How Do You Spell THAN?

Pronunciation: [ðˈɐn] (IPA)

The word "than" can be spelled with just three letters, but its pronunciation can be tricky for non-native English speakers. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), the word is transcribed as /ðæn/. The first sound represented by the symbol /ð/ is a voiced dental fricative, produced by placing the tongue behind the upper teeth and slightly pushing air through. The second sound, /æ/, is an open front unrounded vowel pronounced by positioning the tongue in the front of the mouth. Together, they make up the familiar word "than".

THAN Meaning and Definition

Than is a conjunction used to introduce the second element in a comparative statement or to show contrast. In comparative statements, than is used to establish a comparison between two things, indicating that the second thing is different or greater in some aspect than the first. It is commonly employed to express a difference in quantity, quality, degree, or manner. For instance, in the sentence "He is smarter than his brother," than is used to indicate that the intelligence of "he" surpasses that of his sibling.

Additionally, than is used to present a contrasting idea between two clauses or phrases, often expressing a preference or choice. It highlights a comparison where one option is favored over another. For example, in the sentence "I would rather read than watch TV," than emphasizes the preference for reading over watching television.

Than is a versatile conjunction that plays a crucial role in comparative and contrasting constructions. It acts as a connection between two elements, highlighting their differences or preferences. As such, it enables precise communication by aiding in the comparison of characteristics, qualities, or choices.

Top Common Misspellings for THAN *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for THAN

Etymology of THAN

The word "than" is derived from the Old English word "þan", which ultimately traces back to the Proto-Germanic word *þanē. In Old English, þan was used as a comparative conjunction, meaning "in contrast to" or "rather than". Over time, the spelling and pronunciation of þan transformed, and it gradually became the word "than" as we know it today.

Idioms with the word THAN

  • better safe than sorry The idiom "better safe than sorry" means that it is wiser to take caution and preventive measures in order to avoid any potential problems or regrets in the future. It emphasizes the importance of being cautious and making choices that prioritize safety to prevent potential negative consequences.
  • easier said than done The idiom "easier said than done" means that something may sound simple or straightforward when described or suggested, but in reality, it is more complex, difficult, or challenging to actually carry out or accomplish. It implies that there is a notable gap between theory and practice, or between words and actions.
  • no sooner said than done The idiom "no sooner said than done" means that something is accomplished or completed immediately after it is mentioned or requested. It implies that the person is very prompt and efficient in taking action or fulfilling a task.
  • sb's bark is worse than their bite The idiom "sb's bark is worse than their bite" means that someone frequently uses strong or aggressive language, threats, or warnings, but rarely actually follows through with their actions. It suggests that a person's intimidating or aggressive demeanor is not truly representative of their true capabilities or intentions.
  • you can't say fairer than that The idiom "you can't say fairer than that" means that something offered or proposed is considered to be very reasonable, honest, or favorable and cannot be improved upon.
  • can't see further than the end of your nose The idiom "can't see further than the end of your nose" is used to describe someone who lacks foresight, perception, or the ability to see or understand potential consequences or implications beyond the immediate situation. It implies that the person is short-sighted, focusing only on what is directly in front of them and failing to consider the bigger picture or long-term effects.
  • more (...) than you can shake a stick at The idiom "more (...) than you can shake a stick at" refers to an abundance or excessive quantity of something. It is often used to express the idea that there is an overwhelming number or quantity of things, people, or options available. The phrase suggests that there are so many of those items that shaking a stick to count or point at them would be futile or insufficient.
  • no sooner ... than The idiom "no sooner ... than" is used to express that one event or action happens immediately after another. It emphasizes the quick or immediate sequence of events.
  • actions speak louder than words The idiom "actions speak louder than words" means that someone's actions and behavior are a more accurate reflection of their true intentions and beliefs than the words they use. In other words, what a person does is more significant and revealing than what they say.
  • sb's eyes are bigger than their belly/stomach The idiom "sb's eyes are bigger than their belly/stomach" means that someone has taken or ordered more food or drink than they are able to consume, or they have undertaken a task or committed to something that is beyond their capabilities or resources. It suggests that the person's ambition or desires exceed their practical limitations.
  • truth is stranger than fiction The idiom "truth is stranger than fiction" means that real-life events and situations can be more extraordinary, bizarre, or unbelievable than anything that could be imagined or created in fictional stories. It emphasizes that reality can often be more surprising or peculiar than the most imaginative works of fiction.
  • have another/more than one string to your bow The idiom "have another/more than one string to your bow" means to have multiple skills, abilities, or options available in order to increase one's chances of success or achieve a particular goal. It suggests being versatile, adaptable, and having alternative strategies or alternatives to rely on.
  • the pen is mightier than the sword The idiom "the pen is mightier than the sword" means that the power of writing and communication is more effective and influential in bringing about change and resolving conflicts than the use of force or violence.
  • better the devil you know (than the devil you don't) The idiom "better the devil you know (than the devil you don't)" suggests that it is preferable to deal with a familiar or known situation, even if it is difficult or unpleasant, rather than taking a risk with something or someone unknown, which may turn out to be worse. It implies that familiarity, despite its flaws, can be more manageable and predictable compared to uncertain or potentially more harmful alternatives.
  • be better than sex The idiom "be better than sex" is typically used to describe something that is incredibly enjoyable, satisfying, or pleasurable. It implies that the experience being referred to surpasses the level of pleasure or fulfillment one might associate with sexual activity.
  • better late than never The idiom "better late than never" suggests that it is preferable for something to happen or be done late than to not happen or be done at all. It implies that although tardiness or delay is not ideal, it is still better than having no outcome or result.
  • be no better than (a) sth The idiom "be no better than (a) something" means that someone or something is equally as bad, undesirable, or of the same low quality as the thing being referenced.
  • know better (than sb) The idiom "know better (than someone)" means to have the knowledge or experience to make better decisions or have a better understanding of a situation compared to someone else. It implies that the person being referred to lacks the understanding or knowledge that should prevent them from making certain mistakes or choices.
  • prevention is better than cure The idiom "prevention is better than cure" means that it is preferable to avoid problems, illnesses, or difficult situations beforehand rather than encountering and dealing with them later. It emphasizes the importance of taking preventative measures to avoid negative consequences rather than trying to resolve them after they occur.
  • know better (than to do sth) The idiom "know better (than to do sth)" means to have the knowledge or wisdom to avoid certain actions or behaviors because they are considered unwise, inappropriate, or wrong. It implies that one has experience, understanding, or common sense to make better choices and avoid repeating past mistakes.
  • half a loaf is better than none The idiom "half a loaf is better than none" means that it is better to have or receive something, even if it is not as much as one wanted or expected, rather than having nothing at all. It suggests that it is preferable to have a partial or limited amount of something than to have nothing.
  • more trouble than it's worth The idiom "more trouble than it's worth" means that something requires so much effort, time, or resources that the potential benefits or value gained from it are not enough to justify or outweigh the difficulties and problems it brings.
  • not worth the trouble, at more trouble than it's worth The idiom "not worth the trouble" or "more trouble than it's worth" refers to a situation or endeavor that requires too much effort, time, or resources compared to the benefits or rewards it offers. It suggests that the drawbacks and difficulties associated with a particular activity outweigh any potential advantages or gains. It implies that the potential outcome is not valuable enough to justify the difficulties or complications that come along with it.
  • bite off more than you can chew The idiom "bite off more than you can chew" means to take on more tasks, responsibilities, or challenges than one can handle or manage effectively. It implies overestimating one's capabilities or capacity, resulting in difficulty or failure to complete what was initially intended or promised.
  • blood is thicker than water The idiom "blood is thicker than water" means that family bonds and relationships are stronger and more important than friendships or other connections. It suggests that one should prioritize and support their family members above others in times of need or conflict.
  • whiter than white The idiom "whiter than white" is used to describe someone or something as exceptionally pure, virtuous, or morally upright. It implies that the person or thing surpasses normal standards of goodness and displays an impeccable character or behavior.
  • a fate worse than death The idiom "a fate worse than death" refers to a situation or outcome that is considered so terrible or undesirable that it is worse than dying. It implies that the prospect of experiencing or enduring this fate is seen as more distressing, painful, or unbearable than death itself.
