating something in a makeshift or unpolished manner.
  • pick up the tab (for sth) The idiom "pick up the tab (for sth)" means to pay or cover the cost or expenses of something, typically a meal, drink, or other collective expense incurred by oneself or others. It implies taking financial responsibility for the incurred expenses.
  • trim sth from sth The idiom "trim something from something" means to remove or cut off a small or unnecessary part of something, typically to improve or make it more concise. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • denude sm or sth of sth The idiom "denude someone or something of something" means to strip or remove something, usually referring to the removal of clothing, covering, or resources. It implies a complete or thorough removal.
  • scrape together sth The idiom "scrape together sth" means to gather or accumulate something, usually money or resources, often in a limited or difficult situation, through great effort or desperation. It implies the act of collecting or acquiring something little by little, often from various sources, in order to achieve a specific goal or satisfy a particular need, despite challenging circumstances.
  • pop sth on(to) sth The idiom "pop something on(to) something" means to place or attach something quickly or casually onto something else. It often implies doing so in a simple and effortless manner, without much thought or precision.
  • refuse sth to sm The idiom "refuse something to someone" means to deny or withhold something from someone, typically in a deliberate or intentional manner. It implies the act of not allowing or granting someone access to or ownership of something they desire or request.
  • glide away (from sm or sth) The idiom "glide away (from sm or sth)" means to leave a place or situation effortlessly and smoothly, usually without attracting attention or causing disruptions. It suggests a graceful and seamless departure.
  • recount sth to sm The idiom "recount something to someone" means to tell or relate a story, event, or experience to someone in a detailed manner. It involves sharing or narrating an account of something to provide a clear and comprehensive description.
  • sub for sm or sth The idiom "sub for Sm or sth" means to act as a substitute or replacement for someone or something. It is often used when an individual is unable to fulfill a particular role, duty, or function, and another person is enlisted to temporarily take their place.
  • put away sth The idiom "put away something" typically means to store or place something in its designated location or to tidy up by returning items to their proper places. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate the act of saving or setting aside money or resources for future use.
  • roll in sth The idiom "roll in something" typically refers to having an excessive or abundant quantity of something, often relating to money, wealth, or resources. It implies that someone possesses or is enjoying a large amount or an overwhelming surplus of the mentioned thing.
  • waste sth on sm or sth The idiom "waste something on someone or something" means to use or spend something, such as time, energy, or resources, on someone or something that is not deserving, appreciative, or capable of benefiting from it. It implies that the effort or resources put into that person or thing are in vain or unproductive.
  • penalize sm for sth The idiom "penalize someone for something" means to impose a punishment, penalty, or disadvantage on someone as a consequence of their actions or behavior. It refers to holding someone accountable for a particular action or behavior by subjecting them to negative consequences or penal measures.
  • towel sm or sth off The idiom "towel sm or sth off" refers to the act of using a towel to remove moisture or liquid from something or someone. It implies the action of drying or wiping off any wetness or residue using a towel.
  • lose track (of sm or sth) The idiom "lose track (of someone or something)" means to be unable to keep a record of or accurately remember the details or whereabouts of someone or something. It implies a sense of losing knowledge or awareness of a person, object, or situation due to lack of attention, time, or effort.
  • look for sth The idiom "look for something" means to search or seek for something with the intention of finding it. It refers to actively trying to locate or find a specific item, answer, solution, or person. It can be used when physically searching for an object or when trying to obtain information or solutions.
  • churn sth out The idiom "churn sth out" means to produce something rapidly or in large quantities, usually referring to work or creative output. It implies a high rate of production or creation with a focus on quantity rather than quality.
  • take a long, hard look at sth The idiom "take a long, hard look at something" means to carefully and critically examine or evaluate something. It suggests the need for a thorough and honest assessment of a situation, usually in order to gain a better understanding or make an informed decision.
  • sag under sth The idiom "sag under something" typically means to become weak or give way under the weight or pressure of something. It can be used both in a literal and figurative sense.
  • reject sm or sth out of hand To "reject something out of hand" means to dismiss or refuse something immediately and without consideration or hesitation. It suggests a quick and firm rejection without any open-mindedness or willingness to entertain the idea or proposal.
  • parcel sm or sth out The idiom "parcel sm or sth out" refers to the act of dividing or distributing something, usually in small portions or quantities, to different people or places. It implies the act of sharing or dispersing something among various recipients.
  • rule in favor of sm or sth The idiom "rule in favor of someone or something" refers to a decision made by a judge or an authority figure in support or agreement with a particular person or thing. It means that the person or thing in question is being granted a favorable decision or outcome in a legal or authoritative context.
  • pin one's faith on sm or sth The idiom "pin one's faith on someone or something" means to place complete trust or reliance on someone or something. It implies that an individual has strong confidence or belief in a particular person, idea, or possibility.
  • make a secret of sth The idiom "make a secret of something" means to keep something undisclosed or concealed from others. It implies that one intentionally hides or keeps certain information private, not openly sharing it with others.
  • keep sth on an even keel "Keep something on an even keel" is an idiom that means to maintain stability, balance, or equilibrium in a certain situation or aspect of life. It suggests keeping things steady and avoiding extreme fluctuations or disruptions. It can be used to describe efforts to maintain peaceful relationships, consistent progress, or emotional stability.
  • muse over sm or sth The idiom "muse over someone or something" means to calmly and silently think about a person, an idea, or a situation in a deep or prolonged manner. It implies a state of introspection or contemplation where one dwells upon a subject, often with curiosity or fascination.
  • spatter on sm or sth The idiom "spatter on someone or something" means to scatter, sprinkle, or splash small drops or particles of a liquid or substance onto someone or something, often unintentionally or in a messy manner. It usually refers to the action of causing small, fleeting marks or stains on a surface or person.
  • butt into sth The idiom "butt into something" means to intrude or interfere in someone else's conversation, business, or affairs in an unwanted or meddling manner. It suggests an unwelcome intrusion into a particular situation or conversation.
  • spring (up)on (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "spring (up) on (someone, something, or an animal)" means to approach or surprise someone or something suddenly and unexpectedly. It typically implies a quick and sometimes aggressive action, often catching the person or thing off guard. It can also imply a sudden and intense attack or confrontation.
  • take charge (of sth) The idiom "take charge (of sth)" means to assume control, responsibility, or leadership over something. It refers to actively taking control of a situation, project, or task and making decisions or giving directions. It implies becoming the person in charge or having the authority to make important decisions and take necessary actions.
  • impute sth to sm or sth To impute something to someone or something means to attribute or assign it as a source or cause. It suggests holding someone or something responsible or accountable for a particular action, quality, or outcome, often based on perceived evidence or inference.
  • take (great) pains (to do sth) The idiom "take (great) pains (to do sth)" means to make a considerable effort or take extra care to do something correctly, thoroughly, or perfectly. It implies going to great lengths, enduring hardships, or paying close attention to details in order to achieve a desired outcome or objective.
  • make a mockery of sth The idiom "make a mockery of sth" means to ridicule or belittle something, often through actions or behavior that portray it as foolish, worthless, or without value. It implies turning something serious or respectable into something absurd or trivial.
  • owe it to sb to do sth The idiom "owe it to someone to do something" means that someone has a moral or ethical obligation to do a particular action or fulfill a responsibility towards someone else. It implies that the action or responsibility is a way to show gratitude, respect, or to repay a debt towards that person.
  • wake (up) from sth The idiom "wake (up) from something" means to suddenly become aware or conscious again after being unconscious, asleep, or in a state of unawareness. It can be used both in a literal sense, referring to physical awakening, as well as figuratively, pertaining to becoming mentally or emotionally alert after a period of disengagement or unawareness.
  • come to sth The idiom "come to something" is typically used in the context of realizing or understanding something. It means to arrive at a certain point or state, often through a process of contemplation, introspection, or enlightenment. It can refer to reaching a decision, conclusion, or realization about a particular situation or topic.
  • tell the difference between (sm and sm else) (or sth and sth else) The idiom "tell the difference between (sm and sm else) (or sth and sth else)" means to be able to distinguish or recognize the distinct characteristics, qualities, or features of two similar things or concepts. It refers to having the ability to perceive or understand the variations or disparities between two similar things or ideas.
  • ease sm or sth along The idiom "ease (someone or something) along" means to help, encourage, or assist someone or something to move or progress smoothly and without difficulty or delay. It implies providing support or assistance to make a process or task easier or more efficient.
  • rattle on (about sm or sth) The idiom "rattle on (about someone or something)" means to talk in a continuous and often boring or irrelevant manner about a particular person or topic. It refers to someone who is rambling or speaking at length without pausing or considering the interest of the listener.
  • lay emphasis on sth The idiom "lay emphasis on sth" means to give special importance, attention, or focus to something. It refers to highlighting or emphasizing a particular topic, idea, or aspect to make it more prominent or noticeable.
  • hurry sm or sth up The idiom "hurry someone or something up" means to expedite or accelerate the pace or progress of someone or something. It implies a desire for increased speed or efficiency in completing a task or reaching a goal.
  • hammer sth home The idiom "hammer something home" means to emphasize or reinforce a point or message by repeating it forcefully and repeatedly until it is fully understood or accepted by others. It is often used when trying to make sure that important information or ideas are not overlooked or ignored.
  • fold sth over The idiom "fold sth over" typically means to bend or crease something in half or in a specific manner, usually by bringing one section of a material or object onto another section to create a fold. This action may involve folding a piece of paper, fabric, or a similar materials in a way that creates a new shape or aligns the edges together.
  • tear sth apart The idiom "tear something apart" refers to the act of criticizing, scrutinizing, or analyzing something or someone in a highly critical and thorough manner. It implies disassembling or breaking something down into smaller parts to fully examine and evaluate it, often with a negative tone.
  • audition sm for sth The idiom "audition someone for something" refers to the process of assessing or evaluating someone's suitability, skills, or talent for a particular role, position, or opportunity. It usually involves a formal or informal audition or performance test to determine if the person is capable or qualified for the given task or role.
  • pay homage to sm or sth To "pay homage to someone or something" means to show deep respect, honor, or admiration towards them/it. It implies acknowledging the significance, importance, or influence that the person or thing holds. It often involves expressing reverence, paying tribute, or showing appreciation for their contributions, achievements, or qualities.
  • risk one's neck (to do sth) The idiom "risk one's neck (to do sth)" means to take a great or significant risk in order to achieve a particular goal or accomplish something. It implies putting oneself in potential danger or harm's way in pursuit of a certain objective or undertaking.
  • deliver sm or sth to sm or sth The idiom "deliver something to someone or something" means to transport or bring something to a specific person or place. It often implies the act of completing a task or fulfilling a responsibility by providing the intended item or message to the designated recipient.
  • tip sth over The idiom "tip something over" refers to the act of causing something to fall or turn upside down, often accidentally or unintentionally. It can also be used metaphorically to describe causing disruption or chaos to a situation or plan.
  • send sm or sth up The idiom "send someone or something up" typically means to mock or imitate someone or something, often in a humorous or satirical way. It refers to the act of parodying or making fun of a person, thing, or situation through imitation.
  • trick sm into (doing) sth The idiom "trick someone into (doing) something" means to deceive or manipulate someone in order to persuade them or make them do something they may not have been willing to do otherwise. It refers to using cunning or clever tactics to convince or fool someone into taking a specific action or accepting a particular situation.
  • slip off sth The idiom "slip off something" means to remove or take off an item quickly and easily, often without being noticed or causing much disturbance. It implies a smooth and seamless action of taking off something swiftly.
  • allow sm or sth into a place The idiom "allow someone or something into a place" means to give permission for someone or something to enter or gain access to a particular location or area. It signifies granting an individual or an object the right to be present or admitted to a specific space.
  • take sth for granted The idiom "take something for granted" means to not appreciate or value something or someone properly, often because it is always available or present. It refers to the act of assuming that something will always be there or happen, without realizing its true worth or considering the possibility of losing it.
  • wipe out (sb/sth) The idiom "wipe out (sb/sth)" refers to completely destroying or eliminating someone or something. It can also mean causing someone or something to fail or suffer a great loss.
  • sth is not a bed of roses The idiom "something is not a bed of roses" means that a situation is difficult, filled with challenges, or unpleasant. It suggests that there are obstacles, hardships, or hardships involved in a particular task or situation.
  • eat (away) at sth The idiom "eat (away) at something" means to cause gradual damage, erosion, or deterioration to something over time. It can also refer to causing persistent worry, anxiety, or guilt.
  • luck into sth The idiom "luck into something" means to unexpectedly or coincidentally come across or acquire something valuable, fortunate, or advantageous, often without much effort or intention. It suggests a situation where one's good luck or fortune plays a significant role in obtaining something desirable.
  • brood about sm or sth The idiom "brood about something" means to continuously think or worry about something, often in a negative or obsessive manner. It refers to a state of being preoccupied or fixated on a particular issue or problem, often to the point of causing distress or anxiety.
  • tease sth out of sth The idiom "tease something out of something" means to extract, obtain, or reveal information or a specific result through persistent effort, questioning, or careful investigation. It is often used when describing the process of obtaining hidden or difficult-to-reach information or understanding by gradually coaxing or drawing it out.
  • deflect sth away from sm or sth The idiom "deflect something away from someone or something" means to redirect or divert something, such as attention, blame, or criticism, in order to protect or shield someone or something from its negative impact. It involves shifting the focus or responsibility onto a different target or subject, thus avoiding any potential harm or consequences.
  • line up sth The idiom "line up something" means to organize, arrange, or prepare something in advance, often in regards to a planned event, activity, or task. It implies putting things in order or securing commitments to ensure everything is ready.
  • delight in sm or sth The idiom "delight in someone or something" means to take great pleasure, enjoyment, or satisfaction in someone or something. It indicates a feeling of joy or delight that one experiences towards a particular person, thing, or activity.
  • plump sth up The idiom "plump sth up" means to make something fuller, fleshier, or more voluminous. It is often used when referring to making something, such as a cushion or pillow, more comfortable and soft by adding more stuffing or filling. It can also be used metaphorically to describe making something stronger, more substantial, or more impressive by adding more content, details, or weight to it.
  • climb down (from sth) The idiom "climb down (from sth)" refers to the act of retracting or changing one's previously rigid or stubborn stance on a matter. It means to abandon or withdraw from a previously held position or viewpoint, usually in response to pressure, criticism, or a realization that it was incorrect or untenable. It implies a shift in position or a willingness to compromise.
  • cut sb/sth loose The idiom "cut sb/sth loose" means to set someone or something free or release them from an obligation or connection. It can also refer to abruptly ending a relationship or association with someone or something, often to distance oneself or avoid further involvement or harm.
  • draft sm for sth The idiom "draft sm for sth" typically means to create or write something, especially a document or text, with the intention of it being used for a specific purpose or situation. It often refers to the initial preparation or rough version of something that will undergo further revisions or edits.
  • in the name of sth The idiom "in the name of something" means to act or behave on behalf of or under the authority of that particular thing. It implies that the action being taken is justified or carried out with utmost dedication and commitment to the cause or purpose represented by the mentioned entity.
  • have your (fair) share of sth The idiom "have your (fair) share of sth" means to experience or possess an appropriate or expected amount of something, typically in a negative or burdensome context. It suggests that one has received an amount that is proportionate to what others have received, emphasizing fairness or equality.
  • jibe with sth The idiom "jibe with something" means to be in agreement, accord, or alignment with something else. It implies that the mentioned thing or idea supports or corresponds to another thing or idea.
  • illuminate sth with sth The idiom "illuminate something with something" typically means to shed light upon or provide clarity on a particular topic or issue by using or presenting additional information, insights, or evidence. It suggests bringing greater understanding or making something clearer by utilizing a specific element or resource.
  • communicate sth to sm The idiom "communicate something to someone" means to convey or share information, thoughts, or ideas to another person in an effective and understandable manner. It involves the act of expressing or transmitting a message or intention so that it is comprehended and received by the intended recipient.
  • what's the drill for sth? The idiom "what's the drill for sth?" refers to asking for instructions or guidelines on how to handle or proceed with a specific task, situation, or activity. It implies wanting to know the proper procedure or protocol in order to accomplish something efficiently or correctly.
  • slave away (at sth) The idiom "slave away (at sth)" means to work extremely hard or put in a lot of effort on something, often for an extended period of time, without receiving appropriate recognition or reward. It implies a sense of being trapped in laborious work, similar to the conditions of a slave.
  • cut down (on sth) The idiom "cut down (on sth)" means to reduce or decrease the amount, frequency, or intensity of something. It is often used when referring to minimizing or moderating one's consumption, habits, or behaviors.
  • nuzzle up against sm or sth The idiom "nuzzle up against someone or something" refers to a physical action where a person or an animal presses or snuggles their face affectionately against someone or something in a gentle and cozy manner. It signifies a display of intimacy, comfort, or affection.
  • unite in sth The idiom "unite in something" means to come together or join forces for a common purpose or objective. It implies that individuals or groups set aside their differences or disagreements to collaborate towards a shared goal or to work towards a common cause.
  • sucker sm into sth The idiom "sucker someone into something" refers to deceiving or tricking someone into doing something, usually to their disadvantage or for the benefit of the person doing the deceiving. It implies that the person being deceived is gullible or easily manipulated.
  • take note (of sb/sth) The idiom "take note (of sb/sth)" means to pay attention to or be aware of someone or something. It implies giving importance or recognizing the significance of the person or thing being referred to.
  • walk right into sth The idiom "walk right into something" means to unintentionally find oneself in a difficult or awkward situation. It implies that the person did not anticipate or foresee the potential complications or problems resulting from their actions.
  • go after sm, sth The idiom "go after someone or something" means to pursue, chase, or actively seek out a person, object, or goal. It implies making efforts or taking actions to obtain or achieve something that one desires. It can refer to physical pursuit or metaphorical pursuit, such as going after a promotion, going after a romantic interest, or going after a dream.
  • go by the book/do sth by the book The idiom "go by the book" or "do something by the book" means to follow rules, procedures, or guidelines strictly and exactly as they are written or prescribed. It implies adhering to established norms or conventions in a thorough and meticulous manner without deviating from the instructions or regulations provided.
  • preserve sth for sm or sth The idiom "preserve something for someone or something" means to protect, maintain, or safeguard something specifically for a particular person or purpose. It implies ensuring that the specified thing remains in good condition or availability for its intended use or recipient. It can relate to physical objects, relationships, opportunities, or any valuable asset.
  • plunge sth into sm or sth The idiom "plunge something into something or someone" typically means to forcefully or abruptly thrust an object or concept into a particular situation or individual. It implies a sudden or drastic action that introduces a new element or changes the course of events.
  • have sth up one's sleeve The idiom "have something up one's sleeve" refers to the act of having a secret plan, idea, or solution to a problem that is not yet revealed or known to others. It indicates that someone is prepared with an alternative or hidden strategy to achieve a particular outcome.
  • joke (with sm) (about sm or sth) The idiom "joke (with someone) (about something or someone)" means to engage in light-hearted banter, humor, or playful teasing with someone while focusing on a particular topic or person. It typically involves exchanging funny remarks or witty comments to amuse each other and create a lighthearted atmosphere.
  • entrust sm with sm or sth The idiom "entrust someone with someone or something" means to give someone the responsibility or task of taking care of someone or something. It implies that the person being entrusted is trusted with the well-being or management of the other person or thing.
  • maneuver for sth The idiom "maneuver for something" refers to attempting to manipulate or position oneself strategically in order to gain or achieve something, typically in a competitive or challenging situation. It often involves clever or calculated actions aimed at securing an advantage or accomplishing a specific objective.
  • want for sth The idiom "want for sth" means to lack or be in need of something. It refers to the feeling of desiring or needing something that is currently absent or unavailable.
  • poke a hole in sth The idiom "poke a hole in something" means to find a flaw or weakness in an argument, theory, or explanation. It implies that by questioning or examining something closely, you are able to reveal its shortcomings or inconsistencies. It can also refer to the act of undermining or disproving someone's claims or beliefs.
  • lunge at sm or sth The idiom "lunge at someone or something" refers to making a sudden, aggressive, and determined movement toward someone or something with intent to attack, catch, or grasp them forcefully. It implies a swift and forceful action, often driven by strong emotions like anger or eagerness.
  • dispense with sth To "dispense with something" means to get rid of, forego, or eliminate something that is considered unnecessary or not needed. It implies the act of eliminating or doing away with something in a practical or straightforward manner.
  • jump at sth The idiom "jump at something" means to eagerly accept or seize an opportunity or offer without hesitation. It implies a quick and enthusiastic response to a chance or proposition.
  • extend (from sth) (to sth) The idiom "extend (from sth) (to sth)" means to continue or stretch from one thing to another, often referring to physical or geographical expansion or the progression of an idea, concept, or influence. It implies a connection, continuity, or expansion between two related elements.
  • look like sth The idiom "look like sth" is used to describe the appearance or resemblance of something or someone. It means that the subject has similar characteristics, features, or qualities to what is being compared. It is often used to make a visual or descriptive comparison.
  • look after sm or sth The idiom "look after someone or something" means to take care of or be responsible for the well-being, protection, or welfare of someone or something. It implies providing support, attention, supervision, or assistance to ensure their needs or interests are met.
  • impress sth into sth The idiom "impress sth into sth" typically refers to forcefully or firmly embedding or engraving something into another material or surface.
  • crowd sth with sm or sth The idiom "crowd something with someone or something" means to fill or pack a space or place with a large number of people or things, often causing it to become overcrowded or too full.
  • come to grips with sm or sth The idiom "come to grips with someone or something" means to finally accept, understand, or deal with a difficult or challenging situation, person, or problem. It implies facing and accepting the reality of a situation and actively taking necessary actions to cope with it.
  • jack up sth The idiom "jack up sth" means to raise or increase the level, price, or intensity of something. It is often used when referring to raising the prices of goods or services, increasing the volume or intensity of a sound, or raising a vehicle using a mechanical device called a jack.
  • fall prey to sb/sth The idiom "fall prey to sb/sth" means to become a victim or to be harmed, deceived, or influenced negatively by someone or something. It suggests being helpless or vulnerable to the actions or influence of another person or a certain situation.
  • chip sth away (from sth) The idiom "chip sth away (from sth)" means to gradually reduce or diminish something by continuously removing small pieces or amounts from it. It can be used in a literal sense, referring to physically chipping away at an object, or in a metaphorical sense, indicating a gradual process of reducing or eroding something, such as a person's confidence or a company's profits.
  • disengage sth from sth The idiom "disengage something from something" means to detach, separate, or remove something from another thing. It typically refers to releasing or unhooking a part or object from a larger component or whole.
  • have an impact on sm or sth The idiom "have an impact on someone or something" means to create an effect or influence on someone or something, resulting in a noticeable change or outcome. It implies that whatever action or event occurred has made a significant difference or left a lasting impression.
  • give voice to sth To "give voice to something" means to express or convey something, such as an idea, opinion, or emotion, usually in a public or vocal manner. It implies speaking up or giving expression to a particular thought or feeling that may have been previously silent or unheard.
  • a dead ringer for sb/sth The idiom "a dead ringer for sb/sth" refers to someone or something that looks exactly like another person or thing. It suggests that the resemblance is so striking that it is difficult to tell them apart.
  • expurgate sth from sth The idiom "expurgate sth from sth" means to remove or delete objectionable, offensive, or inappropriate content or material from something, usually a text, document, or piece of writing. It refers to the act of censoring or purging offensive or unsuitable elements to make it more acceptable or suitable for a particular audience or purpose.
  • hinder sm from sth The idiom "hinder someone from something" means to create an obstacle or difficulty that prevents someone from achieving or having something. It implies the act of causing delays, slowing down progress, or impeding someone's ability to accomplish a specific task or obtain a particular goal.
  • dispossess sm of sth The idiom "dispossess someone of something" means to take away or deprive someone of their possessions, rights, or ownership of something. It refers to forcibly removing or making someone surrender what they own or have a claim to.
  • put/set sth in train The idiom "put/set something in train" means to initiate or start something. It is typically used when referring to beginning a process, plan, or series of actions to achieve a particular goal. It implies taking the necessary steps or actions to ensure that something is set in motion or underway.
  • drone (sth) out To "drone (something) out" is an idiomatic expression that means to speak in a monotonous, dull, or uninteresting manner, usually for an extended period of time. It suggests a lack of enthusiasm, energy, or variation in speech, often resulting in the listener losing interest or becoming bored. This expression can also be used to describe someone speaking at length without much purpose or relevance.
  • map sth out To "map something out" means to plan or design something in detail before beginning it. It involves creating a strategic plan, often taking into account various factors and potential obstacles, to ensure a successful outcome. This idiom is commonly used when referring to the process of organizing or outlining a project, task, or any complex endeavor.
  • arouse sm from sth The idiom "arouse someone from something" means to awaken or stir up someone from a particular state or condition. It can refer to waking someone up from sleep, interrupting their concentration or focus, or prompting them to act or react to a situation.
  • as well as sm or sth The idiom "as well as [someone or something]" is used to indicate additional people or things that are included in a list or group. It implies that the mentioned person or thing, along with others, are all part of a particular category or set. It emphasizes the inclusion of multiple or supplementary elements.
  • throw on sth The idiom "throw on (something)" typically means to quickly put on or wear something, often in a careless or relaxed manner, without paying much attention to one's appearance or the suitability of the clothing for the occasion. It implies a casual and effortless action of putting on clothes without much consideration.
  • pull off sth The idiom "pull off something" means to successfully accomplish or achieve something, often despite difficulty or challenge. It implies being able to complete a task or action skillfully or skillfully execute a plan despite potential obstacles or doubts.
  • beam sb/sth up The idiom "beam sb/sth up" is a reference to the popular science fiction TV series Star Trek, in which characters are transported or teleported from one location to another using an advanced form of technology called a "transporter." In a broader sense, the idiom means to transport or move someone or something from one place to another, often implying a quick and effortless transfer.
  • walk all over sm or sth The idiom "walk all over someone or something" means to dominate, control, or take advantage of someone or something without opposition or resistance. It refers to a person or thing being treated poorly or being used by someone in a manipulative or oppressive manner. It implies that the person or thing being walked all over lacks the ability or willingness to stand up for themselves or assert their rights.
  • lay sm or sth in(to) sth The idiom "lay something in(to) something" means to store or stock up on something for future use or consumption. It often refers to acquiring a supply of goods or provisions in advance.
  • chuckle about sm or sth The idiom "chuckle about something" means to laugh quietly or mirthfully about something. It is often used to describe a situation where someone finds amusement or humor in a particular person or thing, and expresses it through chuckling.
  • chop (sm or sth) (up) (into sth) The idiom "chop (sm or sth) (up) (into sth)" means to cut something, whether it be a person, object, or idea, into smaller pieces or parts. It can also refer to breaking down something into more manageable or organized components or sections. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe the act of dissecting or analyzing a complex situation or concept.
  • advise sm about sm or sth The idiom "advise someone about something" means to provide guidance, suggestions, or recommendations to someone regarding a specific topic, issue, or situation. It implies offering knowledge, expertise, or counsel to help someone make informed decisions or take appropriate actions.
  • suit sm or sth to sth The idiom "suit someone or something to something" means to adjust or modify someone or something to fit a specific purpose, situation, or requirement. It involves making changes or adaptations to ensure that someone or something is suitable or appropriate for a particular context or environment.
  • quit over sm or sth The idiom "quit over sm or sth" means to resign or leave a job or position because of a specific issue or situation that one finds unacceptable or intolerable. It implies that the reason or circumstance is significant enough to prompt someone to end their association with a particular job or organization.
  • wedge sm or sth (in) between people or things The idiom "wedge someone or something (in) between people or things" means to forcefully insert or position someone or something, often causing division or discomfort within a group or situation. It implies creating a barrier or causing conflict between individuals or objects by placing an element that becomes an obstacle or source of tension.
  • keep sm or sth away (from sm or sth) The idiom "keep someone or something away (from someone or something)" means to prevent or avoid the interaction, presence, or proximity of someone or something. It implies maintaining a distance or ensuring that there is no contact or association between the two mentioned entities.
  • yield sm or sth (over) (to sm or sth) The idiom "yield (something) (over) (to someone)" refers to the act of giving up or surrendering something to another person or entity. It implies handing over control, power, authority, or possession of something willingly.
  • rope sm into sth The idiom "rope someone into something" typically means to persuade or compel someone to participate in or be involved in an activity or a situation, often through manipulation or coercion. It implies convincing or coercing someone to take part in something they may not have initially wanted or planned to do.
  • write in (sth) The idiom "write in (sth)" typically means to submit something in writing, such as a letter, form, or suggestion. It refers to providing written feedback, input, or communication rather than verbal or direct interaction.
  • sock sth away The idiom "sock sth away" means to save or store something, often referring to money or valuables, in a secure or secret place for future use or safekeeping. It implies the act of accumulating or setting aside resources for later use or emergencies.
  • be a far cry from sth The idiom "be a far cry from something" means that there is a significant difference or gap between two things, usually in terms of quality, appearance, or expectation. It suggests that the present situation or thing being referred to is not similar or comparable to something else that is typically considered better or more desirable.
  • credit sm or sth with sth The idiom "credit someone or something with something" means to attribute or ascribe a certain quality, achievement, or success to someone or something. It implies acknowledging that someone or something is responsible for a particular outcome or deserves recognition for a specific action.
  • slide down from sth The idiom "slide down from sth" typically refers to a situation where someone gradually descends or moves downwards from a higher position, often in a metaphorical sense. It implies a decline or deterioration in a person's or situation's status, reputation, or state. It can also represent a decrease in productivity, efficiency, or success.
  • lick sm or sth into shape The idiom "lick someone or something into shape" means to improve or refine someone or something, often through careful training or instruction. It refers to the act of bringing someone or something to a desired state or condition, typically through efforts to rectify flaws or shortcomings.
  • go about sth/doing sth The idiom "go about something/doing something" means to proceed with a task, activity, or plan in a deliberate or methodical manner. It implies taking necessary steps or actions to accomplish a specific objective or complete a particular task. It often emphasizes the idea of being focused, organized, and purposeful in one's actions.
  • dawdle over sth The idiom "dawdle over sth" means to excessively delay or procrastinate while doing something, typically resulting in wasting time or being inefficient. It implies a lack of urgency or a tendency to linger unnecessarily.
  • lose the thread (of sth) The idiom "lose the thread (of sth)" means to lose the connection, understanding, or continuity of something. It often refers to losing track of the main point, idea, or storyline of a conversation, discussion, or narrative. It indicates a difficulty in following or comprehending the progression or sequence of events.
  • stammer sth out The idiom "stammer sth out" means to speak hesitantly or with difficulty, usually due to nervousness, stress, or a lack of confidence. It implies struggling to articulate words or thoughts, resulting in a stuttering or stammering manner of speech.
  • pluck at sm or sth The idiom "pluck at something" means to provoke, provoke a reaction, or touch someone's emotions or sensitive area. It refers to an action that stirs or instigates a strong response.
  • slow sm or sth up The idiom "slow something up" means to cause a delay or decrease in the speed or progress of something. It implies that something is becoming slower or taking longer than anticipated or desired.
  • strain sth off of sth The idiom "strain sth off of sth" means to filter or separate a liquid from solid particles or unwanted substances by using a strainer or similar device. It is commonly used when cooking or making beverages, where the solid particles need to be removed to obtain a clearer liquid, free from impurities.
  • slip sth in (to) sth The idiom "slip sth in (to) sth" means to discreetly or secretly insert or introduce something into a place, conversation, or situation, often without others being aware. It implies a subtle or unnoticed action.
  • give sth the thumbs up The idiom "give something the thumbs up" means to approve or give a positive evaluation or endorsement to something.
  • get a fix on sth The idiom "get a fix on sth" means to accurately determine or establish something, typically referring to obtaining a clear understanding or exact location of someone or something. It implies acquiring information or achieving a precise assessment of a situation or target.
  • patch sth up To "patch something up" means to repair or fix something, typically when it is in a state of disrepair or damage. It can refer to physical objects, such as patching up a torn garment or fixing a broken item, as well as metaphorical situations, like resolving a conflict or repairing a relationship. Overall, the idiom implies restoring something to a functional or harmonious state through some form of repair or resolution.
  • end with sth The idiom "end with something" means to finish or conclude an event, situation, or sequence of actions with a particular result, outcome, or object. It implies that the specified thing is the final or ultimate element or component of a series or process.
  • churn sth up The idiom "churn sth up" means to cause upheaval or disturbance, often by creating chaos or stirring up strong emotions or reactions. It can refer to a physical stirring up of sediment or dirt, as well as metaphorical situations where emotions, memories, or conflicts are brought to the surface and cause disruption.
  • struggle along under sth The idiom "struggle along under something" means to manage or continue working despite facing difficulties, burdens, or challenges caused by something. It implies persevering through a situation or task, even if it requires great effort or becomes overwhelming.
  • rough sth up The idiom "rough something up" typically means to handle or treat something with force or aggression, resulting in damaging or making it untidy. It can also refer to a physical altercation or causing harm to someone.
  • circulate among sm or sth The idiom "circulate among someone or something" refers to the act of moving or spreading regularly among a particular group of people or things, often for the purpose of distributing information, participating in activities, or interacting with others. It implies the act of being present or engaging with a variety of individuals or elements within a specific context.
  • hunt for sm or sth The idiom "hunt for someone or something" means to search or look for someone or something, usually with great effort or determination. It implies a dedicated and intense search for a desired person or object.
  • dig out (of sth) The idiom "dig out of (something)" typically refers to the act of extricating oneself or someone else from a challenging, difficult, or problematic situation. It implies making a concerted effort to overcome obstacles or overcome adversity. It can also be used more literally to mean physically removing someone or something from a confined, buried, or trapped situation by digging.
  • cower from sth The idiom "cower from sth" means to show fear or timidity by shrinking or recoiling from something threatening, intimidating, or frightening. It implies a reaction of crouching or hiding in order to protect oneself or avoid confrontation with the perceived danger.
  • run aground (on sth) The idiom "run aground (on sth)" refers to a situation where a person or a plan encounters an obstacle, difficulty, or failure, preventing them from progressing or achieving their intended goal. It originated from the nautical term "run aground," which describes a ship getting stuck on the ground or a shoal, unable to move forward. In a broader sense, the idiom implies getting stuck or encountering a setback while trying to accomplish something.
  • meant to be sth The idiom "meant to be something" refers to the belief or notion that something is destined or fated to happen. It implies that there is a predetermined purpose or plan behind a specific event, action, or outcome. It suggests that certain things are designed or intended to occur, regardless of any intervening circumstances or obstacles.
  • bury sm or sth in sth The idiom "bury sm or sth in sth" means to hide, conceal, or cover something or someone completely within something else, often in a way that makes it difficult to find or notice. This can be used both in a literal sense, such as physically hiding an object, and in a figurative sense, such as drowning someone or something in a large amount of work or information.
  • crank out sth The idiom "crank out sth" refers to producing or creating something quickly and in large quantities, often with little attention to quality or detail. It implies a sense of mechanical or repetitive work, as if operating a crank handle to output items rapidly.
  • drum on sth The idiom "drum on sth" refers to the action of tapping or beating on something repeatedly, often with one's fingers or hands, typically to create a rhythmic sound. It can also be used figuratively to suggest repetitive or persistent efforts or actions towards a particular goal.
  • stand by sm or sth The idiom "stand by someone or something" means to support, be loyal to, or uphold someone or something regardless of the circumstances. It implies being present or available whenever needed and willing to provide assistance or help. It can also mean to stay committed or remain faithful to a particular cause, person, or belief.
  • surprise sm by sth The idiom "surprise someone by something" means to astonish or startle someone with something unexpected or out of the ordinary. It refers to the act of surprising someone with a particular action, event, gift, or information that catches them off guard.
  • swindle sm out of sth The idiom "swindle someone out of something" means to deceive or trick someone into giving or losing something, usually money or valuables, through dishonesty or fraud. It implies that the person being swindled is being taken advantage of and manipulated for personal gain.
  • count sm or sth off The idiom "count sm or sth off" means to count aloud while pointing at or marking each item or person in a sequential manner. It is often used to keep track or allocate things or individuals in an organized manner.
  • wouldn't touch sm or sth with a tenfoot pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something or someone with a ten-foot pole" means to strongly dislike or want to avoid something or someone. It implies that one would not come into contact with the mentioned thing or person under any circumstances.
  • enchant sm with sth The idiom "enchant someone with something" means to captivate or fascinate someone with a particular thing or quality. It implies that the person or thing being enchanted holds a strong, positive influence over someone, producing feelings of charm, admiration, or delight.
  • round out sth The idiom "round out something" means to complete, enhance, or perfect something by adding necessary or missing elements. It often refers to making a final addition or touch that brings a project, idea, or concept to its full potential or a satisfactory state.
  • bollix sth up The idiom "bollix sth up" means to make a mess of something or to cause confusion or disorder. It refers to actions or decisions that result in the failure or disruption of a task, plan, or situation.
  • tuck sth away To "tuck something away" is an idiom that means to store or save something, usually in a secure or hidden place. It can also imply keeping something secret or hidden.
  • bequeath sth to sm The idiom "bequeath something to someone" means to leave or pass on something, usually in a will or as a gift, to a specific person or organization after one's death. It implies the act of bestowing or transmitting something valuable or significant to the designated recipient.
  • upshot of sth The idiom "upshot of sth" refers to the final result or consequence of a situation or event. It can be used to describe the outcome or conclusion that is reached after considering all the details or factors involved. It typically implies the final, often significant, consequence that stems from a series of actions or circumstances.
  • be nothing less than sth The idiom "be nothing less than sth" means that something or someone is of the highest or most extreme level or quality. It emphasizes that there is no room for anything lower or lesser. It suggests that the thing or person being described is truly exceptional and exceeds what is typically expected or imagined.
  • crank up sth The idiom "crank up something" typically means to increase the intensity, volume, or power of something. It can refer to raising the level or speed of activity, increasing the intensity of a situation, or boosting the output or performance of a machine, system, or process.
  • carve sth from sth The idiom "carve something from something" typically means to create or obtain something by skillfully or carefully cutting or shaping it out of a larger or existing entity. It often implies the effort and precision required to accomplish such a task.
  • exemplify sth by sth The idiom "exemplify something by something" means to illustrate or demonstrate a particular quality, characteristic, or concept through an example or specific instance. It refers to using a specific case to represent or typify a broader concept or idea. It is commonly used to provide a clear and concrete illustration of an abstract concept or to showcase the defining features of something.
  • sth gone mad The idiom "sth gone mad" typically refers to a situation or thing that has become chaotic, irrational, or out of control. It implies that the subject has deviated from its usual or expected behavior in an extreme and often unpredictable manner.
  • head sm or sth off To "head off" something or someone means to prevent or stop it from happening or reaching its intended destination. It is often used when taking proactive or preemptive measures to intercept or control a situation before it becomes a problem or before someone reaches their destination.
  • lean sth against sm or sth The idiom "lean something against someone or something" means to place or rest an object in an inclined position, usually with one end touching or propped up against someone or something for support. It implies a temporary or casual placement of an item without securing or fixing it in place.
  • bulge with sth The idiom "bulge with sth" typically refers to something being excessively full or overflowing with a specific thing or substance. It implies a significant amount or abundance of the mentioned element, causing an outward swelling or protrusion.
  • stack up to sm or sth The idiom "stack up to someone or something" means to compare or measure up to someone or something in terms of quality, performance, or abilities. It suggests assessing how well someone or something matches or competes with a particular standard or expectation.
  • lay into sth To "lay into something" means to attack, criticize, or scold someone or something vigorously or forcefully. It implies expressing strong disapproval or unleashing a tirade of harsh words or actions towards the target.
  • look after sb/sth The idiom "look after someone/something" means to take care of, watch over, or be responsible for someone or something. It often implies the act of ensuring their safety, well-being, or the fulfillment of their needs.
  • rouse sm from sth "Rouse someone from something" is an idiom that means to awaken or stir someone from a state of rest, sleep, or inactivity. It can be both a literal and figurative expression, suggesting the act of waking someone up physically or stirring them from a state of mental or emotional inertia.
  • play sth on sm or sth The idiom "play sth on sm or sth" typically means to manipulate or deceive someone or take advantage of a situation or person for personal gain or amusement. It can involve trickery, misrepresentation, or exploitation.
  • truss sm or sth up The idiom "truss sm or sth up" refers to securing or fastening something tightly or securely, often using ropes or other means of restraint. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts. Literally, it can mean tying or lashing an object firmly to prevent movement or damage. Figuratively, it can imply synthesizing or wrapping up something hastily or efficiently.
  • hit out (for sth or sm place) The idiom "hit out (for sth or sm place)" means to set off or depart toward a specific destination or goal. It implies making a determined effort or taking action to achieve something or reach a particular place.
  • gear sm or sth up (for sm or sth) The idiom "gear something up (for something/someone)" means to prepare or make something ready for a particular event, task, or situation. It often implies increased effort, intensity, or focus to achieve the desired goal or outcome.
  • have sth on file The idiom "have sth on file" refers to the act of keeping records or documents of something for future reference or use. It means to have something documented or stored in a systematic manner, usually for easy retrieval or to serve as a reference point when needed.
  • pass by (sm or sth) The idiom "pass by (someone or something)" typically means to go past or move beyond someone or something without stopping or paying much attention. It can refer to physically walking or driving by someone or something, or it can be used metaphorically to describe a missed opportunity, a disregarded person or thing, or simply ignoring or neglecting something.
  • snap at sm or sth The idiom "snap at someone or something" means to speak to or address someone or something in a sharp, impatient, or irritable manner. It implies reacting or responding abruptly and with a lack of patience or tolerance.
  • fly at sm or sth The idiom "fly at someone or something" means to angrily attack, criticize, or confront someone or something. It can also refer to lashing out in a sudden and aggressive manner towards a person or an object.
  • in the absence of sm or sth The idiom "in the absence of someone or something" means that a certain person or thing is not physically present or available. It refers to a situation where someone or something is missing or not there, and as a result, an alternative action or choice must be made.
  • within a stone's throw (of sth) The idiom "within a stone's throw (of sth)" means to be very close to something, usually referring to a physical location or distance. It suggests that the distance between two things is short and can be easily covered by throwing a stone.
  • the last sb heard/saw of sb/sth The idiom "the last sb heard/saw of sb/sth" refers to the final known information or sighting of someone or something. It indicates that there has been no further contact, communication, or sighting since that particular instance.
  • touched by sm or sth The idiom "touched by someone or something" typically means to be affected, influenced, or moved emotionally by someone or something. It could refer to experiencing sympathy, compassion, or a deep connection with someone or being moved by a particular event or circumstance.
  • thunder across sth The idiom "thunder across something" typically means to move or travel quickly and loudly across a particular area, often with great force or intensity. It implies a sense of energy, power, or urgency in the movement.
  • soap sm or sth down The idiom "soap something down" typically means to thoroughly clean or wash something, usually with the use of soap or cleaning agents. It refers to the action of applying soap and water to an object or surface in order to remove dirt, grime, or stains.
  • daydream about sm or sth When someone daydreams about something or someone, it means that they are indulging in pleasant thoughts or fantasies about that person or thing, often in a way that distracts them from their present reality.
