How Do You Spell THE?

Pronunciation: [ðˈə] (IPA)

The word "the" is one of the most commonly used words in the English language. It is pronounced /ðiː/ and has a unique spelling. The sound /ð/ is called the "voiced dental fricative" and is made by placing the tip of the tongue between the teeth while vibrating the vocal cords. The letter "e" at the end of the word is silent, and is used to indicate that the preceding vowel is pronounced as a long sound. Though it is a small word, the spelling of "the" is essential to understanding spoken and written English.

THE Meaning and Definition

  1. The is a definite article used in the English language. It is commonly referred to as the most frequently used word in English, appearing in almost every sentence. The function of the article "the" is to specify or point out a particular noun or group of nouns. It suggests that the speaker intends to refer to something known or previously mentioned. "The" is primarily used with singular and plural nouns, including both countable and uncountable nouns.

    In terms of pronunciation, "the" is pronounced with a soft "th" sound, similar to the word "that." It is a function word, often classified as a determiner, and can be used before nouns or adjectives followed by nouns.

    "The" carries several shades of meaning depending on the context in which it is used. These meanings include denoting something specific or previously mentioned, referring to a particular person or thing, or indicating a unique or well-known object. It also conveys a sense of definiteness in relation to a noun.

    In summary, "the" is a common and essential word in the English language. It is used to specify or point out particular nouns and is flexible in terms of its application across various grammatical structures.

  2. A word placed before nouns, or nouns preceded by adjectives, to point them out and limit their signi-fication; usually called the definite article, but is really a demonstrative adjective, and only a softened form of that; used before adjectives in the comparative and superlative degrees. Note.-In poetic compositions, the e in often cut of before a vowel thus, th, and also the he, as t'other.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Top Common Misspellings for THE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for THE

Etymology of THE

The word "the" has origins in Old English, specifically from the West Germanic language family. It can be traced back to the Old English word "þē" or "þēo", which in turn derives from the Proto-Germanic word "*þatō". This ancestral term signifies "that" or "those". Over time, the pronunciation and spelling evolved, and "þē" eventually transformed into "the". The word has remained relatively consistent in its usage and form throughout the development of the English language.

Idioms with the word THE

  • work your way up/to the top The idiom "work your way up/to the top" means to gradually progress or advance in one's career or position, starting from a lower or entry-level position and eventually reaching a higher or more senior level. It implies the process of hard work, dedication, and continuous improvement in order to achieve success and higher levels of responsibility or authority.
  • under the wire The idiom "under the wire" refers to completing or accomplishing something just in time before a deadline or cutoff point. It implies that the task was completed at the last possible moment or with very little time to spare.
  • many's the The idiom "many's the" is used to express that there have been numerous occasions or instances of something happening. It implies a large number or a significant amount of occurrences.
  • the gogglebox The idiom "the gogglebox" refers to a television set. It is often used to describe the act of watching television or the television itself.
  • turn the tide The idiom "turn the tide" refers to the act of changing the course or direction of a situation, often by reversing a decline or a disadvantageous trend and bringing about a positive outcome. It implies the ability to shift the momentum or change the fortunes in one's favor.
  • walk the walk The idiom "walk the walk" means to consistently demonstrate or follow through on one's words or beliefs with corresponding actions or behavior. It refers to someone's ability to prove their claims or intentions by actually doing what they say they will do.
  • up the wall The idiom "up the wall" refers to a state of extreme annoyance, frustration, or anger. It suggests a feeling of being overwhelmed or driven to the point of exasperation.
  • How's the wife? The idiom "How's the wife?" is a colloquial way of asking about someone's spouse or partner. It is often used as a friendly, casual greeting to show interest in the well-being of the person's significant other.
  • the works The idiom "the works" typically refers to a situation in which something is done or provided in its entirety or with all available options and features. It implies that no shortcuts or compromises are made and everything that is expected or desired is included or done.
  • The game's up! The idiom "The game's up!" means that someone's secret or hidden actions or intentions have been exposed or discovered, and there is no longer a possibility to continue or succeed in their endeavor. It signifies the end of a deceptive or dishonest activity, revealing the truth and putting an end to it.
  • the Yard "The Yard" is an idiom that typically refers to a prison or correctional facility. It can also be used to describe the outdoor area within a prison where inmates are allowed to exercise or spend recreational time.
  • the Word "The word" is an idiom that refers to a significant, influential, or authoritative message or statement. It can also be used to express agreement or affirmation, similar to saying "That's right" or "Absolutely."
  • the West "The West" refers to the Western world or Western countries, primarily Europe and North America, specifically those countries that share common political, economic, and cultural values rooted in Western traditions and ideologies. It often signifies Western democratic systems, capitalism, individualism, rule of law, and certain cultural traits, such as emphasis on personal freedoms and human rights.
  • the way "The way" is an idiom that refers to a person's preferred method or approach in doing something, often emphasizing their distinctive style or behavior. It can also depict someone's unique perspective or understanding of a particular situation.
  • the Twins The idiom "the Twins" typically refers to two people or things that are very similar or identical in appearance or characteristics. It is often used to describe siblings or individuals who look alike or share many similarities, such as behavior, interests, or skills. It can also refer to objects or entities that bear a strong resemblance to each other.
  • the rheumatics The idiom "the rheumatics" refers to a condition or age-related ailment characterized by stiffness, pain, or inflammation in the joints, primarily affecting older individuals. It is often used figuratively to describe someone who is experiencing physical discomfort or difficulty moving due to old age or health issues.
  • the Ladies' The idiom "the Ladies'" typically refers to toilet facilities designated for women or ladies. It is a euphemism used to indicate restrooms specifically for female individuals.
  • the Epigoni The idiom "the Epigoni" refers to a group of successors or second generation individuals who continue the legacy, work, or achievements of their predecessors. This phrase is often used to describe individuals who follow in the footsteps of notable figures or continue a particular movement or cause.
  • the thing The idiom "the thing" refers to the most suitable or desired item, action, or situation for a particular purpose or individual. It implies that something is specifically appropriate, ideal, or necessary in a given context.
  • the aughts "The aughts" is an idiom used to refer to the decade ranging from 2000 to 2010. It is derived from the word "aught," which means "zero" or "nothing," and is often used to describe a time period when the year numbers start with zero, such as 1900-1909 or 2000-2009. So, "the aughts" essentially indicates the first decade of a century when the year numbers contain zeros.
  • the tube The idiom "the tube" refers to the colloquial term commonly used in the UK for the London Underground, which is the city's subway system. It can also refer to any underground or subway system in general.
  • tip the balance/scales The idiom "tip the balance/scales" refers to a situation where a small change or action has a significant impact on the overall outcome or result. It implies that the addition of something minor or the alteration of a certain element can completely change the course of events or determine the final decision.
  • what’s the betting…? The idiom "what's the betting...?" is a colloquial expression that is often used to introduce a prediction or speculation about a future event or outcome. It implies that the speaker is willing to wager or bet on their prediction. It is similar to saying "I bet that...", suggesting a level of certainty or confidence in the prediction being made.
  • what/where/who the blazes…? The idiom "what/where/who the blazes…?" is generally used to express astonishment, frustration, or confusion about something. It is a more colorful and exaggerated way of saying "what/where/who on earth...?" or "what/where/who in the world...?" The word "blazes" adds emphasis and intensity to the question, implying that the situation or person being referred to is either very puzzling, difficult to find, or surprising.
  • the cat's whiskers/pyjamas The idiom "the cat's whiskers/pyjamas" is used to describe someone or something that is considered to be excellent, exceptional, or outstanding. It implies that the person or thing in question is the best or top of its kind, often in a slightly exaggerated or boastful manner.
  • who's she, the cat's mother? The idiomatic expression "who's she, the cat's mother?" is used to express annoyance or frustration towards someone who has interrupted a conversation without introducing themselves. It is commonly used as a colloquial way of saying "Who is this person, and why haven't they introduced themselves properly?"
  • What’s the scam? The idiom "What's the scam?" typically refers to a skeptical or suspicious inquiry about someone's intentions or motives. It implies doubt and questioning regarding the authenticity or honesty of a situation, usually suspecting an ulterior motive or hidden agenda.
  • the hungries The idiom "the hungries" refers to a state or feeling of intense hunger or a strong desire for food.
  • firing line, on the The idiom "on the firing line" refers to being in a position where one is facing criticism, blame, or direct confrontation for a mistake or wrongdoing. It originates from military terminology, where soldiers in a line formation would face the enemy's gunfire. In a figurative sense, being on the firing line means being directly exposed to criticism, scrutiny, or responsibility for a difficult situation or decision.
  • be raking over the coals To "be raking over the coals" means to be subjected to intense criticism or scrutiny, often for past mistakes or wrongdoings. It suggests someone experiencing a thorough and harsh interrogation or reprimand, as if metaphorically being dragged through burning coals.
  • if you can't stand the heat The idiom "if you can't stand the heat" means if someone is unable to handle or cope with a difficult or challenging situation. It implies that if someone cannot tolerate the pressure, criticism, or demands associated with a particular circumstance, they should remove themselves from it or avoid getting involved.
  • be in the mood for something/for doing something The idiom "be in the mood for something/for doing something" means to have the desire or willingness to engage in a particular activity or have a particular experience. It relates to being emotionally or mentally prepared to enjoy or participate in a certain event, task, or form of entertainment.
  • throw (one's) hat over the windmill The idiom "throw (one's) hat over the windmill" means to take a risk or venture into the unknown. It typically refers to someone embracing a daring or bold challenge, disregarding caution or conventional wisdom. This idiom is often used to encourage individuals to pursue their dreams or ambitions with determination and courage. It originates from the story of Don Quixote, a character in Miguel de Cervantes' novel, who famously tilted at windmills, mistaking them for giants, illustrating bravery in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.
  • save the day/situation The idiom "save the day/situation" refers to resolving or successfully addressing a problem or crisis, often at the last minute or when all hope seems lost. It involves taking action or making a crucial decision that prevents a negative outcome and brings about a positive or favorable result. The person or group who "saves the day/situation" is seen as a hero or savior, as they effectively handle the problem and prevent further harm or damage.
  • have all the aces The idiom "have all the aces" means to have a significant advantage or to be in a position of power where success or victory is almost certain. It refers to holding the best possible cards in a card game, making it very difficult for opponents to defeat or overcome the person who possesses them.
  • live high off the hog The idiom "live high off the hog" means to live in a luxurious or extravagant manner, often characterized by indulging in expensive food, possessions, or accommodations. It implies enjoying a wealthy and comfortable lifestyle.
  • the last person The idiom "the last person" refers to someone who is the least likely or expected individual to be involved in or aware of a particular situation or event. It suggests that out of all the people who could be involved or knowledgeable, this person would be the most surprising or unexpected choice.
  • what the eye doesn't see The idiom "what the eye doesn't see" refers to things or events that are hidden, unnoticed, or kept secret. It often implies situations or actions that might be deceitful, clandestine, or concealed from public view.
  • first step is always the hardest The idiom "first step is always the hardest" means that beginning a new task or endeavor is often the most difficult part. It suggests that starting something can be challenging due to uncertainties, fears, or the resistance to change. Once the initial step is taken, it becomes easier to continue and make progress.
  • get (or be given) the gate The idiom "get (or be given) the gate" is an informal expression that means being rejected, dismissed, or excluded from a particular situation or opportunity. It suggests being denied entry or access, similar to being shown the exit gate.
  • (get) in on the ground floor The idiom "(get) in on the ground floor" refers to getting involved in or joining something at its early stages or inception. It implies being part of an opportunity or venture from its earliest and potentially most profitable or advantageous phase.
  • have a/(one's) finger on the button To have a/(one's) finger on the button means to have control or influence over a situation, often referencing the power to initiate a crucial action or decision. It implies being in a position of authority, with the ability to take action or make important choices.
  • see the colour of somebody's money The idiom "see the colour of somebody's money" means to examine or confirm someone's financial ability or willingness to pay or invest in something before proceeding with any transaction or agreement. It implies a desire to ensure that the person has the necessary funds or resources to support their claims or promises.
  • devil's children have the devil's luck The idiom "devil's children have the devil's luck" means that people who engage in wicked or immoral actions often seem to have good fortune or uncanny luck despite their wrongdoings. It implies that sometimes individuals who are deceitful or malicious can escape punishment or experience unexpected success.
  • bug the hell/crap/shit out of somebody The idiom "bug the hell/crap/shit out of somebody" is generally used to describe irritating or annoying someone to a significant extent. It implies persistent, bothersome behavior that may cause frustration or agitation in the person being "bugged."
  • separate the grain from the chaff The idiom "separate the grain from the chaff" is commonly used to describe the process of distinguishing valuable or important elements from those that are worthless or unimportant. It originates from the practice of separating the edible grain (valuable part) from the husks or chaff (worthless part) in agriculture. In a figurative sense, it refers to sorting and selecting the valuable or meaningful aspects or people from the irrelevant or unimportant ones.
  • rough around the edges The idiom "rough around the edges" refers to someone or something that appears or behaves in a slightly unrefined or unpolished manner, usually due to a lack of sophistication or being incomplete or imperfect.
  • be in the pocket The idiom "be in the pocket" refers to being in a state of complete synchronization or alignment with a particular task or situation, often referring to musicians or athletes performing exceptionally well. It means to be fully absorbed, dialed in, or in perfect control of one's performance or role.
  • on the factory floor The idiom "on the factory floor" typically refers to being physically present and actively engaged in the day-to-day operations and activities of a manufacturing or production facility. It implies being directly involved in the tasks, processes, and overall functioning of the factory, rather than supervising or managing from a higher level. This idiom can also be used metaphorically to describe being involved in any hands-on work or being directly engaged in the core activities of a specific environment or industry.
  • put sth to the test The idiom "put something to the test" means to examine or evaluate something rigorously in order to determine its quality, effectiveness, or true nature. It involves subjecting something or someone to challenging or demanding conditions to assess their capabilities or performance.
  • take the field The idiom "take the field" typically refers to the act of participating in a sport or game, especially in team sports like football, soccer, or baseball. It means to go onto the playing area or field to compete or begin a match. It can also encompass the idea of taking an active role or joining a particular group in any given situation.
  • game is not worth the candle, the The expression "the game is not worth the candle" means that the effort, time, or resources required for a particular activity are not justified by the potential benefits or rewards of that activity. It implies that the outcome or result is not worth the trouble or investment.
  • stem the tide The idiom "stem the tide" means to stop, prevent, or slow down the progress or negative effects of something that is increasing or becoming overwhelming. It refers to the act of trying to control or manage a situation that is getting out of hand.
  • send to the showers The idiom "send to the showers" refers to the act of dismissing or removing someone from a particular situation or activity, usually due to poor performance or incompetence. It originates from the practice of sending players to the communal showers after being removed from a sports game or event.
  • dance the antic hay The idiom "dance the antic hay" refers to engaging in wild or boisterous behavior, often involving lively and exaggerated movements or unconventional actions. It implies acting in a carefree and exuberant manner, usually for entertainment or amusement purposes.
  • the lunatics have taken over the asylum The idiom "the lunatics have taken over the asylum" is a phrase used to describe a situation where people who are irrational, incompetent, or otherwise unsuitable for a position of authority or responsibility have gained control or power. It implies that the individuals in charge or decision-making positions are acting in a chaotic or irrational manner, leading to disorder or dysfunction.
  • in the driver’s seat The idiom "in the driver's seat" refers to being in control or in a position of power and influence. It means being the one who has the ability to make decisions, direct actions, and determine the course of events.
  • beyond the horizon The idiom "beyond the horizon" means something that is not visible or not currently known or understood, usually referring to future possibilities or opportunities that are not yet accessible or within reach. It implies looking beyond the present circumstances or limitations and envisioning a realm of potential or unexplored territory.
  • it isn't over until the fat lady sings The idiom "it isn't over until the fat lady sings" means that you shouldn't assume the outcome of a situation until it has reached its conclusion, or until there is clear and definitive evidence. It suggests that final judgments should not be made prematurely and that unexpected events or turns of events can still occur. The phrase is often used to emphasize the notion of perseverance, not giving up, and maintaining hope until the very end.
  • wipe sm's slate clean and wipe the slate clean To "wipe someone's slate clean" or "wipe the slate clean" is an idiom that means to disregard or forgive past mistakes or wrongdoings, giving someone a fresh start or a clean slate. It signifies the act of erasing previous errors or transgressions and starting anew without any prejudice or judgment based on the past.
  • catch someone on the hop The idiom "catch someone on the hop" means to surprise or catch someone off guard, usually by acting or speaking unexpectedly, before they have a chance to react or prepare.
  • the Neolithic The idiom "the Neolithic" refers to the period of human history that occurred from around 10,000 to 2,000 BCE, characterized by the development and progression of agriculture, the domestication of animals, and the establishment of settled communities. It is often used to describe the transition from a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a more sedentary and agricultural one, marking a significant milestone in human civilization.