  • it's more than my job's worth The idiom "it's more than my job's worth" means that the speaker is unwilling to do something or take a particular action because it exceeds the expectations or responsibilities associated with their job. It implies that they believe the risks or consequences of performing the task are too great and may jeopardize their position or employment.
  • an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, at prevention is better than cure The idiom "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" means that it is easier and more effective to prevent a problem or take precautions beforehand rather than trying to fix or solve it after it has occurred. This implies that putting effort and taking preventive measures can save a significant amount of time, money, or trouble in the future. It is often used to emphasize the importance of being proactive and prepared rather than dealing with the consequences of neglect or inaction. Another common and synonymous phrase for this idiom is "prevention is better than cure."
  • more than The idiom "more than" is typically used to express the idea of exceeding or surpassing a certain quantity or expectation. It suggests that something is greater or larger in magnitude, scale, or degree than what is being compared to. It indicates an abundance or an additional amount beyond what is considered sufficient or expected.
  • no fewer than The idiom "no fewer than" is used to emphasize a particularly large or impressive number. It means that there is a minimum or minimum acceptable number of something, and that it is greater than or equal to the number stated. It is often used to emphasize the largeness or significance of the quantity mentioned.
  • no less than The idiom "no less than" means that something is at least as important, impressive, or significant as what has been mentioned or can be expected. It emphasizes the magnitude or importance of a statement or situation.
  • larger than life The idiom "larger than life" refers to someone or something that is grand, impressive, or extraordinary in a way that surpasses normal expectations or characteristics. It usually describes individuals who have a powerful personality, immense physical presence, or an exceptional level of success or achievement.
  • not/no more than The idiom "not/no more than" means that something or someone has not exceeded a certain quantity or extent, indicating a limit or a maximum level that has not been surpassed.
  • nothing more than The phrase "nothing more than" is an idiom that means something is seen or described as nothing other than what it currently appears to be, without any additional or higher significance or value. It implies that there are no hidden or additional elements to consider apart from what is obvious or known.
  • more often than not The definition of the idiom "more often than not" is that something typically or frequently occurs, although it may not be the case every time. It suggests that a particular outcome or situation is the usual or majority occurrence.
  • more often than not, at as often as not The idiom "more often than not" or "as often as not" is used to describe something that happens more frequently or commonly than not. It implies that a particular outcome or behavior is likely to occur most of the time, but not necessarily always.
  • rather you than me The idiom "rather you than me" is an expression used when someone expresses that they would not want to be in another person's situation or face the challenges they are dealing with. It conveys a sentiment of relief or gratitude for not having to experience something difficult or unpleasant, while implying that the speaker is glad it is someone else going through it instead of themselves.
  • do more harm than good The idiom "do more harm than good" means that an action or decision leads to negative consequences or outcomes that outweigh any potential benefits or good intentions it may have had initially.
  • none other than sb/sth The idiom "none other than sb/sth" is used to emphasize that the person or thing mentioned is of great significance or importance. It indicates surprise or excitement about the identity or existence of someone or something.
  • more by accident than design The idiom "more by accident than design" means that something was achieved or happened unintentionally, often with little or no planning or deliberate effort. It implies that the outcome or result was a result of chance or luck rather than intentional action.
  • more by luck than judgment The idiom "more by luck than judgment" refers to a situation or outcome that is achieved by chance or fortunate circumstances rather than careful planning or deliberate actions. It suggests that the success or positive result was not intentional or due to skill, but simply a stroke of luck.
  • be nothing less than sth The idiom "be nothing less than sth" means to be exactly or at least the thing mentioned, emphasizing that it is of the highest quality or the most extreme form.
  • be more to sth than meets the eye The idiom "be more to something than meets the eye" suggests that something or someone has hidden, deeper or more significant qualities or characteristics beyond what is initially apparent. It implies that there is more depth, complexity, or importance to be discovered upon further observation or inspection.
  • be more to this than meets the eye The idiom "be more to this than meets the eye" means that there is something hidden, deeper, or more complicated behind a situation or person than what is initially apparent or easily understood. It implies that further investigation or consideration is necessary to fully comprehend the true nature or significance of something.
  • more by accident than (by) design The idiom "more by accident than (by) design" refers to something that happens or is achieved unplanned or unintentionally, instead of being intentionally planned or executed. It suggests that the outcome or result occurred by chance or happenstance rather than through deliberate intention or careful planning.
  • have more than one string to one's fiddle The idiom "have more than one string to one's fiddle" means to possess multiple skills, abilities, or options beyond what is commonly known or expected. It emphasizes versatility, adaptability, or the ability to handle various situations.
  • It is better to be born lucky than rich. The idiom "It is better to be born lucky than rich" means that having good fortune or luck in one's life is more valuable and advantageous than being born into a wealthy family or having material wealth. It suggests that luck or fortunate circumstances can bring more opportunities, happiness, and success than simply having financial resources.
  • more dead than alive The idiom "more dead than alive" is used to describe someone who looks extremely or very sick, tired, weak, or close to death. It implies that the person's condition is so severe that they appear to be barely clinging to life or on the verge of dying.
  • use your head for more than a hatrack The idiom "use your head for more than a hatrack" means to encourage someone to think or use their brain for something other than simply holding a hat. It implies that the person should engage their intelligence, reasoning, or common sense to solve problems or make better decisions. It emphasizes the importance of actively thinking and not merely relying on one's head as a passive object.
  • 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all The idiom "'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all" is a quote from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "In Memoriam A.H.H." This phrase suggests that it is more preferable to experience love, even if it ultimately ends in loss or heartbreak, than to have never loved anyone at all. It conveys the idea that the joy and fulfillment that love brings outweigh the pain and sorrow that may come when it is lost.
  • have done etc. more than has had hot dinners The idiom "have done etc. more than has had hot dinners" is typically used to describe someone who has experienced a great number of things or has a great deal of expertise in a particular area. It suggests that the person has had a very eventful or productive life, compared to the number of meals they have eaten.
  • It is better to wear out than to rust out. The idiom "It is better to wear out than to rust out" means that it is more beneficial and fulfilling to exhaust oneself, both physically and mentally, through constant activity, productivity, and engagement, rather than stagnating or becoming inactive, which leads to dullness, decline, and wasted potential.
  • Better (to be) safe than sorry. The idiom "Better (to be) safe than sorry" means that it is more prudent and wise to take precautions or be cautious in advance, rather than experience regret or negative consequences later on. It emphasizes the importance of being proactive and avoiding potential risks or harm.
  • Better (be) safe than sorry. The idiom "Better (be) safe than sorry" means it is wiser to take precautions or be careful in order to avoid problems or regrets later on, rather than risking negative consequences or regrets by being careless or reckless.
  • I can't say fairer than that The idiom "I can't say fairer than that" means that the proposed offer or statement is the most reasonable and justifiable one can make. It conveys the idea that the speaker has been as fair and reasonable as possible in the given situation.
  • exchange no more than The idiom "exchange no more than" means to communicate or give to someone only a limited amount or specific type of information. It suggests keeping the conversation or interaction brief and not delving into further details or extending the exchange beyond what is necessary.
  • stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach The idiom "stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach" means to not overextend oneself or take on more responsibilities, tasks, or obligations than one can handle or manage effectively. It emphasizes the importance of knowing one's limits and not exceeding them to prevent negative consequences or jeopardize one's well-being. This idiom promotes self-awareness and the idea of exercising caution and prudence in various aspects of life.
  • It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive. The idiom "It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive" means that the process or journey towards achieving a goal or destination can often be more enjoyable or fulfilling than actually reaching the end result. It emphasizes the importance of having hope, optimism, and enjoyment in the pursuit of goals or dreams rather than solely focusing on the final outcome.
  • see no further than the end of nose The idiom "see no further than the end of one's nose" is used to describe someone who is narrow-minded, lacking in foresight, or unable to consider anything beyond their immediate concerns or interests. It suggests that the person is unable to see or understand the bigger picture or long-term consequences of their actions.