  • plug (oneself) in (to sth) The idiom "plug oneself in (to something)" means to connect or become involved in a particular activity, system, or community. It usually refers to the act of actively engaging or immersing oneself in something, whether it's a conversation, a project, a group, or a technological device.
  • preside at sth The idiom "preside at something" means to take charge or serve as the leader or moderator of a particular event, meeting, or function. It involves assuming a position of authority or responsibility over the proceedings and making decisions or overseeing the activities involved.
  • figure sth up The idiom "figure something up" means to calculate or add up the total of something.
  • show signs of sth The idiom "show signs of sth" means to exhibit or display indications or evidence of a particular condition, behavior, or quality. It implies that there are visible or noticeable indications that something is present or happening.
  • kid sm about sm or sth The idiom "kid someone about someone or something" means to joke or tease someone in a lighthearted manner about someone or something. It involves making playful or sarcastic comments to provoke amusement or laughter.
  • zone sth for sth The idiom "zone sth for sth" typically means to delineate or designate a specific area or region for a particular purpose, activity, or use. It refers to the act of dividing or marking off specific zones or zones of land, buildings, or spaces for specific functions or purposes.
  • trot sth out The idiom "trot sth out" refers to the act of presenting, showcasing, or bringing something forward, often repeatedly or in a formulaic manner. It implies that the thing being presented may not be particularly new, original, or exciting and is often used in a slightly critical or dismissive way.
  • fit sm or sth up (with sth) The idiom "fit sm or sth up (with sth)" generally means to equip or provide someone or something with necessary objects or tools. It refers to the act of furnishing or outfitting someone or something with the appropriate items for a particular purpose.
  • promise sth to sm The idiom "promise something to someone" typically means to make a commitment or assurance to provide or do something specifically for that person in the future. It implies a guarantee, pledge, or declaration of intent to fulfill the mentioned promise.
  • cull sm or sth out of sth The idiom "cull someone or something out of something" means to carefully select or remove people or things from a group or collection, usually based on certain criteria or standards. It implies a deliberate and systematic process of elimination or extraction.
  • double as sm or sth The idiomatic expression "double as" means to have a dual purpose or function. It refers to a situation where a person or thing is capable of performing two different roles or tasks at the same time.
  • go to town (on sth) The idiom "go to town (on sth)" means to do something with great enthusiasm, energy, or effort. It often implies that one is doing something to its fullest extent or in an extravagant manner.
  • worry sth out of sm The idiom "worry something out of someone" means to persistently or anxiously question or pressure someone in order to obtain information or a desired outcome. It involves causing someone to feel uneasy or concerned until they reveal what is being sought.
  • lean on sm or sth The idiom "lean on someone or something" means to depend on or rely heavily on someone or something for support, guidance, or assistance, particularly during difficult or challenging times. It implies seeking help or solace from someone/something to alleviate stress or burden.
  • under the wing of sth The idiom "under the wing of something" refers to being protected, guided, or supported by someone or something more experienced, knowledgeable, or powerful. It suggests being taken care of or providing assistance in a nurturing manner.
  • put sth under the microscope The idiom "put something under the microscope" means to closely examine or scrutinize something in great detail, looking at every aspect or element of it with precision and care. It refers to a thorough analysis or investigation of a particular subject or issue.
  • bind sm over (to sm or sth) The idiom "bind (someone) over (to someone or something)" refers to the act of legally requiring someone to attend court or face a trial. It is commonly used when a person is accused of a crime and is required to appear before a judge or attend a trial. It indicates that the individual is bound by law to appear or be present in the specified court or trial.
  • avail yourself of sth The idiom "avail yourself of sth" means to take advantage of or make use of something that is available or offered to you. It implies using or benefiting from an opportunity, resource, or option in a practical or beneficial way.
  • swing at sb/sth The idiom "swing at sb/sth" refers to making an attempt to hit or strike someone or something, usually with a forceful or aggressive motion. It can be used both in a literal sense, referring to physically swinging at someone or something, or in a figurative sense, indicating an attempt to criticize, attack, or confront someone or something.
  • abound in sth The idiom "abound in sth" means that there is a large quantity or a great number of something. It implies that there is an excessive amount or an overflowing abundance of a particular thing or attribute.
  • loan sth to sm The idiom "loan something to someone" means to temporarily give or lend an item or money to someone, with the expectation that it will be returned in the future.
  • sic sb/sth on sb The idiom "sic sb/sth on sb" means to incite or send someone or something aggressively or forcefully at another person or group. It involves encouraging or directing them to attack, confront, or cause harm to someone. "Sic" is derived from the Latin word "sÄ«c," which means "thus" or "in this way."
  • lay sb/sth open (to sth) The idiom "lay sb/sth open (to sth)" means to make someone or something vulnerable or exposed to something, often a criticism, attack, or danger. It suggests that the person or thing is unprotected or defenseless.
  • knit sth together The idiom "knit something together" refers to the act of uniting or combining various elements or parts into a single cohesive whole. It typically implies bringing different components together to create a stronger, more integrated entity. This can be used in various contexts, including the integration of ideas, concepts, organizations, or even physical objects.
  • adjust sth to sth The idiom "adjust something to something" means to modify or alter something in order to make it suitable or compatible with a particular situation, condition, or expectation. It refers to the act of making necessary changes or adaptations to ensure that something fits or meets a specified standard, requirement, or objective.
  • apply to sm or sth The idiom "apply to someone or something" means to be relevant, suitable, or appropriate for a particular person or thing. It implies that something is meant to be used, considered, or considered for a specific purpose or in a specific context.
  • cast sth aside The idiom "cast something aside" means to discard or reject something without much importance or consideration. It refers to the act of getting rid of or disregarding something easily, often without careful thought or value.
  • not to mention sb/sth The idiom "not to mention sb/sth" is used to introduce an additional item or fact that is even more important or noteworthy than what has already been mentioned. It emphasizes that the following person or thing is worthy of consideration or attention, in addition to what has already been discussed.
  • holler sth out The idiom "holler sth out" means to shout or speak loudly or forcefully in order to be heard or to get someone's attention.
  • head toward sm or sth The idiom "head toward someone or something" means to move in the direction of a particular person or object. It implies the act of moving towards a specific target or destination, either physically or metaphorically.
  • mine a rich seam of sth The idiom "mine a rich seam of sth" refers to the act of discovering or tapping into a plentiful source or supply of something valuable or useful. It is often used metaphorically to represent the process of exploring or uncovering a profitable or productive vein of ideas, opportunities, or resources.
  • talk out sth The idiom "talk out something" typically refers to discussing or debating a matter or issue at length with someone, often in order to come to a resolution or decision. It involves exchanging ideas, perspectives, and opinions in order to clarify differences, reach a mutual understanding, or find a solution to a problem. It emphasizes the act of discussing and communicating in order to address and work through a particular matter.
  • kick sth around The idiom "kick something around" refers to the act of discussing or considering something casually or informally, often in a group setting. It implies exchanging ideas, opinions, or suggestions in a relaxed manner without making any firm decisions.
  • put sb through sth The idiom "put sb through sth" means to cause or make someone undergo a difficult or unpleasant experience or situation, often involving pain, stress, or hardship. It can also refer to making someone go through a particular process or event, such as an exam, interview, or trial.
  • talk sm out of sth The idiom "talk sm out of sth" refers to persuading or convincing someone not to do or pursue something they had originally intended to do. It involves using persuasive communication to change someone's mind or dissuade them from a particular course of action.
  • absent oneself from sm or sth The expression "absent oneself from sm or sth" means to deliberately or intentionally stay away or be absent from a particular place or event, or to avoid being involved in a certain matter or situation.
  • bulk up sb/sth The idiom "bulk up sb/sth" refers to the act of increasing the size, strength, or mass of someone or something through exercise, training, or adding additional substance. It commonly refers to enhancing physical appearance by gaining muscle mass or adding extra material to make something larger or more substantial.
  • erase sth from sth The idiom "erase something from something" means to completely remove or eliminate something from a particular thing or situation. It suggests wiping away or eradicating something, leaving no trace or evidence of its existence.
  • charge sth against sth The idiom "charge sth against sth" refers to the act of holding someone or something responsible or accountable for a particular action or offense, usually by recording it formally or making it part of an official record. It generally implies assigning blame or responsibility.
  • point up sth The idiom "point up something" means to highlight or emphasize something, typically a particular aspect, detail, or problem, in order to draw attention to it or make it more evident. It can also refer to making something more clear, noticeable, or significant.
  • not be in the business of sth The idiom "not be in the business of something" means that someone or something does not typically engage in or participate in a particular activity. It implies that the individual or entity does not have expertise, interest, or inclination to be involved in that specific matter.
  • star as sm or sth The idiom "star as someone or something" means to have a leading or prominent role or portrayal as a particular character or in a specific profession. It refers to an individual who is given the opportunity to play a significant or noteworthy role in a performance, film, or any other form of media.
  • toss sm or sth aside The idiom "toss someone or something aside" means to disregard, dismiss, or reject someone or something as unimportant or insignificant. It implies a lack of concern or interest towards someone or something.
  • rub sth in The idiom "rub sth in" means to worsen someone's situation by reminding them of their mistake, misfortune, or failure in an excessive or cruel manner.
  • run to sth The idiom "run to sth" generally means to have enough of an item, resource, or capability (such as money, food, or knowledge) to fulfill a specific purpose or meet a particular need. It implies that one has enough of something available, usually in sufficient quantity or quality, for a specific use.
  • push sm or sth back (from sm or sth) The idiom "push someone or something back from someone or something" means to physically move or force someone or something away from a particular person, place, or thing. It can also refer to delaying or postponing an event or activity.
  • grovel before sm or sth The idiom "grovel before someone or something" means to act in an excessively subservient or humble manner towards someone or something, often to gain favor, forgiveness, or acceptance. It implies displaying extreme flattery or humility, usually out of fear, desperation, or a desire for lenience or approval.
  • line sm or sth up The idiom "line something/someone up" means to arrange or organize something in a particular order or sequence, or to make preparations or plans for something in advance. It can also refer to getting someone or something ready for a specific purpose or event.
  • avail oneself of sth The idiom "avail oneself of something" means to make use or take advantage of something, usually for one's own benefit or advantage. It implies actively utilizing or accessing a resource, opportunity, or service.
  • what's sth in aid of? The idiom "What's something in aid of?" is used to question or challenge the purpose or justification behind an action, event, or effort. It implies that there may be doubt or skepticism about the usefulness or worthiness of the particular endeavor.
  • deduce sth from sth The idiom "deduce sth from sth" means to reach a logical conclusion or inference based on the given information or evidence. It involves using reasoning and analysis to draw a conclusion or make a judgment based on the available facts or clues.
  • make a habit of sth The idiom "make a habit of sth" means to develop a regular and consistent practice or behavior of doing something. It implies that the action or behavior has become customary, automatic, or a part of one's routine.
  • group sth under sth The idiom "group something under something" refers to the act of categorizing or organizing similar things or ideas into a specific group or category. It suggests combining or grouping multiple items or concepts together based on their similarities or common characteristics.
  • taste like sth The idiom "taste like sth" refers to the taste or flavor of something, indicating that it resembles or is similar to the mentioned substance or object. It is usually used to describe the flavor of food or drink.
  • call sth out The idiom "call something out" refers to the act of publicly criticizing or pointing out a fault or wrongdoing in someone or something. It involves drawing attention to an issue or holding someone accountable for their actions.
  • give an account (of sm or sth) (to sm) The idiom "give an account (of sm or sth) (to sm)" means to provide a detailed explanation or report about someone or something to another person. It involves narrating or describing the events, circumstances, or actions related to a particular person or thing.
  • swoop down (up)on sm or sth The idiom "swoop down (up) on someone or something" means to approach rapidly and unexpectedly, typically in an aggressive or forceful manner. It implies the act of taking action swiftly and decisively, often to seize or attack something or someone. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • in the grip of sth "In the grip of something" is an idiom used to describe being under the strong influence or control of something. It suggests being unable to escape or break free from a particular situation, emotion, addiction, or powerful force. It implies being deeply affected or overwhelmed by the thing in question, making it difficult to think or act rationally.
  • keep faith with sb/sth The idiom "keep faith with sb/sth" means to remain loyal, trustworthy, or true to someone or something. It refers to maintaining a commitment, belief, or confidence in a person or cause, and not betraying or abandoning them. It emphasizes the importance of remaining steadfast and dedicated.
  • punch a hole in sth The idiom "punch a hole in something" means to undermine or weaken something, such as an argument, theory, or plan, by finding a flaw or providing evidence that contradicts or challenges it. It suggests the act of creating a significant problem or weakness in a particular concept or proposition.
  • paint a black picture of sth/sb To "paint a black picture of something/someone" means to present a negative or pessimistic view or description of a situation or person. It implies depicting something or someone in a particularly unfavorable or gloomy light. This idiom is often used to highlight the speaker's or writer's dissatisfaction or displeasure.
  • center sth on sm or sth To "center something on someone or something" means to focus, base, or align something around a particular person or thing. It refers to making someone or something the main point of attention or importance in a given situation or context.
  • shrug sth off (as sth) The idiom "shrug sth off (as sth)" means to dismiss, ignore, or minimize the importance or impact of something, often without much concern or attention. It refers to the act of treating something as unimportant or insignificant and not letting it affect one's thoughts, feelings, or actions.
  • see the last of sth/sb The idiom "see the last of something/somebody" means to have one's final encounter or to witness the departure of something or someone, indicating that it is the end or last time one will see or experience them.
  • cut in(to sth) The idiom "cut in(to sth)" typically means to interrupt or interrupt someone's conversation, activity, or movement, especially when it is not expected or welcomed.
  • set/put the seal on sth The idiom "set/put the seal on something" means to finalize or authenticate something, especially an agreement or decision. It refers to the act of affixing a seal, symbolizing the completion or confirmation of a particular action. It signifies that all necessary steps or requirements have been fulfilled and no further changes or amendments are expected.
  • fritter sth away (on sm or sth) To "fritter something away (on someone or something)" means to waste or squander a resource, such as time, money, or energy, particularly on trivial or unimportant things or people. It implies using something in a careless or thoughtless manner without gaining any significant value or benefit from it.
  • in the unlikely event of sth The idiom "in the unlikely event of something" is used to refer to a highly improbable or unlikely situation that may occur. It suggests that the mentioned event is not expected to happen, but if it does, one should be prepared or take appropriate action.
  • squeeze sm or sth together The idiom "squeeze someone or something together" means to tightly press or compress someone or something so that they occupy less space or are closer together. It can be used both literally and figuratively, indicating physical or emotional pressure.
  • stir up sb/sth The idiom "stir up sb/sth" means to provoke, instigate, or cause a specific reaction or response from someone or something. It often involves creating a state of agitation, excitement, or disturbance.
  • on the alert (for sm or sth) The idiom "on the alert (for sm or sth)" means being watchful, attentive, or vigilant in order to notice or respond quickly to something or someone. It indicates a state of being mentally prepared, aware, and ready to take action when necessary.
  • see through sb/sth To "see through someone or something" means to perceive or understand the true nature, motives, or intentions behind someone's actions or the real quality or true nature of something. It implies not being easily deceived or fooled by someone or something.
  • write off sth The idiom "write off something" means to deem or dismiss something as unimportant, not worth considering or incapable of success. It can also refer to canceling or reducing the value of an asset or debt in accounting terms.
  • collude with sm or sth The idiom "collude with someone or something" refers to the act of conspiring or working together in secret with someone or something, typically with the intent of deceiving or cheating others for personal gain. It implies a hidden agreement or understanding between parties, often involving illegal or unethical activities.
  • be the pride of smw/sth To be the pride of someone or something means to be a source of great satisfaction, admiration, or honor. It refers to a person or thing that is highly regarded, respected, or esteemed by others.
  • dam sth up The idiom "dam sth up" means to block or obstruct the natural flow or progression of something, usually to accumulate or store it for later use. This can refer to physical obstructions such as a dam holding back water, or metaphorical obstructions that hinder the progress or release of something.
  • recuperate from sth The idiom "recuperate from something" means to recover or regain one's strength, health, or well-being after an illness, injury, or strenuous activity. It implies that a person is taking necessary time and actions to heal physically or mentally.
  • clutter sth up The idiom "clutter something up" means to make a space or area untidy, messy, or filled with unnecessary items or objects.
  • rent sth from sm The idiom "rent something from someone" means to borrow or temporarily use something from someone in exchange for payment or a fee. It refers to the act of taking something on rent or lease for a specific period of time.
  • relax into sth The idiom "relax into something" refers to the act of becoming more comfortable or at ease with a particular situation or activity over time. It suggests that the initial tension or unease gradually diminishes as a person lets go of stress or anxiety and allows themselves to feel more relaxed and confident.
  • attach to sth The idiom "attach to something" can be defined as having a strong emotional or sentimental connection to something or someone, or being strongly interested or involved in something. It reflects a sense of deep affinity, affection, or dedication towards a particular thing or individual.
  • on pain of sth The idiom "on pain of sth" refers to a condition or requirement that must be met, usually with the threat of punishment or negative consequences if it is not fulfilled. It implies that failing to comply will result in severe consequences or personal suffering.
  • sensitize sm to sth The idiom "sensitize someone to something" means to make someone more aware or sensitive to a particular issue, problem, or perspective. It involves increasing someone's understanding or perception of something, often with the aim of fostering empathy or facilitating a deeper understanding of the topic.
  • dump on sm or sth To "dump on someone or something" means to criticize, belittle, or unfairly blame someone or something. It refers to the act of expressing negative opinions or complaints towards a person or thing without offering any constructive solutions or support. It often conveys a sense of unloading one's frustrations or displeasure onto another entity.
  • call on sth The idiom "call on sth" means to request or demand something, often by taking action or making an official request. It can also refer to seeking or asking for something to be done, such as calling on someone to fulfill their responsibilities or obligations.
  • gleam with sth The idiom "gleam with sth" means to have a noticeable shine, sparkle, or glow due to the presence or reflection of something. It is often used figuratively to describe eyes or a person's expression that reflects excitement, happiness, or another strong emotion.
  • play fast and loose (with sm or sth) The idiom "play fast and loose (with someone or something)" refers to behaving in a deceitful or irresponsible manner, often involving bending or breaking rules, in order to gain an advantage or achieve one's own goals. It implies a lack of respect for others or a disregard for the consequences of one's actions.
  • let on sth The idiom "let on" means to reveal or disclose something, especially information or a secret, often unintentionally or carelessly.
  • the beauty of sth The idiom "the beauty of something" refers to the inherent or exceptional qualities that make something or someone aesthetically pleasing, attractive, or impressive. It implies the appreciation and delight one experiences when encountering or witnessing the particular thing or situation. It can also suggest the simplicity or elegance of a concept, idea, or solution.
  • rake through sth The idiom "rake through something" means to search or look through a collection or a pile of things (such as papers, clothes, or objects) in a thorough or systematic manner. It implies a thorough investigation or search for something specific, often involving a messy or disorganized situation.
  • quarrel (with sm) (over sm or sth) The idiom "quarrel (with someone) (over something)" refers to an argument or disagreement between two or more people about a specific issue or topic. It implies a heated or intense dispute where each party expresses opposing views or perspectives on the subject at hand.
  • dine on sth The idiom "dine on sth" means to consume or eat a specific type of food or dish during a meal. It implies enjoying or feasting on that particular food item.
  • clean sm or sth up The idiom "clean something up" typically means to tidy, organize, or remove mess or clutter from an area, object, or situation. It can also refer to improving or rectifying a situation, often by eliminating or correcting the negative elements.
  • wangle sth from sm The idiom "wangle something from someone" means to obtain or acquire something in a clever or devious way from someone, often through manipulation or persuasion. It implies using cunning or crafty tactics to successfully get what one wants from another person.
  • mop sth up The idiom "mop sth up" means to complete or finish a task or situation in a final and decisive manner, often by efficiently resolving any remaining issues or details. It can also refer to cleaning up or removing any remnants or traces of a mess or problem.
  • qualify for sth The idiom "qualify for something" means to meet the necessary conditions or requirements to be eligible for something. It often refers to obtaining a specific position, benefit, opportunity, or achieving a certain level of competence or accomplishment in a particular field.
  • alongside (of) sm or sth The idiom "alongside (of) someone or something" means to be situated or positioned next to or beside someone or something. It suggests close proximity or parallel alignment.
  • run sth out of sth The definition of the idiom "run something out of something" is to exhaust or deplete the supply or availability of something, usually by using it excessively or continuously.
  • poke through (sth) The idiom "poke through (sth)" typically means to search or rummage through something, often in a thorough and vigilant manner. It could refer to physically going through a pile, stack, or collection of items, or metaphorically exploring through information or details to carefully analyze or investigate them.
  • pull sb/sth through (sth) The idiom "pull sb/sth through (sth)" means to help or support someone or something during a difficult or challenging situation, allowing them to overcome it successfully or recover from it. It implies providing assistance or resources to ensure a positive outcome or survival.
  • agree (up)on sm or sth The idiom "agree (up)on sm or sth" means to reach a mutual decision or consensus about something with one or more individuals. It denotes the act of coming to an understanding or making a formal agreement after discussion or negotiation.
  • unite sm in sth The idiom "unite someone in something" means to bring people or groups together for a common purpose or goal. It refers to the act of joining or combining individuals, often with different backgrounds or opinions, to work together towards a shared objective or idea.
  • sew sm or sth up The idiom "sew sm or sth up" means to secure or conclude something successfully, often referring to the successful completion of a task or achieving a desired outcome. It implies efficiently and effectively wrapping up a matter or ensuring an outcome in a definitive manner.
  • reminiscent of sm or sth The idiom "reminiscent of someone or something" means that something or someone reminds you of a certain person, thing, or past experience. It indicates similarities or associations with a particular memory, event, or characteristic.
  • drum sth out The idiom "drum sth out" means to publicly expel or force someone or something out through noise, uproar, or intense criticism. It often implies a strong and collective effort to condemn or remove someone or something from a particular place or situation.
  • tuck into sth The idiom "tuck into sth" means to eat something with great enthusiasm or gusto. It implies a sense of enjoyment and satisfaction while consuming food.
  • measure up (to sm or sth) The idiom "measure up (to sm or sth)" means to meet a particular standard or expectation, typically in comparison to someone or something else. It refers to assessing one's abilities, qualities, or performance against a set criterion or benchmark. It implies determining if someone or something is adequate, satisfactory, or capable of fulfilling requirements or demands.
  • scheme against sm or sth To scheme against someone or something typically means to plan or plot in a secretive and often malicious manner in order to undermine, harm, or gain an advantage over them. It involves formulating a detailed and calculated strategy to achieve one's objectives by deceitful or manipulative means.
  • hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life The idiom "hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life" means to grip or hold tightly onto something or someone, usually in a desperate or intense manner, in order to prevent oneself from falling, getting hurt, or losing something important. It conveys a sense of extreme determination, urgency, or fear of losing control.
  • bang sth out The idiom "bang something out" generally means to quickly and efficiently produce or complete something, usually with a sense of urgency or speed. It can be used for various activities, such as writing, typing, or creating.
  • back away (from sth) The idiom "back away (from sth)" means to retreat or withdraw from a situation, typically due to fear, reluctance, or a desire to avoid conflict or involvement. It implies a physical or figurative movement of stepping back or distancing oneself from something or someone.
  • put sth/sb in a pigeonhole The idiom "put something/someone in a pigeonhole" means to categorize or classify something or someone based on preconceived notions or stereotypes, often without considering individual characteristics or qualities. It implies that something or someone is being unfairly labeled and restricted to a specific category or type.
  • have a thing about sth/sb The idiom "have a thing about sth/sb" means to have a strong or particular preference, interest, or obsession concerning something or someone. It suggests having intense emotions or an unusually strong liking or attachment to a certain subject or individual.
  • beset sm with sth The idiom "beset someone with something" means to have someone constantly confronted or troubled by something. It refers to a situation where a person is repeatedly faced with a particular difficulty, challenge, or problem. It implies that the person is overwhelmed or heavily burdened by the persistent occurrence of that specific thing or issue.
  • stake sm to sth The idiom "stake someone to something" means to provide someone with the necessary resources or support for a particular venture or task. It implies offering financial or material support to help someone achieve a goal or pursue an opportunity.
  • tread (up)on sm or sth The idiom "tread (up)on someone or something" means to hurt, offend, or disrespect someone or something without intending to or being aware of it, usually through one's actions or words. It implies an unintentional or accidental harm caused to someone or something.
  • inoculate sm with sth The idiom "inoculate someone with something" means to introduce or expose someone to a particular idea, concept, or knowledge, in order to prepare or protect them from its potential negative effects. It implies the act of providing someone with certain information or experiences to help them understand, deal with, or become resistant to a specific situation or problem.
  • pop out (of sth) The idiom "pop out (of sth)" means to come out or appear suddenly, quickly, or unexpectedly from something or somewhere.
  • give sb/sth the cold shoulder The idiom "give someone or something the cold shoulder" refers to intentionally ignoring or acting distant towards someone or something, often as a way to show disapproval, displeasure, or to avoid association. It implies an intentional indifference or coolness in one's behavior towards another party.
  • read up on sth The idiom "read up on something" means to study and acquire knowledge or information about a particular topic or subject by reading extensively about it.
  • do a job on sm or sth The idiom "do a job on someone or something" refers to performing a task or action that significantly affects or impacts someone or something. It can imply either a positive or negative outcome, depending on the context. It often suggests that the task or action was done thoroughly or extensively.
  • cash sth in The idiom "cash something in" means to exchange or convert something, especially an asset or investment, into its monetary value or to redeem a favor, benefit, or opportunity for personal gain or advantage. It often implies the act of realizing immediate financial value from a resource or capitalizing on an opportunity.
  • not buy sth The idiom "not buy something" means to not believe or accept something as true or valid. It can also imply not being convinced or persuaded by a particular argument or explanation.
  • vote for sm or sth The idiom "vote for someone or something" generally means to express support or preference for a particular person or thing, typically through a formal or informal ballot process. It signifies the act of endorsing or choosing someone or something as the favored option. This expression is often used in the context of elections, where individuals cast their votes to elect a candidate or decide on a specific issue. However, it can also be used metaphorically in various situations where a choice or decision needs to be made.
  • peel sth away (from sth) The idiom "peel something away (from something)" means to remove or separate a layer or covering from something. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of revealing or uncovering a hidden or underlying truth or understanding.
  • take no stock in sth The idiom "take no stock in something" means to not place any value, importance, or belief in something. It suggests a lack of trust or confidence in the significance or relevance of a particular thing or idea.
  • father sth on sm The idiom "father something on someone" means to falsely or dishonestly claim, attribute, or implicate someone as the source or creator of something, often in order to shift blame, avoid responsibility, or deceive others. It implies making someone the scapegoat or unfairly designating them as the originator of something they did not do.
  • commit oneself to sm or sth The idiom "commit oneself to someone or something" means to dedicate or pledge oneself to a particular person, cause, goal, or action. It indicates a strong level of devotion, loyalty, or determination towards that specific person or objective. It implies a willingness to invest time, effort, and resources in order to achieve the desired outcome.
  • transmute sth (from sth) (to sth) The idiom "transmute something (from something) (to something)" refers to the act of transforming or changing something from one form or state to another. It implies a significant and often magical or alchemical alteration in which the original thing is completely transformed into something else. This transformation occurs by changing the inherent nature or essence of the object or idea.
  • ramp up sth The idiom "ramp up something" typically means to increase, intensify, or accelerate the production, speed, or quantity of something. It is often used in business or project management contexts to describe the act of scaling up operations, resources, or efforts in order to meet increased demand or achieve a target.
  • figure sm or sth out "To figure someone or something out" means to understand, discover, or solve a problem, situation, or mystery related to that specific person or thing. It refers to gaining a clear comprehension or finding a solution through analysis, observation, or investigation.
  • be fresh out of sth The idiom "be fresh out of something" means to have completely run out of or be depleted of something, usually referring to a specific item, resource, or opportunity. It suggests that there is none or very little left of the particular thing being referenced.
  • pack sm or sth together The idiom "pack sm or sth together" means to place or organize similar things closely packed or grouped together in an efficient manner, usually to save space or make transportation easier. It implies the act of arranging or consolidating items so they occupy less space.
  • refer sth to sb/sth The idiom "refer something to someone/something" refers to the act of directing or sending something, such as a question, problem, or matter, to a specified person or entity for further action, consideration, or judgment. It implies seeking guidance, assistance, or a decision from someone or a group with relevant expertise or authority.
  • take credit for sth The idiom "take credit for something" means to claim responsibility or recognition for something that was accomplished or achieved, often without sharing the acknowledgment or giving proper credit to others who were also involved in the process.
  • get sth into your (thick) skull The idiom "get something into your (thick) skull" means to understand or comprehend something, especially when someone is not grasping or accepting it despite repeated explanations or evidence. It implies that the person's mind is obstructed or resistant to accepting the information or idea being presented. The addition of "thick" emphasizes that the person is particularly stubborn or slow to comprehend.
  • cry for sm or sth The idiom "cry for someone or something" typically means that there is a need or strong desire for someone or something. It implies a longing or a strong urge for a particular person, object, or situation.
  • lead sm or sth forth The idiom "lead someone or something forth" means to guide or direct someone or something to a particular place or in a particular direction, typically referring to taking them out from a specific location or bringing them forward in a purposeful manner. It implies taking the initiative to lead or guide someone or something confidently and decisively.
  • jaw about sm or sth The idiom "jaw about someone or something" means to talk at length, usually in a casual or gossipy manner, about someone or something. It refers to engaging in a conversation or discussion that is often filled with personal opinions, stories, or rumors. It implies that the conversation may be lengthy or somewhat unproductive, focusing on trivial matters or gossip.
  • a mess of sth The idiom "a mess of something" typically means a large quantity or jumble of things, often in a disorganized or chaotic manner. It can be used to describe physical objects, situations, or even thoughts that are in a state of disorder or confusion.
  • keep after sb/sth The idiom "keep after someone/something" means to persistently remind, urge, or pursue someone or something in order to ensure that a particular task or action is completed or achieved. It implies a continuous and determined effort to stay involved and engaged with someone or something until the desired outcome is accomplished.
  • advise sm on sm or sth The idiom "advise someone on something or something" means to provide guidance, counsel, or suggestions to someone regarding a particular topic, issue, or situation. It implies sharing one's knowledge, expertise, or opinion to help someone make informed decisions or take appropriate actions.
  • peek in(to sth) The idiom "peek into something" means to take a quick and secretive look or glance into something, typically through a small opening or from a hidden position in order to observe or gain knowledge about what is happening inside. It implies a brief and cautious act of looking into a restricted or private space.
  • lay sth to rest The idiom "lay something to rest" means to put an end to or resolve something, usually a doubt, worry, or dispute, by settling, proving, or clarifying it. It refers to resolving an issue or concern by providing clarity or closure.
  • keep one's finger on the pulse of sth The idiom "keep one's finger on the pulse of something" means to stay informed and aware of the latest trends, developments, or changes in a particular situation, industry, or field. It implies being in touch with the current state and having a comprehensive understanding of what is happening.
  • mulct sth out of sm The idiom "mulct something out of someone" means to extract or obtain something from someone, typically through deception or dishonesty. It implies manipulating or tricking someone into giving up something of value willingly or unwillingly.
  • have sth on your side The idiom "have something on your side" means to have an advantage or a favorable circumstance that supports your position or goals. It suggests having a particular factor or resource on your side that strengthens your position or increases the likelihood of desired outcomes.
  • saw sth down The idiom "saw sth down" typically means to cut or fell something using a saw. It can be used literally, referring to physically sawing down a tree, wood, or any object. Figuratively, it can also mean eliminating or reducing something or someone forcefully or decisively.
  • plow into sm or sth The idiom "plow into someone or something" means to collide forcefully or abruptly with someone or something, usually due to a lack of control or awareness.
  • in concert (with sb/sth) The idiom "in concert (with sb/sth)" means to be working together or in cooperation with someone or something towards a common goal or objective. It implies a collaborative effort or synergy between different parties to achieve a desired outcome.
  • slosh through sth The idiom "slosh through something" means to struggle or make slow progress while moving through a difficult or unpleasant situation. It often refers to the effort required to overcome obstacles or complete a task that feels burdensome or tiring.
  • wash out (sth) The idiom "wash out (sth)" typically means to cause something to become clean by flushing it with water or by cleaning it thoroughly. However, it can also have various figurative meanings depending on the context. For example, it can mean to remove or eliminate something completely, to cancel or nullify something, to cause disappointment or failure, or to exhaust or deplete something. The specific meaning would depend on the context in which the idiom is being used.
  • file sth with sm or sth The idiom "file something with someone or something" typically means to submit or deliver certain documents, paperwork, or information to the intended recipient or authorized place for record-keeping, processing, or other organizational purposes. It implies the act of officially or formally documenting or registering something with the respective individual or organization.
  • scold sm about sth The idiom "scold someone about something" means to reprimand or criticize someone for a specific issue or mistake. It refers to expressing disapproval towards someone's actions or behavior in a stern or angry manner.
  • put one's dibs on sth The idiom "put one's dibs on something" means to claim or assert ownership or rights over something, typically before others have the chance to do so. It suggests that a person is staking a claim or expressing their intention to possess or control that particular thing. It often implies a level of assertiveness and competition.
  • hoard sth up The idiom "hoard something up" means to collect or accumulate something, usually in large quantities, and store it for future use or keeping it for oneself. It implies stockpiling or saving something rather than using or sharing it immediately.
  • the cradle of sth "The cradle of something" is an idiom that refers to the place or origin where something began or was nurtured. It is often used to signify the birthplace or the geographical location where something significant, such as an idea, a movement, or a civilization, originated and developed.
  • declare (oneself) for sm or sth The idiom "declare (oneself) for someone or something" means to publicly announce or openly express support, allegiance, or preference for a particular person, cause, belief, or idea. It refers to making one's position or stance known and declaring it openly to others.
  • crowd sm or sth together The idiom "crowd someone or something together" means to gather or fit a large group of people or things into a small or limited space. It implies a lack of sufficient room, causing discomfort or inconvenience due to the tightness of the space.
  • sweep sm or sth aside The idiom "sweep someone or something aside" means to dismiss or disregard someone or something without giving it much consideration or importance. It implies dismissing an idea, opinion, or person as unimportant or inconsequential.
  • skip out (on sm or sth) The idiom "skip out (on someone or something)" means to leave or depart hastily, often without providing notice or fulfilling a commitment. It implies intentionally avoiding responsibility or obligations.
  • sink below sth The idiom "sink below something" refers to the act of declining or falling to a lower or inferior level. It can be used to describe a situation or a person's performance that worsens or becomes less successful over time. It conveys the sense of deteriorating or becoming less elevated compared to a previous state.
  • nothing but sth The idiom "nothing but something" means that there is only one thing or aspect present and nothing else. It emphasizes that there is nothing more significant or important than the particular thing being referred to. It implies exclusivity or being limited to a single element.
  • gloat over sth The idiom "gloat over something" means to take excessive pleasure or satisfaction in someone else's misfortune or failure. It refers to the act of feeling smug or triumphant while relishing in someone else's difficulties or downfalls.
  • sponge sth away The idiom "sponge something away" means to remove or erase something, typically a debt, obligation, or problem, by paying it off or resolving it completely. It can also refer to quickly and efficiently eliminating or getting rid of something that is unwanted or undesirable.
  • live up to sth The idiom "live up to something" means to fulfill or meet the expectations, standards, or qualities associated with something or someone. It implies that a person, thing, or action should measure up to a certain level of performance, reputation, or merit.
  • harp on sm or sth The idiom "harp on something" means to continuously talk or complain about something, often in a repetitive and annoying manner. It implies that someone is obsessively or excessively dwelling on a particular topic, issue, or problem.
  • pull the rug (out) from under sb/sth The idiom "pull the rug (out) from under someone/something" means to suddenly and unexpectedly remove support, stability, or advantages from someone or something, causing them to be thrown off balance or facing difficulties. It refers to the act of figuratively pulling a rug from under someone's feet, causing them to stumble or fall.
  • build sm or sth up The idiom "build something up" or "build someone up" means to speak positively about something or someone, often with the intention of increasing their reputation, importance, or confidence. It involves promoting or praising something or someone in order to create a stronger or more favorable impression.
  • apart from sth The idiom "apart from" is used to indicate an exception or exclusion of something from a particular situation or category. It means excluding or disregarding a specific thing or factor in a given context.
  • poke out (of sth) The idiom "poke out (of sth)" means to extend or protrude from something. It refers to something sticking out, especially slightly or partially, from a confined space or container.
  • be the new sth The idiom "be the new something" is used to describe a person or object that has recently gained popularity or recognition as a modern or updated version of something else. It implies that the person or object is seen as a replacement or a fresh alternative to the previous or traditional version.
  • cut sb/sth down to size The idiom "cut sb/sth down to size" means to humble or deflate someone's ego, or to reduce the importance or success of something to a more realistic or manageable level. It often refers to bringing someone or something down from a position of superiority, arrogance, or exaggeration.
  • condemn sm for sth The idiom "condemn someone for something" means to express strong disapproval or criticism towards someone for a particular action, behavior, or decision they have made. It suggests that the person is being held responsible for their actions and is being judged negatively for it.
  • sth is anyone's guess The idiom "something is anyone's guess" means that a particular outcome or answer is unknown or uncertain. It suggests that no one can accurately predict or determine the result of something.
  • circle around (over sm or sth) The idiom "circle around (over someone or something)" generally refers to a situation where people discuss or address a particular topic in a vague or indirect manner without getting to the point or making a decision. It implies a lack of progress or a failure to tackle the issue directly.
  • scour sth for sm or sth The idiom "scour something for someone or something" means to search or explore something thoroughly and systematically in order to find someone or something. It implies a detailed or intensive search, often involving scrutinizing every part or corner of a place or object.
  • on loan (from sm or sth) The idiom "on loan (from someone or something)" refers to temporarily borrowing or lending something to someone or something else. It indicates that the item or person mentioned is not permanently owned or employed by the current holder, but rather belongs to another party for a specified period of time.
  • bargain (over sm or sth) (with sm) The idiom "bargain (over something) (with someone)" means to negotiate or discuss terms, prices, or conditions with someone in order to come to a mutually agreeable agreement or deal. It typically involves haggling or trying to obtain a better deal or price for something.
  • put the skids on (sth) The idiom "put the skids on (sth)" refers to preventing or halting the progress, development, or success of something. It means to impede or hinder the forward movement or advancement of a particular project, plan, or situation.
  • count sm in (for sth) The idiom "count someone in (for something)" means to include or involve someone in a particular activity, event, or plan. It implies that the person mentioned should be considered as a participant or part of the group being discussed. It can also convey the idea that the person's presence or contribution is important or desired.
  • revolt against sm or sth The idiom "revolt against someone or something" refers to an act of rebellion or resistance against a person, group, or idea. It implies a strong and collective opposition, often driven by discontent, dissatisfaction, or a desire for change.
  • put sth on the cuff The idiom "put something on the cuff" refers to the act of purchasing or acquiring something on credit, particularly when there is an informal agreement or understanding that the payment will be made later. It often implies a sense of trust between the parties involved.
  • rest up (from sth) The idiom "rest up (from sth)" means to take a break or get some rest after expending energy or after engaging in a physically or mentally demanding activity. It implies taking time to relax, recover, or rejuvenate oneself in order to regain strength, energy, or focus.
  • feast (up)on sth The idiom "feast (up)on something" means to enjoy or consume something with great pleasure, enthusiasm, or indulgence. It implies a sense of delight and satisfaction in experiencing or having something. It can be used to describe a situation where someone thoroughly enjoys or takes advantage of a particular thing, such as food, entertainment, or a pleasurable experience.
  • hate sm or sth like sin The idiom "hate someone or something like sin" is used to convey an intense and profound dislike or aversion towards someone or something. It implies that the level of hatred is so strong that it may be considered sinful or morally wrong.
  • spin off sth The idiom "spin off something" refers to the creation or development of a new product, company, or entity as a result of a pre-existing one. It indicates the act of separating or branching out from an existing entity to form something new, often leveraging or building upon the original entity's resources, ideas, or reputation.
  • run to sm or sth The idiom "run to (someone or something)" is often used to describe seeking assistance, help, or support from someone or something. It implies approaching or relying on a specific person or thing for a particular purpose or in times of need.
  • kick in (on sth) (for sm or sth) The idiom "kick in (on sth) (for sm or sth)" usually means contributing or pitching in something, typically in terms of money or resources, to support someone or something. It refers to the act of joining or participating in an effort or cause by providing assistance or financial aid.
  • be lost without sb/sth The idiom "be lost without sb/sth" means to feel confused, helpless, or unable to function properly without the presence, support, or assistance of someone or something. It indicates a strong dependency on a particular person or thing for guidance, comfort, or success.
  • look to sm or sth (for sth) The idiom "look to someone or something (for something)" means to rely on, depend on, or expect help, support, guidance, or a specific outcome from someone or something. It suggests seeking assistance or answers from a particular source. For example, "I'm looking to my mentor for advice on my career" means that the person is expecting guidance or support regarding their professional path from their mentor.
  • slop sth over sth The idiom "slop something over something" refers to the act of spilling or accidentally pouring a liquid or substance excessively or messily onto another surface. It implies a lack of precision or care in handling the liquid, resulting in it overflowing or spreading onto something else.
  • ease (sm or sth) down The idiom "ease (sm or sth) down" means to gradually reduce the speed, intensity, or effort involved in something. It suggests a gentle and controlled decrease or relaxation of a situation, usually to avoid sudden changes or potential problems. This can be applied to physical actions, emotional situations, or any other aspects requiring a gradual and cautious approach.
  • record sth on sth The idiom "record sth on sth" means to create a permanent or official documentation of something by writing or entering it into a record, document, or electronic device. It refers to the act of preserving information or data for future reference or evidence.
  • move toward sm or sth The idiom "move toward someone or something" means to physically or mentally progress or approach someone or something. It implies taking steps or making a conscious effort to come closer in a literal or metaphorical sense.
  • come across (with sth) The idiom "come across (with sth)" means to present or provide something, usually information, in a clear and effective manner, often to convince or impress others. It can also refer to conveying a particular impression or displaying a certain attitude or demeanor.
  • groove on sm or sth The idiom "groove on sm or sth" refers to thoroughly enjoying or feeling a strong sense of pleasure or satisfaction from someone or something. It suggests being in sync or being captivated by the person or thing, allowing oneself to be completely immersed and enjoying the experience.
  • rough sth out To rough something out means to create a preliminary or incomplete version of something, usually a plan, idea, or draft. It involves quickly and roughly outlining the main points or structure without going into great detail or refining the work. The purpose of roughing something out is to get a general idea or framework before further development or completion.
  • likes of sm or sth The idiom "likes of sm or sth" refers to individuals or things that are similar to or comparable to a specific person or item being mentioned. It implies that there are others of a similar nature or category.
  • sway sm to sth The idiom "sway someone to something" means to persuade or influence someone to adopt a particular opinion, belief, or course of action. It implies convincing someone to change their initial stance or viewpoint and getting them to align with or follow a different standpoint or choice.
  • spatter sth around The idiom "spatter something around" means to scatter or distribute something in a random or messy manner. It is often used to describe the action of splashing or sprinkling liquid or small particles in different directions, creating a disorganized or scattered pattern.