  • leave sb/sth in the dust The idiom "leave sb/sth in the dust" means to surpass or outperform someone or something by a significant margin. It refers to the act of leaving someone or something behind in terms of achievements, skills, or abilities.
  • knock the bottom out of (something) The idiom "knock the bottom out of (something)" refers to completely destroying, weakening, or undermining something so that it becomes ineffective or no longer functional. It suggests removing the foundation or essential part of something, thereby causing it to collapse or fail.
  • have (someone or something) by the tail The idiom "have (someone or something) by the tail" means to have complete control or a strong advantage over someone or something. It suggests that one is in a position of power or influence and is easily able to handle or manipulate the situation to their advantage.
  • move the goalposts The idiom "move the goalposts" refers to the act of changing the criteria or requirements for achieving success or victory in order to make it more difficult for someone or shift the outcome in one's favor. It implies changing the rules or expectations during the course of a situation, often without the knowledge or agreement of others involved, resulting in unfairness or frustration.
  • join the ranks (of something) The idiom "join the ranks (of something)" means to become a member of a specific group, organization, profession, or social class. It signifies joining others who are already a part of that particular group or category.
  • be staring in the face The idiom "be staring in the face" means that something is very obvious or impossible to ignore. It suggests that the person is fully aware of the situation or problem, and it is becoming increasingly unavoidable or imminent.
  • a blight on the land The idiom "a blight on the land" refers to something or someone that causes great harm, devastation, or ruin to a particular area or society. It suggests a destructive force that adversely affects the overall well-being or prosperity of a region or community.
  • off the wall The idiom "off the wall" refers to something that is unusual, strange, or eccentric. It can describe a person's behavior, ideas, or actions that are unconventional or unexpected. The phrase suggests that the subject matter is peculiar or idiosyncratic, expressing a departure from the norm or conventional thinking.
  • the least (someone) could do The idiom "the least (someone) could do" refers to the minimum effort or action an individual could take in a particular situation. It implies that they should be doing more or making a greater effort, but are only doing the bare minimum.
  • be sloshed to the gills The idiom "be sloshed to the gills" refers to being extremely drunk or intoxicated. The phrase "sloshed" means being heavily intoxicated, while "to the gills" is an exaggeration suggesting being completely filled or saturated with alcohol.
  • be not worth the paper it's printed on The idiom "be not worth the paper it's printed on" means that the item, such as a document, contract, or promise, has no value or credibility. It implies that whatever is written or stated holds no significance or cannot be trusted.
  • drain the main vein "Drain the main vein" is a crude and colloquial expression that is used to refer to the act of urinating or going to the restroom to relieve oneself. The phrase uses humorously exaggeration by comparing the act of emptying the bladder to draining a large pipe or vein.
  • bury your head in the sand The idiom "bury your head in the sand" means to ignore or avoid a particular problem or situation, often out of fear, discomfort, or a desire to remain ignorant. It refers to the common behavior of an ostrich, which is believed to bury its head in the sand when it senses danger. This idiom implies that when someone buries their head in the sand, they are refusing to acknowledge the reality or severity of a situation, which may lead to negative consequences.
  • be better than a kick in the pants The idiom "be better than a kick in the pants" means that although a situation may not be ideal or completely satisfactory, it is still preferable or more desirable than a worse alternative. It implies that while the current situation may not be perfect, it is still better than nothing or more bearable than other alternatives.
  • read the riot act The idiom "read the riot act" means to strongly reprimand or scold someone for their unacceptable behavior or actions, often in a stern and authoritative manner. It is derived from the historical Riot Act, a law in England that required a mob or unruly crowd to disperse within a certain timeframe; failure to comply would result in severe consequences.
  • on the edge of your seat The idiom "on the edge of your seat" means to be in a state of anticipation, excitement, or suspense, typically while watching or listening to something. It implies being completely engrossed or captivated, often because the outcome is uncertain or thrilling.
  • the Book The idiom "the Book" refers to the Bible, which is considered a sacred text in Christianity. It is often used to imply the ultimate source of knowledge, truth, or guidance.
  • (just) to be on the safe side The idiom "(just) to be on the safe side" means taking an extra precaution or action in order to avoid potential risks, dangers, or uncertainties. It implies that one is being cautious and taking extra measures to ensure their safety or prevent any potential negative consequences.
  • the Paleozoic The idiom "the Paleozoic" refers to a specific geological era that spanned approximately 541 to 252 million years ago, characterized by the emergence and diversification of various life forms, including marine invertebrates, plants, and early land animals.
  • between you, me, and the bedpost The idiom "between you, me, and the bedpost" is a playful and informal expression used to emphasize the confidentiality or secrecy of information being shared. It indicates that whatever is being discussed should remain strictly between the speaker, the listener, and nobody else.
  • the scales fall from somebody's eyes The idiom "the scales fall from somebody's eyes" refers to the moment when someone finally sees or understands the truth after being blinded or deceived by a misconception or illusion. It signifies a sudden realization or enlightenment that allows them to perceive things more clearly.
  • None but the brave deserve the fair. The idiom "None but the brave deserve the fair" means that only those who are courageous, daring, or brave enough deserve or are able to obtain desirable or valuable things, rewards, or opportunities. It suggests that bravery or noble qualities are necessary to win the favor or love of someone or achieve success in certain situations.
  • her/his heart is in the right place The idiom "her/his heart is in the right place" means that someone is well-intentioned, kind-hearted, and genuinely has good intentions in their actions or beliefs, even if their approach or execution might not be perfect or successful. It implies that their intentions come from a place of goodness and sincerity.
  • achieve the impossible The idiom "achieve the impossible" means successfully accomplishing a task or goal that is believed to be extremely difficult or even thought to be beyond one's capabilities. It refers to surpassing expectations and accomplishing something that was previously deemed unattainable.
  • be up in the air The idiom "be up in the air" means that something is undecided, uncertain, or unresolved. It refers to a situation where a decision or outcome is yet to be determined, leaving it open and unclear.
  • the gloves are off The idiom "the gloves are off" means that a situation has become more intense, aggressive, or combative, often suggesting that it has escalated to a point where there are no more rules or restrictions, and all polite behavior or restraint has been abandoned. It signifies a shift toward a more confrontational or unrestricted approach.
  • up in the air (about sm or sth) The idiom "up in the air" means that something is uncertain, undecided, or in a state of flux. It typically refers to a situation or decision that has not been resolved or finalized, leaving it open to various possibilities or outcomes.
  • on the game The idiom "on the game" typically refers to someone who is engaged in or involved in prostitution or the sex trade.
  • tarred with the same brush The idiom "tarred with the same brush" means to be unfairly associated with someone or a group of people who have a negative perception or reputation. It implies that individuals are being judged based on the actions or qualities of others, even if they are not personally guilty of the same offense or have different characteristics.
  • boo someone off the stage The idiom "boo someone off the stage" means to loudly express disapproval or dissatisfaction with a performer's act or performance, often resulting in the performer being forced to leave the stage due to the negative reaction from the audience.
  • on the scrap heap The idiom "on the scrap heap" refers to someone or something being discarded or abandoned due to being considered useless, irrelevant, or no longer in a usable condition. It suggests being cast aside or deemed to have no value or purpose, similar to items that are thrown away onto a scrap heap.
  • the boy/girl next door The idiom "the boy/girl next door" refers to a person, typically a young man or woman, who is considered to be wholesome, friendly, and familiar. It implies that the person possesses qualities such as approachability, trustworthiness, and down-to-earth nature, often associated with someone who lives nearby.
  • build castles in the air The idiom "build castles in the air" means to fantasize or daydream about unrealistic or impractical things, usually without taking any action towards achieving them. It refers to creating elaborate plans or hopes that are unlikely to become reality.
  • take the liberty of The idiom "take the liberty of" means to do something without asking for permission or without considering the possible offense it may cause. It implies that someone is acting independently and making a decision or taking an action that they believe is justified, even if it may go against social norms or expectations.
  • pay the ultimate price The idiom "pay the ultimate price" means to suffer the most severe consequence, often involving loss of life or irreparable damage, as a result of one's actions or choices. It refers to the highest level of sacrifice or the most extreme outcome that someone may experience.
  • at the expense of sm or sth The idiom "at the expense of someone or something" means to achieve or obtain something by causing harm, loss, or sacrifice to that person or thing. It implies that the benefit or gain is achieved through the cost or detriment of someone or something else.
  • behind the times The idiom "behind the times" refers to someone or something that is outdated or old-fashioned. It describes individuals or things that have not kept up with the latest trends, technology, or ideas.
  • your good deed for the day The idiom "your good deed for the day" refers to an act of kindness or helpful action that a person does or is encouraged to do within a day. It implies the fulfillment of one's moral obligation or responsibility towards others by performing a benevolent act. This idiom often implies that this singular act of goodness or charity brings a sense of personal satisfaction or self-righteousness.
  • the feathers/fur/sparks will fly The idiom "the feathers/fur/sparks will fly" is used to describe a situation where there is expected to be a fierce or intense argument, conflict, or confrontation between two or more parties. It suggests that the situation will become heated, passionate, or explosive, similar to animals fighting or sparks flying in a literal sense.
  • get (or have) the drop on The idiom "get (or have) the drop on" means to have a superior advantage, typically in a confrontation or conflict, by being the first to act or having the upper hand. It often refers to gaining control or an advantage over someone through surprise, quick thinking, or superior position. The expression originated from the Wild West era, wherein a person who had the drop on someone had drawn their gun first, putting the other person at a severe disadvantage.
  • be one in the eye for The idiom "be one in the eye for someone" is typically used to describe an action or event that is intended to cause someone embarrassment, humiliation, or frustration. It refers to a situation where someone experiences a setback or defeat, symbolically portrayed as "one in the eye." This idiom often implies a sense of revenge or satisfaction for the person who orchestrates or witnesses the 'one in the eye' moment.
  • in the black The idiom "in the black" refers to a financial situation in which a company or individual is making a profit or has positive financial standing. It is commonly used to indicate that an entity's accounting books show positive figures and that they have more assets than liabilities.
  • be left at the post To be left at the post means to be left behind or disadvantaged in a competition or race. It refers to a situation where one is unable to keep up with others or falls behind right from the start, similar to a racehorse that is left behind at the starting point of a race.
  • from the horse's mouth The idiom "from the horse's mouth" means obtaining information directly from a reliable or authoritative source. It refers to getting first-hand or insider information that is genuine and trustworthy. The phrase originated from the practice of assessing a horse's health and age by examining its teeth, which is most accurate when information comes directly from the owner or caretaker of the horse.
  • have the right idea The idiom "have the right idea" means to possess or understand the correct or appropriate concept or approach to a particular situation or problem. It implies that the person has a good understanding or insight into the matter at hand.
  • if it comes to the crunch The idiom "if it comes to the crunch" means when a situation becomes critical or crucial, or when decisive action or a difficult decision needs to be made. It refers to the moment when a difficult or challenging situation reaches a breaking point or demands immediate attention or action.
  • as (something) as the next man/woman/person The idiom "as (something) as the next man/woman/person" is used to convey the idea that someone possesses a common or ordinary quality or characteristic that is shared by most people. It implies that the individual is no different from others in terms of a particular aspect or behavior.
  • cover the same ground The idiom "cover the same ground" means to repeat or go over previously discussed information or topics that have already been addressed. It implies revisiting a subject or reiterating points that have been already established or talked about.
  • look somebody in the eye/face The idiom "look somebody in the eye/face" means to maintain direct eye contact with someone while speaking or indicating honesty, confidence, and sincerity. It signifies a sense of openness and truthfulness in communication between two individuals.
  • kiss the ground The idiom "kiss the ground" means to express extreme relief, appreciation, or gratitude for an event or situation after experiencing a difficult or challenging time. It implies a sense of overwhelming joy or happiness that makes one want to physically touch the ground as a sign of gratitude or to demonstrate how lucky they feel.
  • take care of the pennies, and the pounds will take care of themselves The idiom "take care of the pennies, and the pounds will take care of themselves" means that if one pays attention to and manages the smaller details or smaller amounts of money, the larger or more significant aspects will be taken care of naturally or without much effort. It emphasizes the importance of being mindful and careful with even the smallest things because they contribute to the overall success or well-being in the long run.
  • what the hell (or heck, devil, etc.) The idiom "what the hell (or heck, devil, etc.)" is an exclamation used to express surprise, frustration, confusion or disbelief regarding a situation, event, or behavior. It conveys a sense of strong emotional reaction to something unexpected or out of the ordinary, often accompanied by a touch of shock or dismay.
  • in the grand scheme of things The idiom "in the grand scheme of things" refers to considering or evaluating something within the broader or long-term perspective of a situation or overall context, rather than focusing on individual or immediate aspects. It emphasizes the idea that something may not be as significant or impactful when viewed in the context of a larger scale or long-term perspective.
  • be the best of a bad lot The idiom "be the best of a bad lot" means to be the least undesirable option or the most competent among a group of inadequate choices or options. It implies that while the available options may not be particularly good, one option stands out as the most favorable or least problematic.
  • be at the end of tether The idiom "be at the end of your tether" means to be extremely frustrated, exhausted, or at the limits of one's patience or endurance. It implies a feeling of being overwhelmed or in a state of desperation, often due to continuous stress or an inability to cope with a particular situation.
  • clear the decks The idiom "clear the decks" means to remove all obstacles and distractions in order to prepare for a particular task or event. It originated from the maritime industry, where "decks" refers to the main working area of a ship. Clearing the decks involved removing any unnecessary items or potential hazards to ensure a smooth and efficient operation. In a broader sense, the idiom can be used to indicate the need to eliminate any hindrances or distractions before focusing on a specific goal or objective.
  • something of the sort The idiom "something of the sort" is typically used to refer to an unspecified or approximate example or equivalent of something. It suggests that the thing being mentioned may not be exactly the same, but it shares similar characteristics or falls within a similar category.
  • cheer (one) to the echo The idiom "cheer (one) to the echo" refers to enthusiastically applauding or supporting someone to the highest extent. It implies a loud and resounding outburst of cheers and encouragement. It suggests that the person being cheered for has done something impressive or praiseworthy, and the audience or supporters are responding with great enthusiasm.
  • the Prophets The idiom "the Prophets" generally refers to a group of people who possess remarkable foresight, intuition, or insight regarding future events or trends. It can also specifically refer to the biblical figures known as prophets, who were believed to receive divine inspiration and deliver messages from God to guide and warn people. Thus, it carries the connotation of individuals who are highly perceptive and possess wisdom beyond ordinary understanding.
  • throw/put sb off the scent The idiom "throw/put someone off the scent" means to divert or mislead someone, typically by intentionally providing false or confusing information, in order to prevent them from discovering the truth or uncovering one's activities or intentions.
  • leave the field clear for The idiom "leave the field clear for" means to withdraw or step aside, allowing someone else to have an opportunity or be in control. It refers to removing oneself from a situation or competition to make way for others to succeed or take over.
  • Every man is the architect of his own fortune. The idiom "Every man is the architect of his own fortune" means that individuals have control over their own destiny and can shape their future through their own actions, decisions, and efforts. It emphasizes the idea that people are responsible for their own success or failure in life, highlighting the importance of personal responsibility, hard work, and ambition.
  • just the job/ticket The idiom "just the job/ticket" means that something is perfectly suitable or appropriate for a particular purpose or situation. It suggests that the thing in question is exactly what is needed or desired.
  • on the flat The idiom "on the flat" typically refers to something being on level ground or a horizontal surface. It can also be associated with something stable, smooth, or without any incline or variation.
  • be on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "be on the horns of a dilemma" means to be faced with a difficult situation or decision where both options are equally unpleasant or undesirable. It refers to being caught between two unpleasant or conflicting choices, making it challenging to determine the best course of action.
  • scare the (living) daylights out of (someone) The idiom "scare the (living) daylights out of (someone)" means to frighten or startle someone to an extreme degree. It implies causing intense fear, often resulting in a strong physical or emotional reaction.
  • the hawk "The hawk" is an idiom used to refer to someone or something that has a keen ability to observe and notice even the smallest details. It is often used to describe individuals who are very observant, alert, and vigilant in identifying things that others may overlook or miss.
  • the Gay Nineties The idiom "the Gay Nineties" refers to the decade of the 1890s, which is popularly associated with a carefree and exuberant period in Western culture. It typically conveys a sense of optimism, prosperity, and social activity during that time period.
  • cut the rug The idiom "cut the rug" means to dance energetically, often with fast and intricate movements. It is often used to describe someone who is skilled, enthusiastic, or lively on the dance floor.
  • after the Lord Mayor's show The idiom "after the Lord Mayor's show" refers to the feeling of disappointment or a decline in excitement after a highly anticipated event or occasion has taken place. It signifies the contrast between the grandeur and excitement of the main event and the mundane or ordinary experiences that follow. It suggests that the aftermath or follow-up can never live up to the same level of expectation or enjoyment as the original event.