  • have done/seen/had etc. more sth than sb has had hot dinners The idiom "have done/seen/had etc. more something than somebody has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that someone has a great deal of experience or knowledge in a particular area. It suggests that the person has done, seen, had, or witnessed something so frequently or extensively that it surpasses the number of meals the other person has eaten. It indicates a high level of familiarity or expertise in a particular subject or activity.
  • Better the devil you know than the devil you don't know The idiom "better the devil you know than the devil you don't know" means that it is preferable to deal with a familiar or known difficult situation or person, rather than taking the risk or facing the unknown and potentially worse situation or person. It suggests that familiarity, even if unpleasant, has its advantages over uncertainty.
  • have more luck than sense The idiom "have more luck than sense" refers to someone who consistently experiences favorable outcomes or successes purely due to their luck or fortune, rather than their intelligence, knowledge, or good judgment. It implies that the person's actions or decisions may lack logical reasoning or coherent thinking, yet they still manage to come out ahead.
  • better than sex The idiom "better than sex" is typically used to describe an activity, experience, or object that is highly enjoyable, fulfilling, or satisfying. It implies that the particular thing being referred to surpasses or exceeds the pleasure one might derive from sexual satisfaction.
  • more than one can shake a stick at The idiom "more than one can shake a stick at" means having an excessive number or quantity of something. It implies an abundance or a surplus beyond what is necessary or easily manageable.
  • more than can shake a stick at The idiom "more than can shake a stick at" means having an overwhelming or excessive quantity or number of something. It implies that there are too many of a particular thing to easily count, control, or manage. The phrase can also convey a sense of abundance or excess.
  • have had more than your fair share of sth The idiom "have had more than your fair share of something" means that someone has gotten or experienced a larger amount of something, usually something negative, than what is considered fair or reasonable. It suggests that the person has had an excessive or disproportionate amount compared to others.
  • bad excuse is better than none The idiom "a bad excuse is better than none" means that it's preferable to offer any explanation, regardless of its quality or credibility, rather than not giving any excuse at all. It implies that any attempt to justify one's actions or behavior is better than silence or admitting fault without explanation.
  • emptier than a banker's heart The idiom "emptier than a banker's heart" is a figurative expression used to describe something or someone that is extremely lacking in emotions, compassion, or empathy. It implies that a banker's heart, often associated with the stereotype of being cold and focused solely on financial gains, is completely void of any warmth or understanding.
  • more than sb/sth bargained for The idiom "more than sb/sth bargained for" means that something is more difficult, challenging, or unexpected than what was originally expected or anticipated. It implies that the situation or outcome surpasses one's initial expectations or plans, often resulting in an undesirable or overwhelming experience.
  • more than one bargained for The idiom "more than one bargained for" means to receive or experience more difficulty, trouble, or responsibility than initially anticipated or expected.
  • sb/sth has more bark than bite The idiom "sb/sth has more bark than bite" is used to describe someone or something that appears aggressive or threatening but is actually not dangerous or intimidating. It implies that the person or thing talks or boasts more forcefully than their actions can support.
  • One's bark is worse than one's bite. The idiom "One's bark is worse than one's bite" means that someone appears to be aggressive or threatening, but in reality, they are not as formidable or dangerous as they seem. It suggests that their words or actions may seem intimidating, but they do not possess the ability or willingness to follow through with their threats.
  • be more fun than a barrel of monkeys The idiom "be more fun than a barrel of monkeys" means that something or someone is extremely entertaining, joyful, or amusing. It suggests that the experience or person being referred to brings boundless fun, excitement, and laughter in abundance, similar to the lively nature of a barrel filled with playful monkeys frolicking together.
  • more fun than a barrel of monkeys The idiom "more fun than a barrel of monkeys" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely enjoyable, entertaining, or amusing. It implies that the experience or person is so full of fun and excitement that it exceeds the level of enjoyment one would expect from a literal barrel filled with monkeys.
  • more than one can bear The idiom "more than one can bear" means that a situation or burden is too difficult, overwhelming, or stressful for someone to handle or tolerate. It implies that the person is unable to cope with the demands or hardships being placed upon them.
  • There's more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "There's more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple ways to achieve the same goal or solve a problem. It suggests that there are various alternative methods or approaches to accomplish a task, emphasizing the importance of flexibility and creativity.
  • You make a better door than you do a window The idiomatic expression "You make a better door than you do a window" is often used humorously to imply that someone is blocking the view or obstructing the way. It suggests that the person is not being considerate or helpful in allowing others to have a clear line of sight or passage.
  • Two heads are better than one The idiom "Two heads are better than one" means that it is beneficial to have more than one person working together or contributing their ideas to solve a problem or make a decision. It suggests that collaboration and teamwork often result in better outcomes compared to individual efforts.
  • It is better to give than to receive The idiom "It is better to give than to receive" means that it is more fulfilling and advantageous to give help, kindness, or gifts to others than to be on the receiving end. It emphasizes the idea that being generous and selfless brings greater joy and personal satisfaction than simply receiving assistance or material possessions.
  • is better than nothing The idiom "is better than nothing" refers to a situation where having or receiving something, even if it is not perfect, is preferable to having nothing at all. It highlights the principle that having a flawed or inadequate option is still preferable to having no option or opportunity.
  • Example is better than precept The idiom "Example is better than precept" means that actions speak louder than words. It suggests that it is more effective and persuasive to demonstrate something through one's own behavior or actions rather than merely giving advice or instruction about it.
  • better than nothing The idiom "better than nothing" means that having or receiving something, even if it is of low quality or not exactly what one desires, is preferable to having or receiving nothing at all.
  • Better be the head of a dog than the tail of a lion The idiom "Better be the head of a dog than the tail of a lion" suggests that it is preferable to be in a position of leadership or authority, even if it is in a small or humble setting, than to be in a subordinate position in a more prestigious or powerful group. It emphasizes the importance of having control and influence, even if it is on a smaller scale.
  • Better be an old man's darling than a young man's slave The idiom "Better be an old man's darling than a young man's slave" suggests that it is preferable to be favored and cherished by an older person, typically someone more mature and experienced, rather than being subservient and controlled by a younger person. This phrase emphasizes the importance of valuing wisdom, security, and stability over youth and potential exploitation in relationships or partnerships.
  • one's eyes are bigger than stomach The idiom "one's eyes are bigger than their stomach" is used to describe a situation where someone takes more food or resources than they can actually consume or handle. It means that a person's desire or appetite for something exceeds their actual capacity, resulting in wastage or an inability to finish what they have taken.
  • eyes are bigger than belly The idiom "eyes are bigger than belly" is used to describe a situation where someone takes or desires more than they can handle or consume. It suggests that a person's appetite or ambition exceeds their capacity or ability to fulfill it. It is derived from the literal action of someone filling their plate with more food than they can actually eat.
  • be larger than life The idiom "to be larger than life" typically refers to someone or something that is extremely remarkable, impressive, or extraordinary. It suggests that the person or thing in question possesses such qualities or characteristics that make them stand out and command attention.
  • One's bark is worse than bite The idiom "One's bark is worse than bite" means that someone's words or behavior might sound or appear threatening or aggressive, but they rarely follow through with any actual action or harm.
  • has more bark than bite The idiom "has more bark than bite" refers to someone or something that appears or behaves aggressively or intimidatingly, but lacks the ability or willingness to follow through with their threats or actions. It implies that the individual or thing is all talk and bluster, but lacks substance or true power.
  • bite off more than one can chew The idiom "bite off more than one can chew" means to take on or attempt to do more than one is capable of handling or managing. It signifies accepting or committing to a task or responsibility that exceeds one's ability or capacity, often resulting in negative consequences or difficulties.
  • bite off more than can chew The idiomatic expression "bite off more than can chew" means to take on more responsibility or commit to more tasks than one is capable of or prepared for. It refers to a situation where someone overestimates their abilities or resources and ends up struggling to handle the load.
  • bark is worse than bite The expression "bark is worse than bite" is used to describe someone or something that appears or sounds intimidating or threatening, but in reality, they are not as dangerous or powerful as they seem. It means that a person's or an animal's aggressive or fierce behavior or warnings are not an accurate reflection of their actual capability or likelihood to cause harm.