  • pull sm through (sth) The idiom "pull (someone) through (something)" typically means to help or support someone during a difficult or challenging situation, enabling them to successfully overcome it or survive it. It implies providing assistance, encouragement, or resources to help someone make it through a hardship.
  • tap on sth The idiom "tap on something" typically means to lightly touch or strike something gently and quickly, often to get someone's attention or to provide a signal.
  • fan the flames (of sth) The idiom "fan the flames (of sth)" means to intentionally fuel or intensify a conflict, argument, or controversy by provoking or encouraging it further. It involves adding more emotions, tensions, or antagonism to an already heated situation rather than seeking to calm or resolve it.
  • ply between (sth and sth else) The idiom "ply between (sth and sth else)" typically refers to a situation where someone or something regularly travels back and forth between two places or engages in activities involving two different situations or entities. It implies a repetitive or continuous movement or operation between the mentioned entities.
  • close sth off To "close something off" refers to the act of blocking or obstructing access to a particular area or space. It typically implies preventing entry or exit to a specific space, whether physical or abstract. This can be done by using physical barriers, putting up obstacles, or closing doors or gates, or it can refer to the act of ending or concluding something, such as a discussion or a chapter in a book. Overall, "closing something off" means isolating or separating it from a larger context or preventing further interaction or involvement with it.
  • mix in (with sm or sth) The idiom "mix in (with someone or something)" means to join or become part of a particular group or environment. It refers to the act of integrating or blending in with others or situations.
  • go with (sm or sth) The idiom "go with (someone or something)" refers to the act of selecting or choosing someone or something that complements or matches another person or object. It implies a harmonious or compatible association between two things or the act of making a suitable choice.
  • complain of sth The idiom "complain of something" means to express dissatisfaction or grievances about a particular issue, problem, or situation. It refers to voicing one's negative feelings or concerns regarding something in a formal or informal manner.
  • slice in(to sth) The idiom "slice in(to sth)" means to forcefully and abruptly enter or interrupt a situation or conversation, often without being invited or expected. It implies an intrusion or disruption of the existing order or flow.
  • kick sb off sth The idiom "kick sb off sth" means to forcefully remove or dismiss someone from a particular position, group, or activity. It implies a sudden and forceful action, typically due to some form of misconduct or violation of rules.
  • smirk at sm or sth The idiom "smirk at someone or something" refers to making a smug or arrogant facial expression in response to someone or something, usually to exhibit superiority, amusement, or contempt. It may involve a slight smile and raising one corner of the mouth, often perceived as an insincere or mocking gesture.
  • win sth at sth The idiom "win something at something" typically means to achieve or obtain something as a result of a particular activity, competition, or event. It implies that the person has successfully accomplished a task or goal in a specific context.
  • round sth down The idiom "round something down" refers to the act of reducing or approximating a number or quantity to its nearest lower whole number or decimal place.
  • lash sm or sth down To "lash something down" means to secure or tie down something tightly and securely. It is often used in a literal sense when referring to physically fastening objects, such as tying down cargo or equipment on a vehicle or securing items during a storm. The expression can also be used metaphorically to imply firmly attaching or limiting something, such as controlling emotions or restraining actions.
  • stamp sm or sth as sth The idiom "stamp someone or something as something" means to categorize or officially classify someone or something as a particular type or characteristic. It implies making a definitive determination or evaluation of someone or something.
  • ship sb/sth off to smw The idiom "ship sb/sth off to smw" refers to the act of sending someone or something away, often without much consideration or care, to a specific location or destination. It implies a sense of urgency or removal, suggesting that the person or thing is being quickly dispatched or relocated.
  • the ABCs of sth The idiom "the ABCs of something" refers to the fundamental or basic principles or fundamental aspects of a particular subject or skill. It implies understanding or knowledge of the essential elements or foundations of a given topic.
  • coexist with sm or sth The idiom "coexist with" is used to describe the ability to exist or live together peacefully or harmoniously with someone or something, despite differences or conflicts. It implies mutual tolerance and understanding between parties despite any differences or disagreements.
  • relinquish sth to sm or sth The idiom "relinquish something to someone or something" means to let go of or surrender something, typically a position, power, control, or possession, to someone or something else voluntarily. It implies willingly giving up authority or control over something in favor of someone or something else.
  • hold no brief for sm or sth The idiom "hold no brief for someone or something" means to not support or advocate for someone or something. It refers to having no argument or opinion in favor of a certain person or thing.
  • tick off sth The idiom "tick off something" typically means to mark or note down items on a list or checklist. It can also mean to make someone annoyed, angry, or irritated, often by repeatedly mentioning or reminding them about something.
  • feel sm out (about sm or sth) The idiom "feel sm out (about sm or sth)" means to subtly or indirectly assess someone's opinion, perspective, or response regarding a certain subject or matter. It involves gauging their thoughts or feelings by engaging in a conversation, asking questions, or observing their reactions without directly addressing the topic at hand.
  • tune up (for sth) The idiom "tune up (for sth)" means to prepare oneself physically, mentally, or emotionally for a particular event or activity. It often refers to making necessary adjustments or improvements in order to be ready and perform at one's best.
  • cut across sth The idiom "cut across something" means to take a shorter or more direct route across a particular area or object, usually disregarding established paths or boundaries. It can also mean to have a wide-ranging impact or influence that spans across different areas, interests, or groups.
  • end sth up The idiom "end up" means to eventually reach or find oneself in a particular place, situation, or condition, often unexpected or unintended. It suggests that despite the initial plans or intentions, the outcome or result is different.
  • commit sm or sth to sth The idiom "commit something to something" refers to devoting or dedicating something, such as time, effort, resources, or a particular task, to a specific purpose or cause. It implies making a conscious decision or choice to pursue or engage in a particular action or commitment.
  • spatter sm or sth up The idiom "spatter someone or something up" means to dirty or splatter with small drops or spots of liquid, usually unintentionally. It often refers to someone or something getting scattered with small amounts of a liquid substance, causing a messy or untidy appearance.
  • write away for sth The idiom "write away for sth" means to send a written request for something, typically by mail, in order to receive it. It suggests that one takes the initiative to formally request or apply for a specific item or information.
  • cry out (in sth) The idiom "cry out (in sth)" means to express strong emotions or feelings audibly. It can refer to shouting, calling out, or exclaiming in a particular state or condition, usually one of distress, pain, or excitement.
  • leap at the opportunity (to do sth) The idiom "leap at the opportunity (to do sth)" means to eagerly take advantage of a chance or offer that presents itself. It implies that one is quick to seize opportunities or readily accepts them without hesitation.
  • paper over sth The idiom "paper over (something)" refers to the act of concealing or hiding a problem or issue temporarily without actually solving it. It implies using superficial tactics to camouflage or mask an underlying problem, situation, or disagreement.
  • tuck sth in (to) sth The idiom "tuck sth in (to) sth" typically refers to placing or fitting something securely or neatly into a particular space or area. It often implies making sure that the item is snugly or inconspicuously positioned. This can be used both in literal and figurative contexts. For example, you can tuck in a shirt into your pants, tuck a child into bed, or tuck a detail or information into a report or conversation.
  • perish in sth The definition of the idiom "perish in something" is to suffer severe consequences or to meet a disastrous end as a result of being involved in a particular situation, action, or condition.
  • come short of sth The idiom "come short of something" means to not fully achieve or reach a desired goal or expectation. It is often used to express a sense of falling or failing to meet a certain standard or level of accomplishment.
  • give sth/sb a wide berth The idiom "give something/somebody a wide berth" means to intentionally keep a considerable distance away from someone or something in order to avoid any potential problems, dangers, or conflicts.
  • ruin of sm or sth The idiom "ruin of someone or something" refers to the act or process of completely destroying or causing significant damage to someone or something. It implies that whatever is being referred to is left in a state of complete disrepair, destruction, or utter failure.
  • skate around sm or sth The idiom "skate around someone or something" can be defined as avoiding or evading a particular person, topic, or issue, usually in a conversation or situation, without directly addressing or confronting it. It implies trying to keep distance or steer clear of someone or something for various reasons such as discomfort, conflict avoidance, or lack of interest.
  • straighten sth out The idiom "straighten something out" means to clarify or resolve a problem or misunderstanding, to settle a dispute, or to organize and tidy something up.
  • along with sth The idiom "along with sth" means to have or include something or someone in addition to something else. It indicates that two or more things or people are associated or together in a particular situation or arrangement.
  • tap sth into sth The idiom "tap something into something" means to enter or input information, data, or a command into a device or system using typing, keystrokes, or specific actions. It is often used to describe the process of entering data into a computer, mobile phone, or other electronic device through a keyboard, touchscreen, or other input methods.
  • look at/see sth through rosecoloured/tinted spectacles, at look at/see sth through rosecoloured/tinted glasses To "look at/see something through rose-colored/tinted spectacles or glasses" means to have an excessively optimistic or positive view of a situation, person, or event. It implies that one is ignoring or disregarding any potential negative aspects and only seeing things in a positive light. This idiom is often used to suggest that someone is being overly naïve, idealistic, or unrealistic in their perception.
  • store sth up The idiom "store something up" means to accumulate or save something for later use or consumption. It can refer to physically storing goods or supplies, as well as figuratively storing information, emotions, or experiences.
  • count (up)on sm or sth The idiom "count (up)on someone or something" means to rely on or depend on someone or something for support, assistance, or reliability. It implies trust and confidence in the person or thing being relied upon.
  • mark up sth The idiom "mark up something" refers to the act of increasing or assigning a higher price or value to something, typically a product or a service, in order to make a profit or reflect a markup percentage. It involves raising the original cost or value of an item by a certain amount or percentage before selling it.
  • steep sth in sth The idiom "steep sth in sth" means to immerse or soak something, usually in a liquid, for a considerable amount of time. This is often done to infuse the soaked substance with the flavor, properties, or qualities of the liquid.
  • switch sth on The idiom "switch something on" means to activate or operate a device or equipment by turning on a switch or button. It often refers to starting or initiating a process, system, machine, or light by making it run or become active.
  • take sth on trust The idiom "take something on trust" means to believe or accept something without any evidence or proof. It refers to trusting someone or something based solely on their reputation, credibility, or the previous positive experiences one has had with them.
  • play up sth The idiom "play up something" typically means to highlight, emphasize, or draw attention to something, often in a way that exaggerates its importance or significance. It can also refer to intentionally causing or exaggerating problems or difficulties related to a particular aspect or situation.
  • thrust sm or sth against sm or sth The idiom "thrust someone or something against someone or something" generally refers to forcefully pushing or shoving someone or something onto or towards another person or object. It implies a sudden, strong movement or action of pressing something against someone or something with determination or force.
  • talk sth through The idiom "talk something through" means to discuss or explain a situation, problem, or plan in detail, ensuring that all relevant information or perspectives are considered and understood. It involves open and thorough communication to reach a mutual understanding or clarity on a particular matter.
  • not let sm catch sm doing sth The idiom "not let someone catch someone doing something" means to take precautions or be discreet in order to avoid being seen or caught by someone while engaging in a particular action or behavior.
  • beat sm into (doing) sth The idiom "beat someone into (doing) something" means to force or intimidate someone to do something against their will. It implies that physical or emotional coercion is used to make someone comply or take a specific action.
  • come within an inch of sth The idiom "come within an inch of something" means to come very close to achieving or experiencing something, but ultimately fall just short or narrowly miss it.
  • let sth off The idiom "let sth off" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To release or set something off, usually referring to a device, such as a firework, bomb, or alarm. Example: "He let off the firecrackers on New Year's Eve." 2. To excuse or not punish someone or something for a wrongdoing or mistake. Example: "The teacher let the student off with a warning instead of giving detention."
  • inhibit sth from doing sth The idiom "inhibit something from doing something" means to prevent or restrict something from happening or functioning in a certain way. It implies the idea of restraining or limiting the natural course or action of something.
  • write sth down The idiom "write something down" means to record or document information by putting it in writing.
  • send around sth The idiom "send around something" typically means to distribute or share something with a group of people. It can refer to physical items being circulated or information being shared among individuals.
  • distribute sth over sth The idiom "distribute something over something" means to divide or spread something evenly across a particular area, group, or period of time. It involves the act of sharing or apportioning something in a fair or balanced manner.
  • hit on sth The idiom "hit on something" means to discover or find something, often by chance or accident. The term "hit on" implies stumbling upon or coming across something unexpectedly. It can also be used to describe the act of figuring something out or finding a solution to a problem.
  • smooth sth out To "smooth something out" refers to the act of resolving or alleviating problems, difficulties, or inconsistencies in a situation, plan, or relationship. It involves eliminating friction, conflict, or irregularities in order to make things operate more smoothly and efficiently.
  • tumble from sth The idiom "tumble from sth" means to fall or stumble out of something in a clumsy or disorganized manner, often implying a lack of control or coordination. It can be used both figuratively and literally.
  • elect sm (as) sth The idiom "elect someone as something" means to choose or select someone for a particular role, position, or title. It refers to the act of putting someone in a specific position through a formal process of voting or selection.
  • grow in sth The idiom "grow in something" refers to the process of improving or developing a particular skill, quality, or understanding over time through practice, experience, or exposure. It implies gradual progress and increased proficiency or knowledge in a specific area.
  • bring sth on sm The idiom "bring something on someone" means to cause or provoke a particular consequence or outcome for someone. It implies that someone's actions or behavior have incited a response or reaction from another person or a situation.
  • reduce sb to sth The idiom "reduce sb to sth" means to cause or bring a person to a lower or less desirable state, typically involving embarrassment, shame, or degradation. It implies that someone or something has diminished the worth, dignity, or status of the person referred to.
  • nip at sm or sth The idiom "nip at someone or something" refers to making slight, quick, or sharp bites or bites at someone or something, usually with the intention to annoy or harm. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone criticizing, disapproving, or undermining someone or something subtly or persistently.
  • hear from sm or sth The idiom "hear from someone or something" means to receive communication or news from a particular person or thing. It implies waiting or anticipating contact or information from that specific source.
  • carry sth back The idiom "carry sth back" typically means to return or bring something back to a previous location or position. It can refer to physically transporting something back or to the act of reminding someone of a past event or idea.
  • pull sm or sth back (from sm or sth) The idiom "pull someone or something back (from someone or something)" usually refers to physically or metaphorically retracting or restraining someone or something from a specific action or direction. It implies preventing someone or something from moving forward or progressing in a particular situation.
  • scuff sth up The idiom "scuff sth up" refers to causing superficial damage or marks to something, typically by scraping or dragging it across a rough surface. It implies the act of accidentally or carelessly causing the item to look worn, scratched, or scuffed.
  • bump sm or sth up The idiom "bump sm or sth up" means to increase the level, quantity, or intensity of something. It refers to elevating or boosting something to a higher degree or position.
  • tense up (for sth) The idiom "tense up (for sth)" means to become anxious, nervous, or apprehensive in anticipation of something that is expected to be challenging, stressful, or difficult. It refers to the physical and mental state of tensing one's muscles and feeling unease or tension due to a forthcoming event or situation.
  • solicit for sm or sth The idiom "solicit for something or someone" means to make a request or appeal for something or someone, often in a persuasive or persistent manner. It commonly refers to seeking support, donations, assistance, or involvement from others for a particular cause, person, or organization.
  • hide behind sm or sth The idiom "hide behind someone or something" means to use another person or object as a shield or barrier in order to avoid facing responsibility, accountability, or consequences for one's actions. It implies a lack of courage or accountability by avoiding direct confrontation or acknowledgement of one's actions.
  • transmit sth to sm or sth The idiom "transmit something to someone or something" means to pass or send something to someone or something else. It typically refers to the act of conveying information, instructions, signals, or messages from one person or place to another. The transmission can be done through various means, such as verbally, in writing, electronically, or by any other method of communication.
  • siphon off sth The idiom "siphon off something" means to gradually and secretly take or divert a portion of something, usually resources or funds, for personal gain or unauthorized use. It implies the act of extracting or redirecting without any legitimate or rightful purpose.
  • put a stop to sth The idiom "put a stop to something" means to take action or make an effort to end or prevent a particular activity, behavior, or situation from continuing or occurring further. It implies the need for intervention or control in order to cease or restrict something undesirable or unwanted.
  • lay sth up The idiom "lay something up" generally means to store or set aside something for future use or reference. It can also refer to keeping someone or something out of harm's way or avoiding damage or injury.
  • brush (up) against sm or sth The idiom "brush (up) against someone or something" refers to a situation where two objects or people come into light contact or touch each other briefly. It is often used metaphorically to describe a fleeting or casual encounter with someone or something.
  • put out (sm) feelers (on sm or sth) The idiom "put out (sm) feelers (on sm or sth)" means to discreetly inquire or investigate about someone or something in order to gather information or gauge potential interest. It often involves subtly searching for clues, opinions, or reactions to determine the general sentiment or availability of a person or a particular opportunity.
  • leaf through sth The idiom "leaf through something" means to quickly skim or glance through the pages of a book, magazine, or any printed material without reading it in detail.
  • grow away from sth The idiom "grow away from something" refers to the phenomenon where a person or individual gradually loses interest or outgrows a specific hobby, interest, belief, or relationship over time. It implies moving on or distancing oneself from something that was once significant or important.
  • torture sm into sth The idiom "torture someone into something" means to put immense pressure or force on someone in order to make them do or accept something against their will. It implies subjecting someone to extreme or prolonged mental or physical suffering to achieve a desired outcome.
  • screw sth down The idiom "screw something down" means to fasten or secure something firmly in place using screws. It typically refers to physically securing an object by tightening screws to hold it securely, preventing it from moving or becoming loose. This expression can also be used metaphorically to denote the act of firmly establishing or ensuring the stability or permanence of something.
  • level sth to the ground The idiom "level something to the ground" means to completely destroy or demolish something, leaving it completely flattened or flattened to the ground. It suggests a thorough or comprehensive destruction of a structure or object.
  • as for sm or sth "As for something or someone" is an idiomatic expression used to introduce a new topic or shift the focus of a conversation towards something or someone. It is used to provide information or give an opinion about a particular thing or person.
  • melt sth down To "melt something down" means to heat and dissolve a solid material, usually metal, in order to extract the valuable or useful components from it. It can also refer to destroying or breaking down an object or structure for the purpose of using its parts or materials for something else. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe the process of reducing or simplifying something to its basic or essential elements.
  • in reference to sth The idiom "in reference to something" is used when talking about or mentioning a particular subject or topic. It implies that the statement or discussion is related to the mentioned subject.
  • be sick and tired of sth/doing sth The idiom "be sick and tired of something/doing something" means to be extremely annoyed, fed up, or exasperated with a person, situation, or activity. It expresses a deep feeling of frustration and weariness, indicating that one has reached the point of having no patience or tolerance left.
  • pound out sth The idiom "pound out something" typically means to relentlessly or persistently work on or achieve something, often with a great deal of effort or forceful determination. It can refer to physically pounding or hitting something repeatedly, or metaphorically signify the act of consistently and vigorously working on a task or goal until it is accomplished.
  • bash sth against sm or sth The idiom "bash something against someone or something" means to forcefully strike, hit, or collide something against someone or something. It typically implies a careless or aggressive action causing impact or damage.
  • accrue to sm or sth The idiom "accrue to someone or something" refers to the gradual accumulation or increase of something over time, either in terms of benefits, advantages, privileges, or even monetary value. It implies that the person or thing mentioned is continuously gaining or experiencing the mentioned benefits or advantages.
  • spread sth onto sth The expression "spread something onto something" refers to the action of applying or distributing a substance or material onto another surface or object. It often involves using a tool like a brush, spatula, or hands to evenly spread and cover the surface area. This idiom can be used both literally (e.g., spreading butter onto bread) and figuratively (e.g., spreading information onto a platform).
  • send in sth The idiom "send in something" means to submit, present, or deliver something, such as information, documents, or a request, usually to a specific person or entity. It implies taking proactive action to provide required or requested materials.
  • punch sth into sth The idiom "punch something into something" means to enter or input data, information, or commands into a device or system, often by pressing keys forcefully. It is commonly used in reference to typing or inputting data into a computer, calculator, or similar electronic devices.
  • check sm or sth out The idiom "check someone or something out" means to examine, investigate, or inspect someone or something with curiosity or interest. It often implies looking at or exploring someone or something further to gather more information or to appreciate its qualities.
  • struggle with sm (for sth) The idiom "struggle with someone or something (for something)" means to face difficulties or challenges while trying to achieve or obtain something. It implies that one has to exert considerable effort or deal with obstacles in order to accomplish a particular goal or outcome.
  • tell of sm or sth The idiom "tell of someone or something" means to recount or describe the experience or story of someone or something. It refers to sharing information or narrating events, often involving giving details or providing an account.
  • unite sm or sth into sth The idiom "unite someone or something into something" means to merge or combine individuals or things into a single entity or group. It refers to the act of bringing different elements together to form a cohesive whole or unified front.
  • lead up to sth The idiom "lead up to something" means to gradually approach or build up to a particular event, situation, or outcome. It refers to the sequence of events, actions, or circumstances that precede and prepare for something significant or important. It implies a progression or a series of steps leading to a desired result or a climactic moment.
  • water sth down The idiom "water something down" refers to diluting or weakening something, typically an idea, concept, or statement to make it less intense, forceful, or effective. It implies reducing the strength, impact, or quality of something.
  • heavy into sm or sth The idiom "heavy into (something)" is used to describe someone who is deeply involved or extensively interested in a particular activity, hobby, or subject. It implies that the person is highly knowledgeable or dedicated to that particular thing, often to an extreme degree. It can also suggest that the person spends a significant amount of time, effort, or resources on that activity.
  • boil sth down The idiom "boil sth down" means to simplify or condense something, usually complex information or ideas, into a shorter and more understandable form or essential components.
  • license to do sth The idiom "license to do sth" refers to the permission or authority given to someone to engage in a particular activity, often implying a lack of regulation or restraint. It suggests that someone has been granted the freedom or liberty to act in a certain way without consequences or limitations.
  • restore sm's trust in sth The idiom "restore someone's trust in something" refers to the act of rebuilding or repairing someone's confidence or belief in a particular thing or situation. It involves regaining someone's faith or reliance that may have been lost or damaged due to previous negative experiences or doubts.
  • see sth coming The idiom "see something coming" means to anticipate or predict an event or outcome beforehand. It refers to the ability to recognize, understand, or foresee a situation, problem, or event before it occurs.
  • make your peace with sth To "make your peace with something" means to accept or come to terms with a difficult or disappointing situation, typically when there is no possibility of changing it. It implies finding a way to make peace with the circumstances and move forward, rather than dwelling on or resisting them.
  • pass judgment (on sm or sth) The idiom "pass judgment (on someone or something)" means to form an opinion or make a critical evaluation of someone or something based on one's own beliefs, values, or standards. It implies making a decision or expressing a verdict about the worth, quality, or morality of someone or something.
  • muster sth up The idiom "muster something up" means to gather or summon enough strength, courage, willpower, energy, or effort to accomplish or undertake a task, particularly when it requires overcoming obstacles or resistance. It implies the act of mustering or gathering one's inner resources or determination to tackle a specific challenge or difficulty.
  • intersperse sth among sth The idiom "intersperse sth among sth" means to distribute or scatter something in a random or irregular manner among other things or people. It suggests the act of inserting or placing something at different intervals or amidst something else to create variety or contrast.
  • get behind sb/sth The idiom "get behind someone/something" typically means to support or endorse them/it. It can refer to providing assistance, backing, or advocating for someone or something. It can also imply showing solidarity or aligning oneself with an idea or cause.
  • corral sm or sth The idiom "corral someone or something" means to gather or collect someone or something into a specific location or area, often using force or effort. It is derived from the term "corral," which refers to an enclosed space where livestock or animals are kept. In a figurative sense, it implies bringing order or control to a group of people or objects.
  • blow sm or sth out of the water The idiom "blow someone or something out of the water" means to completely outperform or surpass someone or something, especially in terms of success, performance, or quality. It suggests overpowering or overwhelming the competition or expectations with outstanding achievements or results.
  • smell of sth The idiom "smell of sth" typically refers to the presence or perceived indication of something, often suggesting a negative or suspicious quality. It can imply that there is a hint or trace of something undesirable or improper.
  • get across sth The idiom "get across something" means to successfully communicate or convey an idea, message, or information in a way that is easily understood and accepted by others. It implies effectively making someone else understand or recognize a particular point or concept.
  • get through (with sm or sth) The idiom "get through (with someone or something)" means to successfully complete or accomplish a task, particularly in spite of challenges or obstacles. It can also refer to enduring or surviving a difficult or trying situation.
  • tear away (from sm or sth) The idiom "tear away (from sm or sth)" means to forcibly or abruptly break free from someone or something. It implies a sudden and violent separation or detachment from a situation, place, or person. It often connotes a strong emotional or physical resistance, as if there is a struggle or reluctance to leave or move on.
  • stoop to sth The idiom "stoop to something" means to lower oneself emotionally, intellectually, or morally to engage in a certain behavior or to adopt a specific attitude. It implies doing something that one considers beneath their dignity or standards.
  • desert (sm or sth) for (sm or sth else) The idiom "desert (someone or something) for (someone or something else)" means to abandon or leave behind a person or thing for another person or thing. It implies a betrayal or forsaking of someone or something in favor of a new option or choice.
  • push sm or sth over (sth) The idiom "push sm or sth over (sth)" means to intentionally cause someone or something to fall, collapse, or topple over, typically by exerting force or pressure. It implies physically pushing or knocking down a person, an object, or a structure.
  • put sth across (to sm) The idiom "put something across (to someone)" means to effectively communicate or convey an idea, opinion, or message to someone in a clear and understandable manner. It refers to expressing oneself or making someone understand something in a persuasive and convincing way.
  • transfer to sth The idiom "transfer to sth" refers to the act of moving or shifting from one place, position, or situation to another. It implies a change of location, role, or focus to a particular thing or context. This can involve moving physical objects, changing jobs or schools, or transitioning from one state or condition to another.
  • lay waste, at lay sth to waste The idiom "lay waste" or "lay something to waste" refers to the act of destroying or devastating something completely. It implies causing massive damage or destruction to an object, place, or situation, leaving it in ruins or completely unusable.
  • swear sm in (as sth) The idiom "swear someone in (as something)" refers to the official process of administering an oath to someone, typically a formal ceremony, to formally appoint or recognize them in a specific role or position. It is commonly used when someone takes an oath of office, becomes a member of an organization, or assumes a particular role, such as a judge, police officer, or public official.
  • in the shape of sth The idiom "in the shape of sth" is used to describe something that resembles or looks like a particular thing or form. It can be used both literally and figuratively, indicating the physical appearance or the overall nature of something. The idiom suggests that the object or idea being referred to closely resembles another object or idea.
  • live off (of) sm or sth The idiom "live off (of) someone or something" means to rely on someone or something for one's financial or material needs, often without making any effort to provide for oneself. It implies dependency on the resources or support of another person or thing to sustain one's lifestyle.
  • disqualify sm or sth for sth To "disqualify someone or something for something" means to declare them ineligible or unfit for a particular purpose, opportunity, or competition. It implies that the person or thing fails to meet the necessary requirements or criteria, making them unsuitable or unable to participate in or receive a certain privilege or recognition.
  • knot sth together The idiom "knot sth together" refers to the act of securely connecting or fastening something, often using a knot, in order to ensure its stability or to prevent it from coming apart. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of uniting or combining various elements or aspects to create a cohesive whole.
  • mung sth up The idiom "mung something up" is an informal expression that means to make something messy, disorganized, or confusing. It can also imply making something less efficient, functioning poorly, or ruining it altogether. It is commonly used when someone or something hampers or obstructs a process or situation, leading to negative consequences or complications.
  • debit sth to sm or sth The idiom "debit something to someone or something" means to assign or attribute a particular financial transaction or expense to a specific person or entity in accounting. It involves recording the reduction of funds or increase in expenses on the debiting side of an account ledger.
  • race against sm or sth The idiom "race against someone or something" refers to engaging in a competition or undertaking a task in which time is limited or there is a sense of urgency. It implies striving to complete a task or reach a goal quickly, often in order to outperform others or avoid unfavorable outcomes.
  • hold sth against sm or sth The idiom "hold something against someone or something" means to harbor a grudge, resentment, or negative feelings towards someone or something due to a past action or behavior. It implies that the person isn't willing to forgive, forget, or let go of that particular incident or issue.
  • stuff sth down sm's throat The idiom "stuff something down someone's throat" means to force someone to accept or consume something against their will, often in a forceful or aggressive manner. It can refer to forcing ideas, beliefs, opinions, or information onto someone without allowing any room for discussion or alternative viewpoints.
  • flog sth to death The idiom "flog something to death" refers to repeatedly using or discussing something until it becomes tiresome, stale, or no longer interesting. It implies overusing or overstating a particular idea, topic, or subject beyond its natural point of interest or relevance.
  • rein back on sm or sth The idiom "rein back on sm or sth" means to exercise control or limit something. It is derived from the action of pulling back on the reins of a horse to slow down or stop its movement. In a figurative sense, it refers to the act of exerting restraint or reducing the intensity, speed, or extent of a situation or activity. It can be used to describe reducing spending, reining in emotions, or scaling back certain actions or behaviors.
  • can't do sth for toffee The idiom "can't do something for toffee" is a colloquial expression used mainly in British English to convey a person's inability or incompetence to perform a particular task or activity. It typically suggests a lack of skill, aptitude, or talent in a specific area. The phrase "for toffee" is used metaphorically to imply that the person is incapable of doing the task even if they were offered a reward in the form of toffee, which is a type of candy.
  • solicit sm for sth The idiom "solicit someone for something" means to ask or request someone for something, usually in a persistent or formal manner. It implies seeking or obtaining something from someone by making a specific appeal or plea. It often involves seeking funds, support, opinions, advice, or any form of assistance from the person being solicited.
  • take account of sm or sth The idiom "take account of someone or something" means to consider or include someone or something when making a decision or forming an opinion. It suggests that one should carefully acknowledge and consider the factors or circumstances related to a particular person or thing before taking any action or making a judgment.
  • gush (forth) (from sm or sth) The idiom "gush (forth) (from sm or sth)" refers to something flowing or pouring out forcefully and rapidly. It typically describes a sudden and uncontrollable outpouring of emotions, words, or substances.
  • carry sth over The idiom "carry something over" means to continue or transfer something from one period of time to another or from one situation to another. It often refers to carrying forward or postponing something that was originally planned or scheduled for a different time or circumstance.
  • switch (around) (with sm or sth) The idiom "switch (around) (with someone or something)" means to exchange or trade places with someone or something. It implies a literal or figurative swapping of positions or roles with another person or object.
  • turn sth inside out The definition of the idiom "turn something inside out" is to thoroughly search or examine something by turning it upside down or inside out in order to find or understand something. It can also mean to completely change or reverse something, often referring to a situation or someone's perspective.
  • cajole sm out of sth The definition of the idiom "cajole someone out of something" is to persuade or coax someone into giving or doing something that they may be reluctant to offer or do.
  • not breathe a word (about sm or sth) The idiom "not breathe a word (about something or someone)" means to keep information completely secret or confidential, to not reveal or disclose any details about a particular subject or individual. It implies refraining from speaking about it or spreading any information, often to maintain privacy, trust, confidentiality, or to avoid potential consequences.
  • ascribe sth to sm or sth The idiom "ascribe something to someone or something" means to attribute or give credit for something to a particular person or thing. It refers to assigning a quality, characteristic, action, or outcome to a specific individual or entity. It can also imply assigning blame or responsibility for something.
  • wipe sm or sth (off) (with sth) The idiom "wipe something (off) (with something)" means to clean or remove dirt, stains, or markings from someone or something using a cloth, towel, or other material. It can also be metaphorical, referring to the act of erasing or removing something from a person's record, memory, or existence.
  • delude sm with sth The definition for the idiom "delude someone with something" means to deceive or mislead someone by making them believe something that is not true or is not accurate. It implies manipulating someone's perception or understanding of a situation or information to create a false belief or expectation.
  • grouse about sm or sth To "grouse about someone or something" means to complain or grumble about them or it. It usually implies that the complaints are repetitive, trivial, or unfounded.
  • intervene in sth The definition of the idiom "intervene in sth" is to become involved in a situation, dispute, or conflict in order to influence the outcome or prevent further problems. It refers to taking action or stepping in between parties to offer assistance, guidance, or mediation.
  • increase sth by sth The idiom "increase something by something" refers to the act of raising or augmenting a certain quantity or value by a specific amount or proportion. It signifies the process of making something larger, greater, or more extensive by a given measure or ratio.
  • ferry sm or sth across sth The idiom "ferry someone or something across something" means to transport or carry someone or something across a body of water or distance, typically using a ferry or similar mode of transportation. The phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of facilitating or assisting someone or something through a difficult or challenging situation or task.
  • wave sm or sth aside The idiom "wave someone or something aside" means to dismiss, ignore, or reject someone or something without giving them proper attention or consideration. It implies disregarding someone's opinions, ideas, or requests in a careless manner.
  • call sth up The idiom "call something up" means to bring forth or summon something from memory or the past, typically referring to retrieving specific information or recollections. It can be used in various contexts such as recalling a phone number, discussing a past event, or accessing stored data or files electronically.
  • toy with sth The idiom "toy with something" means to think about or consider something lightly or casually, without making a firm decision or taking it seriously. It often implies a lack of commitment or the act of playing with an idea or possibility without fully engaging with it.
  • damn sm with sth The idiom "damn someone or something with something" means to strongly criticize or condemn someone or something by highlighting their flaws, faults, or negative aspects. It implies expressing strong disapproval or disappointment towards the person or thing in question.
  • pop sth up The idiom "pop sth up" means to suddenly or casually appear or present something, often in a quick and unexpected manner. It can refer to presenting an idea, image, information, or an item in a spontaneous or impromptu way.
  • have a problem with sth/sb The idiom "have a problem with something/someone" means to be in a state of disagreement, disapproval, or disagreement with something or someone. It implies that there is a specific issue or conflict that is causing difficulty or irritation.
  • content oneself with sm or sth The idiom "content oneself with sm or sth" means to accept or be satisfied with something that may not be exactly what one desires or idealizes. It implies finding happiness or fulfillment in making do with what is available or achievable, even if it may not be the best or most desirable option.
  • jest about sm or sth The idiom "jest about sm or sth" means to make jokes, engage in playful banter or tease someone/something in a lighthearted or humorous manner. It refers to engaging in playful or humorous behavior without any ill intent.
  • streak across sth The idiom "streak across something" typically refers to moving quickly and smoothly across a surface, leaving a visible trail or mark. It often implies a swift, conspicuous movement or action that stands out or catches attention.
  • cut out for sm or sth The idiom "cut out for (something or someone)" means to be suited or well-suited for a particular task, occupation, skill, or role. It implies that a person or thing is naturally or inherently able to handle or succeed in a specific situation.
  • tempt sm to do sth The idiom "tempt someone to do something" means to induce or encourage someone to engage in a certain action or behavior, usually one that is considered wrong, dangerous, or undesirable. It suggests the act of enticing or seducing someone into doing something they may not otherwise choose to do.
  • be every inch sth The idiom "be every inch sth" means to fully embody or represent a certain quality or characteristic. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to perfectly encapsulates the stated attribute in every aspect or detail.
  • crush sm or sth down The idiom "crush sm or sth down" typically means to forcefully suppress or overcome someone or something, usually referring to conflicts, opposition, or obstacles. It implies using great force or power to defeat or subdue something.
  • soup up sth The idiom "soup up something" refers to the act of enhancing or improving something, typically a vehicle or machine, by making modifications that increase its performance, power, or speed. It often involves adding or upgrading components, such as engines, parts, or features, to make it more powerful or impressive.
  • break open sth "Break open sth" is an idiom that refers to forcibly opening or cracking something, typically a container or object. It implies using a substantial amount of force to access the contents or interior of the object.
  • not in the same league with sm or sth The idiom "not in the same league with someone or something" means that someone or something is not as skilled, talented, or successful as another person or thing. It highlights a significant difference in abilities or quality.
  • think twice (before doing sth) The idiom "think twice (before doing something)" means to carefully consider the consequences or potential risks before taking a particular action. It suggests taking a moment to reflect and make a more thoughtful decision, advising against hasty or impulsive behavior.
  • wipe sm or sth off the face of the earth The idiom "wipe someone or something off the face of the earth" means to completely destroy or eliminate them or it. It suggests removing all traces or existence of someone or something, usually in a forceful or violent manner.
  • call sth forth The idiom "call something forth" means to evoke, summon, or bring about a particular response, reaction, or result. It refers to the act of causing or encouraging something to be expressed, produced, or developed.
  • take note of sm or sth The idiom "take note of someone or something" means to pay attention to, acknowledge, or be aware of someone or something. It implies recognizing the importance or significance of the mentioned person or thing.
  • invest sth in sm or sth The idiom "invest something in someone/something" means to allocate time, money, or effort in a particular person or thing with the expectation of receiving benefits or positive outcomes in return. It can refer to financial investments, as well as investing emotions, energy, or resources into relationships, projects, or ideas.
  • comb through sth The idiom "comb through something" means to search or examine something very carefully and thoroughly in order to find specific information, details, or patterns.
  • vote sth through The idiom "vote sth through" refers to the act of approving or passing something, typically a proposal, law, or policy, through a formal voting process. It implies the successful progression or acceptance of a particular measure or idea.
  • weave in and out (of sth) The idiom "weave in and out (of sth)" refers to the act of moving quickly and unpredictably through or between various things or places, often in a zigzagging or serpentine manner. It can be used to describe physical movement, such as driving through traffic or maneuvering through a crowd, as well as metaphorical actions or thoughts that change rapidly or fluctuate between different options or ideas.
  • reluctant to do sth The idiom "reluctant to do something" means being unwilling or hesitant to perform a specific action or engage in a certain behavior. It implies a sense of hesitation or resistance towards carrying out the requested or expected task.
  • burn out (sth) The idiom "burn out (sth)" typically means to exhaust or deplete something, often referring to energy, resources, or enthusiasm, as a result of excessive use or strain. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • refer to sb/sth The idiom "refer to sb/sth" means to mention or speak about someone or something in a particular context or way. It can also imply directing someone's attention to a specific person or thing for further information or clarification.
  • get (oneself) into a stew (over sm or sth) The idiom "get (oneself) into a stew (over sm or sth)" means to become overly worried, anxious, or upset about someone or something. It implies getting oneself into a state of mental or emotional turmoil due to a particular issue or situation.
  • perceive sm or sth as sth The idiom "perceive someone or something as something" refers to the act of interpreting or understanding someone or something in a particular way, often based on personal experiences, beliefs, or preconceived notions. It implies how an individual forms a specific impression or judgment about someone or something, shaping their perception accordingly.
  • throw sth up to sm or sth The idiom "throw something up to someone or something" means to mention or remind someone of a past mistake, fault, or failure in order to criticize or reproach them. It refers to bringing up something negative from the past and using it as a weapon against someone or something in a current situation.
  • project sth on (to) sm or sth The idiom "project something onto (someone or something)" means to attribute or assign one's own thoughts, feelings, or characteristics onto another person or object. It involves perceiving or assuming similarities between oneself and others, often projecting one's own emotions or beliefs onto them, without having concrete evidence for such associations.
  • legislate for sth The idiom "legislate for sth" means to make or create laws or regulations specifically addressing a particular issue, situation, or problem. It refers to the process of enacting legislation in order to establish rules or guidelines related to a particular subject matter.
  • lag behind (sb/sth) The idiom "lag behind (sb/sth)" means to not progress or develop at the same pace as someone or something else. It describes a situation where a person or thing is falling behind in terms of progress, achievements, or advancement compared to others.
  • run sb/sth to ground The idiom "run sb/sth to ground" refers to the act of persistently searching for someone or something until they are located or found. It often implies the use of relentless efforts or strategies to chase down or track down the desired person or thing.
  • put stock in sth The idiom "put stock in something" means to have confidence in or place importance on something. It implies that one believes in or trusts the value, reliability, or significance of a particular thing or idea.
  • get sth in(to) sm The idiom "get sth in(to) sm" typically means to successfully fit, squeeze, or insert something into a confined or limited space.
  • stave sth off The idiom "stave sth off" means to prevent or delay something negative or undesirable from happening. It implies taking action to avoid a problem or ward off a threat.
  • pucker sth up To "pucker something up" is an idiom that means to fold, gather, or tighten something, often referring to one's lips or mouth. It commonly implies the action of preparing to kiss, whistle, or express disapproval.
  • raffle sth off To "raffle something off" means to dispose of or give away something by means of a raffle or lottery. It refers to the act of randomly drawing a winning ticket from a pool of tickets or entries, and the winner being awarded the item or prize being raffled. This phrase is commonly used when organizations or individuals want to raise funds or promote a cause by selling tickets to people with the chance to win a prize.
  • believe sth when you see it The idiom "believe something when you see it" means that someone is skeptical about a claim or promise and will only believe it when they see concrete evidence or proof of it happening. It implies that they are doubtful and need visual or observable confirmation before accepting something as true.
  • with respect to sth The idiom "with respect to" means in relation to or concerning something. It is used to indicate the specific subject or topic being discussed or considered. It is often used to clarify the context or frame of reference for a particular statement or discussion.
  • says sth about sb/sth The idiom "says something about somebody/something" is used to describe a situation or behavior that provides insight or reveals information about a person, thing, or situation. It implies that whatever was observed or experienced conveys a particular characteristic, quality, or judgment about the subject being discussed.
  • segregate (sm, sth, or an animal) into sth The idiom "segregate (someone, something, or an animal) into something" means to separate or divide them based on specific characteristics or qualities into distinct groups or categories. It implies the act of isolating or sorting individuals or things into different, usually separate, sections or classifications based on certain criteria.
  • wipe sm or sth off The idiom "wipe sm or sth off" means to remove or eliminate something, often in a quick and thorough manner. It can be used in a literal sense, referring to physically cleaning or erasing a substance or mark, or in a figurative sense, indicating the act of getting rid of something completely, such as a problem, debt, or memory.
  • select sm or sth as sth The idiom "select someone or something as something" means to choose or pick someone or something for a particular role, position, or designation. It implies making a conscious decision to assign that person or thing to fulfill a specific role or function. It indicates a deliberate choice based on certain criteria or preferences.
  • fiddle with sth The idiom "fiddle with something" means to touch, handle, or manipulate something repeatedly or in a restless manner without any particular purpose or goal. It commonly implies that one is engaging in a minor or unnecessary activity, often out of boredom or nervousness.
  • avenge oneself (on sm or sth) (for sth) The idiom "avenge oneself (on someone or something) (for something)" means to take revenge or seek retribution for a wrongdoing or harm done to oneself, another person, or something/someone valuable. It implies seeking justice or correcting a perceived injustice by inflicting harm or bringing harm upon the one responsible for the initial wrongdoing.
  • on the front line of sth The idiom "on the front line of something" refers to being in a position or situation where one is directly involved or impacted by a particular issue, task, or conflict. It is often used metaphorically, drawing from military terminology where the front line is the area closest to the enemy or where the most intense fighting takes place. Being on the front line implies being at the forefront of a situation, actively facing challenges and taking direct action.