  • the grand old man of sth The idiom "the grand old man of something" refers to a person who is highly respected, experienced, and influential in a particular field or area of expertise. This phrase is typically used to honor and acknowledge someone who has achieved great prominence and longevity in their chosen profession or domain.
  • the least you can/could do The phrase "the least you can/could do" is an idiom used to express disappointment or dissatisfaction with someone's action or effort, implying that they have done the absolute minimum or made the smallest possible gesture to fulfill the expectations or obligations placed upon them.
  • night on the town The idiom "night on the town" refers to an evening spent enjoying the entertainment and activities of a city or town, often involving going out to restaurants, bars, clubs, theaters, or other social venues. It typically implies an exciting and enjoyable experience of exploring the nightlife and having a good time.
  • (up) to the hilt The idiom "(up) to the hilt" means to the maximum extent or fully committed. It implies giving or doing something completely, without holding back or leaving any room for doubt. This expression is often used in situations where one is fully engaged, involved, or invested in an activity, decision, or cause.
  • chip off the old block The idiom "chip off the old block" refers to someone who bears a strong resemblance or shares the same qualities or characteristics as their parent, particularly their father. It suggests that the person is similar or identical in nature to their father, as if they were figuratively chipped off from the same block of material.
  • the devil take the hindmost The idiom "the devil take the hindmost" is often used to express a selfish or ruthless attitude where one does whatever it takes to succeed, regardless of the negative impact it may have on others. It implies a lack of concern for the well-being or welfare of others, prioritizing personal gain above all else.
  • in the hands of somebody The idiom "in the hands of somebody" means to be under someone's control, responsibility, or influence. It implies that a person has authority or power over a particular situation or outcome.
  • the best thing since sliced bread The idiom "the best thing since sliced bread" refers to something or someone that is considered extremely impressive, innovative, or remarkable. It suggests that the subject is a significant advance or improvement over previous or existing alternatives, similar to how sliced bread revolutionized convenience in food preparation.
  • raise/up the ante To "raise/up the ante" is an idiomatic expression that means to increase the stakes, level of involvement, or risk in a certain situation, especially in a negotiation or a competitive context. It comes from the world of gambling, specifically from poker, where the "ante" refers to the minimum bet required to participate in a particular round of betting. By raising/upping the ante, one is essentially intensifying the challenges or requirements associated with a particular endeavor.
  • fall off/drop off the radar The idiom "fall off/drop off the radar" is used to describe when someone or something becomes unnoticed, forgotten, or no longer receives attention or recognition. It means to cease being visible or significant in the eyes of others or to be excluded from public awareness or attention.
  • hot off the press The idiom "hot off the press" refers to something newly printed, published, or freshly released, indicating that the information is very recent and up-to-date. It suggests that the content is still warm from the printing press, emphasizing its novelty and immediate availability.
  • fat of the land, the The idiom "fat of the land" refers to an abundance of good or rich resources, particularly in terms of food or wealth. It suggests enjoying the best or most bountiful aspects of a particular situation or place.
  • no plan survives contact with the enemy The idiom "no plan survives contact with the enemy" means that in real-life situations, plans or strategies often need to be adjusted or altered based on unexpected challenges or obstacles. It suggests that even the most well-thought-out plans may become ineffective or irrelevant once they encounter the unpredictable factors of reality.
  • hear the last of (someone or something) The idiom "hear the last of (someone or something)" means to no longer receive communication, updates, or further discussion regarding a particular person or topic. It implies that the matter is resolved or concluded, and there will be no more news or attention given to it.
  • (not) the be-all and end-all The idiom "(not) the be-all and end-all" means that something is (or is not) the ultimate or most important aspect or solution to a particular situation. It implies that there are other factors or options to consider that are equally or more crucial.
  • in the depths of (something) The idiom "in the depths of (something)" typically means being in the most extreme or intense part of a particular situation, experience, or emotion. It suggests being fully immersed or deeply entrenched in a particular state or condition.
  • fit for the gods The idiom "fit for the gods" refers to something that is of exceptional quality, excellence, or beauty. It suggests something so perfect or extraordinary that it is considered worthy of divine beings or deities.
  • rock the house The idiom "rock the house" is often used to describe a performance or event that is highly energetic, exciting, and enjoyable, often resulting in enthusiastic applause and a lively atmosphere. It can refer to any form of entertainment that captivates and deeply engages the audience, leaving a lasting and positive impression.
  • get off on the right/wrong foot The idiom "get off on the right/wrong foot" refers to the initial impression or first encounter between people, where "right foot" indicates a positive and favorable beginning, while "wrong foot" implies a negative and unfavorable start. It alludes to the idea that the first interaction or experience can set the tone and influence future interactions or outcomes.
  • out of/from the corner of your eye The idiom "out of/from the corner of your eye" refers to seeing or perceiving something indirectly, without directly looking at it, usually by using peripheral vision. It suggests a brief or unintentional observation of something or someone, often without much focus or attention.
  • fruit of the union The idiom "fruit of the union" refers to children born or resulting from a marriage or romantic relationship. It signifies the ultimate outcome or product of a couple's union, emphasizing the idea that their children are a tangible expression of their love and commitment to one another.
  • Money is the root of all evil The idiom "Money is the root of all evil" is a common saying that suggests that the desire for money or the pursuit of wealth can often lead to immoral or unethical actions. It implies that money has the potential to corrupt individuals and cause them to prioritize financial gain over moral values or the well-being of others. However, it is important to note that the actual biblical quote from which this phrase is derived is "For the love of money is a root of all sorts of evil" (1 Timothy 6:10). The idiom has been slightly altered over time to convey a similar meaning.
  • make (one) hot under the collar The idiom "make (one) hot under the collar" means to cause someone to become angry, annoyed, or outraged. It refers to situations or actions that provoke strong negative emotions and can make someone's face turn red (symbolizing anger or embarrassment).
  • be near the knuckle The idiom "be near the knuckle" refers to something that is controversial, offensive, or verging on being inappropriate or insensitive. It is often used to describe humor, jokes, or comments that push the limits of acceptability or good taste, usually involving sensitive subjects or being inappropriate in a social or professional context.
  • make the ultimate/supreme sacrifice The idiom "make the ultimate/supreme sacrifice" refers to the act of sacrificing one's own life or giving up something of great value for a noble cause or purpose. It suggests the highest level of commitment, selflessness, and dedication, typically associated with acts of heroism or extraordinary devotion to a principle or duty.
  • in the near future The idiom "in the near future" means within a short period of time, within the next few days, weeks, or months, without specifying an exact timeframe. It refers to an event or action that will occur soon, but is not immediate.
  • be the dead spit of The idiom "be the dead spit of" means to closely resemble or look nearly identical to someone else. It is often used to describe a striking similarity in appearance or physical features between two individuals, suggesting that they could be mistaken for each other.
  • go/come with the territory The idiom "go/come with the territory" means that a particular situation or set of circumstances is an inevitable part or consequence of a certain job, role, or position. It implies that some difficulties, responsibilities, or challenges are expected and should be accepted as a natural part of the role.
  • pull out all the stops The idiom "pull out all the stops" means to make a maximum effort or to use all available means to achieve a goal or accomplish something.
  • put a/the plug in the jug The definition of the idiom "put a/the plug in the jug" refers to stopping or quitting the consumption of alcohol or any kind of addictive substance. It signifies the act of giving up or breaking a habit of regular drinking or substance abuse.
  • be beating the bushes (for someone or something) The idiom "be beating the bushes (for someone or something)" means to search or look everywhere exhaustively, often with a sense of urgency, in order to find someone or something. It implies a thorough and persistent effort to locate or retrieve someone or something that may be elusive or difficult to find.
  • on the strength of The idiom "on the strength of" means to rely or depend on something as the basis for making a decision or taking action. It implies that the information, evidence, or authority being used is strong enough to support the decision or action being taken.
  • speak by the card To "speak by the card" means to speak precisely and accurately, following proper procedure or established rules. It refers to ensuring that one's words or actions align with a predetermined set of rules or guidelines, often in formal or official contexts. This idiom emphasizes the importance of being precise and meticulous in one's communication or conduct.
  • in the long haul The idiom "in the long haul" refers to a perspective or measure taken for a longer duration, often disregarding short-term obstacles or difficulties. It implies looking at the overall outcome or consequences over a prolonged period rather than focusing on immediate results. This idiomatic expression emphasizes perseverance, endurance, and the ability to withstand challenges or setbacks in order to achieve long-term goals or benefits.
  • in the best of health The idiom "in the best of health" refers to being in a state of excellent physical or mental well-being. It suggests that someone is experiencing good health and is free from any illness, injury, or ailment.
  • against (all) the odds The idiom "against (all) the odds" refers to accomplishing or achieving something despite difficult or unfavorable circumstances. It highlights the notion of overcoming obstacles or facing a situation that appears highly improbable or unlikely to succeed.
  • in the dead of night The idiom "in the dead of night" refers to a period of time occurring very late at night or in the early hours of the morning, usually when it is very dark and quiet. It often implies that something is happening secretly or unexpectedly during this time.
  • chew the fat The idiom "chew the fat" means to have a casual and leisurely conversation or chat, typically about unimportant or trivial matters. It refers to engaging in friendly and relaxed small talk or gossip.
  • as the next guy The idiom "as the next guy" is used to describe someone who holds the same opinion or shares the same qualities, desires, or reactions as the majority or general population. It implies that the person being referred to is ordinary, average, or typical in their preferences or behavior.
  • go to bed with the chickens The idiom "go to bed with the chickens" means to go to sleep early, typically at a time considered early or before most other people do. It implies that someone retires for the night early, often with the implication of rising early the next day as well.
  • from the bottom of my heart The idiom "from the bottom of my heart" means to express something sincerely and wholeheartedly, often indicating deep genuine emotions or sentiments. It implies that the feelings or expressions being conveyed are heartfelt and come from a genuine place of sincerity and intensity.
  • Idleness is the root of all evil. The idiom "Idleness is the root of all evil" means that being lazy or having too much free time often leads to trouble or undesirable behavior. It suggests that when people have nothing productive to do, they may engage in negative actions or become involved in harmful activities.
  • lift the lid on sth, at blow/take the lid off sth The idiom "lift the lid on sth" or "blow/take the lid off sth" means to reveal or expose something secret or hidden, often to the public or to a larger audience. It is used to describe the act of disclosing information or revealing the truth about a situation, topic, or event that was previously unknown or concealed.
  • a smack in the face The idiom "a smack in the face" refers to something that is shocking, unexpected, or insulting, often causing emotional or physical distress. It signifies a figurative blow or a sudden realization that is highly unpleasant or disheartening.
  • get the goods on The idiom "get the goods on" means to obtain or gather incriminating or valuable information about someone or something. It refers to the act of discovering and obtaining evidence or knowledge that can be used against someone or for personal gain.
  • the curtain falls on sth The idiom "the curtain falls on sth" refers to the act of something coming to an end or reaching a conclusion, often in a dramatic or final manner, similar to the closing of a theater curtain at the end of a performance. It signifies the end of a particular event, situation, or period of time.
  • What's that got to do with the price of cheese? The idiom "What's that got to do with the price of cheese?" is used to dismiss or express indifference to a statement or question that is irrelevant or unrelated to the current topic or situation. It implies that the mentioned information has no impact or significance in the context being discussed.
  • against the law The idiom "against the law" refers to something that is not in accordance with or violates the rules and regulations set by a governmental authority. It describes actions, behaviors, or activities that are illegal, prohibited, or criminalized by law.
  • wipe smw off the map The idiom "wipe (someone/something) off the map" means to completely destroy or eliminate someone or something, often in a violent or forceful manner. It is used figuratively to convey the total annihilation or eradication of a person, group, place, or object.
  • on the long finger The idiom "on the long finger" means to delay or postpone something, often for an indefinite period of time. It refers to the act of putting off a task or responsibility, leaving it unresolved or unattended for an extended period.
  • game is up, the The idiom "game is up, the" means that someone's secret or deceitful activity has been discovered or exposed, and they can no longer continue with their plans or actions. It implies that any chance of success or avoidance of consequences is over.
  • the name of the game The idiom "the name of the game" refers to the main or essential aspect or objective of a situation or activity. It emphasizes what is most important or fundamental in a particular context.
  • the last sb heard/saw of sb/sth The idiom "the last sb heard/saw of sb/sth" refers to the last time someone heard from or saw someone or something. It signifies the most recent known contact or sighting, often implying that there has been no further communication or visibility since that point.
  • set or put the cat among the pigeons The idiom "set or put the cat among the pigeons" means to create a disturbance or cause trouble by introducing a provocative or controversial element into a situation. It refers to a sudden, disruptive action that stirs up confusion, conflict, or excitement among a group of people.
  • the flower of something The idiom "the flower of something" is used to describe the prime or most perfect stage of something, typically referring to the peak or the best part of a person, group, or thing. It implies a state of full bloom, maturity, or excellence.
  • be on the front foot The idiom "be on the front foot" means to be in a proactive and dominant position, taking control of a situation or initiative. It often refers to being assertive, confident, and proactive in pursuing one's goals or strategies, rather than being defensive or reactive.
  • fly by the seat of (one's) pants The idiom "fly by the seat of (one's) pants" means to act or make decisions based on intuition, instinct, or improvisation, rather than following a predetermined plan or relying on established guidelines. It often implies a situation where one lacks proper knowledge or preparation but manages to navigate through it skillfully by relying on their instincts and quick thinking.
  • have both feet on the ground The idiom "have both feet on the ground" means to be practical, realistic, and sensible in one's thinking and behavior. It refers to someone who is level-headed, down-to-earth, and not easily swayed by emotions or impractical ideas. Having both feet on the ground implies being practical, dependable, and having a good sense of judgment and understanding of reality.
  • all the better (or worse) The idiom "all the better" or "all the worse" is used to indicate that a situation or condition has improved (better) or deteriorated (worse) significantly. It emphasizes the extent of change that has occurred, typically as a result of a particular event or circumstance.
  • after/when the dust settles The idiom "after/when the dust settles" refers to a situation or event calming down and becoming less chaotic or intense. It suggests waiting for the initial emotions, actions, or conflicts to subside so that a clearer perspective or understanding of the situation can be obtained.
  • tighten the reins The idiom "tighten the reins" means to exercise more control or supervision over a situation or someone's actions. It refers to the act of pulling on the reins of a horse to restrict its movement or to exert more control over it. In a figurative sense, it signifies taking firmer control and enforcing stricter guidelines or rules.
  • price yourself/something out of the market The idiom "price yourself/something out of the market" means to set the price so high that it becomes unaffordable or excessively expensive for potential buyers or customers, resulting in a decrease or complete lack of demand. This expression is often used in the context of business or economics when describing a situation where the cost of a product, service, or even a person's remuneration becomes too high to attract customers or employers.
  • all the same The idiom "all the same" means that despite a particular situation or circumstance, the outcome, result, or overall impact remains unchanged or similar. It suggests that despite differences or variations being present, they have little or no effect on the final result.
  • they broke the mold when they made (someone or something) The idiom "they broke the mold when they made (someone or something)" refers to a person or thing being unique or exceptional, so much so that there will never be another like them. It implies that the individual or object is one of a kind, irreplaceable, and stands out from others due to their exceptional qualities, skills, or characteristics.
  • the conventional wisdom The conventional wisdom refers to widely held beliefs or opinions that are accepted as true or reasonable by a majority of people in a particular society or group, often without critical examination or questioning. It is the prevailing or commonly accepted view or understanding of a particular topic, concept, or situation.
  • at the longest The idiom "at the longest" means the maximum amount of time something will take or last. It refers to the longest possible duration or deadline for a task, event, or period.
  • as if own the place The idiom "as if own the place" means to behave or act with confidence, authority, and control in a particular situation, as if one were the owner or in charge of that place or situation. It suggests a sense of entitlement, self-assurance, or dominance.
  • give somebody/get the cold shoulder The idiom "give somebody/get the cold shoulder" means to intentionally ignore or show indifference towards someone, often as a result of anger, disapproval, or dislike. It implies dismissing or snubbing an individual, often by refusing to engage in conversation or interactions with them.
  • cut the corner The idiom "cut the corner" refers to a behavior or action of taking a more direct, often shorter route in order to save time or effort. It can be used in various contexts, such as in sports where a player takes a shortcut to gain an advantage, or in everyday life when someone tries to find a quicker way to finish a task or achieve a goal.
  • the flicks The idiom "the flicks" refers to going to the movies or a cinema.
  • What's the catch? The idiom "What's the catch?" refers to being suspicious or questioning the hidden or undisclosed downside or disadvantage in a situation, deal, or offer. It suggests that there might be a hidden condition or a negative aspect that is not immediately apparent.