  • no sooner than sth The idiom "no sooner than" means that something happens immediately after another event or action. It suggests that there is very little time between two actions or events, emphasizing their close proximity in time.
  • no sooner do sth than do sth else The idiom "no sooner do sth than do sth else" refers to a situation where one action or event is immediately followed by another action or event, without any delay or interruption. It suggests that the second action takes place immediately after the first one, emphasizing the quickness or rapid succession of events.
  • sooner than you think The idiom "sooner than you think" means that something will happen or occur unexpectedly or much sooner than expected or anticipated.
  • blood is thicker than The idiom "blood is thicker than" means that family relationships and bonds are stronger and more important than other types of connections or associations. It suggests that familial loyalty and support will typically take precedence over other relationships or loyalties.
  • female of the species is more deadly than the male The idiom "female of the species is more deadly than the male" refers to the idea that women have the potential to be more cunning, manipulative, or dangerous than men. It suggests that women possess qualities or instincts that make them more capable of causing harm or achieving their goals compared to their male counterparts. This idiom can be used to describe situations where women exhibit unexpected power or dominance in various aspects of life, such as relationships, competition, or even survival.
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do sth The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do something" is an exaggerated expression used to convey extreme aversion, dread, or reluctance toward an activity or task. It emphasizes the idea that the alternative of facing a firing squad, which typically implies imminent death, is preferable to engaging in the mentioned activity.
  • harder than the back of God's head The idiom "harder than the back of God's head" is a colorful way of expressing that something is extremely difficult, next to impossible, or excessively challenging. It implies that the task at hand or the situation being referred to is exceptionally hard beyond ordinary comprehension or expectations.
  • one's eyes are bigger than one's stomach The idiom "one's eyes are bigger than one's stomach" means that someone overestimates or desires more than they can actually handle or consume. This expression is often used to describe someone who takes more food than they can eat or accepts more tasks or responsibilities than they can manage.
  • It is easier to tear down than to build up. The idiom "It is easier to tear down than to build up" means that destroying or criticizing something is often much simpler than creating or improving it. It implies that it takes less effort, time, or skill to criticize or dismantle something than to construct, develop, or repair it.
  • Fact is stranger than fiction,
  • chain is no stronger than its weakest link The idiom "a chain is no stronger than its weakest link" means that the overall strength or effectiveness of a group or system is limited by its weakest or most vulnerable part. It implies that the success or functionality of a whole is dependent on the performance or reliability of its individual components. If even one part is weak or deficient, it can undermine or compromise the entire system.
  • I/You can't say fairer than that. The idiom "I/You can't say fairer than that" means that a suggestion or proposal is so fair and reasonable that it cannot be further improved or argued against. It implies that the proposed solution is as equitable and unbiased as possible, leaving no room for dissatisfaction or complaint.
  • have had more than fair share of The idiom "have had more than fair share of" means that someone has experienced an excessive or unfair amount of something. It implies that a person has had more than what is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • pen is mightier than the sword The idiom "the pen is mightier than the sword" means that communication, particularly through writing, holds more power and influence than the use of violence or force. It implies that words, ideas, and persuasion have a greater impact on people and society than physical warfare.
  • You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar The idiom "You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar" means that it is easier to persuade or attract people by being kind and pleasant rather than being harsh or negative.
  • see no further than the end of one's nose The idiom "see no further than the end of one's nose" means to have a narrow perspective or limited understanding of a situation, lacking foresight or ability to consider long-term consequences or possibilities. It suggests that someone is only focused on their immediate circumstances or personal benefits, without considering the bigger picture or potential consequences of their actions.
  • quicker than hell
  • didn't exchange more than three words with sm The idiom "didn't exchange more than three words with someone" refers to a situation where two individuals had very minimal or no verbal communication. It implies that they only shared a brief and limited conversation, typically consisting of only a few words.
  • in less than no time The idiom "in less than no time" means to do something very quickly or in a very short amount of time. It suggests that the action or event takes place so rapidly that it feels like it happens even before any time has passed.
  • wear more than one hat The idiom "wear more than one hat" refers to someone who takes on multiple roles or responsibilities simultaneously, often in different areas or capacities. It signifies the ability to handle various tasks or positions at the same time.
  • more than Carter has pills The idiom "more than Carter has pills" is a colloquial phrase used to describe an excessive or overwhelmingly large quantity of something. It implies that someone or something possesses an excessive number of items or resources, humorously referencing the former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, attributing an imaginary surplus of medication to him.
  • fate worse than death The idiom "fate worse than death" refers to a situation or outcome that is considered to be extremely undesirable or unbearable, even worse than dying. It implies that the alternative or consequence is so horrific that death would be preferable.
  • be a fate worse than death The idiom "be a fate worse than death" refers to a situation or outcome that is considered to be even more dreadful, unpleasant, or unbearable than dying. It describes a scenario in which the alternative or consequence is so terrible that death seems preferable.
  • You are more than welcome. The idiom "You are more than welcome" is a phrase used to express extra gratitude or a strong willingness to assist or accommodate someone. It essentially means that the person being addressed is indeed welcome or encouraged to accept or partake in something, often with an implication that their presence or actions are highly appreciated.
  • meaner than a junkyard dog The idiom "meaner than a junkyard dog" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely aggressive, fierce, or ill-tempered. It implies that the subject in question is inherently dangerous or ruthless in nature, similar to the aggressive reputation often attributed to junkyard dogs.
  • didn't exchange more than three words with The idiom "didn't exchange more than three words with" means that two people had a very brief or limited conversation, often indicating a lack of familiarity or communication between them. It suggests minimal interaction, typically not exceeding a brief exchange or interaction of only a few words.
  • more (to sb/sth) than meets the eye The idiom "more (to sb/sth) than meets the eye" means that there is more to a person or situation than initially apparent. It suggests that there may be hidden qualities, complexities, or depths that are not immediately obvious, requiring closer examination or deeper understanding to truly grasp.
  • There is more to sth/sb than meets the eye. The idiom "There is more to sth/sb than meets the eye" means that there is something deeper, more significant, or more complex about a person, situation, or thing than can initially be observed or understood. It suggests that there is a hidden or undiscovered aspect that requires further exploration or examination to fully comprehend.
  • more (to sth) than meets the eye The idiom "more (to sth) than meets the eye" refers to a situation or object that is more complex, significant, or impressive than it initially appears. It suggests that there is a deeper or hidden meaning, quality, or aspect that may not be immediately evident or obvious. It implies that one should not judge something solely based on its surface or initial appearance, as there may be more to discover or understand.
  • more by luck than judgement The definition of the idiom "more by luck than judgement" is when something is achieved or successful primarily due to chance or good fortune, rather than careful planning or deliberate actions.
  • more sth than Carter has (liver) pills The idiom "more something than Carter has (liver) pills" is an expression used to convey that someone or something has an excessive quantity or amount of something. It implies an overwhelming abundance or surplus, often in a negative or undesirable context. It originates from the widespread availability and excessive consumption of Carter's Little Liver Pills, a medicinal product marketed as a cure-all in the early 20th century.
  • less than pleased The idiom "less than pleased" means to be somewhat or mildly upset, disappointed, or dissatisfied with someone or something.
  • There is more to than meets the eye The idiom "There is more to than meets the eye" means that there is a hidden or deeper meaning, significance, or complexity to something or someone that may not be immediately apparent or obvious at first glance. It suggests that there is additional information, qualities, or aspects that need to be explored or understood in order to fully grasp the true nature or value of the subject in question.
  • more than meets the eye The idiom "more than meets the eye" refers to something that has a deeper or hidden meaning or complexity beyond what is initially apparent or obvious. It suggests that there is more to something or someone than what can be seen or understood at a first glance or superficial level.
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do" is a figurative expression used to convey extreme reluctance or aversion towards a certain task or activity. It implies that the speaker would prefer to endure a potentially life-threatening situation (such as facing a firing squad) rather than engage in or complete the stated action. It emphasizes the strong negative feelings or the unwillingness of the individual towards the mentioned task.
  • more than you know The idiom "more than you know" typically means that there is a deeper or greater level of understanding, knowledge, or significance related to something that is not readily apparent or widely known. It suggests that there is additional information or insights that go beyond what is currently understood or perceived.