  • I/You wouldn't wish sth on my/your worst enemy. The idiom "I/You wouldn't wish something on my/your worst enemy" is used to express a strong aversion or condemnation towards a particular event or situation. It implies that the speaker finds the mentioned circumstance so unpleasant, painful, or undesirable that they would not even want someone they despise or have ill-feelings towards to experience it. It signifies the severity and intensity of the negative consequences associated with the given circumstance.
  • battle sth out The idiom "battle something out" means to engage in a vigorous or intense conflict or argument in order to resolve a disagreement or reach a conclusion. It suggests a process of confronting opposing viewpoints, ideas, or strategies through active debate or competition until a resolution is reached.
  • speculate in sth The idiom "speculate in something" refers to making investments or engaging in financial activities with the intention of potentially gaining profits, especially when there is a level of uncertainty or risk involved. It implies taking part in speculative ventures or ventures with uncertain outcomes in the hope of making significant financial gains.
  • keep a tight rein on sb/sth The idiom "keep a tight rein on someone/something" means to maintain strict control or close supervision over someone or something. It implies the need for cautious management or strict oversight to ensure discipline, obedience, or efficient functioning. It originates from the act of gripping and managing reins tightly while riding a horse to maintain control and direction.
  • pick up sth The idiom "pick up something" is used to describe the action of acquiring or obtaining something, often spontaneously or without much effort. It can refer to purchasing or getting hold of an item, learning a new skill or information, or forming a habit or behavior.
  • set up sth The idiom "set up sth" typically means to establish or arrange something, often with the intention of making it functional or operational. It can refer to various contexts, such as creating or organizing a business, installing or arranging equipment, preparing or planning an event, or even manipulating or framing a situation.
  • counsel sm against sth The idiom "counsel someone against something" means to advise or urge someone not to do or engage in a particular thing or action. It implies giving guidance or recommendation to dissuade someone from pursuing or choosing a specific course of action due to potential negative consequences or risks associated with it.
  • attached to sm or sth The idiom "attached to someone or something" means having a strong emotional or personal connection, usually indicating affection, fondness, or dependency towards a person or thing. It implies a sense of closeness, involvement, or dedication.
  • slap sth onto sm or sth The idiom "slap sth onto sm or sth" means to add or apply something quickly, often in a careless or haphazard manner, onto someone or something. It implies doing it without much thought, precision, or care, similar to the action of slapping.
  • wangle out of sth The idiom "wangle out of sth" means to skillfully or cleverly avoid or evade a situation, task, responsibility, or obligation. It implies using tactics or manipulation to escape from something one is expected to do.
  • drink sth in The idiom "drink something in" means to absorb or experience something completely or eagerly, often by observing or immersing oneself in it. It implies taking the time to fully appreciate or understand something, using all of one's senses.
  • see eye to eye (about sm or sth) (with sm) To "see eye to eye (about something) (with someone)" means to have the same opinion, viewpoint, or understanding about a particular topic or issue. It refers to a situation where two or more individuals have a mutual agreement or share similar ideas and perspectives, leading to clear understanding and minimal or no disagreement.
  • bring sm uptodate (on sm or sth) The idiom "bring someone up to date (on something or someone)" means to inform or update someone about recent developments, new information, or current events pertaining to a specific topic or situation. It involves ensuring that the person is aware of the latest relevant details and is not ignorant or uninformed.
  • drape sth around sm or sth The idiom "drape something around someone or something" means to hang or loosely place something such as clothing, a fabric, or an object on or around a person or thing in a casual or decorative manner. It suggests the act of arranging or placing something loosely and artfully.
  • sift sth from sth The idiom "sift something from something" refers to the action of carefully examining or evaluating something to separate and extract valuable or important elements from a larger set of information or material. It relates to the process of sorting through a mixture or assortment to identify what is useful or relevant.
  • put sth down to sth The idiom "put sth down to sth" means to attribute the cause or reason of something to a particular factor or explanation. It is often used when trying to find an explanation for an event or situation.
  • pump sth up The idiom "pump something up" refers to increasing the intensity, excitement, or enthusiasm of something. It can be used in various contexts, such as pumping up a crowd, a team, an event, or even one's own motivation. It implies adding energy or vigor to a particular situation.
  • envy sm for sm or sth The idiom "envy someone for someone or something" means to feel a strong desire or longing for something that someone else possesses, be it a person or a thing. It indicates a feeling of jealousy or admiration towards a specific person or their qualities, belongings, achievements, etc.
  • warm up to sm or sth The idiom "warm up to someone or something" means to gradually develop a liking, affection, or enthusiasm towards someone or something. It implies a process of initially being hesitant or distant, but then gradually becoming more open and receptive.
  • won't hear a word (said) against sb/sth The idiom "won't hear a word (said) against someone/something" means to refuse to listen to any negative comments, criticism, or complaints about a particular person or thing. It implies complete loyalty, support, or admiration towards that person or thing, disregarding any negative opinions or remarks.
  • immerse sm or sth in sth The idiom "immerse someone or something in something" means to completely involve or engross someone or something in a particular activity, experience, or environment. It suggests deep involvement and saturation, as if the person or thing is fully surrounded or submerged in the given context.
  • live in sth The idiom "live in sth" typically refers to residing or inhabiting a particular place or situation. It implies that someone is experiencing or enduring a circumstance or condition on a regular basis. It can also indicate that someone is deeply immersed or engrossed in a specific state or emotion.
  • move back (from sm or sth) The idiom "move back (from sm or sth)" means to physically or figuratively retreat or withdraw from someone or something. It implies creating distance or avoiding further engagement or involvement.
  • stop short of sth The idiom "stop short of sth" means to come close to doing something but ultimately decide not to do it. It implies stopping or refraining from taking the final step or completing the action.
  • scream for sth The idiom "scream for sth" means to be in desperate need or demand for something. It implies that a particular thing or action is strongly desired or required. It often suggests a high level of urgency or necessity.
  • carry over sth The idiom "carry over sth" means to continue or bring forward something from one time period or situation to another. It can refer to transferring or retaining something such as work, tasks, ideas, or even emotions from one day, project, or experience to the next without interruption or completion.
  • hurl sm or sth down The idiom "hurl sm or sth down" means to throw or forcefully send something or someone downward with great force or violence. It suggests a forceful and uncontrolled action, often with the intention of causing harm or destruction.
  • turn sth off The idiom "turn something off" means to stop or deactivate a device, a system, or a piece of equipment. It is often used to refer to the action of switching off electricity supply or shutting down a machine, appliance, or any other electronic or mechanical device.
  • lecture at sm (about sth) The idiom "lecture at someone (about something)" refers to speaking in a didactic or instructive manner to someone, often in a condescending or patronizing way. It implies that one person is speaking at length and giving a lengthy, formal lecture or sermon to another person, usually on a topic the listener may not be interested in or already familiar with. It suggests that the speaker is trying to educate or lecture the listener, often without considering their opinion or input.
  • arrive at sth The idiom "arrive at something" means to reach or achieve a particular decision, conclusion, or understanding after thoughtful consideration or investigation. It often implies a process or journey of deliberation before attaining a specific outcome.
  • contribute sth (to sm) (for sm or sth) The idiom "contribute something (to someone) (for something or someone)" means to give or provide something to support a cause or help someone or something. It implies offering assistance, resources, or input for the benefit or advancement of a particular person, group, or situation.
  • bring sm or sth back The idiom "bring something or someone back" means to bring or reintroduce something or someone that was previously present or existed before. It can refer to physically bringing back an item or person, or reintroducing a concept, trend, or practice that had been discontinued or forgotten.
  • train sth on (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "train something on someone/something or an animal" means to direct, focus, or aim something towards them in order to control or manipulate their behavior or actions. This can be done through instructions, commands, or by utilizing tools and techniques to influence the desired outcome.
  • it wouldn't hurt you to do sth The idiom "it wouldn't hurt you to do something" means that doing a particular action or task would not cause any harm or negative consequences to oneself. It implies that the action is relatively easy or beneficial and suggests that it would be a good idea to do it.
  • split sm or sth with sm or sth The idiom "split something with someone" typically means to divide or share something equally between two or more people. It implies an equal distribution or division of a particular thing, such as money, food, or responsibilities.
  • put sth right The idiom "put something right" means to correct or fix a mistake, wrongdoing, or problem, often by taking action to resolve or make amends for the situation. It implies the act of restoring something to its proper or intended state.
  • Crusade for sm or sth The idiom "Crusade for sm or sth" refers to a determined, passionate, and vigorous campaign or effort made by someone to support, preserve, or promote a particular cause, issue, belief, or opinion. It usually involves actively fighting or advocating for something that the person strongly believes in, regardless of any obstacles or opposition.
  • have done/seen/had etc. more sth than sb has had hot dinners The idiom "have done/seen/had more something than someone has had hot dinners" is used to signify that someone has plentiful experience or knowledge in a particular area compared to someone else. It suggests that the person has engaged in, witnessed, or possessed something to an extensive degree, as if they have encountered it more times than the other person has had meals.
  • pout about sm or sth The idiom "pout about something" refers to expressing discontent, displeasure, or sadness usually by sulking, moping, or wearing a sullen expression. It implies reacting negatively or petulantly to a specific issue or situation while showing visible signs of dissatisfaction.
  • make sm or sth available to sm The idiom "make someone or something available to someone" means to provide someone with access to or offer someone the opportunity to use or have something. It could refer to giving someone access to resources, offering services, or making something accessible for their use.
  • open the door to sth 2 The idiom "open the door to sth" means to create an opportunity or introduce the possibility of something happening. It signifies providing access or allowing the occurrence of a situation or opportunity to arise.
  • pick sm or sth off (of) sm or sth The idiom "pick off (of)" means to remove or pluck something from someone or something, often with great precision or accuracy. It can be used in a literal sense, such as picking off a leaf from a branch, or in a figurative sense, such as picking off opponents one by one in a game or contest.
  • ice sth down The idiom "ice sth down" means to cool something down by placing ice or a cold substance on it. It is often used to refer to the act of cooling beverages, injuries, or inflammation by applying ice or cold packs.
  • offend against sm or sth The idiom "offend against someone or something" refers to the action of violating or transgressing a person, a group, or a particular concept, often through words or actions that are disrespectful, inappropriate, or harmful. It implies that someone has acted in a manner that is offensive, displeasing, or insulting, thereby going against the established norms, values, or sensibilities associated with the person or thing being offended.
  • wire sth together The idiom "wire something together" refers to an act of connecting or securing different components or parts using wire. It often implies a temporary or makeshift solution rather than a permanent or proper fix. It can also be used metaphorically to describe haphazardly or hastily assembling something, often with limited resources or skill.
  • clear sth away The idiom "clear something away" refers to the act of removing or tidying up something, usually referring to physical objects or clutter. It means to remove or organize items in order to create a cleaner and more organized space.
  • rake sth up The idiom "rake something up" means to revive, bring up, or resurrect something unpleasant or undesirable from the past, often in a deliberate or unnecessarily persistent manner. It refers to recalling or mentioning a past event or issue that could potentially cause conflict, rekindle old tensions, or reopen old wounds.
  • pick sm or sth apart The idiom "pick something or someone apart" refers to carefully examining and critiquing every aspect of something or someone in a highly detailed and thorough manner. It involves scrutinizing and analyzing each component, often with the intent of finding flaws, weaknesses, or inconsistencies.
  • bounce out (of sth) The idiom "bounce out (of sth)" typically means to quickly and unexpectedly leave or exit from a place or situation. It can indicate a sudden departure or an abrupt exit without notice.
  • stake out a claim to sth The idiom "stake out a claim to sth" means to assert or declare one's right or ownership over something, typically a piece of land or territory. It originated from the practice of using stakes or markers to establish boundaries or ownership boundaries. Figuratively, it can also refer to claiming or asserting one's position, rights, or intentions in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • prostrate oneself before sm or sth The idiom "prostrate oneself before someone or something" means to show extreme reverence, submission, or deference towards someone or something. It often implies completely surrendering one's will or displaying utmost respect or adoration. It can be interpreted as a symbol of complete humility, acknowledging the superiority or importance of the person or thing being revered.
  • ice sth up The idiom "ice sth up" typically means to chill or cool something by adding ice or keeping it in a cold environment. It can be used literally, as in refrigerating or freezing something, or figuratively, meaning to calm down or make a situation less intense or heated.
  • lash back (at sm or sth) The idiom "lash back (at someone or something)" refers to the act of retaliating or responding strongly and negatively, usually with criticism or anger, towards a person or situation that has caused frustration, harm, or offense. It implies a forceful reaction against someone or something that has provoked a strong emotional response.
  • nag at sm (about sm or sth) The idiom "nag at someone (about something)" means to continuously or repeatedly complain, criticize, or pester someone about something, especially in a persistent or irritating manner. It refers to the act of being constantly reminded or bothered by someone regarding a particular topic or issue.
  • wonder at sm or sth The idiom "wonder at someone or something" means to be amazed, curious, or puzzled by someone or something. It suggests a sense of admiration, surprise, or astonishment towards a person or thing.
  • progress with sth The idiom "progress with sth" means to make advancements or move forward in a particular project, task, or situation. It refers to the act of making steady or continuous progress towards achieving a goal or completing a specific task.
  • yell sth out (at sm or sth) The idiom "yell sth out (at sm or sth)" means to shout or speak loudly in order to communicate something to someone or to get their attention. It refers to raising one's voice above normal speaking volume in a forceful manner.
  • give/hand sth to sb on a plate The idiom "give/hand something to someone on a plate" means to provide something or make it very easy for someone, to the extent that they do not have to make any effort or work hard to attain it. It implies that something is given without any effort, difficulty, or struggle on the part of the recipient.
  • do sth on a bet, at do sth for a bet The idiom "do something on a bet" or "do something for a bet" refers to a situation where someone engages in an activity or takes a particular action primarily driven by a wager or a challenge. It implies that the person may not have been inclined to do it otherwise, but they agree to do it due to the prospect of winning the bet or meeting the challenge. It emphasizes that the motivation behind the action is not a genuine desire or interest but rather an external factor.
  • vanish from sth The idiom "vanish from sth" refers to the act of disappearing or becoming completely absent from a particular situation, place, or object. It implies that something or someone was once present or noticeable but has now completely disappeared or ceased to exist in that context.
  • go to extremes (to do sth) The idiom "go to extremes (to do something)" means to take drastic or excessive measures in order to accomplish a particular task or achieve a certain goal. It implies going beyond what is considered reasonable or necessary, and often involves extreme actions, effort, or behavior.
  • take sth in (one's) stride To take something in one's stride means to handle or deal with something calmly and without being disturbed or upset. It suggests that a person is able to accept and manage a difficult situation or setback with ease and confidence, without allowing it to negatively affect their emotions or overall composure.
  • take sm or sth off The idiom "take sm or sth off" typically means to remove or subtract something, or to decrease or reduce the quantity or level of something. It can refer to removing an item of clothing, deducting an amount from a total, canceling or rescheduling an event, or diminishing the intensity or importance of something.
  • veer (away) (from sm or sth) The idiom "veer (away) (from sm or sth)" means to change direction or course abruptly, usually in order to avoid or deviate from someone or something. It often implies a sudden shift or divergence from a planned path or expected behavior.
  • bail sth out The idiom "bail something out" means to provide financial assistance or rescue someone or something from a challenging or difficult situation, typically by providing money or resources. It is often used when referring to the act of helping a business, organization, or individual overcome financial or operational problems.
  • order sth in The idiom "order sth in" means to request or purchase something from a supplier or retailer to be delivered to a specific location. It is typically used to describe the act of placing an order for goods or services to be brought to a designated place, rather than going to a physical store or location to acquire them.
  • be/have sth to do with sth The idiom "be/have something to do with something" generally means to be connected or related to something, to be involved in something, or to play a role in something. It implies a relationship or association between two things or concepts.
  • fold sth away The idiom "fold something away" means to carefully and neatly put or store something, typically by folding it in a compact and manageable form.
  • glare at sm or sth The idiom "glare at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something angrily or intensely, often with a piercing or fixed gaze. It implies a strong expression of displeasure, resentment, or disapproval.
  • keep an eye on sm or sth The idiom "keep an eye on someone or something" means to monitor or watch someone or something closely, typically to ensure their safety, security, or well-being. It implies being vigilant and attentive to any changes, developments, or potential problems that may arise.
  • put/set sth in motion The idiom "put/set something in motion" means to initiate or start a process, activity, or plan. It refers to taking the necessary actions to begin something.
  • intertwine sth with sth The idiom "intertwine something with something" means to combine or connect two or more things closely together, often in a way that they become inseparable or intertwined. It implies a strong or complex relationship between the elements involved, where they are intricately woven or interconnected.
  • mislead sm about sth The idiom "mislead someone about something" means to give someone false or incorrect information, leading them to have a wrong understanding or belief about a specific thing or situation. It implies intentionally guiding or providing misleading facts, causing someone to be confused, deceived, or led astray.
  • carp at sm (about sm or sth) The idiom "carp at something or someone (about something or someone)" means to complain or find fault with something or someone repeatedly, often in a critical or nagging manner. It refers to someone who habitually picks at the smallest flaws or shortcomings, displaying dissatisfaction and negative remarks.
  • lay eyes on sb/sth The idiom "lay eyes on someone/something" means to see or come into visual contact with someone or something for the first time. It implies that the person or thing being seen is captivating, interesting, or attractive.
  • make a beeline for sm or sth The idiom "make a beeline for someone or something" means to head directly and quickly towards a person or thing without any detour or delay. It implies that a person is determined, focused, or eager to reach their destination or goal.
  • up and did sth The idiom "up and did something" refers to taking immediate action or getting something done promptly and efficiently. It implies speed and determination in completing a task or achieving a goal without delay.
  • grind away (at sth) The idiom "grind away (at sth)" means to persistently work on something, often in a repetitive or monotonous manner, without giving up or being discouraged. It refers to putting in consistent effort and dedication towards achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • relate sth to sth The idiom "relate something to something" means to establish or determine a connection between two things or ideas. It involves finding similarities, commonalities, or associations between two different concepts or objects.
  • score against sm or sth The idiom "score against someone or something" generally means to achieve a successful outcome or gain an advantage over someone or something. It is often used in sports or competitive situations where keeping track of points or goals is involved. Additionally, it can also be used metaphorically in non-athletic contexts to describe getting ahead or prevailing over someone or something in a certain situation.
  • grind sth together The idiom "grind something together" typically refers to the act of continuously working hard and putting effort into something, often with another person or a group, in order to achieve a desired outcome or accomplish a shared goal. It implies a dedicated and persistent effort, often involving repetitive or challenging tasks, to eventually achieve success or progress.
  • harmonize with sm or sth The idiom "harmonize with someone or something" means to agree or be in agreement with someone's ideas, views, opinions, or to be compatible or in accordance with something.
  • ram sth into sm or sth The idiom "ram something into someone or something" means to forcefully push, drive, or thrust something forcefully or violently into someone or something. It can be used both in a literal and figurative sense to describe an act of pushing or forcing something with excessive force or intensity.
  • dispense with sm or sth To "dispense with someone or something" means to eliminate or do without them/it, usually because they are not necessary or useful. It refers to getting rid of a person, object, or process, often in order to simplify or streamline a situation.
  • grind sth down The idiom "grind sth down" refers to the process of wearing something or someone down through continuous effort, pressure, or persistence. It implies exerting influence over time to weaken someone's resistance, break their spirit, or decrease the durability of a physical object.
  • doctor's orders sth The idiom "doctor's orders" refers to instructions or directives given by a physician for the treatment, care, or behavior of a patient. It implies that the instructions are to be followed without question, as they are based on the professional expertise and judgment of a doctor.
  • throw sm or sth over sm or sth The idiom "throw something/someone over something/someone" typically means to discard or reject someone or something in favor of another choice or option. It can refer to a situation where someone abandons or betrays a person or idea for someone or something else.
  • laugh at sm or sth To "laugh at someone or something" means to find amusement or joy in mocking, ridiculing, or making fun of them or it.
  • finetune sth The idiom "finetune something" means to make small adjustments or improvements to something in order to achieve optimal results or performance. It involves refining or perfecting a particular thing, process, or system to enhance its effectiveness or efficiency.
  • cure sth of sth The idiom "cure something of something" means to find a solution or remedy for a problem or issue. It implies the action of treating or eliminating whatever is troubling or causing difficulty or harm. This can be applied to a wide range of contexts, such as curing a person of a disease, curing a situation of its negative effects, or curing a habit or behavior.
  • wash sm or sth off The idiom "wash sm or sth off" means to remove dirt, stains, or unwanted substances from someone or something by using water or another cleaning agent. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate getting rid of negative feelings, memories, or associations.
  • dash over (for sth) The idiom "dash over (for sth)" means to quickly go somewhere, typically a short distance away, in order to acquire or obtain something. It implies a sense of urgency or haste in doing so.
  • remain away (from sm or sth) The idiom "remain away (from someone or something)" means to deliberately stay or keep oneself apart from a particular person or thing. It implies choosing not to be involved, present, or associated with the person or thing in question.
  • transpose sth (from sth) (to sth) The idiom "transpose something (from something) (to something)" refers to the act of moving or transferring something, such as information, data, or music, from one place or format to another. It implies rearranging or converting something to match a different system, structure, or order.
  • sth of the sort The idiom "something of the sort" is used to refer to something similar or related to a previous statement or idea. It implies that there is something comparable or akin to what has been mentioned, without providing specific details or clarity about it.
  • be up to your ears in sth The idiom "be up to your ears in something" means to be extremely busy or heavily involved in a particular situation or activity, to the point where it becomes overwhelming or difficult to manage. It suggests a high level of engagement or immersion in something to the point of being deeply occupied or overwhelmed by it.
  • renounce sm for sth The phrase "renounce something for something" typically refers to the act of giving up or rejecting one thing in favor of another. It implies a deliberate decision to abandon or relinquish one's claim, possession, or association with something for the sake of gaining or pursuing something else.
  • beguile sm with sth To beguile someone with something means to charm, deceive, or allure them using that particular thing. It implies enticing someone through the use of cunning or cleverness to manipulate their thoughts or actions.
  • square off (for sth) The idiom "square off (for sth)" refers to the act of preparing for a confrontation or competition. It means to position oneself or a team in a way that is opposite to the opponent, as if forming a square shape. It often implies a sense of readiness, determination, and the anticipation of a struggle or dispute.
  • switch sm or sth around The idiom "switch sm or sth around" means to alter or rearrange the order, position, or arrangement of something or someone. It suggests the act of swapping or interchanging elements to create a different configuration or sequence.
  • wonder about sm or sth The idiom "wonder about someone or something" means to have curiosity, doubt, or speculation about that person or thing. It implies a sense of questioning or pondering regarding someone's actions, motives, or the nature/quality of something.
  • get ahold of sth The idiom "get ahold of something" means to successfully contact or obtain something, typically information or an item, often in a difficult or challenging situation.
  • give sm or sth away The idiom "give someone or something away" means to reveal a secret or confidential information unintentionally or unknowingly. It can also refer to disclosing someone's true intentions or identity, often leading to their detection or exposure.
  • pass along sth (to sb) The idiom "pass along something (to somebody)" means to give or transfer something to someone else. It can refer to passing along information, news, a message, a request, or any other item or piece of knowledge. The act of passing along something implies sharing it with someone else and transferring the responsibility or ownership of it.
  • struggle to do sth The idiom "struggle to do something" means to face difficulty or make a great effort in attempting to accomplish a certain task or achieve a goal. It implies that the action being attempted is challenging or not easily accomplished.
  • dab sth on(to) sth The idiom "dab something on (to) something" means to apply or spread a small amount of something onto a surface using quick, gentle motions. It often refers to using a cloth, sponge, or finger to lightly touch or smear a substance onto another object or surface.
  • huddle around sm or sth The idiom "huddle around someone or something" refers to a group of people gathering closely together around a person or object, usually to listen, discuss, or show interest. It implies a sense of intimacy, unity, and focus in the group's interaction.
  • bore through sth The idiom "bore through something" typically means to pass through or penetrate a substance, material, or situation with great force, determination, or intensity. It can be used metaphorically to describe someone who perseveres or pushes through obstacles, challenges, or difficulties without giving up or being deterred.
  • come by (sth) The idiom "come by (sth)" means acquiring or obtaining something, often with some difficulty or effort.
  • tilt toward sm or sth The idiom "tilt toward sm or sth" means to have a tendency or inclination towards someone or something. It implies leaning, favoring, or showing a partiality or preference for a particular person, group, idea, concept, or thing.
  • bring sth to a head, at come to a head The idiom "bring something to a head" or "come to a head" refers to a situation or problem reaching a critical or decisive point where a resolution or action becomes necessary. It implies that tensions, conflicts, or issues have been building up or progressing over time, ultimately leading to a climax or turning point that demands attention or resolution.
  • set forth sth The idiom "set forth sth" generally means to present, express, or provide information, ideas, or arguments in a clear and organized manner. It refers to making something known or understandable, often through written or verbal communication.
  • stare out at sm or sth The idiom "stare out at sm or sth" refers to the act of looking fixedly or intensely at someone or something for a prolonged period. It implies focusing attention, often with a combination of curiosity, contemplation, or even astonishment.
  • snap sth up The idiom "snap something up" means to quickly and enthusiastically purchase or acquire something, often when it is available for a limited time or in high demand. It implies acting swiftly to secure something before others have a chance to obtain it.
  • banish sm or sth from sm place The idiom "banish someone or something from somewhere" means to forcefully exile or remove someone or something from a particular place or location. It typically implies a permanent or prolonged removal, often necessitated due to a negative or undesirable presence or influence.
  • give birth to sm or sth The idiom "give birth to someone or something" refers to the act of bringing a new idea, concept, or creation into existence. It is often used metaphorically to describe the process of generating or producing something new, similar to the act of giving birth to a child.
  • squeeze sm or sth up When we say "squeeze someone or something up," it means to make space or fit someone or something into a tight or limited area. It involves compressing or adjusting to accommodate additional people or objects in a confined space.
  • nominate sm for sth The idiom "nominate someone for something" means to propose or put forward someone as a candidate for a specific position, role, award, or honor. It involves suggesting or recommending someone to be considered for a particular role or recognition.
  • furnish sth for sth The idiom "furnish sth for sth" typically means to provide or supply something specifically for a particular purpose or situation. It implies the act of equipping or outfitting something or someone with the necessary items, resources, or materials needed to fulfill a certain function or achieve a specific goal.
  • haul sth up (from sth) Haul something up (from something) typically refers to the act of lifting or pulling something, often from a lower position or location to a higher one. It can be used metaphorically to describe retrieving information or memories from the past or extracting something from a difficult or hidden situation.
  • flash sth around To "flash something around" typically means to show or display something, often in a boastful or showy manner, to draw attention or impress others. It can refer to flaunting one's wealth, possessions, achievements, or knowledge, usually with the intention of gaining admiration or asserting superiority.
  • spring for sth The idiom "spring for something" means to treat someone or pay for something, typically as a gesture of generosity or as an act of kindness. It refers to the act of willingly spending money on behalf of someone else.
  • keep a tight rein on sm or sth The idiom "keep a tight rein on someone or something" means to exercise strict control or supervision over someone or something. It implies closely monitoring and managing a person or situation to ensure compliance or prevent any unwanted actions or outcomes. It originates from horse riding, where a tight rein is needed to control and direct the horse's movements.
  • flesh sth out (with sth) The idiom "flesh something out (with something)" means to expand or provide more detail or substance to something, usually by adding additional information, examples, or explanations. It implies adding more depth and completeness to a concept, argument, story, or plan.
  • beg off (on sth) The idiom "beg off (on sth)" means to decline or excuse oneself from an obligation or responsibility, usually by providing a reason or an excuse. It often implies politely or formally expressing one's inability or unwillingness to participate or fulfill a commitment.
  • give sth under (the) threat of sth The idiom "give something under (the) threat of something" refers to a situation where someone is forced to provide or surrender something due to the presence of a threat or the risk of harm. It implies that the individual's action is not voluntary but compelled in order to avoid the negative consequences threatened by someone else.
  • conjecture on sth The idiom "conjecture on something" means to make an educated guess or speculation about something without having enough evidence or definite information. It refers to the act of forming a hypothesis or inference based on limited knowledge or assumptions.
  • punish sm with sth The idiom "punish someone with something" refers to the act of inflicting a penalty or negative consequence on someone through the use of a specific action or thing. It implies that the punishment or retribution being administered is related to or aligned with the specific circumstances or actions that warrant it.
  • consent to sth The idiom "consent to sth" refers to giving permission or agreeing to something. It implies the acknowledgment and approval of an action, decision, or request.
  • stuck with sb/sth To be "stuck with sb/sth" means to be unwillingly or uncomfortably obligated to stay or deal with someone or something. It implies a sense of being unable to escape or change the situation.
  • press on (with sth) The idiom "press on (with sth)" means to continue with determination or perseverance despite difficulties or setbacks. It implies a strong will to keep moving forward and not give up.
  • mix with sm or sth The idiom "mix with someone or something" refers to the act of socializing or spending time with a certain person or group of people, or involving oneself in a particular activity or environment. It implies interacting, mingling, or blending in with others or a specific object or situation.
  • wrote the book on sth The idiom "wrote the book on sth" is used to describe someone who is an expert or highly knowledgeable about a particular subject or skill. This phrase implies that the person in question literally wrote the book on the topic, meaning they have an extensive understanding and expertise in that area.
  • particulars (of sth) The idiom "particulars (of sth)" refers to the specific and detailed information or details regarding something. It refers to the specific characteristics, qualities, or attributes that are unique to a particular object, situation, or event.
  • bring sb/sth to their knees The idiom "bring someone/something to their knees" means to cause someone or something to become weak, submit or surrender, usually through force, pressure, or immense difficulty. It often implies a situation in which someone or something is unable to resist or oppose the overwhelming circumstances that have weakened or overwhelmed them.
  • whip sm or sth on The idiom "whip someone or something on" means to urge, encourage, or motivate someone or something forcefully to move quickly or perform a task expediently. It often implies a sense of speeding up or increasing the pace of someone or something.
  • snow sm or sth in The idiom "snow something in" refers to the situation when heavy snowfall makes it impossible to travel or move freely due to blocked or impassable roads.
  • perk up sth The idiom "perk up something" means to make something more lively, energetic, or improved in performance or appearance. It is often used when referring to situations, events, or objects that become more pleasant, interesting, or engaging.
  • pencil sm or sth in To "pencil someone or something in" means to tentatively schedule or make a provisional arrangement for a particular person or event. It implies that the plan is not confirmed or set in stone and may be subject to change. The phrase is often used when discussing appointments, meetings, or social engagements that are not yet finalized but are being considered as a potential option.
  • bleed from sth The idiom "bleed from something" typically means to experience extreme emotional distress or pain due to a particular situation or issue. It implies that the person's emotional turmoil is so intense that it metaphorically feels like they are physically bleeding.
  • stumble through sth The idiom "stumble through something" means to do or complete something, such as a task or a performance, without much skill or knowledge, often in a clumsy or haphazard manner. It implies that the person is struggling or finding it difficult to accomplish the task successfully.
  • prune sth of sth The idiom "prune something of something" means to remove or eliminate unnecessary or undesirable elements or characteristics from something, often in order to improve it or make it more effective, efficient, or appealing. It involves getting rid of excess or unwanted parts, features, or details to refine or trim down something, such as a design, a document, a plan, or any other thing that needs adjustment or improvement.
  • encourage sm in sth The idiom "encourage someone in something" means to give support or motivation to someone in pursuing a certain activity, goal, or endeavor. It involves providing positive reinforcement, advice, or assistance to help someone develop their skills or capabilities in that specific thing.
  • have a hunch (that sth is the case) The idiom "have a hunch (that sth is the case)" means to have a strong intuition or a gut feeling about something, often without any concrete evidence or logical reasoning. It implies that the person has an instinctive belief or suspicion that something is true or will happen, even though they cannot explain why.
  • wave/say goodbye to sth The idiom "wave/say goodbye to sth" means to acknowledge that something is going away or ending, usually in a negative or regretful way. It conveys the idea of accepting or acknowledging the loss or disappearance of something.
  • talk over sth The idiom "talk over something" means to discuss or deliberate about something with others, usually to understand it better or to reach a decision or consensus. It involves engaging in a conversation or dialogue to exchange thoughts, opinions, or information about a particular topic or issue.
  • prey (up)on sm or sth The idiom "prey (up)on someone or something" means to exploit, take advantage of, or harm someone or something weaker or vulnerable. It suggests an individual or entity who acts aggressively or parasitically to derive personal gain at the expense of others.
  • fall foul of sth The phrase "fall foul of something" means to experience trouble, conflict, or disagreement with something or someone. It implies getting into a difficult or problematic situation due to a certain circumstance, rule, or person. It often suggests violating a rule, law, or expectation and facing negative consequences as a result.
  • peep at sm or sth The idiom "peep at someone or something" means to take a quick or secret look at someone or something, without being noticed or without permission. It implies observing someone or something discreetly or momentarily.
  • steel sm against sm or sth The idiom "steel oneself against someone or something" means to mentally or emotionally prepare oneself to resist or withstand a difficult person, situation, or challenge. It implies building up courage, determination, or resilience to face a specific obstacle or adverse circumstances head-on. This idiom is often used to convey the idea of fortifying oneself against potential harm, disappointment, or failure.
  • knock sth on the head To knock something on the head means to put an end to it or to stop it from continuing, especially because it is not successful, beneficial, or desirable anymore. It implies the act of ending or canceling an activity, plan, or idea.
  • get sm kind of mileage out of sth The idiom "get some kind of mileage out of something" means to benefit or gain a certain advantage or usefulness from a particular situation, object, or experience. It refers to finding a way to obtain some value or result from something, often beyond its original purpose or intention.
  • apply (to sm or sth) (for sth) The idiom "apply (to someone or something) (for something)" means to make a formal request or submit an official application in order to be considered for a specific opportunity or position, such as a job, a grant, or admission to a program or school. It entails filling out relevant forms, providing necessary information, and following the prescribed procedures to demonstrate interest or eligibility for the desired outcome.
  • snuggle (up) against sm or sth The idiom "snuggle (up) against someone or something" means to cuddle or get close to someone or something, usually for warmth, comfort, or affection. It expresses the idea of holding someone or something closely in a tender or intimate manner.
  • take an amount of money for sth The idiom "take an amount of money for sth" typically refers to an individual or entity receiving payment in exchange for a particular object, service, or job. It implies setting a specific price or charge for a particular item or action.
  • keep sm or sth apart The idiom "keep someone or something apart" means to maintain a physical or emotional distance between individuals or things. It implies preventing them from being too close or separating them to avoid conflict, confrontation, or undesired consequences.
  • cast sth back (sm place) The idiom "cast sth back (sm place)" means to return something or send it back to its original location or origin. It implies sending something back after it had been borrowed, taken away, or temporarily relocated.
  • tip the scales at sth The idiom "tip the scales at something" refers to a situation where the weight or importance of something becomes significant or excessive. It means that something, usually a physical object or a situation, is considered to be heavy or large in a literal or metaphorical sense.
  • slip on sth The idiom "slip on something" typically means to quickly and easily put on a certain garment or piece of clothing, such as shoes, clothes, or accessories, often without much effort or trouble.
  • blow sth out of the water The idiom "blow something out of the water" means to completely surpass or exceed something, typically in terms of achievement, performance, or impact. It refers to an action or result that is so impressive or effective that it completely outshines or overwhelms the competition or previous standards.
  • come out with sth The idiom "come out with sth" means to publicly announce, reveal, or disclose something, especially when it is unexpected or surprising. It refers to the act of making information or views known to others.
  • indoctrinate sm with sth The idiom "indoctrinate someone with something" means to teach, persuade, or influence someone to accept a certain set of beliefs, ideas, or principles, often in a forceful or one-sided manner, without allowing for critical thinking or alternative viewpoints. It implies a deliberate and systematic effort to shape someone's thinking and perception in a particular way, often associated with ideological or religious teachings.
  • turn sm or sth to sth The idiom "turn someone or something to something" means to convert or change the purpose or use of someone or something to a different one. It signifies repurposing or altering the function or role of someone or something.
  • gather sth from sm or sth The idiom "gather something from someone or something" means to collect or acquire information, ideas, or knowledge from someone or something. It refers to the act of gathering or obtaining something from a particular source.
  • put (your) money on sb/sth The idiom "put (your) money on sb/sth" means to bet or have confidence in someone or something. It implies willingly investing financially or emotionally in the success or outcome of a particular person or thing.
  • pander to sth The idiom "pander to sth" refers to the act of catering excessively or insincerely to the desires, tastes, or preferences of others, often with the intention of gaining favor, pleasing them or gaining personal advantages. It involves satisfying someone's wishes unethically, by providing them with exactly what they want, irrespective of its harmful consequences or lack of authenticity.
  • dip into sth The idiom "dip into something" typically means to briefly engage or become involved in something, often for a short period of time or without fully committing to it. It can also refer to accessing or using something in small amounts or intervals.
  • howl with sth The idiom "howl with something" typically means to express or exhibit strong emotions, often in a vocal and uncontrolled manner. It signifies a passionate or intense reaction to a particular situation or emotion.
  • direct sm's attention to sm or sth The idiom "direct someone's attention to someone or something" means to intentionally and purposefully guide or indicate a person or thing to be noticed or focused on by someone else. It involves drawing someone's attention to a particular person, object, or situation.
  • expend sth on sm or sth The idiom "expend something on someone or something" means to use or spend a significant amount of money, effort, or resources on someone or something, usually to achieve a particular goal or outcome. It implies making an investment or committing to an expenditure in order to obtain a desired result.
  • proceed against sm or sth The idiom "proceed against someone or something" means to take legal or formal action against someone or something in order to seek justice, resolve a dispute, or enforce rules or regulations.
  • declare war against sm or sth To "declare war against someone or something" means to openly and formally state or announce an intention to engage in a conflict or struggle against them. It signifies a determined and deliberate initiative to combat or overcome the entity being targeted. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe a strong opposition or active hostility towards a particular person, group, idea, or situation.
  • inch along (sth) The idiom "inch along (sth)" means to make slow, gradual progress or movement in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies moving forward slowly and steadily, often with great effort, similar to how an inchworm crawls along inch by inch.
  • slosh sth (all) over sm or sth The idiom "slosh something (all) over someone or something" means to spill or splash a liquid clumsily and carelessly onto a person or an object. It implies a lack of control or precision when handling the liquid, resulting in it being dispersed in an untidy or haphazard manner.
  • argue sm into doing sth The definition for the idiom "argue someone into doing something" is to persuade or convince someone, through reasoning or debating, to do something that they were initially reluctant or unwilling to do. It implies using logical arguments and convincing statements to sway someone's opinion or convince them to take a specific course of action.
  • size up sb/sth The idiom "size up someone/something" means to carefully observe and evaluate someone or something in order to form an opinion or make a judgment about their qualities, abilities, or value. It involves assessing and analyzing a person or thing in order to understand or determine their true nature or worth.
  • withdraw into sth The idiom "withdraw into something" refers to the action of retreating or seeking solitude or isolation in a particular place or state, often in response to feeling overwhelmed, stressed, or in need of privacy. It involves temporarily disengaging from or distancing oneself from external situations, usually to reflect, recover, or gain clarity.
  • cheer for sm or sth The idiom "cheer for someone or something" means to express support, encouragement, or approval for a person, team, or cause. It can involve vocal expressions of enthusiasm, applause, or other positive reinforcement to show one's excitement or admiration for the subject at hand.
  • play sth out The idiom "play something out" typically means to act or continue a certain situation or scenario until it reaches its natural conclusion or resolution. It can refer to the unfolding or progression of events in a particular manner without unnecessary interference or interruption.
  • transliterate sth (from sth) (to sth) To transliterate something (from something) (to something) means to convert the letters or characters of one writing system to another, while maintaining the same pronunciation. It involves representing the sounds of words or phrases in one language using the equivalent characters or letters in another language. Transliteration differs from translation, as it focuses on the phonetic aspect rather than the meaning of the words.
  • take away from sth The idiom "take away from something" means to diminish, reduce the value, importance, or impact of something. It refers to a situation where a particular aspect or element subtracts or detracts from the overall quality or significance of something.
  • bite sth off The idiom "bite something off" means to take on or accept a task or responsibility that is difficult or challenging, often more than one can handle. It implies committing oneself to a task or project without considering the potential consequences or difficulties involved.
  • hear about sm or sth The idiom "hear about someone or something" means to receive information or news related to a particular person or thing, usually through word of mouth or by being informed by others. It implies that the person did not have prior knowledge or awareness of the mentioned person or thing and has learned about it for the first time.
  • bleep sth out To "bleep something out" is an idiom that originated from the practice of using audio censorship in broadcasting or media. It refers to the act of replacing or removing offensive or inappropriate content, such as profanity or controversial words, by substituting them with a high-pitched beep sound or silence. This is done to prevent the audience from hearing or understanding the objectionable content. In a broader sense, the phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe any act of censoring or obscuring information.
  • lap sth up The idiom "lap something up" means to eagerly and enthusiastically accept, enjoy, or appreciate something. It often refers to the act of getting pleasure from or taking in information, praise, attention, or experiences with great enthusiasm and satisfaction.
  • gather sth from sm The idiom "gather something from someone" typically means to obtain or collect information, facts, or knowledge from someone or something. It suggests the act of gathering or assembling bits and pieces of information in order to form a more complete understanding or picture.
  • make a practice of doing sth The idiom "make a practice of doing something" means to develop a regular or habitual behavior of doing a particular action or activity. It suggests that the person regularly, consistently, and intentionally engages in that action or activity as part of their routine or approach.
  • root sm or sth out of sth The idiom "root something out of something" means to find, search for, or discover something hidden or deeply entrenched within a larger entity or place. It often refers to the act of uncovering or eliminating a problem, habit, or undesirable element that is deeply rooted or hidden.
  • commit sth to memory To commit something to memory means to learn and remember it thoroughly. It implies consciously making an effort to memorize and store information or data in one's mind. This can involve repetition, practice, or any other method employed to ensure the information is retained and readily accessible.
  • disembark from sth The idiom "disembark from something" means to leave or exit a vehicle, such as a ship, plane, train, or bus, after a journey or trip. It refers to the act of stepping off or getting out of the mode of transportation.
  • pick at sm or sth The idiom "pick at someone or something" means to repeatedly criticize, find fault with, or nitpick someone or something in a persistent and nagging manner. It involves focusing on small flaws or minor details and making negative comments or complaints about them.
  • flee from sm or sth The idiom "flee from someone or something" means to quickly and urgently escape or run away in order to distance oneself from a person, place, or situation that is perceived as dangerous, harmful, or undesirable. It implies a need to escape for one's own safety or well-being.
  • expunge sth from sth The idiom "expunge something from something" means to completely erase, eliminate, or remove something from a particular place, record, or memory. It often implies a deliberate and thorough removal of something undesirable or unwanted in order to eliminate any trace or evidence of it.
  • refer sb to sb/sth The idiom "refer sb to sb/sth" means to direct or recommend someone to another person or thing for further assistance, advice, or information.
  • have sth on good authority The idiom "have something on good authority" means to have information or news from a reliable or trustworthy source. It suggests that the information is accurate and can be trusted as it comes from a person who is known to have reliable knowledge or access to the facts.