  • be cut from the same cloth The idiom "be cut from the same cloth" means that two or more people are very similar in character, behavior, or attitudes because they share common qualities or traits. It implies that they have similar backgrounds, values, or beliefs, as if they were made or fashioned from the same material.
  • have a lot on the ball The idiom "have a lot on the ball" typically means that someone is competent, intelligent, or capable. It refers to someone who has the necessary skills, knowledge, or qualifications to succeed in a particular area or situation.
  • strike while the iron is hot The idiom "strike while the iron is hot" means to take advantage of an opportunity or act promptly and decisively when favorable conditions present themselves. It comes from the literal act of a blacksmith striking hot iron while it is malleable and can be shaped easily. Therefore, figuratively, it refers to making use of a situation when it is at its most advantageous state.
  • not have the heart to do sth The idiom "not have the heart to do something" means lacking the emotional strength or courage to do a particular action. It implies that one feels sympathetic or compassionate towards a situation or person, making it difficult to carry out an action that could cause harm, disappointment, or sadness.
  • in the cold The idiom "in the cold" typically refers to a situation where someone is left out, neglected, or abandoned, often without support or assistance from others. It could also imply being uninformed, clueless, or unaware of something important happening around them.
  • put sb through the wringer The idiom "put sb through the wringer" means to subject someone to a difficult or challenging experience, usually involving intense scrutiny, questioning, or pressure. It metaphorically refers to subjecting someone to a process similar to wringing out clothes through a wringer, where they are squeezed tightly and face a lot of stress or discomfort.
  • that beats the Dutch The idiom "that beats the Dutch" refers to a situation or event that is overwhelming, astonishing, or highly impressive beyond what is expected or imagined. It conveys the idea that something is extraordinary and surpasses the abilities, skills, or accomplishments of the Dutch people, who are known to be capable, skilled, and successful in various fields. The idiom may be used to acknowledge and emphasize the remarkable nature of an achievement or an outcome.
  • in the light of The idiom "in the light of" means to consider or examine something in terms of new or additional information or understanding. It suggests reevaluating a situation or topic by taking into account recent insights, perspectives, or data that may have emerged.
  • blow sth/sb out of the water The idiom "blow something/somebody out of the water" means to greatly surpass or outperform something or someone else, often unexpectedly or impressively. It is commonly used to describe achieving an outcome or level of achievement that completely exceeds expectations or exceeds a competitor by a significant margin.
  • out of the blocks The idiom "out of the blocks" refers to someone starting a task or activity quickly and energetically, often with a strong and impressive initial performance. It originally comes from the sport of track and field, specifically the sprint events, where athletes start from blocks placed on the track. Being "out of the blocks" implies a swift and explosive start to gain an advantage over opponents at the beginning of a race. In a broader sense, the idiom is used to describe someone who starts something with great momentum, speed, or efficiency.
  • sweeten (up) the deal The idiom "sweeten (up) the deal" means to make a proposal or offer more attractive or appealing, typically by adding extra incentives or making concessions in order to encourage someone to agree or accept the terms.
  • dish fit for the gods The idiom "dish fit for the gods" refers to a delicious or exquisite meal or food item that is considered to be of extremely high quality or exceptional taste. It implies that the dish is so superb that it would be worthy of being served to the gods themselves.
  • the Method The idiom "the Method" typically refers to a specific acting technique called "Method Acting." Method Acting is a school of acting that emphasizes a deeply emotional and psychological approach to portraying characters. It focuses on the actors' personal experiences, sense memory, and emotions to deliver realistic performances. The phrase "the Method" is often used to describe this particular acting technique.
  • with one's back to the wall The idiom "with one's back to the wall" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation, often with limited options or resources and feeling trapped or threatened. It refers to being in a vulnerable or defensive position, where there is no escape or assistance available.
  • beat around the bush The idiom "beat around the bush" means to avoid addressing a topic directly or to speak indirectly without getting to the main point or issue. Instead of being straightforward or explicit, a person "beats around the bush" by using evasive language or taking a circuitous route in a conversation.
  • (a)round the bend The idiom "(a)round the bend" is used to describe someone or something that is crazy, mentally unstable, or irrational. It implies that the person or thing has lost their normal or rational behavior, often due to frustration, stress, or an unusual circumstance.
  • appear under the name of The idiom "appear under the name of" means that something is being credited or presented as belonging to or created by a particular individual or group. It implies that the person or entity mentioned is taking ownership or responsibility for the work, idea, or creation.
  • in the can The idiom "in the can" means that something is completed, finished, or achieved. It often refers to a task, project, or work being successfully accomplished and ready for use or distribution.
  • the long and the short of it The idiom "the long and the short of it" means to summarize or give a brief and concise explanation of something. It is used when someone wants to get straight to the point or provide a concise summary of a situation, story, or explanation.
  • under the care of somebody The idiom "under the care of somebody" means to be in the responsibility or guardianship of someone. It implies that someone is taking care of or looking after another person or thing.
  • be the image of somebody/something The idiom "be the image of somebody/something" means to closely resemble or closely resemble the appearance, characteristics, or qualities of a specific person or thing. It suggests that the person or thing being discussed bears a strong resemblance to the original, almost like a duplicate or mirror image.
  • the line (or path) of least resistance The idiom "the line (or path) of least resistance" refers to the easiest or least challenging course of action or approach to a situation. It suggests choosing an option that requires minimal effort or confrontation, avoiding any obstacles or difficulties that may arise. In essence, it means opting for the path that offers the least resistance or opposition.
  • put the bite on (one) The idiom "put the bite on (one)" means to ask or pressure someone for money, typically in a demanding or forceful manner. It implies an action of seeking financial assistance or contributions from someone.
  • look like the cat dragged in The idiom "look like the cat dragged in" is used to describe someone or something that appears messy, disheveled, or generally unattractive. It implies that the person or thing looks tired, worn out, or as though they have just been through a rough experience.
  • a slip of the pen/tongue The idiom "a slip of the pen/tongue" refers to an unintentional mistake or error made while writing or speaking. It implies that the person made a brief, accidental, and often humorous or embarrassing mistake, resulting in an incorrect word or phrase being written or spoken.
  • return to the charge The idiom "return to the charge" refers to the act of resuming or reinitiating a discussion or argument after a period of interruption or disagreement, often with renewed determination or insistence. It implies persistently bringing up a topic or issue for further consideration and advocating for one's point of view.
  • come up with the goods The idiom "come up with the goods" means to deliver or produce the desired results, performance, evidence, or quality that was expected or required. It implies successfully meeting expectations or fulfilling one's promises or obligations.
  • have heard the last of (someone or something) The idiom "have heard the last of (someone or something)" refers to the belief that one will not encounter or experience a particular person or thing again, usually within a negative or unwanted context. It suggests that there will be no further communication, involvement, or dealing with the person, topic, or situation in question.
  • beat the clock The idiom "beat the clock" means to complete a task or accomplish a goal just before the time available for doing so expires. It refers to successfully finishing something within a tight or limited timeframe.
  • be in the land of the living The idiom "be in the land of the living" means to be alive and present, especially after a period of being absent, unconscious, or otherwise disconnected from the world. It implies someone's return to an active and engaged state of existence.
  • lay the foundations of/for The idiom "lay the foundations of/for" means to establish or create the basis or groundwork for something. It typically refers to setting up a solid and sturdy starting point, which can be built upon or developed further. This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe the initial stages or preparations required for the accomplishment of a particular goal or the success of a project.
  • give (one) the OK The idiom "give (one) the OK" means to give approval, permission, or authorization to someone or for something. It indicates that one has received consent or been given the go-ahead to proceed with a particular action or decision.
  • under the heel of sth/sb The idiom "under the heel of something/somebody" refers to being oppressed, controlled, or dominated by something or someone. It implies a situation where one is subservient and powerless, feeling trapped and unable to break free from the influence or authority being exerted upon them.
  • what's the damage? The idiom "what's the damage?" is a way of asking about the cost, price, or consequences of something. It is commonly used when referring to the financial cost of a product, service, or situation. It implies a desire to know the extent of financial loss or burden that may occur.
  • be dead to the world The idiom "be dead to the world" means to be completely and deeply asleep, unaware of anything happening around oneself. It suggests a state of profound sleep in which the person is oblivious to their surroundings and completely unresponsive to any external stimuli.
  • moist around the edges The definition of the idiom "moist around the edges" is when someone appears or seems nervous, anxious, or slightly uncomfortable, usually in a social setting or when facing a specific situation.
  • change the subject The idiom "change the subject" means to redirect the conversation or topic being discussed to a different subject or topic, often to avoid talking about something uncomfortable, embarrassing, or sensitive.
  • Hunger is the best sauce. The idiom "Hunger is the best sauce" means that food is more enjoyable when one is hungry. It suggests that the sensation of hunger enhances the taste and appreciation of a meal. The phrase is often used to emphasize that the satisfaction derived from something is heightened when there is a genuine desire or need for it.
  • rob the cradle The idiom "rob the cradle" refers to the act of being involved romantically or sexually with a significantly younger person. It usually implies that one partner is considerably older, suggesting that they are "robbing" someone from the innocence or youth of their early years.
  • put the knife in The idiom "put the knife in" typically means to deliberately say or do something that harms or deeply hurts someone emotionally or psychologically. It implies causing additional pain or damage to an already difficult situation.
  • the lion's share The idiom "the lion's share" refers to the majority or the largest portion of something. It implies that someone or something has taken or received the most significant amount or portion of a particular resource, opportunity, or benefit. The term originates from Aesop's fable "The Lion's Share," in which the lion claims the largest portion of a kill, leaving the other animals with less.
  • of the same kind The idiom "of the same kind" means that two or more things possess similar characteristics, qualities, or traits. They belong to the same category or share common attributes.
  • the top of the tree The idiom "the top of the tree" refers to the highest or most prestigious position within a particular profession, field, or organization. It signifies a person who has achieved great success, recognition, or dominance in their chosen endeavor.
  • against the stream The idiom "against the stream" typically means to go against the prevailing or dominant belief, opinion, or trend. It refers to someone who opposes the mainstream or popular view and chooses to follow a different path or opinion.
  • bring up the rear The idiom "bring up the rear" means to be at the back, last in line, or the last person or thing in a particular group or sequence. It can also refer to the act of coming after others in a group or activity.
  • slice of the pie The idiom "slice of the pie" refers to getting or receiving a portion or share of something, usually referring to a financial or business situation where there is a limited amount of resources, opportunities, or benefits to be divided among different individuals or groups. It implies that everyone involved wants a piece of the same limited resource or opportunity and aims to obtain their fair share.
  • get the hots for someone "Get the hots for someone" is an informal idiom that means to develop a strong attraction or infatuation towards someone, often romantically or sexually. It implies a feeling of intense desire or passion for that person.
  • overstep the bounds (of something) The idiom "overstep the bounds (of something)" means to go beyond the accepted limits or rules of a particular situation or relationship. It refers to exceeding the appropriate or expected behavior or actions.
  • another nail in the coffin The idiom "another nail in the coffin" refers to a situation, event, or action that contributes to the inevitable or impending downfall, failure, or ending of someone or something. It symbolizes the accumulation of problems or setbacks that ultimately lead to a final and irreversible outcome.
  • out of the way The idiom "out of the way" refers to something or someone that has been moved or situated in a position where it is no longer causing an obstruction or hindrance. It can also mean completing or dealing with a task or responsibility so that it is no longer pending or causing any delays.
  • have your back to the wall The idiom "have your back to the wall" means to be in a difficult or desperate situation where one has little or no options or support. It refers to the feeling of being trapped or cornered, with no way to escape or defend oneself effectively.
  • Shit or get off the can/pot! The idiom "Shit or get off the can/pot!" is a colloquial expression used to convey the message that someone needs to quickly make a decision or take action, rather than hesitating or procrastinating. It implies a sense of urgency and impatience, urging a person to either commit to a course of action or step aside to let someone else proceed. The phrase may be considered informal and may contain offensive language when used in its original form.
  • the in thing "The in thing" is an idiomatic expression used to describe something that is currently fashionable, trendy, or popular. It refers to something that is widely accepted, admired, or followed by a large number of people at a given time.
  • think the sun shines out arse The idiom "think the sun shines out arse" is an informal expression typically used to describe someone who has an excessively high opinion of themselves or believes they are exceptionally wonderful or important. It suggests that the person thinks so highly of themselves that they believe even the sun shines brightly from within them.
  • have (got) sb by the short hairs, at have (got) sb by the short and curlies The idiom "have (got) someone by the short hairs" or "have (got) someone by the short and curlies" is an expression used to describe a situation where one person has complete control or power over another person. It implies that the person being controlled is in a vulnerable position and has no choice but to comply with the demands or wishes of the person who has them "by the short hairs." It can be used in various contexts, such as relationships, negotiations, or authority dynamics.
  • pull/haul yourself up by the/your (own) bootstraps The idiom "pull/haul yourself up by the/your (own) bootstraps" means to achieve success or improve one's situation through one's own efforts, determination, and self-reliance, without any external assistance or support. It implies that someone is able to overcome challenges and progress independently, relying solely on their own resources and abilities. This expression often refers to starting from a disadvantaged position and achieving success against the odds.
  • a piece/slice of the action The idiom "a piece/slice of the action" refers to having a share or involvement in an exciting or profitable activity or situation. It implies being part of something advantageous or engaging, often related to business, opportunity, or adventure. It is often used to express a desire to be included or participate in a particular venture or experience.
  • the new kid on the block The idiom "the new kid on the block" refers to someone who is new or recent to a particular situation or environment. It typically implies that the person lacks experience or familiarity and may be viewed with curiosity or skepticism by others.
  • follow the hounds "Follow the hounds" is an idiom that refers to participating in or joining a pursuit or adventure, especially one that involves excitement, exhilaration, or the thrill of the chase. It stems from the traditional practice of fox hunting, where participants on horseback follow a pack of hounds that are pursuing a fox. Therefore, "follow the hounds" implies actively engaging in a pursuit or actively pursuing a desired goal or experience.
  • play the waiting game The idiom "play the waiting game" means to remain patient and delay taking action until a specific situation unfolds or a desired outcome is achieved. It involves tolerating uncertainty or waiting for an opportune moment instead of acting impulsively.
  • put your head/neck on the block The idiom "put your head/neck on the block" means to take a significant risk or to make a bold and potentially dangerous statement, action, or decision, often against popular opinion or expectation. It refers to the concept of willingly exposing oneself to potential criticism, blame, or negative consequences. It implies assuming full responsibility and accountability for one's actions or decisions, even if they end up being unsuccessful or unpopular.
  • take the wind out of sm's sails The idiom "take the wind out of someone's sails" means to diminish someone's enthusiasm, energy, confidence, or excitement by saying or doing something that undermines or deflates them. It implies robbing someone of their momentum or causing them to lose their forward progress or motivation.
  • kick the bucket The idiom "kick the bucket" means to die or to pass away.
  • the golden goose The idiom "the golden goose" refers to a valuable or lucrative asset or opportunity that consistently brings benefits or profits to someone or something. It originates from a popular folktale about a goose that lays golden eggs, symbolizing a rare source of wealth or success.
  • ring the changes (with something) The idiom "ring the changes (with something)" generally means to make variations or introduce alterations in something, often in a repetitive or cyclic manner. It can refer to changing or modifying a routine, plan, or situation to add variety, excitement, or freshness.
  • have all the cards The idiom "have all the cards" means to have complete control or advantage in a situation or negotiation. It refers to having all the necessary information, resources, or power to have the upper hand and dictate the outcome.
  • have the shirt off (one's) back The idiom "have the shirt off (one's) back" means to be extremely generous or selfless, willing to give away everything one owns or possesses, even essential clothing, to help someone in need. It emphasizes a person's extreme devotion to helping others, often disregarding their own well-being.
  • in the bad graces of The idiom "in the bad graces of" refers to being in a state of disfavor or displeasure with someone. It implies that the person has done something to upset or disappoint another, resulting in their loss of favor or approval.
  • give someone the ax The idiom "give someone the ax" means to dismiss or fire someone from their job or position.
  • Doctors make the worst patients. The idiom "Doctors make the worst patients" refers to the notion that medical professionals, such as doctors or physicians, often do not take care of themselves when they become sick or injured. It suggests that those who are well-versed in diagnosing and treating illnesses tend to neglect their own health needs, possibly due to their knowledge, busy schedules, or overconfidence.
  • in the sight of somebody/in somebody’s sight The idiom "in the sight of somebody" or "in somebody's sight" refers to being visible or within the visual range of someone. It means that the person mentioned can see or observe an event, action, or situation that is happening.
  • make a hole in the water The idiom "make a hole in the water" means to make little or no progress, to have no impact or effect, or to waste one's effort or resources. It implies that the action or endeavor being pursued is futile or ineffective, much like attempting to create a hole in a body of water.
  • in the ordinary, normal, etc. course of events, things, etc. The idiom "in the ordinary, normal, etc. course of events, things, etc." refers to events, situations, or outcomes that are expected or likely to happen naturally or under typical circumstances. It implies that a particular outcome or situation is usual, predictable, or normal without any exceptional or extraordinary circumstances or interventions.