  • know no more about than a frog knows about bedsheets The idiom "know no more about than a frog knows about bedsheets" refers to someone who has absolutely no knowledge or understanding of a particular subject or topic. It implies that the person possesses no awareness or information about the matter, similar to how a frog would have no concept or understanding of bedsheets.
  • know no more about sth than a frog knows about bedsheets The idiom "know no more about something than a frog knows about bedsheets" means to have absolutely no knowledge or understanding of a particular subject or topic. It implies a lack of familiarity or cluelessness that is comparable to a frog's complete unawareness of bedsheets, emphasizing a significant level of ignorance or incompetence in the matter at hand.
  • other than The idiom "other than" is used to indicate exclusion or contrast, suggesting that something or someone is different or separate from the other options or possibilities being discussed.
  • none other than The idiom "none other than" is used to introduce or emphasize the identity of a person or thing, indicating that it is someone or something of great significance or importance. It is often used to reveal a surprising or unexpected individual or entity.
  • go one better (than sb/sth) The idiom "go one better (than sb/sth)" means to surpass or outdo someone or something by achieving a more impressive or remarkable accomplishment. It suggests improving upon an already impressive effort or achievement.
  • blood is thicker than sth The idiom "blood is thicker than sth" means that family ties or relationships are stronger and more important than other types of connections or associations. It suggests that bonds within a family, based on shared blood or genetics, supersede other loyalties or allegiances.
  • nothing less than sth The idiom "nothing less than something" is used to emphasize that something is no less than what is stated or expected. It implies that the thing being referred to is of the highest, utmost, or most extraordinary quality, importance, or level.
  • meaner than a junkyard dog (with fourteen sucking pups) The idiom "meaner than a junkyard dog (with fourteen sucking pups)" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely mean, aggressive, or fierce. It implies a level of nastiness and hostility beyond normal expectations or just exaggerates the degree of meanness.
  • no less than sb/sth The idiom "no less than sb/sth" is used to emphasize the exceptional or surprising nature of someone or something. It indicates that the person or thing being referred to is of considerable significance, importance, or quality, often higher than expected.
  • less than sth The idiom "less than something" is used to compare something to a lower or lesser degree, quality, or amount than what is being referred to. It implies that the thing being compared falls short or is inferior in comparison to the mentioned standard or expectation. It can be used in various contexts to convey the idea of insufficiency or inadequacy.
  • No more than I have to The idiom "No more than I have to" means doing only the bare minimum or fulfilling the necessary obligations, without putting in any extra effort or going beyond what is required. It implies a reluctance to go above and beyond the basic expectations or responsibilities.
  • more than bargained for The idiom "more than bargained for" means encountering or receiving something that is more intense, challenging, difficult, or surprising than expected or initially agreed upon. It suggests a situation where the outcome or consequences exceed one's original expectations or assumptions.
  • have more than one string to fiddle The idiom "have more than one string to fiddle" means to have multiple options, alternative plans, or skills to rely on in a particular situation. It suggests that a person has a versatile or backup approach to handle or achieve something.
  • nothing less than The idiom "nothing less than" is used to express a high level of expectation or demand for something. It suggests that nothing short of a certain quality, standard, or result will be acceptable.
  • rather than The idiom "rather than" is used to introduce a preference or choice between two options or actions. It indicates a preference for one thing over another.
  • it’s better to be safe than sorry The idiom "it's better to be safe than sorry" means that it is more prudent and advisable to take precautions or act cautiously, even if it may seem unnecessary or excessive, as it is better to avoid potential harm or regret in the future.
  • you know better than that The idiom "you know better than that" is used to express disappointment or disbelief in someone's actions or decisions, implying that the person should have known or acted differently based on their knowledge, experience, or common sense. It can also be used to suggest that the person is capable of making better choices and should exercise sound judgment.
  • rather you, him, etc. than me The idiom "rather you, him, etc. than me" is an expression used to convey that the speaker would prefer the mentioned unpleasant or difficult situation to happen to someone else rather than themselves. It implies a sense of relief or gratitude for not being directly involved, as they believe the other person is better equipped to handle the situation.
  • sooner rather than later The idiom "sooner rather than later" means to complete or take action on something as soon as possible or without unnecessary delay.
  • an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure The idiom "an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure" means that it is easier and more effective to prevent problems or take precautions beforehand, rather than dealing with the consequences or trying to solve them later. It emphasizes the importance of taking proactive measures to avoid potential issues instead of waiting for them to arise and having to deal with the more challenging task of fixing or dealing with them.
  • half a loaf is better than no bread The idiom "half a loaf is better than no bread" means that it is better to have or accept something, even if it is not as much as you desire or ideal, rather than having nothing at all. It emphasizes the importance of appreciating and making the most of what is available, rather than having nothing or waiting for the perfect situation.
  • be easier said than done The idiom "be easier said than done" means that something may sound simple or straightforward when discussed or explained, but in reality, it is difficult or challenging to actually accomplish.
  • there is more to somebody/something than meets the eye The idiom "there is more to somebody/something than meets the eye" means that there is a hidden or deeper aspect or quality to a person or thing that may not be immediately apparent or easy to notice. It suggests that there is more depth, complexity, or significance to be discovered or understood beyond what is initially observed.
  • there’s more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "there’s more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple methods or approaches to accomplish a task or solve a problem. It emphasizes the idea that there are numerous alternatives or various ways to achieve a desired outcome.
  • some (people, members, etc.) are more equal than others The idiom "some (people, members, etc.) are more equal than others" is a variation of the phrase "all animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others," which comes from George Orwell's novel "Animal Farm." The idiom implies that, despite claiming to treat everyone equally, some individuals enjoy more privileges, power, or advantages than others. It critiques situations where those in authority or with higher status are treated more favorably or have exceptions to the rules compared to others, despite the principle of equality.
  • somebody’s eyes are bigger than their stomach The idiom "somebody's eyes are bigger than their stomach" means that someone has taken or desired more food or drink than they can actually consume. It metaphorically refers to a situation where someone underestimates their capacity or overestimates their appetite. This idiom can also be applied in a broader sense to describe someone who takes on more responsibilities or commitments than they can handle.
  • be greater/more than the sum of its parts The idiom "be greater/more than the sum of its parts" means that something or a group of things, when combined, result in a final outcome or value that is bigger, better, or more impressive than what one would expect based solely on the individual elements or components involved. It emphasizes the idea that the whole is more valuable or significant than the individual parts in isolation.
  • somebody’s bark is worse than their bite The idiom "somebody's bark is worse than their bite" means that someone appears or sounds more aggressive or threatening than they actually are. It suggests that while someone may make a lot of noise and seem intimidating, they are not likely to follow through with their threats or actions.
  • little/no better than The idiom "little/no better than" is used to express that something or someone is not significantly superior to another thing or person. It suggests that there is not much of a difference in quality, moral character, or worth between two entities being compared.
  • more by accident than (by) judgment The idiom "more by accident than (by) judgment" means that a person's success or positive outcome was attained through luck or coincidence rather than through careful planning or skill. It implies that the individual did not intend for the favorable outcome to happen, but it occurred unexpectedly.
  • more sinned against than sinner The idiom "more sinned against than sinner" refers to a situation or person who is portrayed as being wronged or harmed more by others than they have wronged or harmed others themselves. It highlights the perception of being a victim rather than a perpetrator in a given situation.
  • more sinned against than sinning The idiom "more sinned against than sinning" refers to a situation where a person is perceived or portrayed as having experienced more harm or wrongdoing from others than they have caused themselves. It suggests that the individual is unfairly treated or victimized, compared to their own wrongdoing or mistakes.
  • exchange no more than (an amount of) words The idiom "exchange no more than (an amount of) words" is used to describe a situation in which very few words or a minimal amount of conversation takes place between two or more individuals. It implies that there is a lack of communication or a limited exchange of information in a given interaction.
  • more in sorrow than in anger The idiom "more in sorrow than in anger" refers to expressing disappointment, sadness, or regret rather than exhibiting anger or outrage. It implies that the speaker feels a deep sense of sadness or disappointment about a situation or someone's actions, but does not express their emotions in an angry or aggressive manner.