  • lie to sm (about sm or sth) The idiom "lie to someone (about someone or something)" means to deliberately provide false information or deceive someone about a person or a topic. It involves intentionally not telling the truth or distorting facts to mislead or manipulate an individual for personal gain or to avoid consequences.
  • quip about sm or sth The idiom "quip about something or someone" means to make a witty, clever, or sarcastic remark or comment about a particular subject or person.
  • fling sm or sth aside The idiom "fling something or someone aside" means to disregard or dismiss them without any concern or hesitation. It refers to a deliberate action of quickly giving up on someone or something, treating them as insignificant or unimportant.
  • sail against sth The idiom "sail against something" typically means to strongly oppose or resist something. It refers to the act of navigating a boat or ship in the opposite direction of the wind, which requires great effort and determination. Similarly, when someone "sails against something," they are going against the prevailing opinions, trends, or norms, expressing their disagreement or taking an opposing stance.
  • not able to make anything out (of sm or sth) The idiom "not able to make anything out (of someone or something)" means to be unable to understand or comprehend someone or something. It suggests confusion or a lack of clarity in grasping the meaning or purpose of someone or something.
  • bear (up)on sth The idiom "bear (up)on sth" means to have a connection, influence, or relevance to something. It refers to the act of impacting or affecting a particular situation or topic.
  • seize sm or sth with sth The idiom "seize someone or something with something" means to take hold of or grab tightly onto someone or something using a specific tool or instrument for the purpose. It implies using force or a strong grip to secure the person or object.
  • oust sm from sth The idiom "oust someone from something" refers to forcibly removing or expelling someone from a position of power, authority, or a particular place. It implies the act of removing someone against their will or replacing them with someone else.
  • throw sm or sth off (of) sth The idiom "throw sm or sth off (of) sth" means to remove or force something or someone out of a particular place or position. It implies getting rid of something that is causing hindrance or interference, or shifting someone or something away from their intended location.
  • thicken sth up The idiom "thicken sth up" typically means to make something thicker or denser, either by adding more substance or by increasing the concentration of a particular ingredient. It can be used in various contexts, such as cooking, where adding more flour or starch is used to thicken a sauce or soup. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of making a story or plot more intricate or dense, often to generate excitement or suspense.
  • sprinkle sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "sprinkle something on (to) someone or something" refers to lightly scattering or distributing something in small, scattered amounts over a person or object. It can be both literal or figurative, indicating the act of adding small amounts of a substance or quality onto someone or something.
  • take sth/sb into account The idiom "take something/somebody into account" means to consider or give importance to a particular factor or person when making a decision or judgment. It implies considering relevant information, opinions, or circumstances that may affect the outcome or have an impact on a situation.
  • awake(n) from sth The idiom "awake(n) from sth" means to become aware of or conscious about a particular situation, fact, or reality after being oblivious or unaware of it. It indicates the moment of realization or understanding, often resulting in a change in perspective or action.
  • make every effort to do sth The idiom "make every effort to do something" means to put in maximum or extensive exertion, determination, or attempt in order to achieve or accomplish a particular task or goal. It signifies going to great lengths, sparing no resources, and using all available means in pursuit of success.
  • drink sth up The idiom "drink something up" means to consume a liquid quickly and completely, usually by drinking it all in one go or in large quantities. It can also be used metaphorically to mean absorbing, enjoying, or taking in something, such as knowledge or experience, eagerly and enthusiastically.
  • worry through sth The idiom "worry through something" means to work through or deal with something causing anxiety or concern, usually by thinking about it extensively, discussing it with others, or taking action to resolve it.
  • flunk out (of sth) The idiom "flunk out (of sth)" means to fail an academic course or program to the extent that one is required to leave or is expelled from it. It typically refers to a student's inability to meet the academic requirements and subsequently being unable to continue in their studies.
  • let sth out (to sm) The idiom "let sth out (to sm)" generally means to give or reveal information or a secret to someone. It involves sharing something that was previously unknown or kept confidential with a specific individual.
  • had better/best do sth The idiom "had better/best do sth" is used to indicate a strong recommendation or warning about the consequences or importance of doing something. It implies that not doing the suggested action could result in negative outcomes or regret. It signifies that the speaker believes it is wise or necessary for the listener to take the suggested action.
  • parcel sth up To "parcel something up" is an idiom that means to wrap or package something securely, usually in order to send it or store it. It can also be used metaphorically to describe organizing or completing something in a tidy or efficient manner.
  • refresh sm with sth The idiom "refresh someone with something" means to provide or give someone new knowledge or information about a particular topic or subject. It involves updating or reminding someone about something they have previously learned or experienced.
  • bring in sth The idiom "bring in something" means to introduce or incorporate something new into a situation or discussion, typically with the intention of enhancing or improving it. It can refer to ideas, opinions, information, resources, or any other element that adds value or contributes to the topic at hand.
  • walk (right) into sm or sth The idiom "walk (right) into sm or sth" means to encounter or come across something or someone unexpectedly or without intending to do so. It implies stumbling upon a situation or finding oneself in a particular environment or circumstance by chance or accident.
  • inquire sth of sm The idiom "inquire something of someone" means to ask or seek information, advice, or clarification from a specific person regarding a particular subject or matter. It implies directing a question or query towards someone with the intention of obtaining knowledge or insight from them.
  • fool (around) with sm or sth The idiom "fool (around) with someone or something" generally means to casually or playfully spend time with or experiment with someone or something without any particular purpose or seriousness. It can imply engaging in aimless or unproductive activities or interactions.
  • yank sm or sth around The idiom "yank someone or something around" means to handle, manipulate, or forcefully move someone or something in a rough or forceful manner. It implies the act of pulling or dragging with sudden force or without consideration for the recipient's comfort or well-being.
  • terrify sm into sth The idiom "terrify someone into something" means to frighten or intimidate someone to the extent that they feel compelled or forced to do something or take a particular course of action. It involves instilling fear or dread in a person to influence their decisions or behavior.
  • have sth on your hands The idiom "have something on your hands" means to have a responsibility, burden, or problem that requires attention or action. It refers to being in possession of, or being tasked with, something that demands one's time, effort, or supervision.
  • blend in (to sth) The idiom "blend in (to sth)" means to integrate or assimilate oneself into a certain environment, group, or social setting in order to appear similar or inconspicuous. It refers to the act of adapting or adjusting one's behavior, appearance, or attitudes in order to not stand out or draw attention.
  • have recourse to sth The idiom "have recourse to sth" means to turn to something or someone in order to find help, support, or a solution to a problem or difficult situation. It implies seeking assistance or using a particular resource as a last option or when there are no other alternatives available.
  • feed off (of) sth The idiom "feed off (of) something" means to benefit or thrive by taking advantage of a particular thing or situation. It is often used metaphorically to describe how someone or something gains energy, inspiration, or sustenance from a specific source.
  • switch sth out The idiom "switch something out" refers to the act of replacing or exchanging one thing for another, usually in a swift or effortless manner. It often implies a substitution or change, particularly when it comes to objects or components.
  • brush by sm or sth The idiom "brush by someone or something" means to pass very close to someone or something, often without making contact or causing much attention. It can also imply a quick or brief encounter with someone or something, where there is limited involvement or interaction.
  • maneuver sm into sth The idiom "maneuver sm into sth" refers to the act of skillfully influencing or manipulating someone to adopt or be involved in a particular situation, action, or belief, often for personal gain or advantage. It involves employing strategic tactics to convince or persuade someone to do something or make a specific decision that aligns with one's own intentions or objectives.
  • make (a) nonsense of sth The idiom "make (a) nonsense of sth" means to render something absurd, meaningless, or illogical. It suggests that the subject under discussion or consideration lacks sense or coherence.
  • flush out sth The idiom "flush out" means to force something or someone out of hiding or concealment, especially through determined effort or action. It can also refer to the act of bringing something to the surface or making it visible by applying pressure or taking specific measures.
  • box sm or sth in The idiom "box someone or something in" means to restrict or confine someone or something within a small or limited area or space, making it difficult for them to move or escape. It can also refer to a situation where someone or something is placed in a narrowly defined category or limited options.
  • lay sth down (on sth) The idiom "lay sth down (on sth)" typically means to establish or prescribe rules, regulations, guidelines, or principles for a particular situation or context. It implies setting a framework or formalizing expectations for how something should be done or followed.
  • drape oneself over sth The idiom "drape oneself over something" refers to the act of laying or hanging oneself loosely and casually across or on top of something. This action often conveys a relaxed or nonchalant posture.
  • demonstrate against sm or sth The idiom "demonstrate against sm or sth" means to publicly express one's dissent or disapproval, usually by participating in a protest or rally, against a specific person, group, or issue. It involves showcasing opposition and actively advocating for change or addressing grievances through organized and visible actions.
  • advertise for sm or sth The idiom "advertise for someone or something" refers to the act of actively seeking or requesting someone or something through public communication or advertising. It typically implies a need or desire to attract specific individuals or objects by promoting or making them known to a wide audience.
  • puzzle over sth The idiom "puzzle over something" means to think carefully and thoroughly about something in order to understand or solve it. It refers to the act of trying to figure out or comprehend a perplexing or confusing situation, problem, or topic.
  • desensitize sm to sth The idiom "desensitize someone to something" means to gradually make someone less sensitive or emotionally affected by a particular situation, experience, or stimulus. It involves reducing someone's natural sensitivity or reaction to something through repeated exposure, often in order to help them cope with or tolerate it better.
  • choke sth up The idiom "choke something up" has a few different meanings depending on the context. Here are two possible definitions: 1. To become emotional or teary-eyed, particularly due to sadness, grief, or strong sentiment. In this usage, when someone chokes something up, they are struggling to speak or hold back tears. Example: John choked up when he tried to give his emotional speech at his best friend's wedding. 2. To fail or underperform in a high-pressure situation, especially when the outcome is affected by nervousness, anxiety, or excessive self-consciousness. When someone chokes something up in this sense, they are unable to perform to the best of their ability. Example: The athlete choked up and missed the crucial
  • race into sm or sth The idiom "race into sm or sth" means to hurry or move quickly towards a person, place, or thing with great speed and excitement. It implies a sense of urgency or eagerness in reaching the destination or achieving a goal.
  • strap sm or sth down The idiom "strap someone or something down" means to securely fasten or tie down someone or something in order to prevent movement, escape, or harm. It often represents taking necessary precautions or measures to ensure safety, stability, or control.
  • take action against sm or sth The idiom "take action against someone or something" means to initiate or engage in a course of action or punishment in response to a person or thing that has caused harm, offense, or a violation of rules or laws. It implies the act of holding someone accountable or seeking retribution for their actions.
  • cost sth out The idiom "cost sth out" refers to the act of performing a detailed analysis or calculation to determine the total cost of something, such as a project, product, or business endeavor. It involves considering various expenses, including materials, labor, overhead, and any other relevant costs, in order to estimate or plan budgets and finances accurately.
  • spread sth on thick The idiom "spread sth on thick" means to exaggerate or overemphasize something, usually in a way that is insincere or dishonest, to make a greater impact or to persuade others. It refers to the act of embellishing or magnifying a situation or statement beyond its actual significance or truth.
  • keep sth to oneself The idiom "keep something to oneself" means to refrain from sharing or disclosing certain information or feelings with others. It refers to the act of keeping something private or maintaining secrecy about a particular matter.
  • screw up (sth) The idiom "screw up (something)" means to make a mistake or do something incorrectly or ineffectively, often resulting in negative consequences or the failure of a plan or task.
  • throw sth back in sb's face The idiom "throw something back in someone's face" means to remind or confront someone with something they previously said or did, especially in a way that is intended to embarrass or make them feel regretful or foolish. It refers to using someone's own words, actions, or past behavior against them in order to criticize or blame them.
  • home in (on sm or sth) The idiom "home in (on sm or sth)" means to move or focus directly towards a specific target or objective. It can be used in a literal sense when referring to physical movement, or figuratively when describing the act of concentrating on and honing in on a specific idea or goal.
  • prejudice sm or sth against sm or sth The idiom "prejudice something against someone or something" refers to forming an unfair or biased opinion about someone or something without proper knowledge or understanding. It implies having preconceived notions or attitudes that may lead to discrimination or unfair treatment based on irrelevant factors such as race, religion, or background.
  • wake sm (up) from sth The idiom "wake (someone) up from (something)" means to help someone become aware or alert after being engrossed, absorbed, or lost in something. It involves interrupting the person's state of focus or deep thought to bring them back to reality or the present moment.
  • steal a march on sb/sth The idiom "steal a march on someone/something" means to gain an advantage over someone or something by acting early or secretly. It is often used in situations where one person or group manages to make progress or achieve a goal before others have the chance to do so, giving them an advantage.
  • pull back (from sth) The idiom "pull back (from sth)" means to withdraw or retreat from a situation, project, relationship, or commitment. It can also refer to the act of taking a step back or reducing one's involvement or investment in something.
  • withdraw from sth The idiom "withdraw from something" means to remove oneself or disengage from a situation, activity, or involvement in something. It often implies a deliberate decision to step back, retreat, or remove oneself from a particular situation or relationship.
  • start out (on sth) The idiom "start out (on sth)" means to begin or initiate something, usually a task, journey, or career. It refers to the initial stage of starting something new or embarking on a specific path.
  • foot the bill (for sth) To "foot the bill (for sth)" means to pay for something, especially a significant or expensive expense. It refers to taking responsibility for covering the cost of a particular item or service. The phrase suggests that the person or entity paying the bill has incurred the financial obligation and is responsible for settling it.
  • drape sm or sth in sth The idiom "drape someone or something in something" means to cover or adorn someone or something with a particular material, fabric, or item. It implies that the person or object is completely enveloped or decorated with the mentioned element.
  • mine for sth The idiom "mine for something" typically refers to the act of searching, exploring, or digging for a particular resource or information. It can be used both literally and figuratively. In a literal sense, it refers to the process of mining or digging in the earth to extract valuable minerals or resources. Figuratively, it can refer to the act of intensively searching, investigating, or delving into something to discover or obtain a specific outcome, knowledge, or result.
  • toss sth together The idiom "toss something together" means to quickly and casually combine or assemble various elements or ingredients to create something, often without much thought or organization. It implies a hasty or improvised manner of putting things together, usually resulting in a less refined or well-planned outcome.
  • originate from sth The idiom "originate from sth" means to have its source, roots, or beginnings in something. It refers to the concept of something having been created, developed, or started from a particular place, time, event, person, or idea. It implies that the subject or idea being referred to has its primary or initial existence attributed to the mentioned source.
  • instill sth in (to) sm The idiom "instill something in (to) someone" means to gradually and firmly teach, impart, or introduce something to someone, often by repetition or ensuring it becomes a lasting part of their beliefs, values, or knowledge.
  • switch sth back (to sth) The idiom "switch something back (to something)" means to change or revert something to its original state or previous setting. It involves returning something to its original condition or mode of operation after it has been altered or modified.
  • sweep sth into sth The idiom "sweep sth into sth" typically means to quickly or forcefully gather or put something into a specific place or situation. It often implies a swift and efficient action, as if using a sweeping motion to move things.
  • think up sth The idiom "think up something" means to invent, create, or come up with something, typically a solution, idea, or plan, using one's imagination, creativity, or mental faculties.
  • feature sm in sth The idiom "feature someone/something in something" means to incorporate or include someone or something as a prominent element or aspect of something. It refers to giving importance or showcasing a particular person, thing, or concept within a certain context or setting.
  • stall sm or sth for sth The idiom "stall something or someone for something" means to intentionally delay or hold something or someone back, usually for a specific purpose or reason. It suggests buying time or delaying action in order to achieve an advantage or reach a desired outcome.
  • spare sm sth The idiom "spare someone something" means to choose not to burden or trouble someone with a particular thing, usually unpleasant or difficult. It implies a desire to prevent someone from experiencing something negative or to relieve them from a certain responsibility or task.
  • flatten sm or sth out The idiom "flatten sm or sth out" means to smooth or make something flat or level. It can also figuratively refer to resolving or eliminating any inconsistencies, problems, or difficulties in a particular situation or system.
  • in the teeth of sth The idiom "in the teeth of something" means to face or confront a difficult or challenging situation directly, often with determination and defiance. It implies that one is standing up against something contrary or adverse, despite the opposition or obstacles involved.
  • bounce sth around (with sm) To "bounce something around with someone" means to discuss or share ideas, opinions, or suggestions with someone in an informal or casual manner. It implies having a conversation to seek input, feedback, or advice on a particular topic or issue. The phrase suggests a back-and-forth dialogue where thoughts, options, or plans are exchanged to gain different perspectives or insights.
  • pile on(to) (sm or sth) The idiom "pile on(to) (someone or something)" refers to the act of joining or adding to an existing group or situation, often without considering or understanding the potential negative consequences. It can also mean to contribute more of something than is necessary or to excessively criticize or attack someone.
  • despise sm for sth The idiom "despise someone for something" means to strongly dislike or have an intense feeling of contempt or scorn towards someone for a particular quality, action, or characteristic they possess. It implies a deep and profound feeling of disdain or disgust towards that person due to the specified reason.
  • whittle sth out of sth The idiom "whittle sth out of sth" is usually used to describe the act of carefully and gradually forming or creating something by carefully cutting or carving it out of a larger or existing material or situation. It implies a deliberate and skilful craftsmanship involved in creating a desired outcome.
  • try sm or sth out The idiom "try something out" means to test or experiment with something in order to see how well it works or suits one's needs. It involves giving something a trial run or attempting it for the first time to determine its effectiveness or suitability.
  • take the shine off sth The idiom "take the shine off something" means to diminish the appeal, excitement, or positive aspects of something. It refers to the action of tarnishing or making something, typically a situation or an accomplishment, appear less impressive, positive, or important.
  • blow sm or sth up The idiom "blow sm or sth up" means to explode or destroy someone or something using an explosive or excessive force. It can be used both literally, referring to physical objects like buildings or vehicles, and figuratively, referring to exaggerated reactions or amplification of a situation.
  • enfold sm in sth The idiom "enfold someone in something" means to embrace or surround someone with a feeling, emotion, or a physical gesture. It implies providing comfort, protection, or support to someone, often in an affectionate or nurturing manner.
  • bung sth in The idiom "bung sth in" means to quickly and carelessly put or place something in a particular location. It implies a lack of carefulness or precision in handling the object or action being performed.
  • have a thirst for sth The idiom "have a thirst for something" means to have a strong desire or craving for something. It suggests an intense longing or need for a particular thing or experience. This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe someone's passion, ambition, or eagerness to attain or achieve something.
  • sth fierce The idiom "sth fierce" is a colloquial expression used to intensify or emphasize the degree or intensity of something. It implies that something is extremely strong, severe, intense, or extreme.
  • rummage around (smw) (for sth) The idiom "rummage around (for sth)" means to search through or look for something in a hasty or disorderly manner. It implies an act of searching or sorting through a collection of items in order to find a specific object, often involving sifting, shuffling, or moving things around.
  • deplete sth of sth The idiom "deplete something of something" means to drastically reduce or exhaust the supply or amount of something. It implies the complete or significant depletion of a particular resource, substance, or element.
  • send off sth The idiom "send off something" refers to the act of dispatching or shipping something to a specific destination. It can also mean bidding farewell to something or someone, often with emotional significance.
  • stretch forth (from sth) The idiom "stretch forth (from sth)" generally means extending or reaching something out or forward from a particular point or source. It implies the act of extending physically or metaphorically beyond a usual limit or expectation.
  • ball sth up The idiom "ball sth up" means to make a mistake or create a mess of something, often resulting in confusion or disorder.
  • look to do sth The idiom "look to do something" means to have the intention or plans to do something; to consider or contemplate doing something. It indicates the individual's willingness or readiness to take action or explore a specific course of action.
  • look askance at sb/sth The idiom "look askance at someone/something" means to view or regard someone or something with suspicion, disapproval, or doubt. It refers to the act of looking sideways or skeptically, casting a sidelong glance to express skepticism or doubt towards a person or thing.
  • trap sm in sth The idiom "trap someone in something" is often used to describe a situation where someone becomes caught or enclosed in a specific circumstance or condition from which it is difficult to escape. It implies that the person is unable to free themselves or find a way out of the situation. It can be both used literally, such as being physically trapped in a place, and figuratively, like being trapped in an unhealthy relationship or a difficult dilemma.
  • not have the heart to do sth The idiom "not have the heart to do something" means to be unable to bring oneself to do something due to feelings of empathy, sympathy, or compassion for someone or something involved. It implies that one feels too guilty, pained, or remorseful to carry out a particular action.
  • browse over sth To "browse over something" means to quickly scan or look through a document, book, or webpage without examining it in detail. It implies a casual or brief inspection of the material.
  • intersperse sth between sth The idiom "intersperse sth between sth" means to scatter or distribute something among other things at regular intervals or in a random pattern. It is often used to describe the act of placing or inserting something intermittently or in a non-continuous manner within a larger context or sequence.
  • bear with sm or sth The idiom "bear with someone or something" is used to politely ask for someone's patience or understanding in a situation. It suggests that the person being addressed should tolerate or endure a particular person or thing, typically because it may cause inconvenience or difficulties.
  • piece sth together The idiom "piece something together" means to gather or assemble various fragments or bits of information in order to form a complete understanding or picture of something. It is often used when solving a mystery or figuring out a complex problem by gradually collecting and organizing different pieces of evidence or knowledge.
  • commune with sth To commune with something is to establish a deep and spiritual connection or communication with it. It often refers to a state where one feels connected to nature, a higher power, or their inner self.
  • alive to sth The idiom "alive to something" means being aware of, sensitive to, or mindful of a particular fact, issue, or situation. It implies being conscious and actively recognizing the significance or importance of something.
  • get socked with sth The idiom "get socked with sth" means to unexpectedly or suddenly be burdened or afflicted with something, typically something negative or undesirable. It implies that the person is caught off guard or surprised by the situation or problem that they have to deal with.
  • wire ahead (for sth) The idiom "wire ahead" typically means to send a message or notification in advance to someone or a place regarding a future event, request, or arrangement. It is often used in the context of making reservations, informing someone of your arrival, or requesting specific services. The term "wire" originally referred to sending a telegram, but in modern usage, it can include any form of communication, such as email or phone calls.
  • seal sth (up) (with sth) The idiom "seal sth (up) (with sth)" means to close or secure something tightly using a substance, such as glue, tape, wax, etc., to prevent air, liquid, or other objects from entering or escaping. It often involves covering a gap or opening to make it airtight or watertight.
  • slap sth on The idiom "slap sth on" means to quickly apply or put something on in a careless or hasty manner, often without much consideration for quality or precision. It implies doing something without much thought or effort and can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • compress sth into sth The idiom "compress sth into sth" refers to the act of condensing or reducing something, typically ideas, information, or content, into a smaller or more concise form. It implies the process of simplifying or making something more compact while retaining its essential meaning or essence.
  • spout from sth The idiom "spout from something" typically means to flow or gush out of a source continuously and forcefully. It can also metaphorically refer to the act of speaking or expressing something passionately, often with exaggerated or excessive emotion.
  • speak to sth The idiom "speak to something" means to address or discuss a particular topic or issue. It refers to conveying one's thoughts, opinions, or concerns regarding a specific matter.
  • discharge sth into sth The idiom "discharge something into something" typically means to release or eject a substance or object into a particular place or area. It can imply the act of expelling or emitting something forcefully or with a purposeful intent. This can be used both in literal and metaphorical contexts.
  • spoon sth out The idiom "spoon sth out" refers to the act of distributing or giving something in small portions or amounts. It can be used both literally and figuratively. Literally, it could mean to serve food by using a spoon to portion it into smaller amounts. Figuratively, it could mean doling out information, advice, or any resource gradually rather than all at once.
  • pay sth down The idiomatic expression "pay something down" means to make a partial payment towards a debt or to reduce the amount owed by making regular payments over time. It refers to the action of decreasing the balance of a loan or debt by gradually paying off a certain amount.
  • thunder sth out The idiom "thunder something out" means to say or express something forcefully, loudly, and authoritatively, often with a sense of urgency or determination. It implies speaking with great intensity and emphasis to get a point across or to make oneself heard.
  • watch out for sb/sth The idiom "watch out for sb/sth" means to be vigilant, cautious, or careful about someone or something, usually to avoid potential harm, danger, or negative consequences. It implies being alert and attentive towards a specific person or thing in order to anticipate and react appropriately to any possible risks or threats.
  • cut a swath/swathe through sth The idiom "cut a swath/swathe through sth" means to move through or progress through something forcefully or destructively, often leaving a significant impact or impression. It implies making a noticeable and powerful influence or effect on a particular situation, group of people, or field of activity.
  • squabble over sm or sth The idiom "squabble over something" means to have a minor or petty argument or dispute about something. It implies engaging in a disagreement or conflict that is often trivial or unimportant in the grand scheme of things. It typically involves arguing over small details or unessential matters.
  • your idea of sth The idiom "your idea of sth" refers to one's personal perspective or understanding of something. It conveys the notion that individuals have their own unique perception or conceptualization of a particular thing or situation. It emphasizes subjectivity and the fact that different people may have varying opinions, beliefs, or approaches to the same thing.
  • seize (up)on sth The idiom "seize (up)on something" means to eagerly grasp or take advantage of an opportunity, idea, or suggestion. It implies quickly and enthusiastically embracing or making use of something that is perceived as beneficial or advantageous.
  • meddle with sm or sth The idiom "meddle with someone or something" means to interfere or involve oneself in someone's affairs or in a situation without being asked or without having a proper understanding or authority to do so. It typically implies an unwanted or inappropriate intrusion into other people's matters.
  • put sm or sth on ice The idiom "put something on ice" means to delay or postpone an action, plan, or project for a later time. It implies temporarily setting aside or keeping something in reserve until it is necessary or more favorable to pursue.
  • bend sth out of shape The idiom "bend something out of shape" refers to distorting or damaging something, usually by applying pressure or force in a way that causes it to lose its original form or structure. It can be used both literally, when referring to physical objects, or figuratively, when describing situations, plans, or emotions being negatively impacted or altered.
  • stand outside (of) (sth) The idiom "stand outside (of) (sth)" refers to not being included or involved in a particular situation or group. It implies being excluded or left out from something. It can also indicate being on the outside, lacking understanding or familiarity with a certain topic or concept.
  • tilt sth back The idiom "tilt something back" typically refers to the action of leaning or reclining something backwards, often to achieve a more comfortable or relaxed position.
  • ram into sm or sth The idiom "ram into someone or something" means to forcefully crash or collide into a person or object with great impact or force. It implies a sudden and unplanned encounter or collision, often resulting in damage or injury.
  • fed up (with sb/sth) The idiom "fed up (with sb/sth)" means to be extremely annoyed, frustrated, or bored with someone or something, often to the point of wanting to stop dealing with or being involved with them/it altogether.
  • the glory days (of sth) The idiom "the glory days (of sth)" refers to a period of time in the past when someone or something was at its peak or achieved great success and recognition. It often indicates nostalgia or longing for the past when things were better or more successful.
  • test out (of sth) The idiom "test out of (something)" typically refers to the process of taking a test or examination to demonstrate knowledge or proficiency so as to be exempted from a particular requirement, such as a course, class, or portion of a curriculum. It allows individuals to showcase their existing knowledge or skills in order to bypass formal educational requirements and proceed to a higher level or different course.
  • retire on sth The idiom "retire on something" refers to the act of using or relying on a particular resource or source of income to support oneself after retiring from work. It implies that one's financial security or sustenance in retirement is dependent on that particular thing, such as savings, investments, pension, or any other source of funds.
  • resound with sth The idiom "resound with sth" means that a particular sound or quality is heard or echoed strongly and loudly. It can also refer to something being filled or characterized by a particular emotion, feeling, or significance.
  • curve to sth The idiom "curve to something" typically does not have a specific definition. However, it can be interpreted as the act of gradually shifting or deviating towards a particular direction, form, or pattern. It suggests a change or progression that is not linear or straightforward, but rather curved or bent.
  • bear sm or sth up The idiom "bear sm or sth up" means to support or carry someone or something, both physically and emotionally. It can refer to providing strength, resilience, or assistance during difficult times. It can also imply holding up or sustaining something under pressure or weight.
  • boggle at sth The idiom "boggle at (something)" means to be astonished, confused, or overwhelmed by something. It implies a strong reaction of disbelief or perplexity towards a particular situation, idea, or task.
  • leave sb/sth in the dust The idiom "leave someone or something in the dust" means to outperform or surpass someone or something by a considerable margin. It is often used in situations when someone or something is left far behind or left in a state of inferiority due to the dominance or excellence of another person or thing.
  • pan across to sm or sth The idiom "pan across to someone or something" refers to the movement of a camera or a person's gaze, turning from one side to another to focus on another person or object. It is often used to describe shifting attention or perspective from one subject to another.
  • rate sth at sth The idiom "rate sth at sth" refers to the act of evaluating or assessing something and giving it a specific value, score, or level. It is often used to express a judgment or opinion about the worth, quality, or significance of a particular thing, usually on a scale or in comparison to other similar things.
  • dip sth in(to) sth The idiom "dip something in(to) something" refers to the act of submerging or briefly immersing an object into a liquid or substance. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of briefly engaging or participating in a particular activity or situation.
  • conscript sm into sth The idiom "conscript someone into something" means to force or compel someone to join or participate in something, usually against their will or without their consent. It implies the act of recruiting or enlisting individuals for a specific purpose or activity, often in a formal or official context.
  • as for sb/sth "As for sb/sth" is an idiomatic expression used to introduce or discuss someone or something in a conversation or discussion. It signifies that attention is being directed towards a specific individual or topic, often separate from the rest of the discussion or as an afterthought.
  • cut sth off The idiom "cut something off" typically refers to the act of removing or separating something from its original source or connection using a sharp-edged tool or by abruptly stopping its flow or communication. It can also be used in a figurative sense, indicating the termination or discontinuation of something.
  • roll sth over The phrase "roll something over" is an idiom that means to extend or continue a period of time, typically in reference to loans, investments, or debts. It implies the act of renewing or restructuring a financial arrangement instead of settling or paying it off at a given deadline.
  • dream sth up The idiom "dream something up" refers to the act of creating or inventing something, typically an idea or plan, in one's imagination. It conveys the concept of coming up with an imaginative or innovative solution or concept.
  • pave the way for sb/sth The idiom "pave the way for sb/sth" means to make it easier or create favorable conditions for someone or something to succeed or make progress. It involves removing obstacles or preparing the necessary foundation for future achievements or advancements.
  • do justice to sb/sth The idiom "do justice to sb/sth" means to adequately represent or present someone or something in a way that accurately showcases their true value, merit, or quality. It implies providing a fair and comprehensive portrayal that captures the essence and importance of the subject being discussed or depicted.
  • travel over sth The idiom "travel over sth" means to move or journey across or through something, such as a particular region, area, or distance. It refers to physically traversing a specified place or distance.
  • take the blame (for doing sth) The idiom "take the blame (for doing something)" means to accept responsibility or acknowledge one's fault or mistake, even if others are also responsible, and face the consequences or punishment for it.
  • have sth in hand The idiom "have something in hand" means to have control or possession over something or to already have made the necessary arrangements to deal with a particular matter or situation. It implies being prepared or having something under control.
  • place sth at a premium The idiom "place something at a premium" means to highly value or prioritize something. It suggests that the item or quality being referred to is considered to be scarce or exceptionally valuable, therefore being in high demand or essential in a given situation.
  • saddled with sm or sth The idiom "saddled with" is used to describe a situation where someone is burdened or encumbered with something or someone undesirable, inconvenient, or difficult to handle. It implies that the person is stuck or burdened with a responsibility or problem that they did not choose or want.
  • talk sm into (doing) sth The idiom "talk (someone) into (doing) something" means to persuade or convince someone to do something, often through speaking with them and offering logical or persuasive arguments. It implies using communication skills to convince a person to engage in a particular action or decision.
  • wipe sth out The idiom "wipe something out" means to completely eliminate, destroy, or remove something, often in a sudden or forceful manner. It can refer to eradicating or obliterating something physically, emotionally, or metaphorically.
  • call off sth The idiom "call off something" means to cancel or abandon an event, activity, or plan that has been previously arranged or scheduled.
  • cover sm or sth for sth The idiom "cover something for something" typically means to assume someone's responsibilities or tasks temporarily in their absence or to provide protection, compensation, or assistance for something or someone. It implies temporarily taking over duties, filling in, or filling a gap to ensure continuity or support in a particular situation.
  • make inroads into sth The idiom "make inroads into something" means to achieve progress or success in a particular area or field, typically by making gradual and effective efforts or advancements. It implies breaking through existing barriers, gaining a foothold, or making significant headway in a challenging or competitive situation.
  • stink with sth The idiom "stink with something" means to have an excessive or overwhelming amount of something, often in a negative or unpleasant sense. It implies that there is an abundance or prevalence of a particular thing, which may be undesirable or disapproved of.
  • force/ram sth down sb's throat The idiom "force/ram something down someone's throat" means to impose or compel someone to accept or believe something, even if they are unwilling or resistant. It often implies using excessive pressure or persuasion to make someone agree with or adopt a particular viewpoint, idea, or belief.
  • starve for sm or sth The idiom "starve for sm or sth" typically means to have a strong desire or craving for something, often in an emotional or metaphorical sense. It can refer to wanting or longing for a particular experience, achievement, love, attention, success, or any other personal desire.
  • knock sth back The idiom "knock sth back" typically means to consume or drink something quickly and in large quantities. It implies that the action is done with enthusiasm or in a carefree manner.
  • filter sth out of sth The idiom "filter sth out of sth" means to separate or remove something undesirable or unwanted from a mixture or a group. It refers to the process of carefully selecting or excluding specific elements or information to obtain a more refined or purified result.
  • peel sth off (of) (sth) The idiom "peel sth off (of) (sth)" refers to removing something, typically a layer or covering, from another thing material or surface, often by gently pulling or lifting it away.
  • live with sth The idiom "live with something" means to accept or tolerate a situation, problem, or decision, often reluctantly or begrudgingly. It implies that although one may not be completely satisfied with the situation, they have come to terms with it and have chosen to continue their life or existence despite its presence.
  • bruit sth about The idiom "bruit sth about" means to spread or circulate information or rumors about something, often in a noisy or exaggerated manner. It refers to the act of talking or gossiping about a particular topic, generally to attract attention or generate interest.
  • dry sm or sth off The idiom "dry something off" means to remove moisture or make something dry.
  • descend into sth The idiom "descend into something" refers to a situation wherein someone or something progressively deteriorates or sinks into a less favorable or undesirable state or condition. It implies a negative shift from a higher or better state into something of lower quality or value.
  • disguise sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "disguise someone or something as someone or something" means to intentionally alter the appearance or nature of someone or something so that it resembles someone or something else. It involves using tactics or props to hide the true identity or purpose, often for deceptive or manipulative reasons.
  • break sth down To break something down, as an idiom, means to dissect or analyze it in a detailed manner, usually into smaller and more manageable parts or components. It involves taking something complex or intricate and simplifying it by breaking it into its fundamental elements for easier understanding and processing.
  • grub around (in sth) The idiom "grub around (in sth)" means to search or explore something in a haphazard or determined manner, often by digging or sifting through it. It implies a sense of persistence, curiosity, or thoroughness in trying to find or discover something specific.
  • hold sth in The idiom "hold sth in" means to suppress or control one's emotions, feelings, or reactions. It refers to the act of not expressing or releasing one's true thoughts or emotions, often keeping them to oneself.
  • identify with sth The idiom "identify with something" means to feel a strong connection or empathy towards a certain person, group, cause, or situation, often because one can relate to or understand their experiences, feelings, or beliefs. It implies a sense of shared identity or a feeling of being similar or connected to something or someone.
  • dangle sth from sth The idiomatic expression "dangle something from something" means to hang or suspend an object loosely from a particular place or object. It refers to the action of holding or attaching something in a way that allows it to swing or move freely.
  • welcome sm to sth The idiom "welcome someone to something" means to greet or receive someone in a friendly or hospitable manner upon their arrival or introduction into a particular situation, group, or place.
  • splash on sm or sth The idiom "splash on sm or sth" means to apply or put on a liquid substance, typically in a generous or extravagant manner. It implies adding a significant amount of the substance, often suggesting a sense of luxury or indulgence.
  • resort to sth The idiom "resort to something" means to turn to or use something as a last option or alternative when all else has failed. It implies that the action being taken is a desperate measure or a choice of last resort.
  • war over sm or sth The idiom "war over sm or sth" refers to a situation of intense conflict, disagreement, or dispute that arises over a particular subject or issue. It implies a fierce or heated battle-like confrontation between individuals or groups who hold opposing opinions, often resulting in prolonged arguments, hostility, or competition. This idiom suggests a heightened level of animosity or contention surrounding the topic in question.
  • taunt sm into sth The idiom "taunt someone into something" refers to provoking or teasing someone in order to make them do or achieve something. It implies that by ridiculing or challenging them, the person is motivated or pressured to pursue a particular action or outcome.
  • heat sth up (to sth) The idiomatic phrase "heat something up (to something)" refers to the act of raising the temperature of something to a particular level or degree. It typically implies the use of heat or a heating source to warm or increase the temperature of an object, substance, or environment. This can be done for various purposes, such as cooking, melting, or achieving a specific desired temperature.
  • mesh with sth The idiom "mesh with something" means to fit or work well together, to be compatible or to blend harmoniously with something else. It implies that two or more things or people can coexist or collaborate in a smooth and synchronized manner.
  • in reference to sm or sth The idiom "in reference to" is used to indicate that you are mentioning or discussing something or someone specific. It means the same as "regarding" or "concerning." It is commonly used to introduce a topic or provide additional information about a particular subject.
  • set the stage for sth The idiom "set the stage for something" means to prepare or create the conditions necessary for a particular event or outcome to occur. It involves establishing the groundwork or creating a favorable environment or circumstances for something to happen.
  • build sth (up)on sth To "build something (up) on something" means to develop or create something by using a particular foundation, basis, or starting point. It suggests constructing or expanding upon an existing concept, idea, or framework to further develop or enhance it. This idiom often refers to the process of adding layers of knowledge, understanding, or complexity to an initial foundation.
  • reconcile oneself to sth The idiom "reconcile oneself to sth" means to accept or come to terms with something that is difficult or undesirable, often after a period of resistance or unease. It implies the process of mentally adjusting and finding a level of comfort or peace with a situation or outcome.
  • match (sm) against (sm else) (or sth against sth else) The idiom "match (someone or something) against (someone or something else)" refers to comparing or contrasting two or more entities or individuals in terms of their qualities, characteristics, or abilities. It implies evaluating their similarities, differences, or compatibility. The idiom often emphasizes a competition or challenge, highlighting the comparison of strengths and weaknesses.
  • speculate on sth To "speculate on something" means to form opinions or make guesses about something without having complete information or evidence. It often implies considering different possibilities and imagining potential outcomes or explanations.
  • breeze through sth The idiom "breeze through something" means to easily and effortlessly complete or achieve something, without facing much difficulty or challenge. It implies that the task or activity was simple and required little effort.
  • learn sth from the bottom up The idiom "learn something from the bottom up" typically means to acquire knowledge or understanding of a subject or skill starting with the most basic or fundamental aspects and gradually advancing to more complex or advanced levels. It implies a thorough and comprehensive learning process from the very foundation onward, ensuring a strong grasp of the subject or skill.
  • toss sth down The idiom "toss something down" generally refers to the act of consuming or drinking something quickly and without much thought or care. It implies a casual or careless approach to eating or drinking, often done hurriedly or without savoring or enjoying the item being consumed.
  • carry sm through (sth) To "carry someone through something" is an idiomatic expression that means to assist or support someone in completing a task or overcoming a difficult situation successfully. It implies lending physical, emotional, or financial assistance to ensure the person achieves their goal or gets through a challenging period.
  • ham sth up The idiom "ham sth up" means to excessively exaggerate or overact in a theatrical or comedic manner, often with the intention of entertaining or amusing others. It refers to the act of being overly dramatic or showy, with an emphasis on creating an exaggerated performance.
  • as regards sth The idiom "as regards something" means concerning or with respect to something. It is used to indicate that the following statement or information is related to the mentioned subject or topic.
  • forgive sm for sth The idiom "forgive someone for something" means to pardon or let go of resentment or anger towards someone for a particular action or offense they have committed. It involves giving up negative feelings or seeking revenge and instead choosing to show understanding, mercy, and acceptance towards the individual.
  • come to grips with sth The idiom "come to grips with sth" means to successfully understand, accept, and deal with a difficult or challenging situation or problem. It refers to the process of confronting and mastering an issue or coming to terms with the reality of it.
  • make sth/it worth your while The idiom "make something worth your while" means to ensure that an action or task is valuable or rewarding enough to justify the effort, time, or resources put into it. It implies a desire for satisfactory or beneficial outcomes or incentives before committing to or engaging in a particular activity.
  • test sm or sth for sth The idiom "test someone or something for something" means to perform an examination or evaluation in order to determine the presence, level, or nature of a particular thing or quality. It refers to the act of assessing or trying out someone or something in order to obtain specific information or results related to a particular aspect or condition.
  • fresh out of sth The idiom "fresh out of sth" is used to describe a situation where someone has recently run out or is completely depleted of something that they typically possess or offer. It indicates that the person or source does not currently have any more of that particular item or resource available.
  • power sth with sth The idiom "power something with something" generally means to supply or provide energy, strength, or capability to achieve or operate something by using a particular source or means. It often refers to using a specific tool, resource, or method to make something work or function effectively.
  • order sm in (to sth) The idiom "order something in (to something)" refers to the act of requesting or acquiring something, usually goods or supplies, to be delivered or brought to a particular place or destination.
  • inform sm of sth The idiom "inform someone of something" means to communicate or tell someone about a particular piece of information or news. It implies conveying knowledge to someone who may be unaware or uninformed about the mentioned subject.
  • send on sth The idiom "send on something" generally means to forward or pass along something that was received or intended for someone else. It could refer to physically sending an object or document, or sharing information or messages with others.
  • set upon sb/sth The idiom "set upon sb/sth" means to attack or assault someone or something, often suddenly and unexpectedly. It can also imply a fierce or relentless verbal or physical attack.
  • perform sth on sm or sth The idiom "perform something on someone or something" means to carry out or execute an action or task with regard to someone or something. It typically implies the act of doing or completing a particular action or function on a specified person or thing.
  • put sth into service The idiom "put something into service" means to start using or employing something for its intended purpose.
  • sail into sth The idiom "sail into sth" typically means to approach or confront something enthusiastically or with great energy. It is often used to describe someone starting a task or engaging in an activity with intense focus, determination, or gusto.
  • get sth into a mess The idiom "get something into a mess" means to cause something to become disorganized, confused, or chaotic. It refers to creating a situation or condition that is difficult to handle or resolve.
  • use up sth The idiom "use up something" means to exhaust or deplete a supply of something, often completely consuming or utilizing all of it. It refers to the act of using or consuming a particular resource or item until there is none left or it is no longer usable.
  • whack sth The idiom "whack something" typically means to strike or hit something with force. It can be used in both literal and figurative senses. In a literal sense, it refers to physically hitting or striking something. In a figurative sense, it implies attempting to solve or deal with something, usually with a decisive or forceful action.
  • marshal sm or sth together The idiom "marshal something together" means to gather or organize things, often in a hasty or efficient manner. It refers to the act of bringing various elements or resources into a cohesive arrangement or order. Generally, it implies the need to quickly assemble or align different aspects to accomplish a specific goal or task.