  • stuff the ballot box The idiom "stuff the ballot box" refers to the act of illegally adding extra votes or tampering with votes in an election to manipulate the outcome in favor of a particular candidate or party. It implies dishonesty and undermines the fairness and integrity of the voting process.
  • show somebody the door The idiom "show somebody the door" means to openly and firmly ask or request someone to leave a place or situation. It implies an assertive or forceful action in removing someone from a certain place or ending their involvement in a certain matter.
  • (choose, follow, take, etc.) the line of least resistance The idiom "the line of least resistance" refers to choosing the easiest or most convenient course of action, rather than putting in more effort or struggling to overcome obstacles. It typically implies taking the path of least resistance to avoid difficulties, challenges, or conflicts, even if it may not be the most productive or beneficial choice in the long run.
  • the last straw The idiom "the last straw" refers to a minor or inconsequential event, action, or occurrence that becomes the final or extra load or burden on top of a series of difficulties or frustrations, causing someone's patience, tolerance, or endurance to be exceeded, and leading to a drastic reaction or breaking point.
  • in the hospital The idiom "in the hospital" refers to the state or condition of being admitted or staying at a hospital due to illness, injury, or medical treatment.
  • give sb/sth the green light The idiom "give someone/something the green light" means to give approval or permission for someone or something to proceed with a particular action or plan. It suggests that all obstacles or restrictions have been removed, and the person or thing involved is now allowed to continue or move forward. The phrase is derived from traffic signals, where a green light indicates that it is safe to proceed.
  • happy as the day is long The idiom "happy as the day is long" is a phrase used to describe someone who is extremely joyful, content, or pleased. It implies a state of happiness that lasts throughout the entire day, emphasizing the depth and duration of the person's happiness.
  • is the Pope a Catholic? The idiom "is the Pope a Catholic?" is a rhetorical question used to express extreme certainty or a sarcastic response indicating that something is unquestionably true. It implies that the answer to the question is so obvious that it does not even need to be stated.
  • hair of the dog The idiom "hair of the dog" typically refers to a remedy for a hangover or illness that involves consuming alcoholic beverages or the substance that caused the affliction in small quantities. It is commonly used to describe the act of drinking more alcohol to lessen the effects of a hangover from excessive drinking the previous day.
  • follow the example of The idiom "follow the example of" means to imitate or emulate the behavior, actions, or qualities of someone else as a guide or inspiration for one's own actions or decisions. It involves looking to someone's actions or achievements and replicating them in one's own life or work.
  • not be out of the wood/woods The idiom "not be out of the wood/woods" means that a person or situation is not yet free from difficulty, danger, or a challenging situation. It suggests that while progress may have been made or temporary relief may have been achieved, there are still obstacles or risks present that need to be overcome before complete safety or success can be achieved.
  • go on the scrounge (for something) The idiom "go on the scrounge (for something)" refers to the act of searching or seeking something, usually in a resourceful or opportunistic manner. It implies that the person is on the lookout for something they need or want, especially when it comes to obtaining it without spending any or much money. It often suggests a sense of resourcefulness, improvisation, or finding things by chance or by relying on the generosity of others.
  • go the way of all flesh The idiom "go the way of all flesh" means to die or experience the same fate as all humans eventually do, to succumb to death. It is often used to express the inevitability of mortality or the transient nature of life.
  • the apple of somebody’s eye The idiom "the apple of somebody's eye" refers to a person, usually a loved one or a favorite, whom someone cherishes and considers extremely precious. This phrase implies that the person is held in high regard and is the center of attention or affection for the individual using the expression.
  • take up the cudgels for sb/sth To "take up the cudgels for someone or something" means to vigorously defend or support someone or something, often in an argument or conflict. It originates from the literal meaning of "cudgel," which is a short thick stick used as a weapon. Figuratively, it implies stepping forward to fight on behalf of someone or something, advocating fiercely on their behalf.
  • the world and his wife The idiom "the world and his wife" refers to a large and diverse group of people or a vast majority of individuals. It implies that everyone, or almost everyone, is included or involved in a particular situation or event. It suggests a strong sense of inclusion and universality.
  • sth takes the cake The idiom "sth takes the cake" means that something is remarkable, extraordinary, or surpasses all others in a particular aspect, often in a negative or absurd way. It implies that the situation or event is the most extreme or outrageous of its kind.
  • chilled to the marrow The idiom "chilled to the marrow" is used to describe someone who feels extremely cold, both physically and emotionally. It implies a deep and penetrating coldness that reaches into the core or essence of a person.
  • give (one) the green light The definition of the idiom "give (one) the green light" is to give someone permission or approval to proceed with a plan or idea.
  • bend the law The idiom "bend the law" refers to the act of manipulating or exercising leniency toward the law in order to achieve one's desired outcome. It typically signifies someone finding ways to interpret or apply the law in a flexible or non-literal manner, often for personal gain or to circumvent legal restrictions.
  • the moment The idiom "the moment" refers to a specific period of time that is significant or crucial, often characterized by an important event or decision. It implies a sense of urgency and emphasizes the significance of the situation or action taking place during that specific time frame.
  • till all hours (of the day and night) The idiom "till all hours (of the day and night)" means to continue working, staying awake, or engaging in an activity until very late at night or even throughout the entire night. It implies staying up well beyond a typical bedtime or working hours.
  • white around the gills The idiom "white around the gills" is used to describe someone who looks pale or sickly, usually due to fear, shock, or illness. It originates from the image of someone losing color in their face, particularly around the area of the gills, like a fish out of water.
  • know somebody in the biblical sense The idiom "know somebody in the biblical sense" is a euphemistic way of saying that someone has had sexual intercourse with another person. It alludes to the Bible where "knowing" someone is used as a euphemism for sexual relations, as in Genesis 4:1 - "Now Adam knew Eve his wife, and she conceived and bore Cain."
  • around the horn The idiom "around the horn" originates from the maritime industry and is a nautical term that refers to sailing around Cape Horn, the southernmost tip of South America. Figuratively, it is used to describe a long journey or a circuitous route taken to reach a destination. It can also imply completing a difficult or challenging task or going through various stages to achieve a goal.
  • the apple doesn’t fall/never falls far from the tree The idiom "the apple doesn’t fall/never falls far from the tree" means that children usually share similar qualities, characteristics, or behavior patterns as their parents or family members. It suggests that a child is influenced or exhibits traits that are similar to those of their parents or ancestors.
  • laugh out of the other side of mouth The idiom "laugh out the other side of the mouth" means to express a different, usually negative or ironic, opinion or sentiment after previously expressing a positive or supportive one. It suggests that the person has changed their perspective or stance on a particular matter and is now showing inconsistency or hypocrisy in their views.
  • stretch the rules The idiom "stretch the rules" means to bend or extend the established guidelines or regulations in order to gain an advantage, exploit a loophole, or achieve a desired outcome. It involves pushing the boundaries of what is allowed or acceptable, often involving some degree of creative interpretation or manipulation of the rules.
  • wear the britches (in the family) The idiom "wear the britches (in the family)" refers to someone who holds the dominant or authoritative position within a family or household. It suggests that this person is in control, makes important decisions, and has the final say in matters. It often implies that this individual is confident, assertive, and takes charge of family affairs.
  • your, his, etc. heart is in the right place The idiom "your, his, etc. heart is in the right place" means that someone has good intentions, even if their actions or decisions may not always be perfect or successful. It implies that the person genuinely cares and wants to do the right thing, even if they may make mistakes along the way.
  • beat the pants off (of) (someone) The idiom "beat the pants off (of) (someone)" means to defeat or outperform someone decisively or overwhelmingly in a competition, contest, or any other activity. It implies the idea of winning so convincingly that it is as if the opponent figuratively loses their pants as a result.
  • keep (an amount of) balls in the air The idiom "keep (an amount of) balls in the air" refers to managing or juggling multiple tasks, responsibilities, or situations simultaneously. It suggests the ability to handle various activities or obligations at once without dropping or neglecting any of them.
  • Half the truth is often a whole lie. The idiom "Half the truth is often a whole lie" means that providing only part of the truth can be as deceptive as telling a complete falsehood. It suggests that withholding crucial information or presenting a distorted perspective can lead to a misleading or deceptive impression, ultimately being equivalent to lying.
  • bottom of the barrel The idiom "bottom of the barrel" is often used to describe something or someone that is of the lowest possible quality or standard. It refers to the idea of scraping the very bottom of a barrel where the remnants or least desirable items are found. It signifies reaching the absolute worst or least desirable option among all available choices.
  • throw caution to the wind/winds The idiom "throw caution to the wind/winds" means to act in a reckless or impulsive manner without considering the potential risks or consequences. It suggests a disregard for safety, prudence, or cautionary advice.
  • strap on the (old) feed bag The idiom "strap on the (old) feed bag" refers to the act of eating a meal or indulging in a hearty feast. It is often used in a playful or informal manner to suggest that someone is preparing themselves for a substantial amount of food. The phrase alludes to the practice of feeding horses by strapping a bag of feed to their face.
  • merge into the background The idiom "merge into the background" refers to the act of blending in or becoming inconspicuous. It implies that a person or an object is becoming unnoticed or invisible by resembling their surroundings or fading into the background.
  • can't see beyond the end of (one's) nose The idiom "can't see beyond the end of one's nose" means that someone lacks the ability or perspective to see or understand anything beyond their immediate situation or personal interests. It implies a narrow-mindedness or limited perspective, often used to describe people who fail to consider long-term consequences or alternative viewpoints.
  • the man/woman/person in the street The idiom "the man/woman/person in the street" refers to an ordinary, average individual within a society. It typically represents the perspective, beliefs, or opinions of the general public, usually in contrast to those of experts or specialists. This idiom is commonly used to highlight or gauge the attitudes and values of everyday people.
  • pain in the arse The idiom "pain in the arse" is an informal expression used to describe someone or something that is extremely annoying, bothersome, or irritating. It implies that the subject is a source of frustration or difficulty, often requiring extra effort to deal with or overcome.
  • suit (right) down to the ground The idiom "suit (right) down to the ground" means to be perfectly suitable, compatible, or appropriate for someone. It describes a situation or person that is an excellent fit, meets preferences, or fulfills specific needs.
  • have one in the oven The idiom "have one in the oven" means to be pregnant. It is often used informally to indicate that someone is expecting a child.
  • be/go on the prowl The idiom "be/go on the prowl" means to be or go out looking for something, usually with a sense of excitement or predatory intent. It is often used when referring to someone who is actively seeking romantic or sexual partners. This expression can also encompass searching for opportunities, information, or any other desired goal.
  • even in the best of times The idiom "even in the best of times" means that even under ideal or favorable circumstances, there are still some difficulties or problems that persist. It acknowledges that despite the overall positive situation, there will always be challenges or shortcomings to contend with.
  • See you in the funny pages The idiom "See you in the funny pages" is a humorous way of saying goodbye or see you later. It originated from the practice of ending comic strips or cartoons in newspapers with the phrase "See you in the funny pages" as a lighthearted farewell. It has since been adopted into common speech as a playful way of bidding adieu.
  • on the fringe The idiom "on the fringe" refers to being on the outer edge or periphery of a group or society. It implies being outside of the mainstream or being an outlier.
  • keeping up with the Joneses "Keeping up with the Joneses" is an idiomatic expression used to describe the act of trying to match or surpass one's neighbors or peers in terms of wealth, possessions, or social standing. It refers to the pursuit of material or social status in an attempt to keep pace with others, often leading to excessive consumerism and an emphasis on outward appearances.
  • mind the gap The idiom "mind the gap" is a phrase often used in public transportation systems, particularly in the London Underground. It serves as a reminder for passengers to be cautious when boarding or getting off a train or subway, as there might be a noticeable space, or "gap," between the train and the platform. On a broader level, "mind the gap" can also be interpreted as a metaphorical reminder to pay attention, be careful, or account for potential differences or disparities in various situations.
  • roll/trip off the tongue The idiom "roll/trip off the tongue" refers to something, usually words or phrases, that are spoken easily, smoothly, and without effort. It implies that the words flow naturally and sound pleasant when spoken.
  • hug the porcelain god The idiom "hug the porcelain god" refers to the act of vomiting or being sick into a toilet. It often humorously portrays the image of someone leaning over the toilet bowl (porcelain god) as if their arms were wrapped or hugging it, due to the effects of nausea or illness.
  • walk the dog The idiom "walk the dog" refers to the act of taking a dog for a walk, but it is often used metaphorically to represent the completion of a simple or routine task that is necessary or expected. It implies performing an effortless or straightforward action that needs to be done regularly or as a part of a routine.
  • That takes the cake! The idiom "That takes the cake!" is used to express extreme surprise, disbelief, or astonishment at something unusual, unexpected, or outrageous. It often implies that the situation or action in question is the most remarkable or outrageous among all others.
  • iron out the wrinkles The idiom "iron out the wrinkles" means to resolve or smooth out problems, difficulties, or complications in a given situation or relationship. It refers to the act of eliminating obstacles or resolving conflicts in order to make something work more smoothly and effectively.
  • (I'm) having the time of my life. The idiom "(I'm) having the time of my life" means that someone is experiencing an exceptionally enjoyable or exciting time. It emphasizes that the person is thoroughly enjoying themselves and making the most of the present moment.
  • the sixty-four-dollar question The idiom "the sixty-four-dollar question" refers to a pivotal or crucial question, often one that is difficult, central, or of great importance. It originated from the popular American radio and television game show from the 1950s known as "The $64,000 Question," where contestants would answer increasingly challenging questions in order to win a large prize. Therefore, this idiom is used to emphasize the significance or difficulty of a particular question.
  • splice the main brace The idiom "splice the main brace" is derived from maritime terminology and originally referred to the ceremonial act of rewarding sailors with an extra ration of rum. It is now commonly used figuratively to mean to have a celebratory drink or to have a special treat or indulgence as a reward or celebration.
  • for the love of The idiom "for the love of" is used to express strong feelings of affection, passion, or devotion towards something or someone. It is often used to emphasize a person's motivation or the reasons behind their actions.
  • at the moment The idiom "at the moment" means the present time or current situation, indicating something that is happening or true now, but might not be the case in the future.
  • stand in the way of sth/sb The idiom "stand in the way of sth/sb" means to obstruct, hinder, or prevent something or someone from progressing, succeeding, or achieving their goals or desires. It implies creating a barrier or obstacle that makes it difficult for someone or something to move forward or make progress.
  • put someone (or go) through the hoops The idiom "put someone (or go) through the hoops" means to subject someone to a series of challenging tasks, tests, or procedures, often to assess their abilities, skills, or dedication. It implies putting someone through a rigorous and demanding process that can be time-consuming or challenging.
  • be coming/falling apart at the seams The idiom "be coming/falling apart at the seams" refers to something or someone that is in a state of disarray, deterioration, or complete lack of control. It implies that the situation or object is experiencing multiple problems or failures simultaneously, resembling an item with its seams unraveling or tearing apart.
  • on the watch (for sm or sth) The idiom "on the watch for (someone or something)" means to be alert, observant, or vigilant in anticipation of someone or something potentially appearing or happening. It implies being on the lookout or monitoring a specific person or thing with a keen focus.
  • lost in the shuffle The idiom "lost in the shuffle" refers to something or someone being overlooked, neglected, or forgotten amidst a chaotic or busy situation. It suggests that due to the overwhelming or disorganized nature of a particular circumstance, an individual or something of importance fails to receive the necessary attention or recognition.
  • stare you in the face The idiom "stare you in the face" means that something is very obvious or impossible to ignore. It refers to a situation or fact that is right in front of you, typically requiring attention or action.
  • think hung the moon The idiom "think hung the moon" means to believe or perceive someone as being supremely good, important, or valuable. It implies that the person in question is considered exceptional or flawless in the eyes of another.
  • worship the ground walks on The idiom "worship the ground (someone) walks on" means to have an extremely high or profound level of admiration, adoration, or reverence for someone. It suggests that the person being described is so highly esteemed and respected that they are held in the highest regard, and their actions or presence are deeply cherished and cherished by the person using the idiom.
  • let the chips fall (where they may) The idiom "let the chips fall (where they may)" means to let events unfold naturally or to let the consequences of one's actions be determined without interference or manipulation. It suggests accepting the outcome, regardless of whether it is favorable or unfavorable.
  • the big stick The idiom "the big stick" refers to a show of power or authority, often through the threat or use of force. It originated from President Theodore Roosevelt's famous quote, "Speak softly and carry a big stick," which emphasized the importance of negotiating diplomatically while also having a strong military capability to back it up if necessary. It denotes the idea of using strength and intimidation to achieve one's goals, both literally and metaphorically.