  • cannot see any further than the end of one’s nose The idiom "cannot see any further than the end of one’s nose" means that someone is unable to see or understand anything beyond their immediate concerns or perspective. They lack the ability or willingness to consider broader possibilities or think about the long-term consequences of their actions.
  • see no further than the end of one’s nose The idiom "see no further than the end of one’s nose" means to have a limited perspective or narrow view of a situation, failing to consider the bigger picture or long-term consequences. It implies a lack of foresight or an inability to see beyond immediate circumstances.
  • (one's) eyes are bigger than (one's) belly The idiom "(one's) eyes are bigger than (one's) belly" means that someone has taken too much food or made plans or commitments that they cannot handle or fulfill due to overestimating their capacity or abilities. It implies that someone's desire or ambition exceeds their actual capabilities or appetite.
  • it's better to ask forgiveness than permission The idiom "it's better to ask forgiveness than permission" means that it is sometimes easier to seek forgiveness for doing something without prior approval than to seek permission beforehand. It suggests that taking action without explicit consent may be more effective or efficient, and if faced with any consequences, it is easier to apologize for the action than to obtain permission first.
  • you attract more flies with honey than vinegar The idiom "you attract more flies with honey than vinegar" means that you can achieve better results by being kind and gentle rather than being harsh or unpleasant. It suggests that being approachable and friendly is more effective in winning people over or getting what you want than being critical or confrontational.
  • than the average bear The idiom "than the average bear" refers to someone or something that is exceptionally intelligent, capable, or skilled in a particular area or task. It often implies superiority or exceptional abilities compared to others. The phrase is derived from the fictitious character Yogi Bear, known for his cleverness and resourcefulness.
  • a bad excuse is better than none The idiom "a bad excuse is better than none" means that offering a weak or poor excuse for not doing something is still preferable to giving no excuse at all. It implies that it is generally more acceptable to provide a feeble reasoning for one's actions or lack thereof than to offer no justification or explanation.
  • get more than (one) bargained for The idiom "get more than (one) bargained for" means to receive or experience something that is more challenging, surprising, or intense than initially expected or anticipated. It often refers to unexpected consequences or outcomes exceeding one's original intentions or plans.
  • bark is worse than one's bite, one's The idiom "bark is worse than one's bite" means that someone may often appear fierce or threatening, but their actions or behavior are not as harmful or aggressive as they might seem. It suggests that someone's words or initial display of aggression should not be taken too seriously or cause fear, as they are likely to be less dangerous than they appear.
  • his, her, etc. bark is worse than his, her, etc. bite The idiom "his, her, etc. bark is worse than his, her, etc. bite" means that someone's threats or boasts of aggression or violence are more intimidating or alarming than their actual ability or willingness to follow through on them. In other words, they talk tough but cannot back it up with real action.
  • someone's bark is worse than their bite The idiom "someone's bark is worse than their bite" means that a person may appear to be aggressive, threatening, or intimidating, but they do not actually follow through with their words, and their actions are less severe or harmful than their initial threats or warnings. It suggests that the person is more inclined to make loud or aggressive statements but lacks the ability or willingness to back them up with action.
  • your bark is worse than your bite The idiom "your bark is worse than your bite" refers to someone who appears or sounds more aggressive or threatening than they actually are. It suggests that despite their intimidating demeanor or words, they do not follow through with aggressive actions or lack the ability to back up their threats.
  • be better than a kick in the pants The idiom "be better than a kick in the pants" means that something may not be ideal or perfect, but it is still preferable to a negative or unpleasant alternative. It implies that although the situation may not be great, it is still more favorable or advantageous than the alternative.
  • have eyes bigger than (one's) belly The idiom "have eyes bigger than (one's) belly" refers to a situation when someone takes or orders more food than they are actually able to eat. It implies that a person's desire or appetite exceeds their capacity or ability to handle it.
  • someone's eyes are bigger than their belly The idiom "someone's eyes are bigger than their belly" means that a person's appetite or desire for something is greater than what they are actually able to handle or consume. It implies that someone may take on more than they can handle or overestimate their capabilities or capacity.
  • a live dog is better than a dead lion The idiom "a live dog is better than a dead lion" means that it is more advantageous or beneficial to be alive and active, even if one's status or achievements are not as impressive as someone who is deceased or no longer relevant. It emphasizes the value of being alive and making the most out of opportunities, rather than holding onto past glories or risking everything for an unattainable goal.
  • better dead than red The idiom "better dead than red" is a phrase that was prevalent during the Cold War era. It refers to the belief that it is preferable to die than to live under communist or socialist rule. The color "red" is associated with communism, often symbolizing the Soviet Union and its influence. Therefore, the phrase suggests that risking death is preferable to living in a society governed by communist ideologies. It often reflects strong political or ideological opposition towards communism.
  • better off than (someone) The idiom "better off than (someone)" means to be in a more advantageous or favorable situation compared to another person. It implies that the person being referred to is in a better or more successful position financially, emotionally, or socially.
  • better than The idiom "better than" typically means superior or more favorable compared to something else. It suggests that one option, situation, or outcome is of higher quality, value, or desirability than another.
  • better the devil you know than the one you don't know The idiom "better the devil you know than the one you don't know" means it is preferable to deal with a familiar, known situation or person, even if it may be difficult or unpleasant, instead of risking an unfamiliar or unknown situation or person that could potentially be worse. It implies that familiarity, even if negative, can be less risky or dangerous than the uncertainty of a new or unknown situation.
  • better you than me The idiom "better you than me" is used to express relief or satisfaction that the person being referred to is in an undesirable situation instead of the speaker. It implies that the listener's predicament is unfavorable, and the speaker is grateful that they are not experiencing it themselves.
  • Foresight is better than hindsight. The idiom "Foresight is better than hindsight" means that it is more beneficial to anticipate and plan for something in advance rather than reflecting on it after it has already happened.
  • half a loaf is better than no loaf The idiom "half a loaf is better than no loaf" means that it is better to accept or settle for less than what you desire instead of having nothing at all. It emphasizes the importance of finding some form of satisfaction or contentment, even if it does not meet your full expectations or desires.
  • half a loaf is better than none/no bread The idiom "half a loaf is better than none/no bread" means it is better to have or receive something, even if it is not everything you wanted or expected, than to have nothing at all. It conveys the idea that it is preferable to accept a portion or less than desired outcome rather than having nothing or being left empty-handed.
  • know better than The idiom "know better than" means to possess knowledge or understanding that someone else lacks, usually implying that the person being referred to should behave or act differently due to this knowledge. It suggests that someone should be aware of the appropriate or correct course of action based on their experience or expertise, but is not currently displaying such knowledge.
  • make a better door than a window The idiom "make a better door than a window" is used to describe someone or something that is obstructing the view or causing an obstacle, making it difficult to see or access what is behind them. It implies that the person or object is being an inconvenience or hindrance.
  • no better than you should be The idiom "no better than you should be" refers to someone who acts or behaves inappropriately or immorally, often beyond the expected or accepted standards of behavior. It implies that the person's actions do not align with their supposed or perceived level of respectability, suggesting that they are not as virtuous or admirable as they may appear.
  • the half is better than the whole The idiom "half is better than the whole" means that having or settling for less of something is often preferable to having or seeking the entire thing. It suggests that sometimes it is wiser to be content with what one has or to take a manageable portion, as it may bring more satisfaction or be less burdensome than striving for complete or excessive fulfillment.
  • (It's) better than nothing. The idiom "(It's) better than nothing" means that even though something may not be an ideal or perfect solution, having it is still preferable to having nothing at all. It implies that having at least a small or imperfect option is better than having no option or alternative whatsoever.
  • eyes are bigger than one's stomach, one's The idiom "eyes are bigger than one's stomach" means that someone's desire to eat or consume more than they can actually handle or comfortably digest. It refers to situations where a person takes more food than they can actually finish because they were enticed by the appearance or amount of food, but later realize that they are unable to consume it all. This phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe situations where someone takes on more tasks or commitments than they can handle.
  • have eyes bigger than (one's) stomach The idiom "have eyes bigger than (one's) stomach" means to take or desire more food than one can actually eat. It speaks to the tendency of someone to be overly ambitious or greedy in their appetites, leading to choosing or serving more food than they can consume.