  • pot sth up The idiom "pot sth up" means to transfer a plant or seedling from its original container into a larger pot or container for better growth and development. It often refers to the act of replanting or transplanting a plant into a bigger pot to provide it with more space and resources to thrive.
  • slant sth against sm or sth The idiom "slant something against someone or something" means to present or depict something in a biased or unfavorable manner, often to create a negative impression or influence opinions. It implies a deliberate intention to unfairly sway or manipulate the perception or interpretation of someone or something.
  • play back sth The idiom "play back something" refers to the act of replaying or reproducing a recorded sound, video, or other media content. It implies listening to or viewing something that has been previously recorded or captured.
  • be the last word in sth The idiom "be the last word in sth" means to be the most advanced, modern, or sophisticated in a particular field, surpassing all other alternatives or competing options. It suggests that something or someone is the ultimate example or pinnacle of excellence or innovation in a specific domain.
  • fight sth through (sth) To "fight something through" is an idiomatic expression that means to persistently and determinedly resolve or overcome a difficult situation, problem, or task. It implies a continuous effort to see something through to completion despite challenges or obstacles that may arise along the way. It suggests putting up a strong fight and not giving up until the goal is achieved or the issue is resolved.
  • scramble for sm or sth The idiom "scramble for something" refers to a situation in which many people or groups compete or rush to obtain or achieve something valuable or desirable. It implies a sense of urgency and intense competition, often with limited availability or time.
  • sand sth down The idiom "sand something down" refers to the process of using sandpaper or a similar abrasive material to smooth or remove imperfections from a surface. It can be used metaphorically to describe refining or improving something through gradual and careful modifications or adjustments.
  • know of sm or sth The idiom "know of someone or something" means to have awareness or knowledge about someone or something. It suggests familiarity with the existence or details of a person, thing, event, or situation.
  • steer clear (of sm or sth) The idiom "steer clear (of someone or something)" means to avoid or keep away from someone or something, usually because they are considered to be dangerous, harmful, or risky. It implies the act of deliberately staying away or maintaining a safe distance to prevent any negative consequences or involvement.
  • botch sth up The idiom "botch sth up" means to do something very badly or to ruin or mess up a task, project, or situation due to mistakes, incompetence, or poor execution. It implies a failure to accomplish something effectively or correctly.
  • deface sth with sth The idiom "deface something with something" means to deliberately damage or spoil the appearance of something by adding markings, graffiti, or other unwanted or inappropriate content.
  • call sm or sth up To "call someone or something up" refers to the act of contacting or summoning them, often by phone. It signifies making a phone call to communicate with a person or to request the presence or availability of someone or something.
  • come out for sm or sth The idiom "come out for someone or something" means to publicly show support, backing, or endorsement for a person, cause, or idea. It refers to declaring one's position or expressing favorable intentions towards a specific individual or issue.
  • deprive sm of sth The idiom "deprive someone of something" means to take or withhold something from someone, usually causing them to be without a particular possession, opportunity, or benefit they previously had or could have had.
  • protect sm or sth against sm or sth The idiom "protect someone or something against someone or something" means to safeguard or shield someone or something from potential harm, dangers, or threats posed by someone or something else. It implies taking precautions or measures to ensure the safety or well-being of the person or thing being protected.
  • sing out (sth) The idiom "sing out (sth)" refers to expressing or declaring something loudly or boldly. It often implies speaking up or proclaiming a particular opinion, feeling, or message in a strong and assertive manner.
  • every inch of sth/smw The idiom "every inch of sth/smw" means to thoroughly know or understand something, or to fully utilize or explore every aspect or detail of something. It emphasizes the idea of being extremely knowledgeable or familiar with a particular subject or location.
  • grasp at sm or sth The idiom "grasp at something" means to desperately try to obtain or understand something, usually an opportunity or an idea, often with a sense of urgency or desperation.
  • pluck sth out of the air The idiom "pluck something out of the air" means to randomly create or make something without any logical or factual basis. It implies coming up with an idea or answer without putting much thought or consideration into it.
  • weed sm or sth out To "weed something out" is an idiomatic expression that means to remove or eliminate undesirable or unnecessary elements from a group, system, or situation. It often implies a process of carefully examining and removing the unwanted things or elements, similar to removing weeds from a garden or field.
  • stir sm (in)to sth The idiom "stir someone (in)to something" means to provoke or incite someone to take action or become involved in a particular situation, often by arousing their emotions or passions. It suggests the idea of stirring someone's interest or enthusiasm towards something.
  • agitate against sm or sth The idiom "agitate against someone or something" means to actively and persistently campaign or rally against a person, group, or idea, typically by creating public unrest, protesting, or advocating for change. It involves stirring up public opinion and attempting to mobilize others to join in opposition or resistance.
  • retire (in)to sth The idiom "retire (in)to sth" means to withdraw from one's career or active life and choose to live or spend time in a certain place or engage in a particular activity. It refers to the act of settling down or moving to a specific location or pursuing a specific lifestyle after ending one's professional or working life.
  • write up sth The idiom "write up something" typically means to create a formal or official document about a particular topic or subject. It refers to the act of writing a detailed report, summary, or explanation of something, often based on observations, research, or analysis. It can also indicate the act of documenting an individual's achievements, performance, or behavior, usually in a workplace or academic setting.
  • loiter over sth The phrase "loiter over something" typically means to linger or spend time in a leisurely manner, often with no hurry or specific purpose. It suggests a relaxed or casual approach to an activity or task.
  • pass sth down (to sm) The idiom "pass something down (to someone)" means to transfer or give something, typically a possession, to someone in a younger generation, such as passing down a family heirloom or tradition. It can also refer to passing on information, knowledge, or skills to someone who follows after you.
  • scout around (for sm or sth) The idiom "scout around (for someone or something)" means to search or explore in order to find someone or something. It involves actively looking and investigating various places or options to gather information or make a selection.
  • talk you through sth "Talk you through something" is an idiomatic expression that means to guide, explain, or provide detailed instructions to someone about a particular task, process, or situation. It typically involves giving step-by-step explanations or sharing insights to help the other person understand or accomplish something with support and guidance.
  • lace sth up The idiom "lace sth up" typically means to fasten or tie something, particularly shoes or any other item with laces. It can also be used metaphorically to imply getting ready or prepared for a task or challenge.
  • not see beyond sth The idiom "not see beyond something" means to have a limited perspective or inability to consider or understand something beyond its immediate or surface-level appearance or implications. It refers to lacking foresight, insight, or the ability to recognize the deeper or long-term consequences or meanings of something.
  • chuck sth up The idiom "chuck sth up" is an informal expression that typically means to vomit or throw up. It is commonly used to refer to the act of expelling the contents of one's stomach forcefully.
  • orbit (around) sm or sth The idiom "orbit (around) someone or something" refers to a person or thing being constantly present or revolving around another person or thing. It implies a strong focus, attention, or dependence on someone or something. It can also suggest a subservient or subordinate relationship.
  • reunite sm or sth with sm or sth The idiom "reunite someone or something with someone or something" means to bring two parties or entities back together after a period of separation or disconnection. It implies restoring a relationship or connection that was previously broken or disrupted.
  • argue sth out The idiom "argue something out" means to discuss or debate something thoroughly in order to come to a resolution or agreement. It involves engaging in a thoughtful and often intense conversation to explore different viewpoints, consider the pros and cons, and reach a common ground. It implies a process of resolving conflicts or reaching a decision through reasoned and constructive debate.
  • ram sth down sb's throat The idiom "ram something down someone's throat" refers to forcefully and excessively imposing one's ideas, beliefs, or opinions on others without giving them a chance to express their own thoughts. It implies the act of aggressively and persistently advocating or promoting something, regardless of the other person's interest or willingness to accept it.
  • lay into sm or sth The idiom "lay into someone or something" means to vigorously and harshly criticize or attack someone or something verbally or physically. It implies strongly and forcefully expressing disapproval, anger, or frustration towards a specific person or thing.
  • infuse sm with sth To infuse someone with something means to imbue or saturate them with a particular quality, emotion, or characteristic. It refers to the act of deeply instilling or filling someone or something with a specific attribute or element, often with the aim of intensifying or enhancing it.
  • make fun of sb/sth To "make fun of someone or something" means to mock or ridicule them in a lighthearted or teasing manner. It refers to the act of laughing or joking about someone or something, often at their expense, in order to entertain oneself or others.
  • satisfy (sm or an animal) with sth The idiom "satisfy (someone or an animal) with something" means to fulfill or meet someone's or an animal's needs, desires, or requirements with a particular thing or action. It implies that the person or animal is content or pleased with what they have received or experienced.
  • do (double) duty as/for sth The idiom "do (double) duty as/for sth" means to serve two purposes or fulfill two different roles simultaneously. It implies that a person or thing is functioning in multiple capacities or carrying out multiple responsibilities at the same time.
  • stir sth around The idiom "stir something around" means to mix or blend something thoroughly by moving or agitating it in different directions. It is often used metaphorically to describe exploring or investigating a situation, topic, or problem in a comprehensive and thorough manner.
  • coach sm for sth The idiom "coach someone for something" means to train, guide, or instruct someone in order to improve their abilities or prepare them for a specific task, event, or challenge. It often refers to providing guidance or support to help someone achieve better results or attain a particular goal.
  • hunker down (on sth) The idiom "hunker down (on sth)" means to settle in or establish oneself firmly in a place, often with the intention of staying there for a prolonged period of time. It implies hunkering down in a determined and focused manner, typically in response to difficult or challenging circumstances. It can also refer to preparing oneself mentally or emotionally for a particular situation.
  • act (up)on sth The idiom "act (up)on sth" means to take action or make a decision based on something, such as information, advice, or a suggestion. It refers to the act of responding and putting into practice or effect what has been learned or heard.
  • wrap up sth To "wrap up something" means to complete or finish something, usually referring to a task, project, or event. It implies bringing something to a conclusion or reaching the end of a given activity, often involving finalizing or summarizing the details.
  • bring sm or sth forward The idiom "bring someone or something forward" typically means to present or introduce someone or something in a discussion, meeting, or event, often referring to bringing them to attention or consideration earlier than originally planned. It can also refer to advancing a particular date, deadline, or schedule.
  • parcel out sth The idiom "parcel out something" means to divide or distribute something into smaller parts or portions, usually for the purpose of giving or sharing it with others.
  • switch sm or sth over to sm or sth The idiom "switch (someone or something) over to (someone or something)" means to change or transfer one person, thing, or system to another person, thing, or system. It typically implies a shift in responsibility, operation, or membership from one entity to another.
  • abet sm in sth To "abet someone in something" means to assist, support, or encourage someone in carrying out a particular action or pursuit, often one that is morally wrong or illegal. It implies actively or knowingly aiding someone in their actions, usually with negative or harmful consequences.
  • heap sth up To "heap something up" means to accumulate or pile up a large quantity or number of things. It often implies that the items are being piled in a disorganized or haphazard manner. This idiom can be used both literally, to describe physically piling up objects, as well as figuratively, to describe accumulating or amassing things in a more abstract sense.
  • acknowledge sth as sth To "acknowledge something as something" means to accept, admit, or recognize something as being a particular thing or having a particular quality or status. It implies a formal or official recognition and acceptance. It can also refer to publicly giving credit or expressing gratitude for something.
  • include sm out (of sth) The idiom "include someone out (of something)" means to intentionally exclude or not invite someone to participate in a particular activity, event, or group. It suggests that the person is intentionally being left out or not considered for inclusion.
  • decide against sm or sth The idiom "decide against someone or something" means to make a choice or decision not to support, choose, or pursue someone or something. It indicates opting for an alternative option or rejecting a particular course of action or person.
  • let slip sth The idiom "let slip something" means to accidentally reveal or disclose information or a secret that was meant to be kept hidden or secret.
  • litter sth up To "litter something up" is an idiomatic expression that means to make a place or area messy or untidy by scattering or scattering objects or items around in a disorganized manner. It implies creating a cluttered or disorderly environment by leaving things scattered or strewn about.
  • bomb sth out The idiom "bomb sth out" typically means to completely fail or perform very poorly in a particular endeavor or task. It refers to a situation where someone puts in little effort or lacks skill in their performance, resulting in a disastrous or embarrassing outcome.
  • embed sth in sth The idiom "embed sth in sth" refers to the act of firmly or deeply placing or fixing something within or into something else, often indicating a close integration or incorporation. It can be used both literally and figuratively. Literally, it refers to physically planting, inserting, or implanting one object into another. Figuratively, it implies incorporating or integrating an idea, concept, or object deeply within another.
  • plump for sb/sth The idiom "plump for sb/sth" means to choose or support someone or something enthusiastically and decisively. It implies making a firm decision or showing strong preference for a particular person or thing.
  • come over sm or sth The idiom "come over (someone or something)" typically means to visit someone or a certain place. It can also refer to the act of coming to a particular realization, experiencing a certain emotion, or being influenced by someone or something.
  • have a brush with sth The idiom "have a brush with something" means to have a brief or indirect encounter or experience with a particular situation, typically one that may be dangerous, harmful, or unpleasant. It suggests a close call or a narrowly avoided negative outcome.
  • send sm out (for sm or sth) The idiom "send someone out (for someone or something)" means to dispatch or assign someone to go and bring back someone or something. It implies sending someone to fetch someone or can also be used when sending someone to purchase or retrieve something.
  • pose for sm or sth The idiom "pose for someone or something" refers to intentionally positioning oneself in a particular way in order to be photographed or painted, or to act in a specific manner for someone or something. It usually implies assuming a specific posture, expression, or attitude for visual representation or to fulfill a specific role or purpose.
  • run the risk of doing sth The idiom "run the risk of doing something" means to take an action that could potentially result in a negative or undesired outcome. It suggests that by pursuing a particular course of action, one is willingly exposing themselves to the possibility of experiencing a negative consequence or encountering a certain level of danger.
  • affix sth to sm or sth The idiom "affix something to someone or something" means to attach or fasten something securely to someone or something. It implies making something stick or become firmly connected to a specific person or object.
  • leave sth to sm The idiom "leave sth to someone" means to allow or trust someone to take care of or handle a specific task, responsibility, or decision on their own, without interference or guidance from others. It implies giving someone the freedom and autonomy to deal with a particular situation according to their own judgment or ability.
  • bear sth out The idiom "bear sth out" means to support or confirm something, often by providing evidence or testimony. It implies that the information or claims being supported are true or accurate. It can be used in various contexts, such as in legal proceedings, investigations, or discussions where one's statement or argument needs validation.
  • graft sth on(to) sth The idiom "graft sth on(to) sth" generally means to attach or add something, often not naturally or seamlessly, to an existing thing or concept. It is commonly used to describe the act of adding something unrelated or incompatible to something else. It can also refer to incorporating or incorporating something new into an established system or structure.
  • set fire to sm or sth The idiom "set fire to someone or something" means to intentionally ignite or cause someone or something to catch fire. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of causing trouble, chaos, or disruption.
  • allow/give sth (a) free rein The idiom "allow/give sth (a) free rein" means to allow something or someone to have complete freedom or unrestricted control over a situation. It implies giving autonomy and not placing any limitations or restraints on their actions or decisions.
  • cracked up to be sth The idiom "cracked up to be sth" means that something or someone is believed or expected to be exceptional, impressive, or extraordinary, but upon closer inspection or actual experience, it does not meet those high expectations or does not live up to the hype.
  • duck out (of sth) The idiom "duck out (of sth)" means to quickly and informally leave or escape from a situation, event, or commitment without others noticing or objecting. It often implies a sense of avoiding responsibility or trying to evade something.
  • leach out of sth The idiom "leach out of sth" refers to the process of a substance slowly or gradually draining or seeping out of something, often against the desired or intended outcome. It implies a gradual loss or depletion.
  • attest to sth The idiom "attest to something" means to provide evidence or testify to the truth, accuracy, or existence of something.
  • whistle at sm or sth The idiom "whistle at someone or something" refers to the act of making a loud, high-pitched sound by blowing through one's lips in order to express approval, attraction, or admiration. It is often used to describe catcalling or making an appreciative noise in response to someone's appearance or an impressive sight.
  • expand (up)on sth The idiom "expand (up)on something" means to provide further explanation, details, or elaboration on a particular topic or idea. It involves going into more depth and adding more information to enhance understanding or clarify a point.
  • put sm or sth to the test The idiom "put someone or something to the test" means to subject someone or something to a trial or examination in order to determine their abilities, effectiveness, or truthfulness. It implies challenging someone or something to prove themselves or their capabilities.
  • route sth to sm To "route something to someone" means to send or direct something to a specific person or place. It implies the action of directing a particular item, message, or information to someone for further action, consideration, or handling.
  • have the brass (neck) to do sth The idiom "have the brass (neck) to do sth" means to have the audacity or boldness to do something, often implying that the action is impertinent, disrespectful, or inappropriate in some way. It suggests an individual's lack of shame or fear in performing the mentioned action, even when it might be considered surprising or offensive to others.
  • fling sm or sth down The idiom "fling something down" typically means to throw or place something down with force or energy. It suggests a lack of care or regard for the object being thrown or the action being taken.
  • latch onto sb/sth The idiom "latch onto sb/sth" means to firmly grasp onto or attach oneself to someone or something, often in a figurative sense. It can imply a strong or desperate desire to stay close to someone or something, as if clinging on for support or guidance. It can also suggest the act of becoming deeply interested or obsessed with something, not easily letting go.
  • pep sm or sth up To "pep someone or something up" means to enliven, invigorate, or boost the energy level or morale of someone or something. It involves making someone or something more energetic, lively, or enthusiastic.
  • move sm or sth off (from sm or sth) The idiom "move someone or something off (from someone or something)" refers to physically or metaphorically transferring or taking away someone or something from a particular place or position. It implies relocation, removal, or displacement of a person or object.
  • amalgamate sth with sth The idiom "amalgamate something with something" means to combine or merge two or more things, ideas, or entities into a single unified whole. It implies integrating or blending different elements or components together to create a cohesive or consolidated result.
  • bring/call sth/sb to heel The idiom "bring/call sth/sb to heel" means to regain control over a situation or person, usually by asserting authority or discipline. It implies exerting influence or dominance over someone or something that has been acting independently or rebelliously, similar to how a dog is brought under control by its owner, called back and made to walk obediently alongside.
  • crave to do sth The idiom "crave to do something" means to have an intense desire or yearning to do or experience a particular thing. It implies a strong and persistent longing for something.
  • tease sm about sm or sth To "tease someone about something" means to mock or playfully provoke someone regarding a particular topic or object. This can involve making jokes, sarcastic comments, or taunting the person in a lighthearted manner.
  • abut on sth The idiom "abut on sth" is used to describe the act of being adjacent or bordering something, typically referring to physical proximity or close connection between two objects, places, or ideas. It implies that two things are in close contact or sharing a common boundary.
  • quail before sm or sth The idiom "quail before someone or something" means to shrink back in fear, to tremble or cower in the face of a person, situation, or thing that is intimidating or formidable. It conveys a sense of being overwhelmed, intimidated, or discouraged by something or someone.
  • write sth to sm The idiom "write sth to sm" typically refers to the act of expressing one's thoughts, feelings, or opinions through writing and addressing it to a specific person or entity. It implies sending a written communication to someone, either via mail or electronic means, to convey a message, provide information, or express oneself.
  • get a buzz out of sm or sth The idiom "get a buzz out of someone or something" means to derive excitement, enjoyment, or thrill from a particular person or thing. It implies feeling a sense of euphoria or exhilaration as a result of engaging with or being around that person or thing. It can also refer to finding something or someone fascinating or captivating.
  • plenty of sth The idiom "plenty of something" means having a large amount or an abundant supply of that particular thing. It implies that there is an ample or more than sufficient quantity available.
  • break off (sth) The idiom "break off (sth)" means to abruptly end or discontinue something, such as a conversation, relationship, or activity. It implies a sudden interruption or termination.
  • spew sth up The idiom "spew something up" typically means to forcefully and vehemently express or divulge something, often without much thought or consideration. It implies the action of speaking or uttering words in an uncontrolled or impulsive manner, without restraint or filtering. It can also relate to sharing information or thoughts in a rapid, unorganized, or chaotic manner.
  • clash against sth The idiom "clash against something" typically refers to a situation where there is a direct or forceful opposition or conflict between two or more things, ideas, or people. It implies a collision or confrontation, often involving opposing forces or contrasting perspectives. This idiom is commonly used to describe instances where there is a noticeable clash or clash of opinions, beliefs, interests, or values.
  • There is more to sth/sb than meets the eye. The idiom "There is more to something/someone than meets the eye" means that there is a hidden or deeper aspect to a situation or person that is not immediately apparent or obvious at first glance. It suggests that one should not make judgments or assumptions solely based on superficial or initial appearances, as there may be additional complexities or qualities to be discovered.
  • have an ear for sth The idiom "have an ear for sth" refers to someone's ability or talent to understand or appreciate a particular thing, especially related to music, language, or sound. It implies that the person has a keen sense of perception and can easily recognize and discern the nuances or qualities of the mentioned thing.
  • theorize about sm or sth To "theorize about something or someone" means to speculate, make hypotheses, or form opinions based on theories or ideas without concrete evidence or facts. It involves the act of theorizing or forming abstract explanations or hypotheses about a particular subject or situation.
  • take a rain check (on sth) The idiom "take a rain check (on sth)" means to politely decline an offer or invitation with the intention of accepting it at a later time or date. It indicates a desire to postpone or reschedule a planned activity or engagement due to current circumstances or unavailability. The phrase is often used when someone is unable to attend an event or fulfill a commitment but wishes to do so at a more convenient or suitable time in the future.
  • bolster sth up The idiom "bolster sth up" means to support or strengthen something, typically through the provision of additional assistance, resources, or reinforcement, in order to improve its stability, durability, or performance.
  • contrary to sth The idiom "contrary to something" means going against or in opposition to something, having an opposite or conflicting nature, or contradicting a particular belief, opinion, or expectation.
  • price sth down To "price something down" means to lower the price of something, typically in order to make it more affordable or to attract buyers. It refers to the act of reducing the cost of a product or service in order to generate sales or increase demand.
  • console sm on sth The idiom "console someone on something" means to offer comfort, support, or sympathy to someone who is experiencing distress, disappointment, or grief about a particular situation or event.
  • name sm or sth for sm or sth The idiom "name someone or something for someone or something" means to give a person or thing a particular name in honor or tribute to another person or thing. It can also imply that the name is chosen to reflect the qualities, characteristics, or origins of the person or thing being named.
  • hook sth into sth The idiom "hook sth into sth" typically means to connect or attach one thing to another. It can also refer to linking or integrating two things together.
  • omit sm or sth from sth The idiom "omit sm or sth from sth" means to intentionally leave out or exclude someone or something from a particular group, list, or discussion.
  • carve sth out The idiom "carve something out" means to create or establish something by persistent effort, skill, or determination, often in challenging circumstances. It refers to the act of shaping or constructing something significant and meaningful out of raw materials or difficult circumstances, often in a way that requires expertise, creativity, and perseverance.
  • wise sm up (about sm or sth) The idiom "wise up (about something or someone)" means to become informed, knowledgeable, or aware of something. It refers to gaining understanding or insight, often as a result of researching, asking questions, or paying attention to the details or facts about a particular subject or person. It can also imply becoming aware of someone's true intentions, motives, or character.
  • chortle about sm or sth The idiom "chortle about something or someone" means to laugh or chuckle with amusement or delight about a particular thing or person. It suggests an element of satisfaction or glee in the laughter, often indicating a sense of enjoyment or pleasure at someone else's expense.
  • have sth going with sb The idiom "have something going with someone" means to be in a romantic or sexual relationship with someone, or to have a romantic or sexual interest in someone. It suggests that there is mutual attraction or involvement between two people.
  • hold sm or sth up as an example To "hold someone or something up as an example" means to use them as a model or representation of a particular quality or behavior. It refers to the act of showcasing someone or something as an illustration of what others should strive for or learn from.
  • hold sm or sth out (of sth) The idiom "hold something or someone out (of something)" means to keep or prevent something or someone from entering, participating or being included in a particular situation or group. It can imply the act of excluding or keeping something at a distance.
  • bring sth to sm's attention The idiom "bring something to someone's attention" means to make someone aware of something, especially if it is important or needs their consideration or action.
  • get the most out of sm or sth The idiom "get the most out of something or someone" means to utilize or extract the maximum benefit, satisfaction, or value from a particular situation, experience, or resource. It refers to making the most of what is available and ensuring optimal productivity, enjoyment, or efficiency.
  • put the mockers on sth The idiom "put the mockers on something" means to bring bad luck or to cause failure or disappointment to something or someone. It is often used when something disrupts or undermines the success or progress of a particular event, plan, or goal.
  • chase sm or sth up sth The idiom "chase sm or sth up sth" refers to the act of following up on something or someone, usually with the intention of getting a response or obtaining information. It implies the urge or need to seek progress or resolution on a particular matter.
  • glide across sth The idiom "glide across something" typically means to move smoothly and effortlessly over or through something. It suggests a graceful and effortless movement, without any hindrance or difficulty.
  • strive after sth The idiom "strive after sth" means to make great efforts or work hard in pursuit of a particular goal, object, or achievement. It implies dedicating oneself wholeheartedly towards achieving something important or desired.
  • trot sm or sth out The idiom "trot sm or sth out" means to bring someone or something forward or present them, typically in a forced or lackluster manner. It implies that the person or thing being presented is not particularly special or deserving of attention.
  • throw sth on sm or sth The idiom "throw something on someone or something" typically means to hurriedly put or place something on someone or something. It often implies a lack of care or thoughtfulness in doing so.
  • notify sm about sm or sth The idiom "notify someone about someone or something" means to inform or give notice to someone about a specific person or thing. It implies the act of formally or officially communicating information to someone for their knowledge or attention.
  • dovetail with sth The idiom "dovetail with something" means to complement, fit together, or be harmonious with something else. It is often used when describing how two different aspects, ideas, or plans work well together and are designed to fit seamlessly.
  • wind up (sth) The idiom "wind up (sth)" has a few different meanings depending on the context: 1. To bring something to an end or conclusion: It refers to completing or finishing something, often in a particular way or state. Example: "They decided to wind up the meeting after reaching a consensus." 2. To find oneself in a particular situation unexpectedly: It conveys the idea of ending up or landing in a specific place, condition, or circumstance unintentionally or inadvertently. Example: "He started investing in risky stocks and ended up winding up bankrupt." 3. To make someone angry or irritated: In this sense, "wind up" means to provoke or annoy someone intentionally for amusement or to elicit a reaction. Example: "Don't
  • no less than sb/sth The idiom "no less than sb/sth" is used to emphasize that someone or something is remarkable, impressive, or of great importance. It highlights the fact that the mentioned person or thing is not any less significant than what is being compared to or mentioned.
  • can't do anything with sm or sth The idiom "can't do anything with someone or something" means that someone is unable to effectively handle or manage a person or thing. It implies a sense of frustration or helplessness in dealing with the individual or situation due to their unmanageable or uncooperative nature.
  • thrash sth out of sm The idiom "thrash sth out of sm" typically means to thoroughly discuss or debate a particular issue or topic until an agreement or solution is reached. It implies engaging in an intense and often heated conversation or argument to explore different perspectives and reach a resolution.
  • feel like sm or sth The idiom "feel like sm or sth" is used to describe a desire or inclination towards doing or experiencing something. It expresses the individual's current emotional or mental state, indicating that they have a strong inclination or urge towards a particular action or object.
  • hold off (sth) The idiom "hold off (something)" means to delay or postpone something, to wait before taking action or making a decision. It can also refer to keeping something or someone at a distance or preventing their approach.
  • prescribe sth for sth "Prescribe something for something" is an idiomatic expression that means to recommend or suggest a particular solution or remedy for a specific problem or situation. It is often used in medical contexts, where doctors prescribe medication or treatment for various illnesses or conditions. However, it can also be used metaphorically, beyond medical contexts, to imply providing a solution or remedy for any kind of problem or situation.
  • lay sth to sth The idiom "lay something to something" typically means to attribute the cause of something to a particular reason, factor, or source. It implies connecting or assigning responsibility to a specific cause or origin for a certain outcome or event.
  • rocket sth into sth The idiom "rocket something into something" means to rapidly accelerate or propel something into a particular state, situation, or condition. It portrays a sudden and remarkable progress or advancement in a certain context.
  • wince at sth The idiom "wince at something" means to have a physical or emotional reaction of flinching or grimacing in response to something unpleasant, such as pain, discomfort, embarrassment, or distaste. It signifies a momentary involuntary reaction to something that causes discomfort or displeasure.
  • err on the side of sth The idiom "err on the side of something" means to take a cautious or safe approach when faced with a decision or action. It implies choosing the option that is more likely to avoid potential risks, even if it may be excessive or overprotective.
  • top sth off The idiom "top something off" is defined as adding something extra or finishing something in a way that adds a final touch or improves its quality or completeness.
  • puff sth out To "puff something out" means to make something expand or become larger by blowing air or filling it with air. This is often used when referring to inflating balloons, rubber objects, or other air-filled items. It can also be used metaphorically to describe making something seem larger or more impressive than it actually is, usually through exaggeration or embellishment.
  • poised for sth The idiom "poised for something" means to be in a state of readiness, preparedness, or anticipation for a particular event or outcome. It suggests a state where someone or something is positioned or situated in a way that indicates they are fully prepared or on the verge of something significant happening.
  • glitter with sth To "glitter with something" is an idiom that means an object or a person displays or exhibits an excessive amount of something, typically in a visually striking or sparkling manner. It suggests a high level of intensity or abundance.
  • welcome sm or sth back The idiom "welcome someone or something back" means to greet or receive someone or something back with warmth, enthusiasm, or acceptance after a period of absence or separation. It implies showing appreciation, joy, or support for the return of someone or something.
  • disappear from sth The idiom "disappear from sth" refers to the act of vanishing or becoming inaccessible or unavailable for a particular situation, object, or location. It implies that someone or something is no longer present or visible in a specific context.
  • rank with sm or sth The idiom "rank with sm or sth" means that something or someone is associated or characterized by a particularly strong or overwhelming quality, often in a negative way. It implies that the mentioned quality is so strongly present that it dominates the situation or person, making it easily noticeable or recognizable.
  • notch sth up The idiom "notch sth up" means to achieve or attain something significant, often referring to a notable accomplishment, victory, or success. It implies a gradual progression or advancement, typically associated with accumulating achievements or specific levels of performance.
  • drone on (about sm or sth) The idiom "drone on (about sm or sth)" refers to someone speaking in a monotonous, boring, or lengthy manner about a particular topic, often without considering the interest or patience of the listeners. It implies that the person continues talking without any regard for the audience's engagement or involvement.
  • throw in sth The idiom "throw in something" typically means to add or include something extra as part of a deal or agreement, often to make the offer more attractive or enticing.
  • be marked as sth, at be marked out as sth The idiom "be marked as sth" or "be marked out as sth" means to be recognized or identified as something specific. It implies that a particular quality, characteristic, or trait stands out or distinguishes a person or thing from others. It signifies that someone or something possesses notable attributes or displays clear indications of a particular identity or role.
  • pat sth down The idiom "pat something down" means to carefully and thoroughly search someone or something by using one's hands in a light, gentle, and probing manner. This typically refers to the act of physically examining a person or their belongings, such as searching for hidden weapons or contraband.
  • for all the difference sth makes The idiom "for all the difference something makes" means that something has little or no impact or influence on a situation or outcome. It implies that the mentioned thing or action doesn't result in any significant change or improvement.
  • scour sth out The idiom "scour something out" means to clean or clear something thoroughly and meticulously, typically by scrubbing or searching through every corner or detail. It implies a thorough and exhaustive effort in removing dirt, impurities, or unwanted elements from a particular item, surface, or situation.
  • wash sth out The idiom "wash something out" means to remove or dilute something, often by using water or another liquid. It can refer to physically removing a substance by rinsing it away, or to neutralizing or diminishing the effects or intensity of something.
  • reduced to doing sth The idiom "reduced to doing something" means being forced or compelled to do something that one finds undesirable or beneath their normal standards or expectations. It implies a situation where one's options or circumstances have deteriorated, leaving them with no choice but to engage in an action they may not have otherwise considered.
  • call sm or sth out The idiom "call someone or something out" means to publicly criticize, expose, or challenge someone or something, usually for their wrongdoing, dishonesty, mistakes, or unacceptable behavior. It typically involves a direct confrontation or speaking out against the person or action.
  • cover sm or sth up The idiom "cover something/someone up" means to hide, conceal, or protect something or someone, typically to prevent the truth from being discovered or to minimize the negative consequences of a situation. It involves taking measures to prevent information from becoming public or to disguise the reality of an event or action.
  • hiss sth out The idiom "hiss sth out" means to say or utter something in a sharp, aggressive, or angry manner, often with a sibilant sound like a low-pitched hiss. It conveys a sense of disdain, annoyance, or disapproval. This idiom suggests that the speaker is expressing their negative emotions forcefully or with contempt.
  • leave off (doing sth) The idiom "leave off (doing sth)" means to stop or discontinue an activity or task that was previously being done. It refers to the act of ending or ceasing something, typically after a period of engagement or involvement.
  • be more to sth than meets the eye The idiom "be more to something than meets the eye" means that something has hidden or deeper qualities, characteristics, or meanings that are not immediately apparent or obvious. It suggests that there is something additional or significant beyond what is initially seen or understood.
  • concern sm in sth The idiom "concern someone in something" means to involve or involve someone in a particular situation, often with a negative connotation. It implies that someone is directly affected or affected by a certain matter or issue.
  • pipe sth away The idiom "pipe something away" refers to removing or diverting something, typically a liquid or gas, through a pipe or conduit. It suggests the act of moving substances from one place to another using a piping system.
  • halfhearted (about sm or sth) The idiom "halfhearted about something" means to have a lack of enthusiasm, commitment, or interest in someone or something. It portrays a sense of minimal effort or involvement, often implying a lack of genuine passion or dedication towards the subject in question.
  • flake off (of) sth The idiom "flake off (of) sth" means to come off or detach in small, thin pieces from a surface or object. It is often used to describe the process of small particles or fragments separating from a larger whole, such as when flakes of paint peel off a wall, or when dead skin flakes off the body.
  • turn sm or sth upside down The idiom "turn someone or something upside down" means to thoroughly search, investigate, or examine a person or thing in a way that disrupts or disorganizes it. It typically implies thorough scrutiny or a thorough investigation to find something or obtain information.
  • wrinkle sth up The idiom "wrinkle sth up" refers to crumpling or creasing something, usually fabric or paper, by folding or twisting it.
  • focus sth on sm or sth To focus something on someone or something means to give specific attention, concentration, or effort towards that person or thing. It implies directing one's energy, resources, or thoughts in a targeted manner to understand, support, or accomplish something related to the mentioned person or thing.
  • sign sth away The idiom "sign something away" typically means to relinquish or give up ownership, control, or rights over something by signing a legal document or agreement. It implies that someone is surrendering their claim or authority over that particular thing.
  • nosh on sth The idiom "nosh on something" refers to the act of eating or snacking on something in a casual or leisurely manner, often implying the consumption of small or light bites of food. It is commonly used to describe eating or enjoying food in a relaxed or informal setting.
  • slip up on sth The idiom "slip up on something" means to make a mistake, error, or oversight while doing or attempting something. It implies an unintentional slip or failure in execution, often resulting in a negative outcome.
  • crusade against sm or sth The idiom "crusade against sm or sth" means to vigorously and passionately campaign or fight against something, usually a social issue, injustice, or perceived wrongdoing. It implies a determined effort or movement to bring about significant change or eradicate a particular problem. The term "crusade" alludes to the historical military campaigns undertaken during the medieval Christian era, suggesting a righteous and zealous commitment to a cause.
  • put sth down to experience The idiom "put sth down to experience" means to accept and learn from a negative or unsuccessful occurrence in order to gain knowledge or wisdom for the future. It implies that one should not dwell on or be discouraged by a setback but rather view it as a valuable lesson that contributes to personal growth.
  • merge with sm or sth The idiom "merge with someone or something" means to combine or join together with another person or thing in order to form a single entity or organization. It often refers to the act of combining two companies or businesses to form a larger and stronger entity.
  • pay out sth The idiom "pay out something" refers to giving or spending a significant amount of money, typically as a result of some commitment, obligation, or cost. It often implies a considerable expense or financial burden.
  • find sth out The idiom "find sth out" means to discover or obtain information or knowledge about something through investigation, research, or inquiry.
  • feel like sth The idiom "feel like sth" is used to express a desire or inclination towards a certain thing or activity. It implies a subjective feeling or urge to experience or have something specific.
  • over and above sth The idiom "over and above sth" means to have more or in addition to what is expected or required. It refers to something that goes beyond the ordinary or necessary, exceeding a standard or exceeding what is already offered or provided.
  • fight off sth To "fight off something" means to forcefully resist or repel an attack, threat, or negative influence. It implies making a strong effort to fend off or combat something that is trying to harm or overcome you. This idiom can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • there's much/a lot etc. to be said for sth/doing sth The idiom "there's much/a lot etc. to be said for something/doing something" means that there are many positive arguments or advantages in favor of a particular thing or action. It implies that there is merit or value in considering or pursuing that particular thing or action.
  • default on sth The idiom "default on something" refers to a situation where a person or entity fails to fulfill a financial obligation, such as a loan or debt repayment, according to the agreed-upon terms and conditions. Defaulting on something means failing to make the required payment or failing to meet the obligations outlined in a contract or agreement.
  • stick with sb/sth The idiom "stick with sb/sth" means to remain loyal, committed, or dedicated to someone or something. It implies the act of continuing to support or stay true to someone or something despite difficulties or temptations to abandon or change allegiances.
  • sth is at your disposal The idiom "something is at your disposal" means that something is available for you to use or access at any time, it is at your service and can be utilized as you see fit. It implies that you have full control or authority over that thing.
  • officiate (as sth) (at sth) The idiom "officiate (as sth) (at sth)" refers to an individual taking on an official role or position, typically in a formal or ceremonial context. It often involves overseeing or conducting a specific event, such as a wedding, a religious ceremony, or a competition. The person assuming this role is responsible for maintaining order, ensuring the proper execution of procedures, and sometimes making official announcements or declarations.
  • take the rap (for sth) The idiom "take the rap (for sth)" means to accept responsibility or blame for something, especially on behalf of others or as a sacrifice, even if one is not solely responsible. It implies willingly accepting the consequences or punishment for a wrongdoing, regardless of personal involvement, to protect others or maintain loyalty.
  • go beyond sth The idiom "go beyond something" typically means to exceed or surpass a particular limit, boundary, or expectation. It refers to extending one's efforts, abilities, or understanding beyond what is considered average, usual, or prescribed. It implies pushing oneself further or going the extra mile in order to achieve a higher level of performance or understanding.
  • walk (sb) through sth The idiom "walk (sb) through sth" means to explain or demonstrate something to someone in a patient and detailed manner, typically step by step. It involves providing guidance or instructions to help someone understand or navigate a particular process, task, or concept.
  • hark back to sth The idiom "hark back to something" means to recall or be reminiscent of something from the past. It refers to recollecting or revisiting a particular event, idea, style, or characteristic that existed in an earlier time. It can be used to describe when something reminds a person of a previous experience or evokes a sense of nostalgia.
  • throw sth up to sm The idiom "throw something up to someone" refers to the act of reminding or frequently mentioning a past mistake, error, or fault to someone in order to criticize or reproach them. It involves bringing up a previous action or situation as a means of holding it against another person.
  • scuttle across sth The idiom "scuttle across something" means to move quickly and with short, hurried steps across a surface, usually to avoid being seen or to reach a destination discreetly. It implies moving in a hurried or shuffling manner, often with a sense of secrecy or stealth.
  • press for sth The idiom "press for something" means to exert pressure or demand persistently or insistently for something to happen or be done. It implies pushing or urging for a particular outcome or result.
  • keep a firm grip on sm or sth The idiom "keep a firm grip on someone or something" means to maintain control or hold onto someone or something securely. It refers to ensuring that one has a strong and unwavering grasp on a situation, an object, or even a person's actions or behavior. It implies being vigilant and not letting go of control or losing one's hold.
  • overdose (sm) (on sth) The idiom "overdose (on sth)" typically means to have or consume an excessive amount of something, often a substance or a particular activity, leading to negative consequences or adverse effects. It can refer to a literal overdose of drugs or medication but is also used metaphorically to convey excessive indulgence or overconsumption of anything, such as food, work, entertainment, or even a particular emotion.
  • rush sm into sth The idiom "rush sm into sth" means to quickly and aggressively push or force someone or something into a particular situation or activity without allowing for enough time for proper assessment, preparation, or consideration. It implies a sense of urgency and haste in getting something done or accomplished, often disregarding potential consequences or drawbacks.
  • submerge sm or sth under sth To submerge something or someone under something means to completely cover or plunge them beneath a liquid or a mass. It can also mean to immerse or hide something or someone within a larger context or group.
  • acquit sm of sth The idiom "acquit someone of something" means to declare or find someone not guilty or free from blame for a particular action or accusation. It implies that the person has been cleared of any wrongdoing or responsibility for the specified matter.
  • needle sm about sm or sth The idiom "needle someone about someone or something" means to persistently annoy, tease, or provoke someone by continually mentioning or making pointed comments about a particular person or topic.
  • clip sth out of sth The idiom "clip sth out of sth" refers to the act of cutting or removing something, typically from a larger piece or source material. It commonly implies the physical action of using scissors or similar tools to carefully remove a specific section or portion from a document, magazine, newspaper, or any other printed material. This can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of extracting or isolating a particular piece of information, image, or idea from a larger context.
  • identify sm or sth by sth The idiom "identify someone or something by something" means to recognize, distinguish, or connect someone or something with a specific characteristic, quality, or trait. It refers to being able to determine or ascertain the identity of someone or something based on a particular factor, such as appearance, behavior, or a specific attribute.
  • weave sth from sth The idiom "weave something from something" typically means to create or produce something skillfully and intricately from various elements or materials. It often implies the act of skillfully combining or integrating different components to form a cohesive whole. This idiom is derived from the weaving process, where individual strands or threads are expertly interconnected to create a fabric or textile. In a figurative sense, it refers to the act of creatively assembling various ideas, concepts, or objects to form a unified or coherent outcome.
  • pin your hopes on sth/sb The idiom "pin your hopes on sth/sb" means to place all of your expectations, desires, or aspirations on a specific thing or person, often with a sense of relying solely on them for success, happiness, or fulfillment. It implies a heavy reliance or dependence on a particular outcome or individual to achieve one's goals or dreams.
  • rich in sth The idiom "rich in something" means to possess an abundant or plentiful amount of that particular thing. It can be used to describe a person, place, or thing that has a notable abundance or quality of something desired or valued, such as wealth, resources, knowledge, culture, experiences, or any other attribute.
  • buy sth sight unseen The idiom "buy something sight unseen" means to purchase or acquire something without seeing or examining it in person beforehand. It often refers to making a purchase based solely on the description, reputation, or recommendation without personally inspecting the item.
  • laugh off sth To "laugh off something" means to respond to a negative or difficult situation by laughing or making light of it, often as a way to minimize its impact or importance. It typically implies not taking the situation too seriously and maintaining a positive attitude.