  • take the words right out of somebody’s mouth The idiom "take the words right out of somebody’s mouth" means to accurately express or articulate exactly what someone else was about to say. It often implies that the speaker has a deep understanding of the other person's thoughts or intentions, to the point where they can preemptively voice them.
  • answer to the description of someone The idiom "answer to the description of someone" means that the person fits the expected or stereotypical attributes, characteristics, or appearance associated with a certain type or category of individuals. It implies that their physical features, behavior, or other qualities align with the perceived or stated description of someone in particular.
  • have the guts (to do something) The idiom "have the guts (to do something)" means to have the courage, bravery, or audacity to do something. It suggests being bold or fearless in facing a particular challenge or taking a risk.
  • to the max The idiom "to the max" means to the greatest or highest level possible or to the extreme. It denotes pushing or taking something to its absolute limit, intensity, or capacity.
  • throw caution to the winds The idiom "throw caution to the winds" means to act in a reckless or careless manner, ignoring all potential risks or dangers. It refers to someone disregarding caution or prudence and acting boldly or impulsively.
  • bridge the gap The idiom "bridge the gap" means to reduce or eliminate the differences or disparities between two things, ideas, or groups. It is often used to describe the act of connecting or creating a link between two separate entities in order to facilitate understanding, communication, or cooperation.
  • You scared the hell out of me The idiom "You scared the hell out of me" is a colloquial expression used to convey a sense of extreme fear or fright caused by someone or something. It indicates that the person or event in question caused intense anxiety or terror, essentially "scaring" the person to an extreme degree.
  • from the git-go The idiom "from the git-go" means from the very beginning or from the start of something. It implies that something has been happening or a situation has been in place since the very first moment or from the initial stage.
  • call the tune, at call the shots The idiom "call the tune" is synonymous with "call the shots" and it refers to being in control or having the authority to make decisions or give orders in a particular situation. It implies that the person who "calls the tune" holds the power and dictates the course of action, often exerting influence over others and being responsible for the outcome.
  • at the cutting edge The idiom "at the cutting edge" refers to being at the forefront or leading position in innovation, technology, or advancement in a particular field or industry. It implies being ahead of others and constantly pushing boundaries to develop new ideas or methods.
  • in the midst of doing sth The idiom "in the midst of doing something" means to be in the middle or midst of actively engaging in or performing a particular task, activity, or action. It implies being currently occupied with or involved in a specific action and not yet completed or finished with it.
  • be the shape of things to come The idiom "be the shape of things to come" refers to something or someone that represents or predicts what will happen in the future. It implies that the present situation or person serves as a preview or foreshadowing of what is yet to come.
  • not look a gift horse in the mouth The idiom "not look a gift horse in the mouth" means not to be critical or ungrateful when receiving a gift or favor. It comes from the practice of examining a horse's teeth to determine its age and health. By extension, looking for faults or drawbacks in something freely received is considered impolite or unappreciative.
  • be preaching to the converted The idiom "be preaching to the converted" means to try to persuade or convince someone who already agrees with or supports your opinion or belief. It implies that the efforts of persuasion are unnecessary or superfluous because the person being addressed already holds the same view.
  • the main drag The idiom "the main drag" refers to the primary street or road in a town or city, typically the most important or central route. It is often used to describe a bustling or vibrant area with a high concentration of shops, businesses, and pedestrian activity.
  • give (or get) the gate The idiom "give (or get) the gate" means to be rejected, dismissed, or excluded, often from a social group or relationship. It implies being denied further access, involvement, or participation.
  • as the white on rice The idiom "as the white on rice" is commonly used to describe a situation where something is closely and inseparably attached or extremely noticeable. It implies that two things or individuals are closely intertwined or that one thing is constantly present or attentive to another. The phrase originates from the visual contrast between white rice and its background, highlighting the idea of something being very close or clinging tightly, just like how white rice sticks together.
  • in the red The idiom "in the red" refers to a financial situation where a person, organization, or business is operating at a deficit or experiencing a negative balance. It indicates that expenses or debts exceed income or available funds, resulting in a financial loss.
  • drink somebody under the table The idiom "drink somebody under the table" refers to outdrinking or consuming more alcohol than someone else without becoming intoxicated. It suggests that a person is able to drink a larger quantity of alcohol without adverse effects and can endure drinking for a longer duration compared to others.
  • stuffed to the gills The idiom "stuffed to the gills" means to be completely and excessively filled or satisfied, typically referring to a person who has eaten an excessive amount of food, resulting in a feeling of being extremely full or satisfied. It can also be used more broadly to describe being overwhelmed or overloaded with something. The phrase originated from the literal meaning of "gills," which are the breathing organs of fish located on their sides, often considered to be their fill capacity.
  • the darkest hour is just before the dawn The idiom "the darkest hour is just before the dawn" is a phrase often used to express that hope or relief may be just around the corner, even in the most difficult or desperate situations. It suggests that moments of greatest despair or hardship often occur right before a positive and transformative change or breakthrough occurs.
  • the acceptable face of something The idiom "the acceptable face of something" refers to a person, thing, or organization that represents or embodies a more positive or socially pleasing aspect of a particular concept or activity. It suggests that this individual or entity is a more agreeable or palatable representation of something that may have negative or questionable connotations.
  • shut the door on The idiom "shut the door on" means to close or eliminate the possibility of something happening or being successful. It suggests ending or preventing further involvement or consideration in a particular situation or outcome.
  • give the show away The idiom "give the show away" means to reveal or disclose something that was intended to be kept a secret, or to unintentionally reveal the outcome or key details of a situation or event before it occurs. It implies spoiling a surprise or giving crucial information prematurely.
  • ne'er the twain shall meet The idiom "ne'er the twain shall meet" means that two things or groups are so fundamentally different or incompatible that they can never come together or find common ground. It implies that the two entities are destined to remain separate and unable to reconcile or connect.
  • be the spit (and image) of sb, at be the spitting image of sb The idiom "be the spit (and image) of someone" or "be the spitting image of someone" means that an individual looks extremely similar to another person, typically a parent, sibling, or relative. It suggests that the physical resemblance between the two individuals is remarkably strong, almost as if they were "spat out" by the same person.
  • see the last of (someone or something) The idiom "see the last of (someone or something)" means to witness or experience the final departure or occurrence of someone or something. It implies that there will be no further encounters or instances of that person or thing.
  • drop in the ocean The idiom "drop in the ocean" is used to describe something that is very small or insignificant in comparison to the larger context or problem. It implies that the mentioned action or quantity is not enough to make a significant impact or difference.
  • that's one for the (record) book(s) The idiom "that's one for the (record) book(s)" refers to something that is extraordinary, remarkable, or highly significant. It often implies that an event or achievement is noteworthy enough to be recorded or remembered for a long time.
  • rich beyond the dream of avarice The idiom "rich beyond the dream of avarice" means to be extremely wealthy, surpassing all desires and fantasies related to greed and material wealth. It implies a level of affluence that is beyond one's wildest and most excessive dreams.
  • half the fun of (something) The idiom "half the fun of (something)" means that a significant part or enjoyment of a particular activity is derived from anticipation, preparation, or the process itself rather than just the end result. It implies that the journey or experience leading up to the outcome contributes significantly to the overall enjoyment or satisfaction of the activity.
  • be three sheets to the wind The idiom "be three sheets to the wind" means to be drunk or intoxicated, usually to the point of stumbling or losing control. It refers to the nautical term where "sheets" are the ropes that control the sails of a ship, and when three of them are loose, the sails flap uncontrollably, much like a person who is heavily intoxicated.
  • go weak in the knees The idiom "go weak in the knees" is used to describe a feeling of extreme emotional or physical weakness, usually due to excitement, admiration, or fear. It implies that something has a strong impact on a person and causes them to lose strength or stability in their legs.
  • nip in the bud The idiom "nip in the bud" refers to the act of addressing or stopping a problem or issue before it becomes worse or spreads. It involves taking immediate action to prevent a situation from escalating or causing further complications.
  • by the head The idiom "by the head" typically refers to a position or distinction within a group or organization, where one is considered a leader or in a superior position. It indicates that someone has authority, control, or is ahead in terms of knowledge or expertise.
  • close to/near the bone The idiom "close to/near the bone" typically means something that is close to being offensive or too sensitive, often relating to humor or comments that touch on delicate or taboo subjects. It refers to words, jokes, or remarks that may be considered close to the limit of what is acceptable or appropriate.
  • be, go, etc. out/out of the window The idiom "be, go, etc. out/out of the window" means that something is disregarded or rendered invalid. It suggests that a previous plan, rule, or expectation has been abandoned or ignored.
  • be spitting in/into the wind The idiom "be spitting in/into the wind" means to engage in a futile or pointless effort that will most likely be unsuccessful or have no significant impact. It suggests that the action being taken will have little or no effect on the outcome, much like trying to spit against a strong gust of wind - the spit will likely be blown back into the person's face.
  • move down in the world, at go/come down in the world The idiom "move down in the world" or "go/come down in the world" refers to a situation where someone's social or financial status deteriorates, leading to a lower position or decreased wealth compared to what they previously had. It implies a decline in one's social standing, reputation, or standard of living.
  • on the horn The idiom "on the horn" typically means to be engaged in a phone conversation or speaking on the telephone. It is often used to refer to someone who is currently talking or making a phone call.
  • glut on the market The idiom "glut on the market" refers to a situation where there is an excessive supply or oversaturation of a particular product or commodity in the market, leading to a decline in its value or demand. It implies that there is more of this item available than can be consumed, resulting in a surplus.
  • the going rate (for something) The idiom "the going rate (for something)" refers to the usual or prevailing price or fee charged for a particular product, service, or job. It signifies the current average or customary price that individuals or businesses typically expect to pay or receive in a given market or industry.
  • one for the book The idiom "one for the book" refers to an event or occurrence that is extraordinary, remarkable, or unexpected, often worthy of being recorded or remembered. It signifies that the situation or outcome is unusual or significant enough to be considered noteworthy.
  • sweep something under the rug To "sweep something under the rug" means to hide, ignore, or conceal a problem, mistake, or undesirable situation instead of dealing with it openly or addressing it properly. It involves attempting to prevent others from discovering or discussing an issue in an effort to avoid consequences or negative attention.
  • by the same token The idiom "by the same token" means that if something mentioned earlier is true or applicable, then a similar or related point is also true or applicable. It is used to show a logical connection between two ideas or situations.
  • light in the loafers The idiom "light in the loafers" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as effeminate or flamboyant, particularly if they are a man. It suggests that the individual may exhibit behaviors or mannerisms that are traditionally associated with being gay or homosexual.
  • go off the deep end The idiom "go off the deep end" means to become emotionally or mentally overwhelmed, usually resulting in a sudden, irrational, or extreme reaction to a situation. It refers to a person's loss of self-control or stability, often characterized by reckless behavior, anger, or an exaggerated response.
  • boo sm off the stage The idiom "boo someone off the stage" means to express overwhelming disapproval or dislike for a performer or speaker by loudly booing or jeering until they are forced to leave or end their performance prematurely. It suggests that the audience's negative reaction is so intense that it drives the person off the stage.
  • over the course of The idiom "over the course of" means throughout a period of time, across a duration, or during the progress of something. It refers to a span of time or a sequence of events that occur within a specific timeframe.
  • on the one hand The idiom "on the one hand" is used to introduce one side or perspective of an argument or situation. It indicates that there is a contrasting viewpoint or alternative option that will be presented as well. Essentially, it signifies the start of a comparison or discussion between two conflicting ideas or aspects.
  • the elephant in the corner The idiom "the elephant in the corner" refers to a significant issue, problem, or topic of discussion that is obvious and apparent but deliberately ignored or avoided. It represents an important matter that is present and noticeable but often overlooked or neglected by individuals or a group.
  • for the birds The idiom "for the birds" means something is worthless, trivial, or not worth paying attention to. It implies that whatever is being referred to is unimportant or inconsequential.
  • take the bit in one's mouth The idiom "take the bit in one's mouth" refers to someone taking control or pursuing their own path, often disregarding or defying authority or expectations. It originates from horse riding, where a "bit" is a metal mouthpiece in a bridle, and when a horse takes the bit in its mouth, it becomes willful and difficult to control. Similarly, when someone "takes the bit in their mouth," they become assertive and independent, going against the grain and taking charge of their own actions.
  • the roof caves/falls in The idiom "the roof caves/falls in" refers to a situation or event where things go disastrously wrong or deteriorate rapidly. It implies a sudden and catastrophic collapse or failure, often used to describe the collapse or downfall of a plan, organization, or relationship.
  • in the eyes of the law, world, etc. The idiom "in the eyes of the law, world, etc." means the perspective or viewpoint of a particular authority or entity. It suggests that something is considered or judged from the standpoint of a specific governing body, societal norms, or recognized standards.
  • the Baptist The idiom "the Baptist" most commonly refers to John the Baptist, a biblical figure known for his role as a prophet and baptizing Jesus Christ. In a broader sense, the term can also be used figuratively to describe someone who strongly believes in a cause, passionately advocates for it, or takes a lead role in promoting certain principles or values.
  • on the/sb's agenda The idiom "on the/sb's agenda" refers to something that is scheduled or planned to be discussed or addressed. It typically implies that an item, topic, or issue is part of a formal or organized plan of action or discussion. It can also indicate that someone has prioritized or included something in their plans or goals.
  • prepare the ground for sth The idiom "prepare the ground for sth" means to make the necessary arrangements or groundwork in order to ensure the success or smooth implementation of something that is about to happen or be introduced. It involves setting the foundation, creating favorable conditions, or taking initial steps to pave the way or make something possible.
  • pick up/take up the slack The idiom "pick up/take up the slack" means to assume or take on the extra work or responsibilities that someone else has neglected or failed to complete effectively. It refers to filling the gap or compensating for the insufficient performance or effort of others in order to maintain productivity or achieve the desired outcome.
  • the way to a man's heart is through his stomach The idiom "the way to a man's heart is through his stomach" means that one can win someone's affection or establish a strong connection with them by preparing or providing them with delicious food.
  • fall/go through the floor The idiom "fall/go through the floor" means to experience a sudden and significant decrease, usually in relation to something such as prices, value, confidence, or performance. It is used to describe a situation or condition that drastically worsens or declines.
  • put the heat on (sm) The idiom "put the heat on (someone)" means to apply pressure or intense scrutiny on someone, usually in order to get them to act or make a decision. It can also refer to creating a challenging or difficult situation for someone, making them uncomfortable or forcing them to confront an issue.
  • keep the field The idiom "keep the field" refers to the act of staying vigilant, persistent, or continuing efforts in a competition, battle, or pursuit of a goal, despite challenges or obstacles that arise. It emphasizes the importance of perseverance and not giving up despite setbacks or difficulties encountered along the way.
  • the grand old man of (something) The idiom "the grand old man of (something)" refers to a person who is highly respected and regarded as a leading figure or authority in a particular field or domain. It is typically used to emphasize the person's significant accomplishments, wisdom, and longevity within their area of expertise.
  • the most The idiom "the most" typically refers to something or someone that is the maximum or highest in a particular characteristic, quality, or degree. It suggests an extreme or unparalleled level of a specific attribute or aspect.
  • fall off the turnip truck The idiom "fall off the turnip truck" means to be naive, unsophisticated, or lacking in awareness of the ways of the world. It is often used to describe someone who is easily fooled or gullible.
  • have the edge on The idiom "have the edge on" means to have a slight advantage or superiority over someone or something. It suggests being slightly ahead or having a little more power, influence, skill, or knowledge in a given situation.
  • bigger they come, the harder they fall, the The idiom "the bigger they come, the harder they fall" means that the larger or more powerful something or someone is, the more disastrous or dramatic their failure or downfall will be. It suggests that when something or someone is perceived to be unbeatable or invincible, their ultimate defeat or decline will be even more significant or impactful.
  • never hear the end of it The idiom "never hear the end of it" means to continuously receive criticism, complaints, or teasing about something, typically for an extended period of time. It implies that the person will repeatedly hear about a particular mistake or action, often in a bothersome or nagging manner.
  • run the gauntlet of something/someone The idiom "run the gauntlet of something/someone" means to endure a challenging or difficult situation or to face a series of obstacles or criticisms. It refers to going through a testing or risky experience, often involving passing through a line or facing a procession of people who may attack, criticize, or challenge you.
  • change up with the times The idiom "change up with the times" means to adapt or adjust to current trends, practices, or expectations. It implies the need to modify one's approach, habits, or mindset in order to stay relevant or keep pace with the evolving world around you.
  • in the light of sth The idiom "in the light of something" means to consider or evaluate something based on a particular situation or new information that has been revealed. It refers to taking into account a specific event, circumstance, or perspective when making judgments or decisions.
  • high man on the totem pole The idiom "high man on the totem pole" refers to the person who holds the highest position or rank within a group or organization. It symbolizes having the most authority, influence, or power in a particular context.