  • have eyes bigger than your stomach The idiom "have eyes bigger than your stomach" means to take more food or things than one can actually consume or handle. It refers to a situation where someone's desire or ambition exceeds their actual capacity or capability to fulfill it.
  • more/bigger/greater than the sum of its parts The idiom "more/bigger/greater than the sum of its parts" refers to something that has a combined value, impact, or effectiveness that surpasses what would be expected based solely on the individual components or elements. It suggests that the whole entity possesses qualities or achievements that are greater or more impressive than what can be attributed to its individual elements or separate entities.
  • your eyes are bigger than your stomach The idiom "your eyes are bigger than your stomach" means that someone has taken or requested more food or things than they can actually handle, consume, or utilize. It signifies a situation where a person's desire or enthusiasm exceeds their actual capacity or ability.
  • have more chins than a Chinese phone book The phrase "have more chins than a Chinese phone book" is often used as a humorous way to describe someone who is overweight or has a notable amount of excess fat around their chin and neck area. It playfully compares the number of chins someone has to the many pages found in a traditional Chinese phone book, implying an exaggerated abundance of chins in a light-hearted manner.
  • have more than one string to (one's) bow The idiom "have more than one string to (one's) bow" means to have multiple skills, abilities, or options available to oneself. It implies being versatile and having alternative avenues or resources to rely on.
  • faster than a speeding bullet The idiom "faster than a speeding bullet" is used to describe someone or something that moves incredibly fast or quickly. It originates from the Superman comics and refers to the superhero's ability to fly at incredible speeds, surpassing the velocity of a bullet.
  • can't say fairer than that The idiom "can't say fairer than that" means that the proposed offer or suggestion is as reasonable, just, or fair as it could possibly be. It implies that no further improvements or compromises can be made to make the situation more favorable or equitable.
  • can't see farther than the end of (one's) nose The idiom "can't see farther than the end of (one's) nose" means that someone lacks foresight or the ability to consider long-term consequences, as they are only focused on immediate or short-term matters. This person is unable to think beyond their own immediate needs or circumstances and fails to consider the bigger picture or long-term implications of their actions.
  • faster than you can say Jack Robinson The idiom "faster than you can say Jack Robinson" is used to describe something happening very quickly or abruptly, without any delay or hesitation. It implies that the action or event takes place so rapidly that it cannot even be verbalized in the time it occurs.
  • keep no more cats than can catch mice The idiom "keep no more cats than can catch mice" means that one should only have as many resources or employees as necessary to get the job done effectively and efficiently. It advises against having excess or unnecessary elements that do not contribute to the desired outcome.
  • more (something) than you can shake a stick at The idiom "more (something) than you can shake a stick at" means an abundance or an excessive amount of something. It implies that there are so many of that particular thing that one would not be able to count or handle them all.
  • more than flesh and blood can stand, endure, etc. The idiom "more than flesh and blood can stand, endure, etc." is often used to describe an overwhelming or unbearable situation that goes beyond what a person can tolerate physically or emotionally. It suggests that the individual has reached their limits and cannot endure any further.
  • more things than you can shake a stick at The idiom "more things than you can shake a stick at" means having a large or overwhelming number of things or options to choose from. It implies an abundance or excessive quantity that exceeds what can be easily managed or addressed.
  • quicker than you can say Jack Robinson The idiom "quicker than you can say Jack Robinson" is used to indicate an action or event that happens very rapidly or abruptly. It implies that something occurs so quickly that it is almost instantaneous, leaving little time for comprehension or reaction.
  • cannot see further than the end of one’s nose The idiom "cannot see further than the end of one’s nose" means that someone lacks the ability to consider or understand things beyond immediate concerns or personal interests. It describes a limited perspective or narrow-mindedness, where one fails to consider the bigger picture or long-term consequences of their actions.
  • cannot see further than your nose The idiom "cannot see further than your nose" means to have a limited perspective, lacking the ability to consider or understand things beyond immediate or obvious situations. It suggests a lack of perception, insight, or foresight in comprehending broader aspects or consequences.
  • more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple ways or methods to achieve a particular goal or objective. It emphasizes the flexibility and variety of approaches that can be taken to solve a problem or complete a task.
  • honey catches more flies than vinegar The idiom "honey catches more flies than vinegar" means that being kind, gentle, or persuasive is more effective in getting people to cooperate or agree with you than being harsh, hostile, or aggressive.
  • be more Catholic than the Pope (himself) The idiom "be more Catholic than the Pope (himself)" is used to describe someone who follows the rules or practices of a particular belief system or ideology even more strictly or devoutly than the recognized authority or leader of that system. It suggests that the person is extremely or excessively orthodox in their beliefs or practices.
  • more Catholic than the Pope (himself) The idiom "more Catholic than the Pope (himself)" refers to someone who is excessively or rigorously observant of the rules, customs, or beliefs of their religious faith. It implies that the person goes to extreme lengths to demonstrate their dedication or adherence, often surpassing the expectations or standards set by even the highest authority figures within their religion, such as the Pope in the Roman Catholic Church.
  • blood is thicker than (something) The idiom "blood is thicker than (something)" means that family relationships are usually more important and stronger than other types of relationships or loyalties. It emphasizes the idea that familial bonds are prioritized over other connections or circumstances.
  • a chain is no stronger than its weakest link The idiom "a chain is no stronger than its weakest link" means that the overall strength or effectiveness of a group, team, or system is determined by its weakest or least capable member. If one component or individual is unable to perform well or meet the required standards, it can undermine the entire operation or cause failure.
  • more holes than Swiss cheese The idiom "more holes than Swiss cheese" is used to describe something or someone that has numerous flaws, weaknesses, or faults. It implies that the subject in question is unreliable, incomplete, or lacks integrity, similar to the numerous holes found in Swiss cheese.
  • richer than Croesus The idiom "richer than Croesus" is used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or affluent. It originates from the ancient king Croesus, who ruled over Lydia in the 6th century BC and was known for his enormous wealth and riches. Thus, being "richer than Croesus" implies having a level of wealth that surpasses even the legendary riches associated with him.
  • more cry than wool The idiom "more cry than wool" means to make a big fuss or show of something that turns out to be insignificant or of little substance. It implies that someone is trying to give the impression of having or offering more than they actually do.
  • fate worse than death, a The idiom "a fate worse than death" refers to a situation or outcome that is considered even more undesirable or horrific than dying. It implies that facing or enduring a particular circumstance would be more unbearable or distressing than losing one's life.
  • didn't exchange more than three words with (one) The idiom "didn't exchange more than three words with (one)" means to have had very little or minimal communication or conversation with someone. It implies that the interaction was brief, with only a few words exchanged, suggesting a lack of familiarity or connection.
  • have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners The idiom "have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that someone has a great amount of experience, skill, or knowledge in a particular field or activity. It implies that the person has done something extensively, surpassing the number of meals they have consumed. It emphasizes a high level of expertise or familiarity in a particular area.
  • more something than someone has had hot dinners The idiom "more something than someone has had hot dinners" is typically used to emphasize that someone has an exceptionally large or extensive amount of something. It suggests that the quantity or frequency of the said "something" is beyond the ordinary or to a remarkable degree.
  • more — than someone has had hot dinners The idiom "more — than someone has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize someone's extensive experience in a particular area or the vast quantity of something they possess. It implies that the person has had an abundance of a particular thing or has been involved in a particular activity for a significant length of time.
  • easier than falling off a log The idiom "easier than falling off a log" means that something is extremely easy to accomplish or achieve. It implies that the task or activity requires little to no effort or skill.
  • easier than rolling off a log The idiom "easier than rolling off a log" means that something is incredibly easy or effortless to do. It implies that an action requires minimal effort or skill, likening it to the simple act of rolling off a log.
  • no sooner (do something) than (do something else) The idiom "no sooner (do something) than (do something else)" is used to describe a situation in which one action or event immediately follows another. It indicates that as soon as one thing occurs, another thing happens without any delay or interruption.