  • reckon with sm or sth The idiom "reckon with someone or something" means to give serious consideration or attention to someone or something, especially when they have unexpected or significant consequences. It implies acknowledging, accepting, or dealing with the challenges, implications, or impact of someone or something.
  • break for sth The idiom "break for something" typically means to make a sudden stop or pause in order to engage or pursue a particular activity or opportunity. It often implies taking a break from routine or work for a specific purpose or desire.
  • behoove one to do sth The idiom "behoove one to do something" means that it is necessary, advisable, or one's duty to do something. It implies a strong recommendation or obligation to take a particular action.
  • flash on sm or sth The idiom "flash on (someone or something)" means to suddenly have a brief and vivid memory or recollection of someone or something. It refers to a moment of instantaneous recognition or remembrance that occurs spontaneously.
  • balk at sth The idiom "balk at something" means to hesitate, resist, or refuse to do or accept something, usually due to fear, doubt, or disagreement. It implies experiencing a reluctance or resistance towards a particular action or idea.
  • jeer at sm or sth The idiom "jeer at someone or something" means to mock, ridicule, or deride someone or something openly and scornfully. It often involves making disrespectful remarks, laughing sarcastically, or taunting in a demeaning manner.
  • venture out (sth) The idiom "venture out (sth)" means to leave a familiar or safe place to explore or attempt something new, different, or risky. It implies taking a step beyond one's comfort zone or usual routine.
  • tire of sm or sth The idiom "tire of someone or something" means to grow bored, weary, or fatigued with someone or something, typically due to repetition, monotony, or a lack of interest or enjoyment. It suggests a loss of enthusiasm or a feeling of being fed up with a particular person, activity, or situation.
  • build sth up The idiom "build something up" typically means to enhance or increase the size, reputation, importance, or value of something gradually over time. It can refer to building up one's physical strength, one's knowledge or skills, a business, a relationship, or even one's confidence or self-esteem.
  • tower head and shoulders above sm or sth The idiom "tower head and shoulders above someone or something" means to be significantly superior or outstanding in comparison to others. It is often used to describe someone's exceptional abilities, achievements, or qualities that make them stand out prominently.
  • phone in (to sm or sth) The idiom "phone in (to someone or something)" refers to the act of making a phone call to someone or something, usually to provide information or participate in a discussion, without being physically present. It can also imply a lack of enthusiasm, effort, or engagement in the communication or activity.
  • work wonders (with sm or sth) The idiom "work wonders (with someone or something)" means to have a remarkably positive and beneficial effect on someone or something. It implies that the actions or efforts being made are resulting in significant improvements, transformations, or successes.
  • place sm or sth next to sm or sth The idiom "place someone or something next to someone or something" means to position or arrange someone or something directly alongside or adjacent to someone or something else. It implies a physical proximity or close positioning of two entities.
  • wipe sth off the face of the earth/globe, at wipe sth off the map The idiom "wipe something off the face of the earth/globe" or "wipe something off the map" means to completely destroy or eliminate something, often referring to a place or group of people. It suggests the total eradication or removal of something, leaving no trace or remnant behind. This phrase is usually used figuratively to emphasize the thoroughness or intensity of the destruction.
  • examine sm or sth for sth The idiom "examine sm or sth for sth" means to carefully inspect or scrutinize someone or something in order to search or look for a particular thing or condition.
  • pry sth up To "pry something up" means to forcefully lift or remove something by applying pressure with a tool like a pry bar or lever. This idiom is commonly used to describe the action of raising or extracting something that is tightly secured or stuck.
  • fend sm or sth off The idiom "fend someone or something off" means to defend oneself or resist an attack or threat, typically through physical or mental effort. It implies taking action to protect oneself from harm or keep something or someone at bay.
  • smash through sth The idiom "smash through sth" means to forcefully break or overcome a physical obstacle or barrier, often with great energy and intensity. It can also be used more figuratively to describe overcoming difficult challenges or barriers in one's path with determination and vigor.
  • dust sth off The idiom "dust something off" figuratively means to revive, restore, or bring back something that has been neglected or forgotten for a while. It implies giving attention or effort to something that has been set aside or ignored. It can be used in both literal and metaphorical contexts, where "dusting off" could mean removing dust or simply giving something much-needed attention or consideration.
  • stand on sth The idiom "stand on something" means to base one's opinions, judgements, or beliefs on a particular thing, such as evidence, facts, principles, or moral values. It suggests relying on reliable, solid ground or support for one's perspective.
  • shut sb/sth up The idiom "shut sb/sth up" means to make someone or something stop talking or making noise. It can also refer to making someone stop expressing their opinions or arguments forcefully or abruptly.
  • will not hear of sth The idiom "will not hear of something" means to refuse to consider or accept a suggestion, idea, or proposal. It implies that the person is determined not to allow or acknowledge that particular thing.
  • have nothing to do with sb/sth The idiom "have nothing to do with sb/sth" is used to express the complete lack of involvement, association, or connection with someone or something. It implies a deliberate decision to keep distance or avoid any kind of relationship or interaction.
  • fasten sth up The idiom "fasten sth up" means to secure, close, or tighten something firmly or securely. It typically refers to the act of closing or securing a garment, bag, or other items using buttons, zippers, laces, belts, or any other fastening mechanism.
  • dillydally (around) with sm or sth The idiom "dillydally (around) with someone or something" refers to wasting time or being indecisive or slow in dealing with someone or something. It can imply procrastination, being hesitant, or engaging in frivolous activities instead of taking prompt action.
  • have sth in your pocket The idiom "have something in your pocket" typically means to have an advantage, resource, or solution readily available for a specific situation, often implying preparedness or advantage over others. It suggests being well-prepared or having access to something that can be used to your benefit when needed.
  • wring sth out The idiom "wring something out" means to forcefully extract liquid from something by twisting or squeezing it. It can also be used figuratively to describe extracting maximum effort, information, or results from a situation or a person.
  • jump on sm or sth The idiom "jump on someone or something" typically means to vigorously criticize, reprimand, or attack someone or something for their actions or behavior. It is used to describe a situation where someone responds quickly and strongly to a particular issue or wrongdoing.
  • work sth off The idiom "work something off" typically means to engage in physical activity or exertion in order to remove or eliminate the effects or guilt associated with something, usually food or indulgence. It can also refer to working diligently to eliminate a debt or payment.
  • put an amount of time in on sth The idiom "put an amount of time in on something" refers to dedicating a certain period or duration of time to work on or engage in a specific task or project. It implies investing effort and focus into completing the task thoroughly or making progress towards a goal.
  • rasp sth out The idiom "rasp sth out" means to speak or pronounce something in a harsh, grating, or unpleasant manner.
  • hanker after sm or sth To "hanker after sm or sth" means to have a strong desire or longing for someone or something. It implies a deep yearning or craving for that particular person or thing.
  • gouge sth out of sm The idiom "gouge something out of someone" means to obtain something from someone by force, coercion, or manipulation. It usually suggests obtaining something in an unfair or excessive manner, taking advantage of the other person's vulnerability or weakness.
  • trust sm to do sth The idiom "trust someone to do something" refers to relying on or having confidence in a specific person to perform a particular action or task. It implies that the person has a consistent or predictable nature, often for something negative or undesirable. The idiom can also be used in a sarcastic or slightly mocking manner to express a lack of surprise or disappointment in someone's actions.
  • go/send sth/sb flying The idiom "go/send something/somebody flying" means to cause something or someone to be propelled forcefully and uncontrollably through the air, usually due to a sudden impact or forceful action. It implies a sudden and unexpected movement or displacement.
  • pump sb/sth up The idiom "pump sb/sth up" means to invigorate, stimulate, or increase someone's energy, enthusiasm, or confidence, usually through encouragement, motivation, or excitement. It can also refer to inflating or increasing the volume, pressure, or size of something physically.
  • tow sm or sth out (to sth) The idiom "tow someone or something out (to something)" means to pull or drag someone or something out of a particular place or situation with the help of a rope, chain, or other mechanism. It often refers to moving a vehicle or object that is stuck or immobile and moving it to a desired location.
  • result in sth The idiom "result in sth" means to cause or produce a particular outcome or consequence. It suggests that a specific action or event leads to a certain result or effect.
  • shoot down sth The idiom "shoot down something" typically means to reject, oppose, or refute an idea, proposal, or opinion in a forceful or immediate manner. It suggests swiftly dismissing or discrediting something without giving it much consideration or further discussion.
  • splash sm or sth with sth The idiom "splash (someone or something) with (something)" means to pour or scatter a liquid or substance onto someone or something in a forceful or reckless manner. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • bring sm or sth into view The idiom "bring someone or something into view" means to make someone or something visible or noticeable, especially by pointing them out or directing attention towards them. It refers to the act of showing or revealing something that was previously hidden or unseen.
  • bother about sth The idiom "bother about something" means to be concerned, worried, or troubled about a specific thing or issue. It implies putting effort or attention into dealing with or addressing that particular matter.
  • unleash sm or sth against sm or sth The idiom "unleash someone or something against someone or something" means to release or set free a powerful force, aggression, or weapon in order to attack or confront someone or something. It implies the act of fully utilizing or directing one's abilities, emotions, or resources in a forceful or aggressive manner to exert dominance or aggression against a specific target.
  • tumble out of sth The idiom "tumble out of something" typically means to fall or come out of a place or container in a hurried or disorderly manner. It can also be used metaphorically to describe when ideas, thoughts, or words flow out of someone's mind or mouth quickly and in an unorganized way.
  • rip sth in half The idiom "rip something in half" means to tear or split something completely into two equal parts, usually using force. It signifies a forceful act of separating or dividing something.
  • snuff out sth The idiom "snuff out something" means to extinguish or put an end to something abruptly or forcefully, often referring to the act of ending a life, a flame, or an idea. It implies the sudden and complete termination of something.
  • take the measure of sb/sth The idiom "take the measure of someone/something" means to accurately assess or judge someone or something's qualities, abilities, or character. It refers to comprehensively understanding or evaluating the true nature or worth of a person, situation, or thing.
  • pluck sth from sm or sth The idiom "pluck sth from sm or sth" means to remove or take out something, typically with skill or effort, from a particular place or situation. It often implies overcoming a difficulty or making an exceptional effort to acquire or achieve something.
  • set sth down The idiom "set something down" refers to the act of formalizing or documenting something in writing or in a permanent manner. It means to record or write down information, ideas, instructions, or thoughts in a comprehensible form for future reference or as an official record.
  • get your tongue round/around sth The idiom "get your tongue round/around sth" means to be able to pronounce or articulate something correctly, especially when it is difficult or unfamiliar. It implies the act of being able to say or speak a certain word or phrase without difficulty or hesitation.
  • permeate sth with sth The idiom "permeate something with something" means to spread or soak something with a particular substance, quality, or element, often to the point of saturation or complete diffusion. It refers to the process of infusing or saturating something thoroughly with another element or attribute.
  • require sth of sm The idiom "require something of someone" means to demand or expect someone to do or provide something. It implies a need or necessity for a specific action, skill, quality, or resource from someone.
  • involve sm in sth The idiom "involve someone in something" means to include or engage another person or group of people in a particular activity, situation, or responsibility. It suggests the active participation or contribution of someone in a specific task, event, or endeavor.
  • transcribe sth from sm or sth The idiom "transcribe something from someone or something" means to write down or type out something that is spoken or written by someone or something else. It refers to the act of converting spoken or written words into a written form while maintaining the original content or message.
  • take pains with sm or sth The idiom "take pains with someone or something" means to put in a great deal of effort, time, or careful attention to ensure that someone or something is done correctly, accurately, or precisely. It implies going to great lengths to achieve a desired result or outcome.
  • thrash out sth The idiom "thrash out something" typically means to discuss or debate something intensively and thoroughly in order to reach a resolution or agreement. It implies that different perspectives or opinions are being actively debated and examined in order to achieve a satisfactory outcome.
  • nominate sm to sth The idiom "nominate someone to something" refers to the act of suggesting or putting forward a person's name for a specific role, position, or responsibility. It involves recommending or selecting someone as a candidate for a particular task, job, award, or position of authority.
  • retrieve sm or sth from sm place The idiom "retrieve something from somewhere" means to recover or regain something that is located or stored in a particular place. It implies the act of finding and bringing back something that was previously obtained, stored, or kept in a specific location.
  • run short (of sth) The idiom "run short (of sth)" means to not have enough of something that is needed or expected. It refers to a shortage or a depletion of a particular item or resource.
  • learn about sm or sth The idiom "learn about something or someone" means to acquire knowledge or information about a specific topic, subject, or person. It refers to the act of gathering information, understanding, or becoming familiar with someone or something through study, research, observation, or experience.
  • slur over sth To "slur over sth" means to skim or bypass something quickly and superficially, without giving it proper attention or consideration. It can also imply hiding or downplaying certain details or aspects of something.
  • prefer sm or sth to sm (or sth else) The idiom "prefer something or someone to something (or someone) else" means to have a stronger liking or inclination towards a particular thing or person compared to another. It implies that one choice is favored or chosen over another due to personal preference or a belief that it is of higher quality, value, or satisfaction.
  • put sth on the shelf The idiom "put sth on the shelf" refers to the act of postponing or delaying something. It typically means to set something aside temporarily or indefinitely, as if placing it on a shelf for future consideration or action. It implies that the matter or project is not a current priority or that it may not be pursued further.
  • keen on doing sth The idiom "keen on doing something" means to have a strong interest, enthusiasm, or desire to do a particular activity or pursue a specific goal. It implies that someone is eager or enthusiastic about engaging in a particular action or pursuing a certain interest.
  • devote sm or sth to sm or sth The idiom "devote someone or something to someone or something" means to dedicate or commit someone or something to a specific purpose, cause, or person. It implies giving one's time, energy, resources, or focus to the mentioned subject.
  • sing the praises of sb/sth The idiom "sing the praises of sb/sth" means to speak or write in very positive terms about someone or something, usually as a form of admiration or commendation. It signifies expressing great praise, admiration, or appreciation for someone or something's qualities, achievements, or abilities.
  • thrash sth out The idiom "thrash sth out" means to discuss or debate something thoroughly and vigorously in order to reach a resolution or decision. It implies a process of examining different arguments, perspectives, or options in a detailed manner to arrive at a conclusion. It can involve intense and extensive back-and-forth discussions or negotiations in order to resolve a particular issue or to come to an agreement.
  • be glued to sth The idiom "be glued to sth" means to be completely engrossed or absorbed in something, to the point where one is unable to divert their attention away from it. It is often used to describe someone who is intensely focused and unable to be distracted from what they are doing or watching.
  • oceans of sm or sth The idiom "oceans of sm or sth" typically means an abundance or extensive amount of something. It is often used to describe a large quantity or a vast expanse.
  • rise to sth "Rise to something" is an idiomatic expression that means to meet or exceed expectations or to perform exceptionally well in a challenging situation or task. It implies demonstrating one's abilities or qualities in a way that surpasses what was anticipated or required.
  • sulk about sm or sth The idiom "sulk about sm or sth" means to behave in a moody and silent manner because of being unhappy or dissatisfied with someone or something. It involves dwelling on negative feelings and withdrawing from social interaction as a result.
  • give sm to understand sth The idiom "give someone to understand something" means to communicate or convey a message or information to someone indirectly or subtly, typically without stating it explicitly. It involves hinting at or implying something without directly expressing it in words.
  • give your eyeteeth for sth The idiom "give your eyeteeth for sth" means to be willing to sacrifice or give up something of great value or importance in order to obtain or achieve something else. It implies a strong desire or longing for something desired.
  • a penchant for sth The idiom "a penchant for sth" is used to describe someone's strong inclination or liking for something. It suggests that the person has a natural tendency or preference towards a particular thing or activity.
  • exceed sm or sth by sth The idiom "exceed someone or something by something" means to go beyond or surpass a certain limit or expectation by a certain amount or degree. It implies that someone or something has exceeded expectations, performed better than anticipated, or achieved a greater level of success than initially predicted.
  • shoot sth down The idiom "shoot something down" refers to the act of rejecting or disproving an idea, suggestion, proposal, or argument. It implies dismissing or denying something forcefully or decisively, often by providing strong and compelling counterarguments or reasons against it.
  • drop sm or sth off The idiom "drop someone or something off" means to leave someone or something at a particular location and drive away without staying or accompanying them further. It typically refers to a situation where one person is giving a ride to another person or delivering an item to a specific destination.
  • bring sth together To "bring something together" typically means to unify or consolidate different elements or parties in order to achieve a common goal or outcome. It involves harmonizing and combining separate entities or ideas to form a cohesive whole.
  • fleck sth with sth The idiom "fleck something with something" means to scatter or sprinkle small spots or specks of something onto another thing. It is often used to describe the act of lightly or sporadically covering one thing with another substance, such as flakes, dots, or droplets.
  • leave sth alone To "leave something alone" means to refrain from interfering with or changing something. It suggests that it is best to not continue to tamper with or disturb a particular situation, object, or person. It implies that it is better to not touch or modify something, as doing so could cause harm or disrupt its natural state.
  • drum up sth The definition of the idiom "drum up something" is to promote, generate or create enthusiasm, support, or interest for something, typically through energetic or persistent efforts. This often involves actively seeking attention, publicity, or support for a cause, event, or idea. The idiom originated from the concept of beating a drum to gather people's attention or to announce something.
  • set to work (on sm or sth) The idiom "set to work (on someone or something)" means to begin or start working on someone or something with determination, focus, and enthusiasm. It implies that one is ready and eager to accomplish a specific task or goal.
  • dab sth off (of) sth The idiom "dab sth off (of) sth" refers to the act of using a quick, light touch or movement to remove or clean something from a surface. It involves applying small, gentle, and precise strokes or pats to eliminate a substance or mark.
  • plunge in(to sth) The idiom "plunge in(to sth)" means to start doing something quickly, energetically, or without hesitation. It implies diving into an activity or situation without any hesitation or reluctance. It can also refer to immersing oneself deeply into something, such as a task or project.
  • spew sth out The idiom "spew something out" means to rapidly and forcefully release or emit a large amount of something, typically in a disorderly or uncontrollable manner. It implies a sense of urgency, lack of control, or disregard for precision in the process of expressing or discharging something.
  • the sun sets on sth The idiom "the sun sets on sth" is used to describe the end or decline of something, often referring to a period of time, an era, or a particular situation. It implies that something is coming to an end, similar to how the sun setting represents the end of the day.
  • plug sth into sth (and plug sth in) The idiom "plug sth into sth (and plug sth in)" refers to the act of connecting or inserting an electrical device, usually with a plug or cable, into a power source or another electronic device in order to initiate its operation or establish a connection. It implies physically joining the required components together to enable functionality or transmission of information.
  • skip off (with sth) The idiom "skip off (with sth)" means to leave a place or situation quickly and often in a lighthearted or sneaky manner, especially with something that does not belong to oneself. It implies a sense of playfulness or mischief.
  • horn in (on sb/sth) The idiom "horn in (on sb/sth)" means to intrude upon someone's activity or involvement in something without invitation or permission. It refers to interfering or joining in a situation where one's presence is unwelcome or not wanted.
  • dash sm or sth against sm or sth The idiom "dash sm or sth against sm or sth" typically refers to forcefully or violently colliding or crashing one thing or someone against another thing or someone. It implies a sudden and forceful impact, often resulting in damage or destruction.
  • fall outside sth The idiom "fall outside something" typically means to not fit within a particular category, boundary, or scope. It refers to situations or things that do not meet the expected criteria or do not fall within the established limits or parameters.
  • run for sth The idiom "run for sth" typically refers to the act of competing in an election or pursuing a candidacy for a specific position, such as running for office or running for a particular role. It implies that the individual is seeking support or votes from others in order to attain the desired position or achieve a specific goal.
  • corner the market on sth The idiom "corner the market on something" means to obtain a dominant or monopolistic position in a particular market or industry by acquiring or controlling a significant share of the available supply. It refers to a situation where a company or individual gains exclusive control or ownership over a product, service, or resource, leaving little to no competition for others in the market.
  • cast sth down The idiom "cast something down" means to overthrow or defeat something or someone with force or aggression. It implies the act of forcibly bringing down or destroying something that was once held in high regard or power.
  • scrunch sth up The idiom "scrunch sth up" means to crumple or crush something into a smaller or more compressed form, usually with force or pressure. It can refer to physically scrunching up a piece of paper, fabric, or any other material, making it into a tight ball or bundle. Additionally, it can also imply scrunching up one's face or body, indicating a physical or emotional discomfort or displeasure.
  • haggle (with sm) over sm or sth To "haggle (with someone) over something or something" means to negotiate or bargain with someone in order to agree on the terms, price, or conditions of something. It involves back-and-forth discussions and attempts to reach a mutually satisfactory agreement. This idiom is often used in situations where the parties involved have differing opinions or desires and need to reach a compromise.
  • arrange sth for sm time The idiom "arrange sth for sm time" means to schedule or plan something to occur at a specific time or during a specific period.
  • fill in (for sm or sth) The idiom "fill in (for someone or something)" means to temporarily replace someone or something, usually when they are absent or unavailable. It can refer to taking over their responsibilities, duties, or roles for a specific period of time.
  • chew sm or sth up The idiom "chew someone or something up" refers to the act of criticizing, consuming, or destroying someone or something in a relentless or merciless manner. It implies that one is subjecting a person or thing to severe scrutiny, criticism, or an overwhelming task that ultimately overwhelms or defeats them.
  • beware of sm or sth The idiom "beware of sm or sth" is a warning or cautionary phrase advising someone to be cautious or careful of someone or something. It implies that the person or thing being warned about may pose a potential threat, danger, or negative consequences, urging the listener to exercise caution and remain vigilant.
  • give sb/sth (a) free rein To give someone or something free rein means to give them complete freedom or control to do as they please, without any restrictions or limitations. It implies a hands-off approach, allowing the person or thing to act independently and autonomously.
  • sb's heart isn't in sth The idiom "sb's heart isn't in sth" means that someone is not fully committed or enthusiastic about something they are doing or involved in. It implies a lack of genuine interest, passion, or motivation for the particular task, activity, or endeavor.
  • intervene with sm or sth The idiom "intervene with someone or something" refers to the act of getting involved or interfering with a person or situation in order to influence or change the outcome or course of events. It implies taking action to prevent or resolve a problem, dispute, or conflict.
  • sustain sm in sth The idiom "sustain someone in something" refers to providing the necessary support or resources for someone to continue with a particular activity, job, or role. It involves helping someone to maintain their position or progress in a specific situation.
  • mix sm or sth into sth The idiom "mix something into something" means to combine or incorporate something into something else. It implies the act of blending or incorporating one substance or element with another to create a new mixture or combination.
  • rage over sm or sth The idiom "rage over sm or sth" means to express or experience intense anger or fury towards someone or something. It indicates a strong and uncontrollable reaction of anger towards a specific person, situation, or thing.
  • ruffle sth up The idiom "ruffle something up" means to cause disorder or disturbance to something, typically referring to messing up or disarranging the appearance or order of something intentionally or accidentally.
  • tear at sm or sth The idiom "tear at someone or something" means to pull or grab forcefully at someone or something with a lot of physical force or with great emotion. It can also refer to passionately expressing strong negative emotions towards someone or something.
  • throng around sm or sth The idiom "throng around someone or something" refers to a large group of people gathering closely around a particular person or thing. It suggests that many individuals are crowded together, typically out of curiosity, interest, or eagerness to be near someone or something important.
  • set sm's mind at ease (about sm or sth) The idiom "set someone's mind at ease (about someone or something)" means to alleviate or relieve someone's concerns, worries, or anxieties about a specific person or thing. It involves providing reassurance or information that helps put someone's mind at rest and reduces their uneasiness or apprehension.
  • cancel out (of sth) The idiom "cancel out (of sth)" refers to the act of nullifying or negating the effect, influence, or participation in something. It means to render a certain action, result, or contribution inconsequential or void.
  • crash through sth The idiom "crash through something" typically means to forcefully break or push through an obstacle or barrier, often in a determined and unstoppable manner. It can be used metaphorically to describe someone's persistence, determination, or ability to overcome challenges or achieve their goals, even if faced with obstacles.
  • snatch sm or sth (away) from sm or sth The idiom "snatch someone or something (away) from someone or something" means to forcefully and quickly take or remove someone or something from another person or place in a sudden and unexpected manner. It typically implies that the action is done with great speed, agility, or stealth.
  • lock sth onto sm or sth The idiom "lock something onto someone or something" typically refers to the act of gaining a firm or unwavering focus or attention on a specific person or thing. It implies concentrating or fixating on a target with determination or intensity.
  • despoil sth of sth The idiom "despoil sth of sth" means to deprive, rob, or remove something valuable, usually by force or dishonest means. It implies the act of taking or plundering possessions, resources, or qualities from something, often resulting in damage, destruction, or loss.
  • whine sth out The idiom "whine sth out" refers to complaining or expressing grievances in a manner that is characterized by a high-pitched, prolonged, and irritating tone. It implies a tendency to voice complaints in an excessive or irritating manner, often without considering the validity or significance of the grievances.
  • strew sth on sm or sth The idiom "strew something on someone or something" means to scatter, sprinkle, or spread something loosely and randomly over a person, object, or surface. This expression is often used metaphorically to indicate that something is being distributed or placed without care or organization.
  • withdraw sth into sth The idiomatic phrase "withdraw something into something" typically means to retract or pull back something into a specific place or situation. It can be used metaphorically to describe the process of isolating or removing oneself or something from a particular situation or environment.
  • in sth's name, at in the name of sth The idiom "in something's name" or "in the name of something" typically means doing or acting on behalf of something or someone, or carrying out actions in their honor or to benefit their cause. It implies that the actions or decisions made are being attributed to that particular thing or person.
  • break sth up "Break something up" is an idiom that refers to the act of separating, dispersing, or causing the dissolution of something that was previously whole or unified. It can be used in various contexts, both literal and figurative, to describe the process of dividing or disintegrating something, such as a group, a relationship, an object, or an event.
  • can't hold a candle to sb/sth The idiom "can't hold a candle to someone/something" means that someone or something is not as good or skilled as another person or thing, and therefore cannot be compared or compete with them. It implies that the person or thing being compared is far superior in terms of ability, quality, or performance.
  • make it (until sth) The idiom "make it (until sth)" means to endure or survive through a particular event, situation, or period of time, often implying that it was challenging or difficult. It suggests successfully reaching a specific point or goal despite obstacles or hardships.
  • load into sth The idiom "load into something" typically means to enter or board a vehicle, especially in a hurried or forceful manner. It can refer to physically getting into a vehicle, such as a car or a truck, or figuratively entering a predicament or an experience.
  • pack sth down The idiom "pack sth down" means to tightly compress or consolidate something, usually by applying pressure or force. It can be used to describe actions like pressing down on clothes in a suitcase to create more space or compacting soil or snow by stepping on it firmly.
  • crumple sth up The idiom "crumple sth up" means to crush or squeeze something into a tight, compact shape, typically referring to paper or another flexible material.
  • pull the rug from under sb/sth The idiom "pull the rug from under someone/something" means to abruptly eliminate support or stability, causing someone/something to become unsteady or unsure. It refers to figuratively removing a rug from under someone's feet, causing them to lose their balance and fall. This phrase is often used to describe situations where someone's plans or expectations are suddenly undermined or destroyed.
  • take sth as it comes The idiom "take something as it comes" means to accept and deal with a situation or event as it happens, without trying to control or plan it too much. It implies being flexible and adapting to whatever challenges or opportunities arise without worrying too much about the future. It emphasizes going with the flow and not getting overly stressed or anxious about things beyond one's control.
  • filter through (sth) The idiom "filter through (sth)" means information or news gradually spreading or reaching people over time, often through various channels of communication. It implies the slow dissemination or dissemination from one source to another.
  • borrow sth from sm The idiom "borrow something from someone" means to temporarily take or use something that belongs to another person with their permission, usually with the intention to return it later. It can refer to physical objects, money, ideas, or concepts.
  • steal sth off sm The idiom "steal sth off sm" typically means to take or snatch something from someone without their knowledge or permission. It implies deceitful or secretive actions in acquiring the item. For example, if someone steals a pen off someone's desk, it suggests that they did so discreetly and without the owner's awareness.
  • become of sm or sth The idiom "become of someone or something" refers to inquiring about the current situation or fate of someone or something. It's often used when you want to know what has happened to someone or something, particularly when the outcome or whereabouts are unknown or uncertain.
  • skirmish with sm or sth The idiom "skirmish with someone or something" refers to engaging in a short, usually minor, conflict or disagreement with a person or thing. It signifies a brief encounter, argument, or clash of opposing forces without necessarily escalating into a full-scale battle or confrontation.
  • paint sth onto sth The idiom "paint sth onto sth" means to apply paint onto a surface, usually with a brush, in order to create an image or change the appearance of something. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the process of adding or enhancing something, such as adding details or qualities to a description or narrative.
  • get your teeth into sth The idiom "get your teeth into something" means to become thoroughly involved or engaged in an activity or task, typically requiring concentration, effort, and determination. It suggests a strong commitment and dedication to understanding or accomplishing something.
  • rein sth up The idiom "rein sth up" means to reduce or control something, typically an activity or a behavior, in order to manage or restrict it within certain limits. It originates from the act of pulling on the reins of a horse, which helps to slow it down or bring it to a stop. Thus, the idiom implies the need to tame or manage a situation by exerting control or restraint.
  • lace sth with sth The expression "lace something with something" means to add or mix a particular substance, element, or quality into something else. It often implies a secret or hidden addition or alteration, and can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • embellish sth with sth The idiom "embellish sth with sth" means to decorate, enhance or adorn something with additional details or features in order to make it more attractive or interesting. It often refers to adding decorative elements or elaborating on a story, piece of art, or any other creative work to make it more visually appealing or engaging.
  • choke on sth The idiom "choke on something" means to have difficulty or struggle to breathe or swallow, usually due to something becoming lodged in the throat. Figuratively, it can also mean to struggle or be overwhelmed by something, such as an emotion, a difficult situation, or a task.
  • be no better than (a) sth The idiom "be no better than (a) sth" is used to describe a situation or a person that is equally flawed, problematic, or undesirable as something else. It implies that there is no significant difference in quality or character between the two compared elements.
  • bring sth to the fore The idiom "bring something to the fore" means to highlight or emphasize something, typically an issue, concern, or idea, and make it more prominent or noticeable. It involves bringing something to the forefront or forefront of attention, discussion, or consideration.
  • leak sth (out) The idiom "leak something out" means to accidentally or deliberately disclose or reveal information to others, often without authorization or intention. It implies that the information is being released or made public in a gradual or unauthorized manner, usually causing speculation or gossip.
  • snoop into sth The idiom "snoop into something" refers to the act of intrusively investigating or prying into someone else's personal or private affairs without their permission or knowledge. It implies a nosy or curious behavior that involves searching for information or details that are not openly shared.
  • ram sth through The idiom "ram something through" means to quickly and forcefully push or pass something, especially a decision or proposal, without much discussion, argument, or consideration for alternative options or potential consequences. It implies a lack of thorough examination or proper evaluation.
  • step sth down The idiom "step something down" means to gradually decrease or reduce the intensity, magnitude, or level of something. It often refers to relinquishing or reducing one's powerful or influential position or role.
  • pit sm or sth against sm or sth The idiom "pit someone or something against someone or something" means to set or place two or more people or things in opposition to each other, often for a competition, conflict, or comparison. It signifies creating a situation where individuals or entities are directly competing or acting against each other.
  • sentence sm to sth (for sth) The idiom "sentence someone to something (for something)" refers to the act of formally punishing or imposing a particular punishment on someone for a specific offense they have committed. It is commonly used in legal contexts to describe the process of declaring a penalty or punishment for an individual's wrongdoing.
  • jot sth down The idiom "jot something down" means to quickly write or note something down in a brief and concise manner. It implies writing or recording something important or noteworthy in a quick and efficient manner.
  • invest sm's time in sth The idiom "invest one's time in something" means to dedicate or allocate one's time and effort to a particular task, activity, or endeavor. It implies a conscious decision to prioritize and focus one's energy on that specific thing, often with the expectation of achieving some desired outcome or result. It highlights the notion of time as a valuable resource that is being intentionally used or spent in pursuit of a goal.
  • fly in the face of sm or sth The idiom "fly in the face of someone or something" means to directly oppose or contradict someone or something. It refers to going against established beliefs, opinions, or expectations in a defiant or confrontational manner.
  • run sth up The idiom "run sth up" typically means to accumulate or increase a debt, expense, or bill, usually by spending recklessly or without careful consideration. It can also refer to quickly creating or producing something, like a flag, by sewing or constructing it rapidly.
  • have had your fill of sth The idiom "have had your fill of something" means that you have experienced, consumed, or witnessed enough of a particular thing or situation, and are now satisfied or even tired of it. It suggests that you have reached the point where you no longer desire or want any more of that thing.
  • pave the way for sth The idiom "pave the way for sth" means to prepare the path or create the conditions for something to happen successfully in the future. It implies removing obstacles, clearing a path, or making necessary arrangements to facilitate the achievement of a goal or the implementation of a plan.
  • brush aside sb/sth The idiom "brush aside sb/sth" means to dismiss or disregard someone or something, often in a casual or nonchalant manner, without giving much importance or attention to them/it. It can also indicate ignoring or neglecting someone's opinion, concerns, or ideas.
  • luxuriate in sth The idiom "luxuriate in something" means to enjoy or take great pleasure in something, especially when it is considered extravagant, indulgent, or pleasurable. It implies a state of extreme enjoyment, leisure, or self-indulgence in a particular experience or activity.
  • look out (of) sth The idiom "look out (of) something" generally means to gaze or observe attentively from a particular place or location. It implies that someone is positioning themselves in a way to have a clear view or watch for something specific.
  • mess around with sth To "mess around with something" typically means to experiment, play with, or casually engage with something in a non-serious manner. It often implies not taking something seriously, not committing fully, or not pursuing it with a specific goal in mind.
  • rope sm into doing sth The idiom "rope someone into doing something" means to convince, persuade, or manipulate someone into doing something they may not initially want or be inclined to do. It implies using cunning or persuasive tactics to get someone to agree or participate in a particular action or situation.
  • take pride (in sb/sth) The idiom "take pride (in sb/sth)" means to feel a deep satisfaction, honor, or pleasure in someone or something. It refers to a strong sense of personal satisfaction, achievement, or contentment associated with a particular person or thing.
  • ease sm out of sth The idiom "ease someone out of something" refers to the act of gradually and subtly inducing someone to leave a position, role, or possession, typically by using methods that are less direct or confrontational. It implies the removal or displacement of someone or something with care and without causing undue stress or conflict.
  • a heck of a sth The idiom "a heck of a (something)" is an informal expression used to emphasize or describe someone or something as remarkable, impressive, or extraordinary. It is often used to convey a strong positive or negative sentiment.
  • in addition (to sth) The idiom "in addition (to sth)" means to include something extra or supplementary to what has already been mentioned or stated. It refers to further or further enhancing a situation.
  • bottle sth up The idiom "bottle something up" refers to the act of repressing or suppressing one's emotions, thoughts, or feelings instead of expressing or confronting them openly. It implies keeping something inside oneself without sharing or releasing it, which can lead to increased stress or internal turmoil.
  • sob sth to sm The idiom "sob sth to sm" means to confide or disclose something through tears or while crying, typically to someone who is sympathetic or understanding. It suggests a deep emotional expression or release of feelings.
  • have sb to thank (for sth) The idiom "have sb to thank (for sth)" means to be grateful or indebted to someone for something positive that they did or provided. It implies that the person acknowledges and appreciates the assistance or contribution of another person.
  • sort of sth The idiom "sort of something" is used to indicate that something is somewhat or to some extent a particular thing. It suggests that it is not a perfect or exact example of that thing, but somewhat resembles or relates to it. It implies a degree of uncertainty or ambiguity regarding the characterization or description of the thing in question.
  • beat one's brains out (to do sth) The idiom "beat one's brains out" means to put in a great deal of effort or struggle intensely to accomplish something, usually without success. It implies using all of one's mental abilities and resources to solve a problem or achieve a goal, often resulting in frustration or exhaustion.
  • avoid sb/sth like the plague The idiom "avoid sb/sth like the plague" means to stay away from someone or something completely, as if they were a highly contagious and deadly disease. It implies a strong aversion or extreme dislike towards the person or thing being avoided.
  • posture as sm or sth The idiom "posture as someone or something" means to present oneself in a particular way or behave in a manner that reflects a certain role or image, often attempting to create a specific impression or perception. It refers to adopting a posture or attitude that may not truly represent one's actual beliefs, intentions, or characteristics.
  • put sth out of your mind The idiom "put something out of your mind" means to intentionally stop thinking about or forget something, especially a worry or concern. It refers to the act of deliberately removing thoughts or distractions from one's mind in order to focus on other things or maintain mental calmness.
  • reconcile sth with sth The idiom "reconcile sth with sth" means to find a way to make two conflicting or opposing things or ideas compatible or harmonious. It refers to the act of resolving differences or establishing a balance between two conflicting elements.
  • converse with sm (about sm or sth) The idiom "converse with someone (about someone or something)" means to have a conversation or discuss something with someone. It refers to engaging in a dialogue or exchange of ideas, thoughts, or information with another person about a specific topic or individual.
  • ferret sth out (from sth) The idiom "ferret something out (from something)" means to search tirelessly and determinedly until one finds or uncovers something, usually information or an object that is hidden, difficult to find, or deeply buried. It implies a persistent and thorough search, akin to how a ferret, a small hunting mammal, would dig through tunnels or burrows to find its prey.
  • clamp down on sth The idiom "clamp down on something" means to take strong or strict measures to control, restrict, or suppress something. It usually refers to a situation where authorities or institutions impose tighter regulations, rules, or enforcement to prevent or discourage certain actions or behaviors.
  • make/put a dent in sth The idiom "make/put a dent in something" means to make progress or an impact on something, typically regarding a difficult or challenging task or problem. It often implies that the progress made is significant or noticeable, but not enough to completely solve the issue or complete the task. It signifies a partial achievement or advancement toward a goal.
  • recognize sm as sm or sth To recognize someone as someone or something means to acknowledge or accept their identity, qualities, or abilities. It refers to being aware of the true nature or value of a person or thing.
  • at the zenith of sth "At the zenith of something" means at the highest point or peak of something, often referring to a period of success, achievement, or influence. It signifies being at the top or pinnacle of a particular situation, status, or ability.
  • heap sth with sth The idiom "heap something with something" means to add or pile a large amount of something onto another thing. It implies an excessive or overwhelming amount of the second thing being added.
  • come forward (with sth) The idiom "come forward (with sth)" refers to the action of volunteering or sharing information or evidence, often regarding a specific situation or issue. It means to step up or present something in a proactive manner, usually to assist or contribute to a certain cause, investigation, or problem-solving process.
  • run away (from sb/sth) The idiom "run away from someone or something" means to escape from or avoid a person, situation, or thing, often due to fear, discomfort, or a desire to avoid responsibility or consequences. It implies avoiding confrontation or evading a difficult or unpleasant situation by physically leaving or emotionally distancing oneself.
  • shake sm or sth off The idiom "shake someone or something off" means to get rid of or escape from someone or something that is pursuing or following you. It implies physically or metaphorically shaking away someone or something that is trying to hold on or catch up with you.
  • talk through sth The idiom "talk through something" means to explain or discuss something in detail with someone. It often implies going step by step, providing thorough explanations or instructions to ensure clear understanding.
  • move on sth The idiom "move on something" means to progress or take action regarding a particular issue, topic, or situation. It suggests moving forward, not dwelling on the current situation, and actively pursuing a new course of action or making a decision. It can also imply leaving behind or letting go of something in order to focus on what comes next.
  • chain sth up The idiom "chain something up" refers to the act of securing or fastening something with a chain in order to prevent it from being stolen, moved, or accessed without permission. It typically implies using a chain or similar object to lock or restrain an item or place.
  • start sth up The idiom "start something up" means to initiate or establish a new project, business, or venture. It refers to the act of beginning or launching something, typically an enterprise or activity.
  • drive sth around sth The idiom "drive something (such as a car) around something" typically refers to the act of maneuvering or navigating a vehicle in a circular or surrounding path, typically around a specific object, location, or area.
  • give the lie to sth The idiom "give the lie to something" means to prove that something is false or incorrect, often by providing evidence or information that contradicts it. It implies revealing the truth and debunking a misconception or falsehood.
  • reproach sm with sth The idiom "reproach someone with something" means to express blame, criticism, or disapproval towards someone for something they have done or for a certain quality they possess. It implies accusing or rebuking someone for their behavior or actions.
  • pay off sth The idiom "pay off something" refers to the act of completing a debt or financial obligation by making the final payment. It can also be used more broadly to describe successfully achieving a desired outcome or getting positive results after a certain effort or investment.
  • apprise sm of sth The idiom "apprise someone of something" means to inform, notify, or give someone an update or information about something. It refers to the act of letting someone know about a particular matter or situation.
  • punch out sth The idiom "punch out something" typically means to forcefully or successfully complete a task or accomplish something. It can also refer to physically striking or hitting something until it breaks or collapses. The exact meaning can vary depending on the context in which it is used.
  • weld (sth and sth else) together The idiom "weld (sth and sth else) together" means to firmly and permanently join or unite two different things or concepts, often creating a strong and cohesive bond between them. It is figurative and typically used to convey the idea of combining or merging two distinct elements to create a whole that is stronger or more effective than its individual parts. The term "weld" is used metaphorically to emphasize the strength and solidity of the connection being formed.
  • tear off (from sm or sth) The idiom "tear off (from someone or something)" refers to the act of quickly and forcefully separating oneself from a person or situation. It implies acting with urgency and determination to leave a particular place or situation.
  • project into sth To "project into something" means to anticipate or imagine oneself or one's future in a certain situation or outcome. It refers to visualizing or projecting oneself into a particular scenario or context in order to understand or prepare for it. It can also refer to projecting one's thoughts, emotions, or desires onto something or someone.
  • be hellbent on sth The idiom "be hellbent on sth" means to be extremely determined or committed to achieving or obtaining something, often regardless of the consequences or obstacles involved. It implies a strong and unwavering determination to pursue a particular goal.
  • wise up (to sm or sth) The idiom "wise up (to sm or sth)" means to become aware or knowledgeable about something, usually after being foolish or naïve. It refers to someone gaining understanding or insight about a particular situation, often by learning from past mistakes or experiences.
  • value sm or sth as sth The idiom "value someone or something as something" means to regard or consider someone or something to be of great importance or worth in a particular role or aspect. It signifies recognizing the significance or worth of someone or something in a specific capacity or context.
  • illdisposed to doing sth The idiom "ill-disposed to doing something" means being unwilling or disinclined to do something. It refers to a state of not being in the right mindset or having a negative attitude towards a particular task or action.
  • file sth away (from sth) The idiom "file something away (from something)" means to put something in a designated place for future reference or safekeeping, typically in an organized manner. It is often used metaphorically to indicate storing information or experiences in one's mind or memory for later use or recollection.
  • make sth stick The idiom "make something stick" means to cause something to remain firmly in someone's mind or to have a lasting impact or effect. It can also refer to making an accusation or charge against someone that is difficult for them to avoid or refute.