  • bring to the party The idiom "bring to the party" typically means to contribute or provide something of value or significance to a situation, event, or group. It implies bringing a positive or desirable element that enhances the overall experience or outcome. It can be used literally, to refer to bringing something tangible like food or drinks to a social gathering, or figuratively, to indicate offering valuable skills, expertise, ideas, or resources to a project or team.
  • drag sb's name through the mire/mud The idiom "drag sb's name through the mire/mud" means to discredit or tarnish someone's reputation or image by spreading damaging or negative information about them. It implies the act of publicly humiliating or shaming an individual by uncovering and highlighting their flaws or past mistakes.
  • at the mercy of sb/sth The idiom "at the mercy of sb/sth" means being in a helpless or vulnerable situation, entirely dependent on someone or something else's decisions or actions. It implies having little or no control over the outcome or being subject to someone else's power or influence.
  • warm the cockles of (one's) heart The idiom "warm the cockles of (one's) heart" means to deeply touch or deeply satisfy someone emotionally, often bringing them feelings of joy, happiness, or contentment. It is used to express the heartwarming effect of something that brings comfort, pleasure, or positive emotions to an individual.
  • go/walk down the aisle The idiom "go/walk down the aisle" typically refers to the act of getting married. It describes the specific moment when the bride enters the ceremonial space, commonly referred to as the aisle, to proceed towards the altar where the marriage vows are exchanged. The idiom can also be used more broadly to denote the act of getting married in general, regardless of the presence of a physical aisle.
  • fall through the cracks The idiom "fall through the cracks" refers to a situation where something goes unnoticed, forgotten, or neglected, often due to a failure in the system or lack of attention. It implies that something or someone has been overlooked or missed unintentionally, leading to an undesired outcome or consequence.
  • split the difference The idiom "split the difference" means to reach a compromise or make a settlement by both sides agreeing to give up an equal amount of their initial demands or positions. It suggests finding a middle ground that is agreeable to both parties involved, with each side making a concession.
  • the day of reckoning The idiom "the day of reckoning" refers to a future moment or event when someone will be held accountable or face the consequences of their actions or decisions. It can also signify a time of judgment or evaluation, typically associated with a significant outcome or revelation.
  • drag name through the mire To "drag one's name through the mire" means to slander, criticize, or tarnish someone's reputation or good name. It refers to causing damage or disgrace to someone's character by spreading malicious rumors, making false accusations, or engaging in degrading conduct or behavior.
  • a shot in the arm The idiom "a shot in the arm" is used to describe something that provides a boost or stimulation to someone or something, usually in a figurative sense. It can refer to an action, event, or development that revitalizes, encourages, or invigorates a person, organization, or situation.
  • Lightning never strikes (the same place) twice. The idiom "Lightning never strikes (the same place) twice" means that a highly unlikely or fortunate event is unlikely to happen again in the same way or to the same person. It suggests that rare or extraordinary occurrences are not likely to repeat themselves.
  • on the market The idiom "on the market" is used to describe something that is available for sale or being offered for purchase. It typically refers to a product, property, or service that is currently being offered or advertised for sale to potential buyers.
  • in the front line (of something) The idiom "in the front line (of something)" refers to being at the forefront or taking a leading position in a particular activity, project, or situation. It often implies being directly involved or exposed to the most intense or challenging aspects of that activity or situation. The term originates from military terminology, where the front line refers to the foremost position in battle.
  • put the finger on (one) The idiom "put the finger on (one)" means to identify or point out someone as responsible or guilty for a particular action or wrongdoing. It suggests blaming or accusing someone directly and often implies providing evidence or implicating them in a specific situation.
  • stewed to the gills The idiom "stewed to the gills" typically means to be extremely intoxicated or drunk. It is often used to describe someone who has consumed excessive amounts of alcohol.
  • get the bum's rush The idiom "get the bum's rush" refers to being hastily or forcefully expelled, dismissed, or ejected from a place or situation, often in a rude or disrespectful manner. It implies a rushed and unpleasant departure, as if one were treated like a homeless person ("bum") being forcibly removed from an establishment.
  • catch it in the neck The idiom "catch it in the neck" means to receive severe criticism, punishment, or retribution for something, often resulting in a difficult or unpleasant situation for the person involved.
  • in the lead The idiom "in the lead" refers to being in a position of advantage or ahead of others in a competition or race. It indicates that someone or something is currently in the forefront or holding the highest position, surpassing others in a given situation.
  • put the lid on The idiom "put the lid on" means to bring something to a final or decisive end, to complete or conclude a task or situation, or to prevent further development or progress. It can also refer to suppressing or ending a discussion or argument.
  • price out of the market The idiom "price out of the market" refers to a situation where the cost or price of a product or service becomes so high that it becomes unaffordable or too expensive for most consumers. It implies that the price exceeds what customers are willing or able to pay, thus resulting in reduced demand or decreased market share for the seller.
  • lay one's cards on the table To "lay one's cards on the table" means to be completely open, honest, and transparent about one's thoughts, intentions, plans, or feelings in a situation. It refers to revealing all the relevant information or sharing one's true motivations in order to promote transparency and avoid any hidden agenda.
  • back the wrong horse The idiom "back the wrong horse" typically means to support or invest in someone or something that ultimately proves to be unsuccessful or misguided. It refers to the act of betting on the wrong competitor in a horse race, resulting in a loss. It can also be used metaphorically to describe situations where one supports a person, idea, or decision that turns out to be a mistake or failure.
  • hold (down) the fort The idiom "hold (down) the fort" means to take responsibility or maintain control of a situation while someone is temporarily absent.
  • see the (hand)writing on the wall The idiom "see the (hand)writing on the wall" means to understand or perceive the signs or indications that something is inevitable or likely to happen in the future, especially when it pertains to an undesirable outcome or impending failure. It refers to being able to foresee an event or situation by interpreting the available clues or evidence. The phrase is often used to suggest recognizing an imminent downfall or recognizing the signals of an impending change or crisis.
  • the finger of suspicion The idiom "the finger of suspicion" refers to the act of accusing or suspecting someone of being guilty or involved in a wrongdoing, often based on circumstantial evidence or intuition. It implies that the person or group being targeted is under suspicion and may be seen as guilty until proven innocent.
  • nip in the air The idiom "nip in the air" refers to a chilly or cold feeling in the atmosphere, indicating the onset of cold weather. It suggests that there is a subtle chill or a brief, sharp cold breeze present.
  • if there's grass on the pitch, play ball The idiom "if there's grass on the pitch, play ball" is a colloquial expression that is typically used in a humorous or slightly inappropriate manner. It suggests that if a certain situation or opportunity arises, one should take advantage of it or engage in the desired activity, regardless of the associated risks or potential consequences. It often implies a willingness to act on one's desires or urges, emphasizing a carefree or impulsive attitude.
  • in the mill The idiom "in the mill" typically refers to something that is currently being processed, worked on, or undergoing a transformation. It can be used to describe a situation, project, or idea that is actively being developed or processed, often with the implication that it is not yet completed or final.
  • keep (one) on the hop The idiom "keep (one) on the hop" means to keep someone busy or active, often causing them to be constantly on the move or occupied with various tasks or responsibilities. It implies keeping someone engaged and consistently challenged.
  • East is East and West is West (and never the twain shall meet). The idiom "East is East and West is West (and never the twain shall meet)" is often used to express the idea that two things or cultures are so fundamentally different that they cannot be reconciled or understood by one another. It emphasizes the notion that two distinct entities or perspectives are inherently incompatible and cannot be brought together or unified.
  • carry/win the day The idiom "carry/win the day" means to be successful or victorious, particularly in a significant or decisive manner. It refers to achieving a favorable outcome, usually against odds or challenges.
  • have the ball at your feet The idiom "have the ball at your feet" typically refers to being in a position of control, power, or advantage, often in a situation where one has the opportunity to make important decisions or take decisive action. It implies having the capacity to dictate the course of events or possessing an advantageous position from which to achieve desired outcomes.
  • on the wagon The idiom "on the wagon" refers to someone who has chosen to abstain from drinking alcohol or has stopped indulging in a particular habit or addiction, typically related to substance abuse or negative behaviors.
  • at the crossroads The idiom "at the crossroads" refers to being at a decisive point or making a significant choice between two or more possible courses of action. It often implies that the decision taken will have a profound impact on one's future direction or outcome.
  • turn the tables (on sm) The idiom "turn the tables (on someone)" means to reverse a situation, often by gaining an advantage over someone who previously had the upper hand. It refers to the act of changing the power dynamics or the outcome of a situation in one's favor.
  • bear the brunt of sth The idiom "bear the brunt of sth" means to endure the majority or main impact of something, typically a burden, responsibility, or negative consequence. It refers to being the one who experiences the most severe or direct effects of a particular situation or action.
  • the Permian The idiom "the Permian" refers to the Permian period, which is a geological time period that occurred approximately 299 to 251 million years ago. It signifies an ancient or long-distant era, often used to describe something very old or outdated.
  • say, etc. something in the same breath The idiom "say something in the same breath" means to mention or express two contradictory or contrasting things or ideas at the same time or in quick succession. It highlights inconsistency or incongruity in someone's speech or statements.
  • give up the ghost The idiom "give up the ghost" means to die or to stop working or functioning, often used to describe inanimate objects or machines. It can also refer to surrendering or resigning oneself to a situation or outcome.
  • burning the midnight oil The idiom "burning the midnight oil" means to work or study late into the night, often sacrificing sleep or leisure time for the sake of completing a task or project. It implies a strong dedication, perseverance, and the willingness to put in extra effort to achieve a goal.
  • blow someone out of the water The idiom "blow someone out of the water" means to greatly surpass, outperform, or defeat someone or something in a manner that completely overwhelms or exceeds expectations. It often implies achieving victory or success in a spectacular or impressive way that leaves no doubt or competition.
  • have the odds/cards stacked against you The idiom "have the odds/cards stacked against you" means that the circumstances or conditions are not in your favor, making success or achieving an outcome difficult or unlikely. It implies facing a situation where the chances of winning or succeeding are greatly reduced due to various obstacles or disadvantages.
  • get hold of the right end of the stick The idiom "get hold of the right end of the stick" means to understand a situation correctly, to have a clear grasp or comprehension of something. It suggests that someone has a good understanding or knowledge of a topic or problem, allowing them to effectively address it or make the right decisions.
  • beat/knock the tar out of sb The idiom "beat/knock the tar out of sb" means to physically harm or defeat someone decisively, generally implying a violent or forceful action. It suggests a severe beating or thrashing, often to the point of rendering the person unconscious or incapacitated.
  • put the fear of God into someone The idiom "put the fear of God into someone" means to intimidate or cause extreme fear in someone, usually through forceful or overwhelming means. It implies instilling a deep sense of awe, terror, or reverence in order to control or discipline someone's actions or behavior.
  • the iron enters (into) (someone's) soul The idiom "the iron enters (into) (someone's) soul" refers to a deeply impactful experience that leaves a lasting impression on one's character or innermost being. This phrase is often used to describe situations or events that bring about significant emotional or psychological transformation, making a person stronger, more determined, or resolute in their beliefs or convictions.
  • not let the grass grow under your feet The idiom "not let the grass grow under your feet" means to be constantly active or to not waste time. It refers to being proactive, taking immediate action, and not procrastinating. It implies being forward-thinking and relentless in pursuing goals or making progress.
  • a slice of the cake The idiom "a slice of the cake" typically refers to getting or receiving a share or portion of something, often in a fair or equitable manner. It implies that the person does not want to be left out or deprived of what others have.
  • be in the know The idiom "be in the know" means to have access to information or to be well-informed about a particular subject or situation. It refers to being knowledgeable or being aware of something that others may not be aware of.
  • be the dead spit of (someone) The idiom "be the dead spit of (someone)" means to closely resemble or be an exact duplicate of someone else in appearance or physical features. It indicates a striking similarity between two individuals to the extent that they could be mistaken for one another.
  • Let the dead bury the dead. The idiom "Let the dead bury the dead" means to leave past issues or conflicts as they are, without trying to resolve or dwell on them any further. It suggests that one should focus on the present and future rather than getting trapped in old problems or grievances.
  • on the increase The idiom "on the increase" means that something is growing or becoming more prevalent or common. It refers to a situation or phenomenon that is experiencing a rise or expansion in its frequency or intensity.
  • the conventional/received wisdom The idiom "the conventional/received wisdom" refers to widely accepted beliefs, ideas, or opinions that have been passed down or ingrained in society over time. It refers to the conventional or commonly held view or understanding of a particular subject or situation, regardless of whether it is supported by evidence or critical analysis. It represents the traditional or mainstream perspective that is often unquestioned or taken for granted.
  • blow off the map The idiom "blow off the map" typically refers to a situation where something or someone is completely destroyed or obliterated, often in a violent or explosive manner. It can be used metaphorically to describe the extent of destruction, loss, or elimination that occurs.
  • there’s no time like the present The idiom "there’s no time like the present" means that the current moment is the best or most opportune time to do something. It emphasizes the importance of taking action immediately rather than delaying it for later.
  • for the sake of argument "For the sake of argument" means to consider or discuss something as a hypothetical or theoretical scenario, even if it may not be true or relevant. It is often used to facilitate a debate or discussion by temporarily adopting a certain viewpoint or perspective, without necessarily endorsing or believing in it.
  • have the drop on (someone or something) The idiom "have the drop on (someone or something)" means to have a significant advantage or superior position over someone or something, often in a confrontational or competitive situation. It originates from the act of having a weapon, usually a firearm, aimed and ready to shoot at someone while they remain unarmed or unaware. This idiom implies the element of surprise and an imminent threat that puts the person or thing at a significant disadvantage.
  • Been there, done that got the T-shirt The idiom "Been there, done that, got the T-shirt" is used to convey the sentiment that one has already experienced or accomplished something and has no interest in doing it again. It implies that the person has already gone through a particular situation or activity, often regarding it as unexciting or unremarkable. The phrase "got the T-shirt" suggests that the person has a physical item, such as a souvenir T-shirt, as proof of their prior involvement or experience.
  • the fair/fairer sex The idiom "the fair/fairer sex" is used to refer to women collectively. It suggests that women are delicate, beautiful, or morally upright in comparison to men.
  • the joker in the pack The idiom "the joker in the pack" refers to an unexpected or unpredictable element or person in a group or situation. It typically implies that this element or person can disrupt or influence the outcome in an unconventional or unexpected way. It alludes to the joker card found in a deck of playing cards, which is often wild or can be used to represent any other card.
  • the archenemy The archenemy refers to a person or entity that is a principal or ultimate enemy. It represents the most intense, fierce, and longstanding adversary or opponent one can have.
  • the sublime The idiom "the sublime" refers to something that is of such beauty, excellence, or grandeur that it evokes awe, admiration, or a sense of transcendence. It often describes experiences, objects, or ideas that are so remarkable or extraordinary that they surpass ordinary human comprehension or standards of beauty. The sublime can inspire a feeling of vastness, overwhelming power, or profound significance.
  • on (or off) the track The idiom "on (or off) the track" generally refers to someone's behavior or thoughts being in line with what is considered normal, appropriate, or expected (on track) or deviating from the norm or expected path (off track). It can also refer to someone being focused and committed to achieving their goals (on track) or being distracted or losing focus (off track).
  • come/get to the point The idiom "come/get to the point" means to stop providing unnecessary information or details and to directly address or discuss the main or important matter at hand. It suggests that someone should be concise and straightforward in their communication without excessive or irrelevant elaboration.
  • go into the stratosphere The idiom "go into the stratosphere" typically means to reach an extremely high level, either in terms of value, popularity, success, or achievement. It suggests exceeding normal expectations or rising to extraordinary heights.
  • break the ice The idiom "break the ice" means to initiate or start a conversation or social interaction in order to alleviate tension or awkwardness in a situation. It refers to the act of overcoming initial barriers or discomfort, often by saying or doing something to create a more relaxed and friendly atmosphere.
  • be on the line The idiom "be on the line" typically means to be at risk or in a situation where the outcome is uncertain or potentially grave. It can also refer to being under pressure or scrutiny, especially in a work or professional context.
  • in the face The idiom "in the face" is used to describe a situation where someone directly confronts or challenges something or someone without hesitation, despite potential obstacles or opposition. It implies a bold or fearless attitude in confronting difficulties head-on.
  • by the thousand The idiom "by the thousand" refers to an abundance or large quantity of something. It implies a vast number or multitude of items, people, or occurrences.
  • beat the system The idiom "beat the system" means to find a way to work around established rules, laws, or procedures in order to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome, often by using clever or unconventional methods. It refers to outsmarting or circumventing what is considered the norm or the standard way of doing things.
  • It is the pace that kills. The idiom "it is the pace that kills" means that trying to do things too quickly or efficiently can lead to mistakes, oversights, or even failure. It emphasizes the importance of taking things slow and steady to ensure accuracy and success.
