How Do You Spell TAKE CARE?

Pronunciation: [tˈe͡ɪk kˈe͡ə] (IPA)

The phrase "take care" is spelled exactly as it sounds. In IPA phonetic transcription, it would be /teɪk kɛr/. The first syllable "take" is pronounced with a long "a" sound, followed by the hard "k" sound. The second syllable "care" has a short "e" sound, and the hard "r" sound at the end. The phrase is commonly used as a parting farewell between friends or acquaintances, conveying a sentiment of concern and well-wishes.

TAKE CARE Meaning and Definition

Take care is a common phrase used in English that can be interpreted in multiple ways depending on the context. It is often used as a parting phrase or as a gesture of concern for someone's well-being. When used as a farewell, it is a way to express that one cares about the other person's safety, health, or general welfare.

In this usage, "take care" implies a sense of concern or caution for the other person's circumstances. It can also be seen as a polite way to wish someone well or to acknowledge that the world can be unpredictable and that it is important to be mindful and attentive to one's surroundings.

Additionally, "take care" can be used as an expression of responsibility or duty. It implies the act of being cautious, preserving or maintaining something, or acting with due diligence. For instance, one might say "take care of your belongings" to remind someone to be responsible for their personal possessions.

Overall, "take care" is a versatile phrase that conveys various meanings of concern, precaution, well-wishing, and responsibility. It is often used to show consideration and to remind individuals to be mindful of their own well-being or the well-being of others.

Top Common Misspellings for TAKE CARE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for TAKE CARE

  • rake care
  • fake care
  • gake care
  • yake care
  • 6ake care
  • 5ake care
  • tzke care
  • tske care
  • twke care
  • tqke care
  • taje care
  • tame care
  • tale care
  • taoe care
  • taie care
  • takw care
  • taks care
  • takd care
  • takr care

Etymology of TAKE CARE

The phrase "take care" can be traced back to the Old English language. The word "take" has its roots in the Old English word "tacan", which means "to grasp" or "to lay hold of". The word "care" originates from the Old English word "caru" or "cara", which denotes "sorrow" or "worry".

When combined, "take care" essentially means to "take hold of one's worries" or "to manage one's sorrows". The phrase has evolved over time to convey a sense of concern, attention, and good wishes toward someone's well-being.

Idioms with the word TAKE CARE

  • take care (of yourself) The idiom "take care (of yourself)" typically means to ensure one's well-being, safety, or health by practicing self-care or exercising caution in one's actions. It implies that the person should be mindful of their physical and emotional needs, and make an effort to maintain their overall wellness.
  • take care of number one The idiom "take care of number one" means to prioritize oneself and look after one's own interests and well-being above others. It suggests putting one's own needs and desires first before considering others.
  • take care of The idiom "take care of" means to attend to or look after someone or something, especially to ensure their well-being, safety, or proper functioning. It implies assuming responsibility and providing necessary actions or support.
  • take care of sb/sth The idiom "take care of sb/sth" generally means to be responsible for the well-being or management of someone or something. It refers to providing necessary attention, protection, guidance, or assistance to ensure the person or thing is safe, healthy, or properly maintained.
  • take care of sth The idiom "take care of something" means to attend to or manage something in order to ensure its well-being, safety, or proper functioning. It implies being responsible for the maintenance, supervision, or resolution of a particular matter.
  • take care of sm The idiom "take care of someone" means to look after or provide for someone's needs, well-being, or safety. It implies assuming responsibility for someone's welfare and taking action to ensure that they are taken care of in various aspects such as physical, emotional, or financial. It can also imply protecting or attending to someone's interests or concerns.
  • take care of sm or sth The idiom "take care of someone or something" means to be responsible for the well-being, safety, or maintenance of someone or something. It implies looking out for their needs, attending to their requirements, or addressing any issues that may arise. It can also refer to protecting, nurturing, or managing someone or something in a responsible manner.
  • take care (that…/to do something) The idiom "take care (that…/to do something)" means to be cautious, vigilant, or attentive in ensuring that something happens or is done correctly, without any mistakes, harm, or negative consequences. It implies being responsible and taking necessary measures to prevent any problems or errors from occurring.
  • take care of somebody/something/yourself The idiom "take care of somebody/something/yourself" means to ensure the well-being, safety, and needs of someone or something. It involves providing proper attention, protection, and support to maintain their physical, emotional, or mental state. It implies assuming responsibility and being vigilant in fulfilling these duties.
  • take care of the pennies, and the pounds will look after themselves The idiom "take care of the pennies, and the pounds will look after themselves" means that if you are diligent in managing and saving small amounts of money or being thrifty, it will eventually accumulate and result in significant savings or financial security. It emphasizes the importance of paying attention to the small details and being frugal to achieve long-term financial stability.
  • take care of numero uno The idiom "take care of numero uno" means to prioritize oneself or to look after one's own interests above all others. It suggests a self-centered or self-preservation mindset, prioritizing personal needs and goals without concern for others.
  • take care of someone The idiom "take care of someone" means to look after or provide for someone's needs, well-being, or interests. It often implies assuming a responsible role in ensuring someone's safety, happiness, or overall welfare. This can involve various actions such as providing support, protection, guidance, or assistance to the person in question.
  • take care of the pence, and the pounds will take care of themselves The idiom "take care of the pence, and the pounds will take care of themselves" means that by being vigilant and careful with small or minor matters, one can avoid larger problems or financial difficulties in the long run. It emphasizes the importance of paying attention to small details, as they can accumulate and have a significant impact. In essence, managing and tending to the smaller aspects will ultimately lead to overall success.
  • take care of the pennies, and the pounds will take care of themselves The idiom "take care of the pennies, and the pounds will take care of themselves" means that by being cautious and frugal with small amounts of money or trivial matters, one can ultimately save and manage larger amounts or more significant issues. It emphasizes the importance of being mindful of the small details, as they can accumulate and contribute to a bigger outcome or success.
  • take care of yourself/somebody/something The idiom "take care of yourself/somebody/something" means to look after or attend to someone or something in order to ensure their well-being, safety, or proper functioning. It implies showing concern, protecting, and providing necessary support or assistance. It can refer to physical, emotional, or practical care, depending on the context.

Similar spelling words for TAKE CARE

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