  • fill sm or sth up (with sth) The idiom "fill someone or something up (with something)" means to completely occupy or consume someone or something with a particular substance or item. It often refers to adding a sufficient quantity of something to reach a desired level or capacity.
  • collect sth up The idiom "collect something up" means to gather or assemble things together in one place in order to organize or tidy them.
  • not worth the paper sth is printed/written on The idiom "not worth the paper something is printed/written on" refers to something that has little or no value, significance, or credibility. It implies that the content or information presented is of such poor quality or lacking in importance that it is essentially useless or worthless.
  • verge (up)on sth The idiom "verge (up)on sth" means to be very close to reaching or experiencing something, typically with a negative or undesirable connotation. It suggests being on the brink or bordering on a certain state or outcome.
  • militate against sth The idiom "militate against something" means to have a significant, adverse influence or impact that acts as a hindrance or obstacle to the success, achievement, or occurrence of something. It suggests that certain factors or circumstances are working against a particular outcome or goal.
  • lay down sth The idiom "lay down something" typically means to establish or set a rule, principle, or condition that others are expected to follow or abide by. It often implies a directive or a statement which outlines a specific requirement or expectation.
  • scatter sth about and scatter sth around The idiom "scatter something about" means to distribute or spread things randomly or without order in different places. It implies a lack of organization or neatness. The idiom "scatter something around" means the same as "scatter something about," indicating the act of spreading or dispersing things in various locations without a specific pattern or arrangement.
  • make as if to do sth The idiom "make as if to do something" means to pretend or give the appearance of preparing oneself or making a motion as if to perform a particular action, usually in order to deceive or mislead someone. It can also be used to express a notion of considering or contemplating an action without actually carrying it out.
  • take to sth like a duck to water The idiom "take to something like a duck to water" means to learn or become skillful at something very quickly and naturally, without difficulties or resistance. It implies that a person easily adapts to and excels in a new activity or environment, just as a duck naturally and effortlessly takes to water.
  • vie (with sm) (for sm or sth) When used as an idiom, "vie (with sm) (for sm or sth)" means to compete or contend with someone for someone or something. It implies engaging in a rivalry or striving to outdo or surpass someone in pursuit of a specific person or objective.
  • of two minds (about sm or sth) The idiom "of two minds (about something or someone)" means that a person is uncertain or undecided about a particular issue, person, or situation. It suggests that someone is torn between two conflicting opinions or options, making it difficult for them to come to a decisive conclusion.
  • brim over (with sth) The idiom "brim over (with sth)" means to be filled to the point of overflowing or to be overwhelmed with a particular emotion or quality. It typically describes a situation or a person experiencing an excess or an abundance of something.
  • keep sm or sth going The idiom "keep someone or something going" means to sustain or maintain someone or something, usually with continuous effort or support, in order to keep them operational or functioning effectively. It implies a sense of perseverance and ensuring that someone or something does not cease or fail.
  • try sth (on) for size The idiom "try something (on) for size" means to test or evaluate something, often referring to trying on an item of clothing to see if it fits or suits one's needs or preferences. It can also be used metaphorically to mean trying out or experimenting with something new to see if it suits one's skills or interests.
  • carve up sth The idiom "carve up sth" means to divide or distribute something, typically land, resources, or a large entity, into smaller portions or sections, often for the purpose of allocation or sharing among different individuals or groups. It implies the act of dividing something into parts, like carving a whole object into smaller pieces.
  • consecrate sm or sth to God To consecrate someone or something to God means to dedicate or set apart that person or thing for a religious or sacred purpose, typically with the intention of offering it to God as a form of worship or devotion. It involves giving special significance and setting apart from secular or ordinary use, symbolizing a sanctification or divine blessing upon the individual or object.
  • whack sth off The idiom "whack sth off" typically refers to quickly and roughly cutting or removing something, often with a careless or hasty approach. It can be used figuratively to describe completing a task or action hastily or without much thought. However, it is important to note that "whack sth off" can also have vulgar connotations or be used inappropriately in certain contexts, so it is crucial to exercise caution while using or interpreting this idiom.
  • thrust sm or sth back The idiom "thrust someone or something back" means to push someone or something forcefully away, often implying resistance or opposition. It can be both metaphorical and literal, indicating a forceful rejection or repulsion of someone or something.
  • throw your weight behind sb/sth The idiom "throw your weight behind somebody/something" means to give full support, influence, or resources to someone or something. It implies using one's power, influence, or reputation to actively support a person, cause, or idea.
  • push sm or sth aside The idiom "push sm or sth aside" means to physically or metaphorically move something or someone out of the way, disregarding or dismissing them in order to make space for something else or to focus on a different matter. It implies the act of ignoring or neglecting someone or something.
  • steer sm or sth through sth The idiom "steer someone or something through something" means to guide, navigate, or manage someone or something through a particular situation or difficulty with skill and determination. It often refers to successfully leading a person or object through a complex or challenging process.
  • put sb/sth through The idiom "put sb/sth through" has several meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To connect someone or something to another person or place through a telephone or communication system. Example: "Can you put me through to the manager, please?" 2. To make someone experience a difficult or challenging situation. Example: "The coach put the team through intense training sessions to prepare them for the competition." 3. To cause someone to experience a specific emotional or physical state. Example: "The movie put me through a rollercoaster of emotions." 4. To undergo or subject someone or something to a process or procedure. Example: "The doctor put the patient through a series of tests to diagnose the illness
  • drum sth up The idiom "drum something up" means to actively and vigorously gather or generate support, interest, or enthusiasm for something, often through persuasive or promotional efforts. It is often used in the context of trying to create or increase support for a cause, event, product, or idea.
  • grope after sm or sth The idiom "grope after someone or something" means to seek or search for someone or something in a confused, random, or haphazard way. It implies an uncertain or desperate attempt to find or understand something. It can also suggest a lack of clarity, direction, or purpose in the search.
  • a hell of a sb/sth The idiom "a hell of a" is used to emphasize the intensity, extreme nature, or quality of someone or something. It is often used to convey a strong level of praise, admiration, or emphasis. It can also be used to express a negative or problematic situation.
  • in opposition (to sm or sth) The idiom "in opposition (to someone or something)" refers to being against or in disagreement with someone or something, often in a political or ideological sense. It implies a stance or position that is conflicting, contradictory, or contrary to another person, group, or belief.
  • demonstrate sth to sm The idiom "demonstrate something to someone" means to show or explain something to someone in a way that makes it clear or evident. It involves providing evidence or proof to support or substantiate a statement, claim, or explanation.
  • switch sth to (sth else) The idiom "switch something to something else" means to change or replace one thing or method with another. It implies a shift or transition from one option, idea, or course of action to another.
  • practice (up)on sm or sth The idiom "practice (up)on someone or something" means to experiment or familiarize oneself with a particular subject or skill, often through repetition or experimentation. It implies active learning or rehearsing in order to improve or obtain better understanding.
  • pour cold water on sth The idiom "pour cold water on sth" means to discourage or dampen enthusiasm for something, often by expressing skepticism or by presenting counterarguments or negative opinions. It implies a figurative act of extinguishing or minimizing the excitement or positivity surrounding a particular idea, plan, or proposal.
  • born to be sth The idiom "born to be sth" refers to a person who possesses natural talent, aptitude, or inherent qualities that make them ideally suited for a particular role, profession, or activity. It implies that they were destined or made for that specific purpose, and excel at it effortlessly.
  • turn off sth The idiom "turn off something" generally means to cause someone to lose interest or become disengaged from something, or to stop a device or appliance from operating.
  • perk sth up The idiom "perk something up" refers to improving or adding energy, enthusiasm, or interest to something that may be dull, boring, or lacking excitement. It is used when an individual or action is able to bring about a positive change or enhancement to make something more engaging or enjoyable.
  • take offense (at sm or sth) The idiom "take offense (at someone or something)" means to feel insulted, annoyed, or angry about someone's words, actions, or behavior. It implies that a person interprets or perceives someone or something as disrespectful, insulting, or hurtful.
  • absolve sm from sth To "absolve someone from something" means to relieve or free someone from guilt, blame, responsibility, or a specific obligation. It can also refer to the act of declaring someone innocent or pardoning them from a particular wrongdoing or fault.
  • sting sm with sth The idiom "sting someone with something" refers to causing emotional or physical pain or discomfort by using or introducing something unpleasant, hurtful, or unexpected. It can also imply surprising someone with the consequences of their actions or decisions.
  • stitch sth onto sth The idiom "stitch sth onto sth" means to attach or add something to another thing, often using stitches or sutures. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • bring to mind sb/sth The idiom "bring to mind sb/sth" means to evoke memories or cause someone to think of someone or something. It refers to triggering recollections or associations related to a specific person or thing in someone's mind.
  • hack one's way through sth The idiom "hack one's way through something" typically means to proceed through a difficult or challenging situation or task by using determination, perseverance, and unconventional methods. It implies overcoming obstacles or finding solutions in a resourceful and sometimes unorthodox manner.
  • fold sth back The idiom "fold something back" means to bend or tuck a part of something, such as a paper or cloth, back onto itself. It involves doubling over or reversing the position of a section in order to create a neat or compact shape.
  • retail at sth The idiom "retail at something" means the price at which a product or merchandise is sold directly to the public, typically in a store or through an online platform. It refers to the specific price set by the retailer for a particular item.
  • tower above sm or sth The idiom "tower above someone or something" refers to being significantly taller, larger, or more impressive than someone or something else. It emphasizes a notable difference in size, stature, or prominence.
  • retrieve sth from sm To "retrieve something from somewhere" means to bring back or recover something that was previously in that specific location.
  • when sb/sth sneezes, sb/sth catches a cold The idiom "when sb/sth sneezes, sb/sth catches a cold" is a figurative expression used to convey the idea that if one person or thing experiences a problem or illness, it is likely to affect or impact others connected to it. It suggests that when one individual or entity is facing troubles, it can easily spread or be transmitted to others, causing them to face similar difficulties or consequences.
  • (very) picture of sth The idiom "(very) picture of sth" refers to someone or something that perfectly embodies or represents a particular quality, characteristic, or situation. It implies that the person or thing being described exhibits all the ideal or typical features associated with whatever is being mentioned.
  • boil sth out of sth The idiom "boil sth out of sth" typically means to extract or remove something from a substance by boiling it. It can also figuratively refer to the process of obtaining information or getting to the core of a problem or situation through thorough investigation or intense scrutiny.
  • hear sth through the grapevine The idiom "hear something through the grapevine" means to learn information through informal channels or gossip rather than through official or direct means. It suggests that the information is passed along from person to person in a similar way to how rumors can spread through a grapevine.
  • satisfy sth by sth The idiom "satisfy sth by sth" typically means to fulfill or appease a particular need or desire using a specific method or means.
  • lighten up (on sm or sth) The idiom "lighten up (on sm or sth)" means to become less serious, strict, or critical towards someone or something. It implies the need to be more relaxed, easygoing, or lenient in one's attitude or behavior.
  • speak highly of sm or sth The idiom "speak highly of someone or something" means to give praise, admiration, or positive comments about another person or thing. It implies expressing positive opinions, commendations, or regards towards someone or something.
  • care for sm or sth The idiom "care for someone or something" means to have a liking or affection for someone or something, to be interested in or have concern for someone or something, to take care or attend to someone or something, or to provide for someone or something.
  • drum sth into sb The idiom "drum something into somebody" means to repeatedly and forcefully teach or impress something upon someone's mind or memory. It implies the act of drilling or imprinting information or ideas into someone's consciousness through constant repetition or insistence.
  • bluff one's way out (of sth) The idiom "bluff one's way out (of sth)" means to use deception or sly tactics to escape from a difficult or challenging situation. It involves pretending or exaggerating one's abilities, knowledge, or intentions in order to avoid negative consequences or to make others believe something that is not true.
  • knock/take the stuffing out of sb/sth The idiom "knock/take the stuffing out of someone/something" means to greatly weaken or deflate someone's confidence, spirit, or enthusiasm. It refers to the act of removing the inner filling (stuffing) from an object, leaving it empty and lifeless. In the context of emotions or morale, it implies a loss of vigor or energy, often due to a disappointment, setback, or demoralizing event.
  • queue up (for sth) The idiom "queue up (for sth)" means to join or form a line or sequence of people waiting for something, often in an orderly or organized manner. It refers to the act of waiting patiently in line for a particular purpose or event.
  • pat sm or sth on sth The idiom "pat (someone) or (something) on (something)" typically means to touch or stroke someone or something gently and lightly with an open hand, usually as a sign of affection, approval, or encouragement. It conveys a sense of subtle reassurance or recognition.
  • sketch sth in The idiom "sketch something in" means to quickly or roughly draw or outline something, often to provide a basic representation or idea. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of outlining or describing something in a general way, without providing detailed or specific information.
  • bring sth to a successful conclusion The idiom "bring something to a successful conclusion" means to successfully complete or finish something, typically a task, project, or objective, achieving the desired outcome or result.
  • while a period of time away (doing sth) The idiom "while a period of time away (doing sth)" refers to spending or passing a specific duration of time engaging in a particular activity or undertaking a specific task or action. It implies that during that time period, the individual is occupied, involved, or focused on the mentioned activity, diverting attention or dedicating effort to it.
  • screw sth into sth The idiom "screw sth into sth" typically refers to the act of fastening or securing something tightly into or onto something else using screws. It denotes the literal action of using screws to firmly attach or affix one object, typically smaller or subordinate, to another object, typically larger or dominant. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the firm integration or incorporation of an idea, concept, or practice into an existing structure or system.
  • Want to make sth of it? The idiom "Want to make something of it?" generally means challenging someone or defying their statement or action, often in an aggressive manner. It can also indicate a willingness to engage in a confrontation or conflict.
  • pull (up) alongside (of sm or sth) The idiom "pull (up) alongside (of sm or sth)" refers to the action of driving or moving a vehicle or object until it reaches the same level or position as someone or something else. It typically suggests positioning oneself next to or parallel to another person, vehicle, or object.
  • recoil from sm or sth The idiom "recoil from someone or something" means to draw back or shrink away in fear, disgust, or aversion from a person or thing. It indicates a strong negative reaction towards someone or something.
  • adapt sth for sth The idiom "adapt something for something" refers to the act of modifying or adjusting something to make it suitable or appropriate for a particular purpose or situation. It involves making changes or alterations to something to ensure it can function effectively in a new context.
  • sponge sth from sm The idiom "sponge something from someone" means to obtain or take advantage of something, such as money, help, or information, from someone else without giving anything in return. It often implies that the act is done in a manipulative or dishonest manner.
  • break sth free (from sth) The idiom "break sth free (from sth)" means to liberate or release something that was previously bound, trapped, or restricted by something else. It often refers to breaking or removing physical constraints, but can also be used metaphorically to indicate freeing someone or something from an oppressive situation or mindset.
  • splash sth (all) over sm or sth The idiom "splash something (all) over someone or something" refers to the act of covering someone or something with a liquid or substance in a careless or excessive manner. It can be both literal and figurative. In a literal sense, it means to pour or throw liquid onto someone or something, causing it to spread or be scattered. In a figurative sense, it means to publicize or promote something in a flamboyant or exaggerated way, often without considering the consequences or appropriateness.
  • take up arms (against sm or sth) The idiom "take up arms (against someone or something)" means to engage in armed resistance or warfare against a person, group, or cause. It signifies the act of becoming militarily involved in a conflict or battle in opposition to a specific target.
  • keep an eye on sb/sth The idiom "keep an eye on someone/something" means to watch or monitor someone or something closely or attentively. It implies taking responsibility for observing and ensuring the well-being or proper functioning of someone or something. It indicates being vigilant and staying aware of any changes, developments, or potential issues.
  • in accordance with sth The idiom "in accordance with sth" means to act or behave in a way that aligns with, follows, or complies with something, such as a rule, law, guideline, or agreement. It implies that one is adhering to or conforming to a particular standard or requirement.
  • raise sm or sth up The idiom "raise someone or something up" means to lift or elevate someone or something physically or metaphorically. It can refer to physically lifting an object or person higher, as well as raising someone's status or improving their position or appearance.
  • put sm distance between (sm and oneself or sth) The idiom "put some distance between (someone or oneself or something)" means to create physical or emotional space or separation between oneself or something in order to improve a situation or resolve a conflict. It suggests the need to step back or remove oneself from a situation or person to gain a better perspective or decrease the level of involvement.
  • get away with sth The idiom "get away with sth" means to avoid punishment, consequences, or detection for doing something wrong or illicit. It implies being successful in escaping any negative repercussions for one's actions.
  • prescribe sth for sm The idiom "prescribe something for someone" means to recommend or give a specific treatment, medication, or solution to someone in order to address or solve a particular problem, issue, or ailment they are facing. It is often used in a medical or clinical context, but can also extend to other areas where a remedy or course of action is suggested or advised to someone to help them in a specific situation.
  • take sth apart The idiom "take sth apart" means to disassemble or separate the components or parts of something, usually in order to inspect, repair, or understand it better. It can also imply criticizing or analyzing something in a thorough or detailed manner.
  • bring sth around The idiom "bring sth around" means to convince or persuade someone to change their opinion, attitude, or behavior, particularly when they were initially resistant or unwilling.
  • the likes of sb/sth The idiom "the likes of sb/sth" is used to refer to people or things of a similar kind or type as the one being mentioned. It is often used to emphasize the exceptional or unusual nature of someone or something.
  • bring sm through sth The idiom "bring someone through something" means to support or assist someone during a challenging or difficult situation, helping them to successfully overcome or endure it. It implies offering guidance, encouragement, or resources to help someone navigate through a specific experience or circumstance.
  • slave over sth The idiom "slave over something" means to work extremely hard, diligently, and with great dedication on a particular task or project. It implies putting in an excessive amount of effort and labor to achieve desired results.
  • compete for sm or sth The idiom "compete for sm or sth" means to take part in a contest or struggle against others in order to achieve or win something. It refers to the act of competing or vying with others for a specific object, position, reward, or opportunity.
  • infect sm with sth The idiom "infect someone with something" means to transmit or spread a certain quality, emotion, or attitude to someone. It often refers to a contagious or influential effect that one person or thing has on another, usually involving a negative trait such as a bad habit, negative attitude, or harmful idea.
  • make capital out of sth The idiom "make capital out of something" means to take advantage of a situation or exploit it in order to gain benefits or achieve success. It refers to the act of using something to your advantage or making the most of an opportunity.
  • scrounge around (for sm or sth) The idiom "scrounge around (for someone or something)" means to search or rummage in a disorganized way, typically in order to find something needed or desired. It implies a sense of desperation or resourcefulness in trying to acquire something, often with limited resources or options.
  • worry about sm or sth The idiom "worry about something" means to be concerned or anxious about a particular thing or situation. It implies that one is giving a lot of thought and mental energy towards fretting or being troubled by the specific issue.
  • stand sth on its head The idiom "stand something on its head" means to completely reverse or overturn the traditional or conventional way of thinking, doing, or understanding something. It implies challenging established norms or ideas and presenting them in an entirely new or opposite way.
  • subscribe to sth The idiomatic expression "subscribe to something" means to agree with, accept, or support a particular belief, theory, ideology, or principle. It can refer to aligning oneself with a specific viewpoint or adhering to a particular philosophy.
  • twist sth out of sth The idiom "twist something out of something" refers to the act of obtaining or extracting something (such as information or a result) from a certain situation or context, often through skillful manipulation or effort. It implies that the desired outcome or information is not readily obvious or easily attainable, and may require some creativity or ingenuity to uncover or achieve.
  • embroil sm in sth The idiom "embroil someone in something" means to involve or entangle someone in a complex, difficult, or troublesome situation or problem. It refers to causing someone to become deeply involved in a complicated or messy situation, often leading to confusion, conflict, or negative consequences.
  • block sth out The idiom "block something out" refers to the act of intentionally disregarding or ignoring something, usually in order to avoid thinking about it or being affected by it. It can also imply intentionally creating a mental barrier to prevent something from entering one's thoughts or consciousness.
  • replenish sth with sth The idiom "replenish something with something" means to refill, restore, or renew something by adding more of a particular substance, item, or resource. It implies the act of replacing or restocking something that has been depleted or used up.
  • strike at sm or sth The idiom "strike at someone or something" means to take action or make aggressive efforts against someone or something in order to weaken or inflict damage. It implies a deliberate and forceful attack or assault on a person, organization, or concept.
  • equate sm or sth with sm or sth The idiom "equate someone or something with someone or something" means to consider or treat two things or people as equal or equivalent. It implies comparing or associating one entity with another, often implying similarities or parallel characteristics.
  • go along with sm or sth The idiom "go along with someone or something" means to agree, support, or conform to someone or something's ideas, actions, or decisions, usually reluctantly or without much enthusiasm.
  • slant sth toward sm or sth The idiom "slant something toward someone or something" means to present or bias information or views in favor of a particular person, organization, or idea. It refers to manipulating or distorting information to support a specific perspective or desired outcome. It implies a biased or partial presentation of facts.
  • see to sth The idiom "see to something" means to attend to, take care of, or handle a particular task or responsibility. It implies ensuring that a task is accomplished or a situation is managed appropriately.
  • hurl sth around The idiom "hurl sth around" means to throw or fling something forcefully and without much control or regard for where it lands. It implies a sense of reckless or aggressive action.
  • fiddle sth away The idiom "fiddle something away" means to waste or squander something, typically valuable resources or opportunities, usually through careless or irresponsible actions. It implies that the person handles or uses something in a careless or nonchalant manner, resulting in its loss or diminishment.
  • go to the stake for sth The idiom "go to the stake for sth" means to be willing to endure extreme hardship or sacrifice one's own well-being or life for a belief, cause, or principle. It originates from the historical practice of burning people at the stake for heresy or other offenses during religious persecution.
  • let sb/sth slide The idiom "let sb/sth slide" means to overlook or ignore someone's or something's mistake, error, or wrongdoing without taking any action or reprimanding them. It implies a lack of intervention or consequence for the situation at hand.
  • not take kindly to sb/sth The idiom "not take kindly to sb/sth" means to react negatively or unfavorably towards someone or something. It implies a lack of acceptance, approval, or tolerance for someone's actions, behavior, or presence.
  • persevere in sth To persevere in something means to continue with determination and persistence, even in the face of challenges, difficulties, or opposition. It implies showing steadfastness and refusing to give up despite setbacks or obstacles in order to achieve a goal or desired outcome.
  • labor over sm or sth The idiom "labor over something" means to put great effort, time, and attention into doing or completing something, often with meticulous attention to detail or with a sense of difficulty or struggle. It implies that the task requires a significant amount of hard work and dedication.
  • establish sm or sth in sth The idiom "establish something in something" typically means to create, develop, or set up something within a particular context or environment. It suggests the act of starting or founding something in a specific place, situation, or organization for it to function and operate effectively. It can refer to various scenarios such as establishing a business in a particular market, establishing a branch of an organization in a new location, or establishing a tradition within a community.
  • remonstrate (with sm) (about sm or sth) The idiom "remonstrate (with someone) (about something)" means to express strong disagreement or disapproval to someone about a particular action, decision, or behavior. It involves issuing a protest, complaint, or objection in an assertive or forceful manner, often in an attempt to persuade or convince the person to change their course of action or rectify a situation.
  • see sth through To "see something through" means to complete or finish a task, project, or commitment, despite any challenges, difficulties, or obstacles encountered along the way. It implies perseverance, determination, and a willingness to stay committed until the goal is achieved.
  • inculcate sm with sth The idiom "inculcate someone with something" means to teach, instill, or impress certain beliefs, values, or ideas strongly and repeatedly into someone's mind or character. It involves persistent efforts to make someone adopt or internalize certain concepts or principles.
  • pattern sth on sth To pattern something on something means to base or model something on a particular example or template. It refers to the act of using a pre-existing pattern or design as a guide or inspiration for creating or replicating something similar. This idiom is commonly used when discussing the creation or development of something new, whether it be a product, artwork, or strategy.
  • hypothesize on sth The idiom "hypothesize on something" means to propose or suggest a possible explanation, theory, or solution based on limited information or evidence. It involves formulating a preliminary assumption or conjecture before conducting further research or investigation to validate or disprove the hypothesis.
  • raise the spectre of sth The idiom "raise the spectre of sth" means to evoke or bring up something, usually a disturbing or alarming issue or possibility that may cause fear, concern, or uncertainty. It suggests the act of introducing or highlighting a troubling topic that may have negative consequences or implications.
  • want sm or sth in sth The idiom "want sm or sth in sth" typically means desiring or seeking something specific within a particular context or situation. It conveys a preference to obtain or have a specific item or quality as part of a larger whole. For example, "He wants his name in the document" means he desires that his name is included or mentioned specifically in the document.
  • your finger on the pulse (of sth) The idiom "your finger on the pulse (of sth)" refers to being keenly aware and closely following the latest developments or trends in a particular field, industry, or situation. It suggests having up-to-date knowledge and understanding of the subject matter, enabling one to make informed decisions or predictions.
  • knock/lick sth/sb into shape To "knock/lick something/someone into shape" means to improve or fix something or someone, often through discipline, training, or organization. It suggests bringing something or someone into a better or more acceptable condition, typically by enforcing order or discipline. It implies taking action to correct flaws or deficiencies and making necessary changes to achieve desired outcomes.
  • beat sm or sth out The idiom "beat sm or sth out" means to forcefully produce or create something, often by continuously working on it or by using great effort or determination. It often implies overcoming obstacles or difficulties in the process of achieving a desired outcome.
  • gain dominion over sm or sth The idiom "gain dominion over someone or something" refers to gaining control, authority, or power over a person or object. It implies taking charge or having complete control over a situation, individual, or thing.
  • differentiate (sm or sth) from (sm or sth else) The idiom "differentiate (someone or something) from (someone or something else)" means to recognize or understand the distinct qualities, characteristics, or differences between two people or things in order to determine their individual or unique qualities. This is often used in contexts where two or more things may appear similar or have similarities, but there are specific features or attributes that set them apart.
  • approach sm about sm or sth The idiom "approach someone about something or someone" means to initiate a conversation or seek someone's opinion or assistance regarding a particular topic, issue, or person. It implies making a request, discussing a matter, or proposing something to someone.
  • button sth up The idiom "button sth up" means to complete or finish something thoroughly and securely. It is often used to describe the act of finalizing or closing a matter with precision and efficiency.
  • wipe sth off the map The idiom "wipe something off the map" means to completely destroy or eliminate something, often referring to a physical location or entity. It implies a complete eradication or removal, leaving no trace or existence behind. This expression is commonly used in contexts related to war, conflict, or complete devastation.
  • turn sm or sth in (to sm or sth) The idiom "turn sm or sth in (to sm or sth)" means to relinquish or surrender someone or something to a person or authority, typically referring to reporting or delivering them to the proper authorities. It implies submitting someone or something to the appropriate individual or institution for further actions or processes.
  • supposed to do sth The idiom "supposed to do something" refers to the belief or expectation that one should do a particular action or fulfill a certain responsibility. It implies that there is a perceived obligation or duty to carry out the mentioned task or activity.
  • part with sm or sth The idiom "part with someone or something" means to give up or relinquish someone or something, often with reluctance or hesitation. It implies separating oneself from a person or thing, typically due to a necessity or a circumstance beyond one's control.
  • switch sm or sth over to sth The idiom "switch something or someone over to something" means to change or transition from one thing or condition to another. It often refers to shifting resources, attention, or operations from one activity, system, or method to a different one.
  • for fear of sth The idiom "for fear of sth" means to avoid or refrain from doing something because one is afraid of the negative consequences or outcome that may result from it. It implies that the fear of a certain consequence is the main reason for not taking action.
  • sucker for sm or sth The idiom "sucker for sm or sth" refers to a person who is easily swayed, enticed, or attracted to someone or something specific. It implies that the person has a weakness or a tendency to be easily influenced or charmed by that particular thing or person.
  • quote (sth) from sm or sth The idiom "quote (sth) from sm or sth" means to extract or repeat a specific statement, passage, or text directly from someone or something. It refers to the act of using someone's exact words as evidence, support, or reference in a particular context.
  • turn a blind eye (to sm or sth) The idiom "turn a blind eye (to someone or something)" means to deliberately ignore or overlook a certain situation, specifically when one has the power or responsibility to address it. It implies choosing not to notice or acknowledge something, usually due to personal interest, convenience, or to avoid confrontation or taking action.
  • glass sth in The idiom "glass something in" typically refers to the act of enclosing or surrounding something with glass material. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts. Literally, it means to build or install glass panels or walls around an area to create a barrier or enclosure. Figuratively, it can imply the act of isolating or protecting something or someone.
  • put aside sth The idiom "put aside something" means to set aside or reserve something, typically in order to focus on another task or to save it for later use. It can also refer to suspending or disregarding certain emotions, feelings, or concerns temporarily.
  • there's sth to be said for The idiom "there's something to be said for" is used to acknowledge a valid or positive aspect of a particular thing or idea, even though there may also be negative aspects associated with it. It implies that there is a reasonable argument or opinion in favor of something, despite any drawbacks or criticisms.
  • veer toward sm or sth The idiom "veer toward" means to make a sudden change in direction in order to approach or move closer to someone or something. It implies a shift or deviation from the original course or path towards a specific target or objective.
  • browse on sth The idiom "browse on sth" typically refers to casually or leisurely looking through something, such as a website, a store, or a collection of items, without any specific purpose or goal in mind. It implies a relaxed and unhurried exploration, often done for pleasure or out of curiosity.
  • choose among sm or sth The idiom "choose among someone or something" means to make a selection or decision from a range of options or alternatives. It implies having multiple choices and the need to select one or more from them.
  • keep the lid on sth The idiom "keep the lid on something" means to maintain control or prevent something from escalating or becoming known or public. It refers to the act of keeping a situation, information, emotions, or events concealed, contained, or under control.
  • go along (with sb/sth) The idiom "go along (with sb/sth)" means to agree or conform to someone or something, usually in a cooperative or supportive manner. It implies showing compliance or going with the flow. It can be used to describe how someone is accepting or endorsing an idea, following someone's lead, or adapting to a particular situation.
  • notify sm of sth The idiom "notify someone of something" means to inform or give someone official notice or information about something. It implies formally or officially bringing an important matter to someone's attention, often through a written or verbal communication.
  • couple sth together The idiom "couple something together" means to connect or combine two or more things or ideas, often in a way that may not be harmonious or well-suited. It can also imply doing something quickly or haphazardly without much thought or care.
  • no sth to speak of, at none to speak of The idiom "no sth to speak of" or "none to speak of" is used to describe a situation or thing that is not significant, important, or remarkable in any way. It implies that the subject being discussed has no noteworthy qualities or substance worth mentioning.
  • know as much about sth as a hog knows about Sunday The idiom "know as much about something as a hog knows about Sunday" means having little to no knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or matter. It implies ignorance, cluelessness, or being completely unfamiliar with a topic, just as a hog would have no knowledge or awareness of the significance of a specific day of the week like Sunday.
  • number off (by sth) The idiom "number off (by sth)" means to designate or identify oneself or others by a specific criterion or parameter. It is often used in situations where people need to be organized or counted in a sequential or specific manner. Each person takes turns stating or revealing their assigned number or characteristic in a structured manner.
  • thump on sm or sth The idiom "thump on someone or something" means to hit or strike forcefully with a thumping sound. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a strong impact or criticism.
  • regard sm or sth with sth The idiom "regard someone or something with something" generally means to have a specific feeling or viewpoint towards someone or something. It typically implies how one perceives or considers someone or something.
  • take sth as read The idiom "take something as read" means to accept or assume something as true or factual without needing further proof or evidence. It refers to trusting and treating something as a given or an established fact, without requiring additional explanation or verification.
  • drift toward sm or sth The idiom "drift toward sm or sth" refers to a gradual movement or progression towards someone or something, often without a specific intention or plan. It signifies a shift or change that happens naturally over time, without any deliberate effort or conscious decision-making.
  • pin sm or sth against sth The idiom "pin someone or something against something" means to trap or press someone or something firmly against a surface or object using force or pressure. It indicates a situation where there is no way for the person or thing to escape or move away.
  • work hand in glove with sb/sth The idiom "work hand in glove with someone/something" means to cooperate closely or work in close coordination with someone or something. It implies a strong and effective working relationship where both parties work together seamlessly to achieve a shared goal. The phrase "hand in glove" suggests a close fit, like a hand inside a glove, indicating a high level of compatibility and coordination.
  • lay sth out To "lay something out" means to arrange or organize something in a systematic or logical order, often with the intent of making it clear or easily understandable for others. It can refer to physically arranging objects or laying out a plan, design, or presentation. It also implies providing a clear structure or layout for information or ideas.
  • goggle at sm or sth The idiom "goggle at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something with wide eyes, often in amazement, surprise, or disbelief. It implies a lingering and sometimes open-mouthed gaze that is typically considered rude or impolite.
  • catch sm at sth The idiom "catch someone at something" generally means to discover or find someone in the act of doing something, especially something they may not have wanted to be seen or noticed doing. It often implies that the person was caught unexpectedly or in a compromising situation.
  • I'll thank you to do sth The idiom "I'll thank you to do sth" is a polite way of requesting or demanding someone to do something. It implies that the speaker expects the person being addressed to comply with their request.
  • ward off sb/sth To "ward off" someone or something means to protect oneself or prevent something undesirable or harmful from happening or approaching. It refers to taking actions or measures to keep someone or something at a distance or to fend off a potential threat or danger.
  • keep a weather eye on sth/sb The idiom "keep a weather eye on something/somebody" means to stay watchful or vigilant about a situation or person, usually to anticipate potential risks, problems, or changes. It is derived from the practice of sailors constantly monitoring the weather conditions to ensure they navigate safely.
  • wrestle sth into sth The idiom "wrestle something into something" means to struggle or exert significant effort to forcefully put or fit something into its desired position, shape, or state. It implies a challenging and strenuous process of overcoming obstacles or resistance in order to achieve a particular outcome.
  • cast a shadow over/on sth The idiom "cast a shadow over/on something" is used to describe when something or someone negatively influences or affects a situation, causing it to feel less positive, hopeful, or joyful. It implies that the presence or actions of an individual or an event create a gloomy or unpleasant atmosphere, overshadowing the positive aspects.
  • make sth out of nothing The idiom "make something out of nothing" means to create or accomplish something substantial, valuable, or significant using only limited or meager resources or starting from a minimal foundation. It implies the ability to turn a seemingly insignificant or unpromising situation into something noteworthy or impressive.
  • turn up sth The idiom "turn up something" means to discover or find something unexpectedly or by chance.
  • haven't seen hide nor hair of sb/sth The idiom "haven't seen hide nor hair of sb/sth" means that one has not seen any sign or trace of a person or thing. It suggests that there has been no sighting or encounter with the mentioned individual or item.
  • elbow sm out of sth and elbow sm out The idiom "elbow someone out of something" or "elbow someone out" is used to describe a situation where someone forcefully or unfairly pushes another person aside or out of a particular position, opportunity, or group. It implies using one's influence, power, or assertiveness to take advantage and exclude someone else. This idiom often suggests a competitive or aggressive behavior aimed at gaining an advantage at the expense of others.
  • go through sb/sth like a dose of salts The idiom "go through someone or something like a dose of salts" means to move swiftly or quickly through a person or situation, often causing a significant impact or disruption. It is usually used to describe someone or something that rapidly passes through a group or situation, leaving a lasting impression or effect. The phrase originated from the strong purgative effect of salt on the human body when consumed in excessive amounts.
  • race with sm or sth The idiom "race with someone or something" typically refers to a situation where there is a competition or contest involving two or more entities or individuals vying to complete a task or reach a goal in the shortest amount of time. It often implies a sense of urgency, speed, and intense competition.
  • allot sth to sm or sth The idiom "allot something to someone or something" means to assign or give a portion or share of something to someone or something. It refers to the act of distributing or allocating something among different individuals or groups.
  • amount to sth The idiom "amount to something" means to add up or result in something significant or meaningful. It refers to achieving a particular outcome or reaching a certain level of importance or value.
  • be up to sth The idiom "be up to sth" means to be doing or planning something, usually involving something that may be secretly or mischievously intended. It can also imply being responsible for a task or taking action in a particular matter.
  • guide sm around sth The idiom "guide someone around something" means to accompany or direct someone through a place or location, showing them various points of interest or explaining the details or features of that particular place. It involves acting as a knowledgeable escort or tour guide to assist the person in exploring and understanding the surroundings.
  • go to/take great pains to do sth The idiom "go to/take great pains to do something" means to make a significant effort or go to extra lengths in order to accomplish a task or achieve a specific outcome. It implies that the person invests considerable time, energy, or resources to ensure that something is done correctly or successfully, often indicating a high level of dedication or commitment.
  • take a crack at sth/doing sth The phrase "take a crack at something/doing something" means to attempt or try something, particularly when it may be challenging or difficult. It implies giving it a go or making an effort to accomplish or solve a task or problem.
  • swallow sm or sth up The idiom "swallow someone or something up" means to consume, engulf, or totally take over someone or something, often in a metaphorical or figurative sense. It can imply that the person or thing is being overwhelmed, absorbed, or overpowered by a larger force or situation.
  • cook sth up (with sm) The idiom "cook something up (with someone)" means to invent, devise, or create something, often in a secretive or scheming way, in collaboration with someone else. It implies that the idea or plan being "cooked up" may not be entirely genuine or honest.
  • think twice about sm or sth The idiom "think twice about something" means to carefully consider or reconsider someone or something before making a decision or taking action. It implies taking a cautious approach and not rushing into a decision without careful thought or consideration.
  • pick at sth The idiom "pick at something" means to repeatedly and often undeservingly criticize, bother, or annoy someone or something, especially in a petty or nagging manner. It can also refer to the act of fidgeting, poking, or probing something repeatedly without any clear purpose.
  • fling sth on oneself The idiom "fling something on oneself" generally refers to hastily or carelessly putting on or wearing something, often with little consideration for appearance or neatness. It suggests a casual or disorganized approach to dressing oneself quickly without paying attention to details or tidiness.
  • conduct sm away (from sm or sth) The idiom "conduct someone away (from someone or something)" means to lead or guide someone physically or metaphorically away from a particular person, place, or thing. It implies redirecting someone's attention or focus to prevent them from becoming involved or affected by it.
  • brush over sm or sth The idiom "brush over someone or something" means to briefly mention or address a topic without giving it much attention or detail. It refers to avoiding a thorough discussion or examination of a subject by just acknowledging it superficially.
  • last call (for sth) The idiom "last call (for sth)" refers to the final opportunity to participate in or obtain something before it is no longer available or ends. It often alludes to the final chance to purchase alcohol in a bar or pub before it closes. The phrase can be used metaphorically in a broader sense to indicate the final chance or deadline for various activities or opportunities.
  • beat sth into sm The idiom "beat something into someone" means to force someone to understand or learn something through intense repetition, effort, or persuasion. It implies using coercion or persistence to ensure someone grasps or accepts a particular idea or concept.
  • put a bee in sm's bonnet (about sm or sth) The idiom "put a bee in someone's bonnet" means to motivate or inspire someone to take action or become passionate about something. It suggests the idea of placing a buzzing bee (representing an idea, suggestion, or cause) in someone's hat (symbolizing their mind), causing them to become preoccupied or fixated on the topic and motivated to pursue it.
  • be the last person (to do sth) The idiom "be the last person (to do sth)" means that someone is the type of person who is extremely unlikely to do a particular action or behave in a certain way. They would be the least expected or willing person to engage in that behavior or action.
  • the flower of sth The idiom "the flower of something" refers to the best or most excellent part or stage of something. It conveys the idea of a particular thing being at its peak or in its prime. It can be applied to various contexts, such as describing the finest years of someone's life, the most vibrant stage of a business or project, or the optimal period of growth for a plant or crop.
  • hook sth on (to sm or sth) The idiom "hook sth on (to sm or sth)" typically means to attach or connect something to someone or something else, often with the use of a hook or similar device.
  • put pressure on sth The idiom "put pressure on something" means to exert influence, make demands, or apply force in order to achieve a particular outcome. It is often used when describing a situation where someone is trying to push or persuade someone else to do something by placing them under stressful or challenging circumstances.
  • step back (from sm or sth) The idiom "step back (from sm or sth)" means to pause, reflect, or withdraw from a situation or problem in order to gain a broader perspective and reassess one's approach or actions. It implies taking a break or distancing oneself emotionally or physically to gain a clearer understanding or make a better decision.
  • fling sth off (of) sth The idiom "fling sth off (of) sth" means forcefully throwing or removing something from a particular place or surface. It implies a swift and vigorous action of getting rid of something.
  • rustle up sth The idiom "rustle up something" means to quickly and informally prepare or gather something, typically food or a meal, often using whatever ingredients or resources are readily available. It implies resourcefulness and the ability to create something with little planning or organization.
  • build in sth The idiom "build in" typically refers to incorporating or including something as an integral part of something else. It implies the addition or integration of something at the initial stage of development or construction.
  • up against sb/sth The idiom "up against someone/something" refers to facing a challenging situation or being in direct competition with someone or something. It implies being confronted or in a difficult position where one must contend with or overcome obstacles to achieve a desired outcome.
  • band together (against sm or sth) The idiom "band together (against someone or something)" means to join forces or unite with others in order to confront, oppose, or challenge someone or something. It often implies a collective action or effort aimed at achieving a common goal or standing up against a common enemy or issue. This idiom highlights the strength that comes from cooperation and solidarity.
  • vest sm with sth The idiom "vest someone with something" refers to giving someone authority, power, or responsibility over something. It means to formally or officially grant someone the right or ownership of something. It is often used in legal or administrative contexts.
  • Futz sth up To "futz something up" means to mess up or ruin something, usually due to clumsiness, incompetence, or lack of attention. It implies making mistakes or causing damage while attempting to do something, often unintentionally. It is an informal expression typically used to emphasize someone's ability to make things worse or complicate a situation unnecessarily.
  • gas sth up The idiom "gas something up" means to fill a vehicle or equipment with gasoline or fuel in order to make it ready for use or to ensure it has enough fuel for a journey.
  • draw on sm or sth The idiom "draw on someone or something" means to utilize or make use of someone or something as a source of support, inspiration, or knowledge. It refers to the act of tapping into a specific resource or individual for assistance or guidance.
  • leave sth in your wake The idiom "leave something in your wake" often refers to the consequences or effects that someone or something leaves behind as they move forward or progress. It implies that the person or thing has caused a noticeable impact or change that lasts even after they have passed or moved on.
  • summon sth up To summon something up means to bring it forth or call it to mind. It typically refers to the act of collecting or gathering one's thoughts, emotions, or courage in order to express or deal with a specific situation or task.
  • tone sm or sth up The idiom "tone (something or someone) up" refers to the act of improving or enhancing the physical condition, appearance, or performance of something or someone. It usually involves making necessary adjustments or modifications to achieve a desired outcome or level of excellence.
  • ram sth home The idiom "ram sth home" means to forcefully or repeatedly emphasize something, with the intention of making it completely clear or understood by others. It suggests a persistent and forceful communication style in order to reinforce a point or idea.
  • peep out (of sth) (at sm or sth) The idiom "peep out (of sth) (at sm or sth)" means to look or glance quickly or furtively from a hiding place or a partially hidden position at someone or something. It implies a quick and secretive observation, typ