  • be more than glad, ready, etc. The idiom "be more than glad, ready, etc." means to express an excessive or exaggerated level of willingness, eagerness, or enthusiasm to do something or fulfill a request. It implies a strong and wholehearted readiness or willingness to engage in an activity or assist in any way possible.
  • more than a little excited, shocked, etc. The idiom "more than a little excited, shocked, etc." is used to describe a state of extreme emotions or reactions beyond what is typically expected or usual. It implies that someone is very excited, shocked, or distressed, expressing a heightened level of intensity.
  • rather you, etc. than me The idiom "rather you, etc. than me" is used to express relief or gratitude that someone else is experiencing a difficult or unpleasant situation instead of oneself. It implies that the speaker is glad to not be in the same situation as the other person.
  • didn't exchange more than three words with someone The idiom "didn't exchange more than three words with someone" is used to describe a situation in which two individuals have had minimal or very brief communication with each other. It implies that their interaction or conversation was extremely limited or insignificant, often suggesting a lack of intimacy, familiarity, or depth in their relationship.
  • there's more to somebody/something than meets the eye The idiom "there's more to somebody/something than meets the eye" means that there is a hidden or deeper quality, talent, or aspect to someone or something that may not be immediately apparent or obvious upon first impression. It suggests that one should not judge solely based on superficial appearance, as there may be hidden qualities or capabilities that are not initially apparent.
  • there's more to someone or something than meets the eye The idiom "there's more to someone or something than meets the eye" means that there is a hidden depth or complexity to a person or thing that may not be initially apparent or obvious. It suggests that there is something beyond the surface or initial impression that is worth discovering or considering.
  • there's more to something/someone than meets the eye The idiom "there's more to something/someone than meets the eye" means that there is a hidden or deeper aspect to a person or situation that might not be immediately evident or apparent at first glance. It suggests that further exploration or understanding is required to grasp the full or true nature of something or someone.
  • have had more than (one's) fair share of (something) The idiom "have had more than (one's) fair share of (something)" means to have experienced an excessive or disproportionately large amount of something, typically implying that it has been burdensome or overwhelming. It suggests that the person has received or endured more than what is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • faster than greased lightning The idiom "faster than greased lightning" is used to describe something or someone that moves or operates very quickly or at an exceptionally high speed. It implies a level of swiftness and efficiency that surpasses typical expectations.
  • finer than frog hair The idiom "finer than frog hair" is used to describe something extremely fine, delicate, or thin, emphasizing its exceptional and almost imperceptible nature. It conveys the idea of something being incredibly fine, comparable to the thinness of a frog's hair, although frogs do not have hair.
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do something The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do something" is an exaggerated expression used to convey a strong aversion or preference towards not doing a particular task. It implies that an individual would rather endure a severe punishment or face imminent danger (such as execution by a firing squad) than engage in the undesired activity.
  • nuttier than a fruitcake The idiom "nuttier than a fruitcake" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely eccentric, crazy, or insane. It implies that the person or thing in question is beyond the realm of normal or rational behavior, likening their level of craziness to that of a fruitcake filled with an excessive amount of nuts.
  • cannot see further than (the end of) your nose The idiom "cannot see further than (the end of) your nose" refers to a limited perspective or lack of foresight. It suggests that someone is only focused on immediate or short-term outcomes, unaware of the potential consequences or future implications of their actions.
  • be more than (something) The idiom "be more than (something)" typically means to surpass or exceed a certain expectation, standard, or level. It suggests going beyond what is anticipated or required.
  • has more money than God The idiom "has more money than God" is a hyperbolic expression used to describe someone who is exceedingly wealthy or has an immense amount of money. It implies that the person's wealth greatly surpasses the financial resources of even the highest imaginable power or authority.
  • be more/bigger/greater than the sum of its parts The idiom "be more/bigger/greater than the sum of its parts" means that something or someone is more impressive, effective, or significant when considered as a whole rather than when the individual components or elements are evaluated separately. It refers to the concept that the combined efforts, qualities, or contributions of various elements or individuals create a result that surpasses what could be achieved by each of them individually.
  • have more money than sense The idiom "have more money than sense" means that someone has a lot of money but lacks good judgment or common sense when it comes to managing or using their wealth. It implies that the person tends to make extravagant or foolish decisions due to their excessive wealth.
  • no better than (one) ought to be The idiom "no better than (one) ought to be" means that someone's behavior, actions, or qualities fall short of what is expected or appropriate for them. It implies that the person is not living up to the standard of behavior or moral conduct that they should adhere to.
  • no better than (one) should be The idiom "no better than (one) should be" is used to imply that someone's behavior or actions are not appropriate or satisfactory. It often suggests that the person is acting immorally or is failing to meet societal or ethical standards.
  • rarer than hens' teeth The idiom "rarer than hens' teeth" is used to describe something that is extremely scarce, uncommon, or non-existent. It stems from the fact that hens do not have teeth, making the concept of hens' teeth almost impossible or exceedingly rare.
  • scarcer than hens' teeth The idiom "scarcer than hens' teeth" refers to something that is extremely rare or almost nonexistent. It emphasizes the rarity of the subject, comparing it to the fact that chickens do not have teeth, making the occurrence of the subject even more unlikely.
  • be higher than a kite The idiom "be higher than a kite" means to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, resulting in a state of euphoria or extreme intoxication.
  • higher than a kite The idiom "higher than a kite" typically refers to a person being extremely intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, resulting in a state of extreme euphoria or confusion. It is used to describe someone who is excessively high or intoxicated.
  • higher than Gilderoy's kite The idiom "higher than Gilderoy's kite" is used to describe something or someone that is excessively or exceptionally elevated in height or altitude. It implies being far above the usual or expected level, often with a sense of astonishment or exaggeration.
  • have more holes than Swiss cheese The idiom "have more holes than Swiss cheese" means that something or someone has numerous flaws, weaknesses, or inconsistencies. It implies that there are significant and noticeable gaps or deficiencies in whatever is being referred to, similar to the numerous holes in Swiss cheese.
  • be more trouble than it's worth The idiom "be more trouble than it's worth" means that the effort, time, or cost required to do something outweighs any potential benefit or result. It suggests that engaging in or pursuing a particular action or task may result in more difficulties, complications, or negative consequences than the desired outcome is worth.
  • slower than molasses in January The idiom "slower than molasses in January" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely slow or sluggish. It highlights the slow movement of molasses, a thick, sticky syrup, particularly in the cold winter months when it tends to move even slower.
  • more than your job's worth The idiom "more than your job's worth" refers to a situation where an individual is being asked or expected to do something that is beyond their role or responsibilities, often implying that the person risks losing their job or facing severe consequences if they comply. It signifies the perceived imbalance between the demand made and the potential negative consequences for the person involved.
  • more kicks than halfpence The idiom "more kicks than halfpence" means to suffer a lot of abuse, criticism, or misfortune. It implies that someone or something is constantly targeted or subjected to negative treatment. It can also refer to experiencing more troubles or difficulties than one deserves.
  • bigger than life The idiom "bigger than life" refers to something or someone that is unusually prominent, impressive, or extraordinary in size, personality, or impact. It often describes a person or thing that stands out, surpassing the ordinary or average, and commands attention or admiration due to their exceptional qualities or achievements.
  • less than The idiom "less than" refers to a situation or quantity that falls short of expectations or is of a lower degree or quality than desired. It implies a comparison between what is expected or desired and what is actually achieved.
  • less than (something) The idiom "less than (something)" typically refers to a situation or feeling that falls short of the expected or desired level. It implies that the mentioned thing is of lesser quality, quantity, importance, or value. It can also suggest inadequacy or a noticeable deficiency in comparison to a specified standard or benchmark.
  • nothing less than (something) The idiom "nothing less than (something)" means that the described thing or accomplishment is the absolute minimum or exact thing that is expected or required. It emphasizes that nothing of a lower standard or degree will suffice.
  • little better than The idiom "little better than" means that something or someone is only slightly or marginally superior to something else. It suggests that although there may be a slight improvement, it is not significant enough to make a substantial difference.
  • more than a little The idiom "more than a little" means an understatement to describe something that is surprisingly or significantly more than what is stated or expected. It implies that the amount or intensity of something is greater than anticipated or acknowledged.

Similar spelling words for THAN

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