  • hit the bull'seye The idiom "hit the bull's-eye" refers to hitting a target right in the center or achieving success or accuracy in a particular effort or endeavor. It signifies achieving the desired goal or outcome perfectly, without any deviation or error.
  • lift, blow, etc. the lid off something The idiom "lift, blow, etc. the lid off something" means to expose or reveal something hidden or secret, bringing it to public knowledge or attention. It implies uncovering the truth or hidden information, often in a surprising or shocking manner.
  • get the go-ahead The idiom "get the go-ahead" means to receive permission, approval, or clearance to proceed with a plan, project, or activity. It implies a green light or authorization to move forward.
  • flushed down the tubes The idiom "flushed down the tubes" means that something has failed or been ruined, often in a sudden or irreversible manner. It refers to the notion of being flushed down a toilet, signifying a loss, waste, or destruction of something valuable or promising.
  • the least can do The idiom "the least (someone) can do" refers to the minimum or smallest action or effort that someone can make to show appreciation, consideration, or fulfill their responsibility towards others. It implies that although the action is minimal, it is still expected or required.
  • come to the job with (something) The idiom "come to the job with (something)" means to bring or possess a particular skill, quality, or trait that is beneficial or necessary for a specific job or task. It refers to having an attribute or characteristic that is relevant and advantageous in the context of a particular profession or work situation.
  • jam on the brake(s) The idiom "jam on the brake(s)" means to suddenly and forcefully press down on the brakes of a vehicle, typically in response to a dangerous or emergency situation, in order to stop or slow down quickly. It can also be used metaphorically to describe taking immediate action to prevent or address a problem or crisis.
  • pay through the nose The idiom "pay through the nose" means to pay an excessively high price for something or to pay more than is necessary or reasonable.
  • in the market The idiom "in the market" typically means that someone is actively seeking or considering buying or selling a particular product or service. It suggests that the person is interested or open to engaging in transactions related to the item in question.
  • the tail wags the dog The idiom "the tail wags the dog" refers to a situation where something small or unimportant has undue influence or control over something larger or more significant. It metaphorically represents a scenario where a minor or subsidiary element is dominating or dictating the actions of a major or principal entity.
  • on/onto the defensive The idiom "on/onto the defensive" refers to the state of being defensive or having to defend oneself, usually in response to criticism, accusation, or the need to protect oneself from harm or a potential threat. It implies adopting a posture or mindset of self-protection and being ready to argue or give explanations to counter any perceived attacks or challenges.
  • in the last resort The idiom "in the last resort" refers to a situation where all other options or possibilities have been exhausted, leaving only one remaining course of action or solution. It implies that this final option is the last attempt to resolve a problem or make a decision after all else has failed.
  • (The) good die young. The idiom "(The) good die young" means that morally upright or virtuous individuals often have a shorter lifespan or tend to die prematurely compared to those who may be less good or virtuous.
  • be like painting the Forth Bridge The idiom "be like painting the Forth Bridge" refers to an endless or never-ending task, indicating a task that requires constant attention or maintenance due to its recurring nature. It originates from the Forth Bridge in Scotland, which is a famous railway bridge known for its continuous need for repainting due to the harsh weather conditions.
  • jump the track The idiom "jump the track" is used to describe a situation where someone or something deviates from its intended course or strays away from the original plan or purpose. It typically refers to an unexpected or sudden shift from the desired path, often resulting in a negative outcome or undesired consequences.
  • the (Great) Depression The idiom "the (Great) Depression" refers to a severe worldwide economic depression that took place in the 1930s. It originated from the historical event known as the Great Depression, which was characterized by a significant decline in economic activity, high unemployment rates, deflation, and widespread poverty. The term is now commonly used to describe any prolonged period of economic downturn or hardship.
  • break the spell The idiom "break the spell" means to put an end to a situation or behavior that has been controlling or dominating someone or a group, usually by introducing a change, realization, or revelation that disrupts the previous state of affairs. It implies breaking free from an enchantment or overcoming a long-held belief or influence that has had a strong hold over someone or a situation.
  • flavor of the week The idiom "flavor of the week" refers to a person, thing, idea, or trend that is currently popular or being given a lot of attention for a limited time before losing its appeal or being replaced by something else. It suggests that the focal point or interest is temporary and subject to frequent change.
  • the golden age The golden age refers to a time in the past that is seen as a period of great prosperity, success, or achievement in a particular field, society, or culture. It implies a time of abundance, progress, and harmony, often viewed as a peak or ideal era.
  • the inner man/woman The idiom "the inner man/woman" refers to a person's emotional or spiritual self, as opposed to their physical or outward appearance. It signifies the core essence or character of an individual, emphasizing their values, thoughts, and feelings.
  • take the gilt off the gingerbread The idiom "take the gilt off the gingerbread" means to reveal or expose the unattractive or unpleasant reality behind something that initially appears impressive, grand, or appealing. It suggests that something loses its charm or attractiveness when its true nature or flaws are revealed.
  • dig the dirt The idiom "dig the dirt" means to gather or uncover information, usually of a scandalous or compromising nature, typically in an effort to expose or discredit someone. It refers to the act of investigating or researching to find potentially damaging or incriminating details about a person or situation.
  • go by the book The idiom "go by the book" means to strictly adhere to established rules, regulations, or procedures. It implies following standard protocols and not deviating from them, often associated with a cautious or conservative approach.
  • the avantgarde The idiom "the avant-garde" refers to an innovative or experimental approach in the fields of art, culture, or any creative endeavor. It typically describes individuals or groups that push the boundaries of traditional or mainstream conventions, striving to introduce new ideas, styles, or techniques that challenge established norms. The avant-garde often involves visionary, cutting-edge developments that may initially be unconventional or controversial but eventually influence and shape the future of their respective fields.
  • throw sb/sth on the scrap heap The idiom "throw sb/sth on the scrap heap" means to dispose of or discard someone or something as useless, no longer valuable, or no longer needed. It typically refers to disregarding or abandoning something or someone due to a perceived lack of worth, relevance, or usefulness.
  • Take the bitter with the sweet. The idiom "Take the bitter with the sweet" means to accept and endure the negative aspects or hardships that come along with the positive or enjoyable things in life. It implies that one should not only focus on or expect the good but also be prepared to deal with the challenges or disappointments that may arise.
  • put one's hand to the plow The idiom "put one's hand to the plow" means to fully commit oneself to a task or endeavor, often implying determination and perseverance. It derives from the agricultural practice of plowing, where a farmer needs to physically put their hands on the plow and exert effort to make progress. It suggests actively engaging in work or an undertaking, without hesitation or distraction, in order to achieve desired results.
  • all the better, at so much the better The idiom "all the better, at so much the better" is a way of expressing an even more favorable or advantageous situation. It suggests that the current circumstances or outcome have become even more beneficial or desirable. It can be used to emphasize the appreciation or satisfaction one feels towards a situation that has improved or become more advantageous than expected.
  • be on the right lines The idiom "be on the right lines" means to be on the correct path or making progress towards a successful outcome or solution. It suggests that someone's ideas, plans, or actions are heading in the right direction and are likely to lead to the desired result.
  • have the weight of the world on (one's) shoulders The idiom "have the weight of the world on (one's) shoulders" is used to describe someone who feels an overwhelming amount of pressure or responsibility. It implies that the person feels burdened as if they are carrying the problems of the entire world on their own shoulders.
  • look like the cat that swallowed the canary The idiom "look like the cat that swallowed the canary" is used to describe someone who has a self-satisfied or smug expression, typically after accomplishing something mischievous or satisfying. It implies that the person is pleased with themselves or knows something others don't.
  • see the error of your/its ways The idiom "see the error of your/its ways" means to recognize and acknowledge that one's previous behavior or actions were wrong or misguided. It implies that the person has gained insight or understanding, realizing the need for change and improvement in their attitude or actions.
  • come/suffer under the lash The idiom "come/suffer under the lash" typically refers to someone enduring harsh treatment, criticism, or punishment. It originates from the literal use of the term "lash," which pertains to a whip or a stroke with a whip, indicating the physical pain inflicted on an individual. In a figurative sense, this idiom signifies facing severe consequences or being subjected to severe and oppressive circumstances.
  • see the glass (as) half full The idiom "see the glass (as) half full" means to have an optimistic outlook or perspective on a situation, focusing on the positive aspects rather than the negative ones. It implies viewing life in a hopeful and positive manner, often emphasizing possibilities rather than limitations.
  • take the pulse of The idiom "take the pulse of" is used figuratively to describe the act of gathering information or assessing the current state or opinion of a particular situation, group of people, or topic. It implies understanding the prevailing sentiment, attitude, or mood surrounding something by obtaining measurements or gauging reactions, similar to monitoring one's pulse to assess their physical condition.
  • till/until the bitter end The idiom "till/until the bitter end" refers to sticking with something or someone until its completion, even if the situation becomes difficult, unpleasant, or unbearable. It signifies a commitment to continue regardless of the challenges faced, indicating a determined and resolute attitude.
  • bread always falls on the buttered side The idiom "bread always falls on the buttered side" refers to the perceived tendency of unfortunate events or accidents to happen repeatedly, often to the same person. It suggests that if something can go wrong, it is likely to go wrong.
  • (put something) on the line The idiom "(put something) on the line" means to risk or gamble something valuable or important in order to achieve a goal or outcome. It refers to taking a significant chance or making a serious commitment that may have consequences or be tested.
  • let the dust settle The idiom "let the dust settle" means to wait for a situation to calm down or stabilize before taking any further action or making a judgment. It refers to the process of allowing emotions, controversy, or turmoil to dissipate before attempting to address or evaluate the situation.
  • the patience of Job "The patience of Job" is an idiomatic expression that refers to an extraordinary level of patience and forbearance demonstrated by someone, even in the face of great adversity and suffering. It originates from the story of Job in the Hebrew Bible, who remained patient and faithful despite enduring severe hardship and loss.
  • that's how the cookie crumbles The idiom "that's how the cookie crumbles" means that it is an unfortunate or disappointing outcome, and it is used to convey acceptance of a situation or acceptance of bad luck. It implies that sometimes things don't go as planned or desired, and there is nothing one can do about it.
  • for the taking The idiom "for the taking" typically means that something is readily available and easily obtainable, usually without much effort or cost. It implies that the opportunity or possession is there for anyone who wants to seize it or claim it.
  • There aren't enough hours in the day The idiom "There aren't enough hours in the day" means that a person has too much to do and not enough time to do it. It expresses the feeling of being overwhelmed or having a lack of time to accomplish all the tasks or responsibilities one has.
  • put the kibosh on The idiom "put the kibosh on" means to put an end to or stop something, often forcefully or abruptly. It can imply halting a plan, ending a discussion, or preventing someone from proceeding with something.
  • an ace in the hole The idiom "an ace in the hole" refers to a hidden advantage or resource that is kept secret until it is needed, usually to gain an advantage in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies having a valuable or powerful asset that can be used strategically at the right moment to achieve success or overcome obstacles.
  • be on the (something) side The idiom "be on the (something) side" typically means to be more cautious or conservative in a particular situation, or to have a preference for the safer or more reliable option. It implies choosing the side that is less risky, uncertain, or adventurous. This idiom is often used when making decisions or taking actions.
  • If can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen The idiom "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen" means that if someone is unable to handle or cope with a difficult or challenging situation, they should remove themselves or quit from it. It implies that if someone is not able to handle pressure or criticism, they should avoid situations that involve such challenges.
  • arrive (up)on the scene (of sth) The idiom "arrive (up)on the scene (of sth)" means to come to the location where a particular event or situation is taking place, usually at the moment it is happening or shortly after it has started. It implies that someone has arrived at a place or situation and become involved in it or aware of it.
  • keep balls in the air The idiom "keep balls in the air" means to manage multiple tasks or responsibilities concurrently, often juggling or multitasking efficiently and effectively. It refers to maintaining a balance or steady progress in handling various obligations, projects, or commitments without dropping or neglecting any of them.
  • for all the world as if/though... The idiom "for all the world as if/though..." is used to describe a situation or someone's behavior that closely resembles or appears to be something else, often with a sense of exaggeration or emphasis. It implies that the resemblance is so strong that it can easily be mistaken for the real thing.
  • take the bit in teeth The idiom "take the bit in teeth" means to seize control or take charge of a situation forcefully and independently, often in defiance of authority or expectations. It originates from horse riding, where the "bit" is the metal mouthpiece in a horse's bridle that controls its movements. When a horse "takes the bit in its teeth," it disregards the rider's guidance and runs off in its own direction. Similarly, when someone uses this idiom, they are demonstrating their determination to act on their own accord, disregarding any restrictions or objections.
  • the lot The idiom "the lot" typically refers to the entirety or the whole of something, often indicating a complete group or collection of things or people. It implies that every single item or person included in the group is involved or affected in some way.
  • give somebody/get the silent treatment The idiom "give somebody/get the silent treatment" refers to a situation where someone intentionally ignores or refuses to speak to another person as a form of punishment or manipulation. It involves deliberately choosing not to communicate or acknowledge the person, usually in order to express disapproval, anger, or assert control over them. It can be a way of expressing passive-aggressive behavior, conveying one's displeasure, or exerting emotional power in a relationship.
  • on the wrong side of the law The idiom "on the wrong side of the law" is used to describe someone who is involved in illegal or criminal activities, or who is not obeying the law. It refers to individuals who are acting against or contrary to legal regulations or requirements.
  • be in the club The idiom "be in the club" typically refers to being a member of a particular group or category, generally indicating that someone is part of an exclusive circle or has a specific shared experience or characteristic. It can imply a sense of belonging or being part of an established group.
  • on the distaff side The idiom "on the distaff side" typically refers to the female or women-centric perspective or influence in a particular context. It originated from the distaff, a tool used for spinning wool or flax traditionally associated with women's work. By extension, the phrase came to represent matters related to or involving women.
  • in/under the shadow of The idiom "in/under the shadow of" refers to being in the presence or influence of someone or something powerful, dominant, or intimidating. It implies being overshadowed or having one's significance diminished by the more prominent entity. It can also suggest being protected or sheltered by someone or something.
  • how the land lies The idiom "how the land lies" refers to understanding the current situation or circumstances, usually in a specific context or location. It implies gaining knowledge about the state of affairs or getting information about what is happening in a given situation or environment.
  • the last thing (one) wants The idiom "the last thing (one) wants" is used to refer to something that is strongly disliked or undesirable. It denotes the least desirable outcome or situation for a person.
  • the Beltway The idiom "the Beltway" typically refers to the highway encircling Washington D.C., known as the Capital Beltway or Interstate 495, which is a ring road that connects various suburbs and areas surrounding the city. However, in a more figurative sense, "the Beltway" can also be used to represent the political establishment, bureaucracy, and power centers of Washington D.C.
  • bring out the best in somebody The idiom "bring out the best in somebody" means to inspire or influence someone in a way that allows their most positive or exceptional qualities, abilities, or behavior to emerge or be showcased. It refers to the ability of a person or situation to encourage someone to reach their full potential or to demonstrate their finest qualities.
  • be as plain as the nose on (one's) face The idiom "be as plain as the nose on (one's) face" means that something is very obvious or clear, often referring to a situation or fact that is easily noticeable or apparent to everyone. It implies that the truth or reality of a situation is so apparent that it is impossible to miss, just like one's own nose on their face, which is a highly visible and prominent feature.
  • the Deity The phrase "the Deity" refers to a supreme being or a divine power, often associated with a specific religion or belief system. It typically denotes an omnipotent, omniscient, and ultimate authority, such as God or gods worshipped by various cultures. The idiom is used to represent the concept of a higher power that is beyond human understanding and controls the course of events in the universe.
  • burst the bubble of (someone) The idiom "burst the bubble of (someone)" means to abruptly and harshly bring someone back to reality or disprove their optimistic beliefs or fantasies. It involves shattering their illusions or hopes by presenting them with a harsh truth or fact that they were unaware of or did not want to accept.
  • not know the time of day The idiom "not know the time of day" refers to someone who is completely unaware or ignorant of what is happening or has no understanding of a situation or issue. It signifies a lack of knowledge, awareness, or attention.
  • detached from the (outside) world The idiom "detached from the (outside) world" refers to a state of being disconnected, isolated, or aloof from the events, issues, or concerns of the wider society or the current reality. It suggests a person's or entity's disengagement or withdrawal from the outside world, often due to a lack of awareness, interest, or understanding of the circumstances and struggles that others may be facing.
  • sing from the same hymn (or song) sheet The idiom "sing from the same hymn (or song) sheet" means to be in agreement or to have a unified understanding or approach to a particular situation or issue. It implies that everyone involved is working together and conveying the same message or viewpoint.
  • cloud the issue The idiom "cloud the issue" means to make a situation more confusing or unclear, usually by bringing up irrelevant or distracting information, thus hindering an effective understanding or resolution of the matter at hand.
  • the eyes are the windows of the soul The idiom "the eyes are the windows of the soul" means that a person's eyes can reveal their true feelings, emotions, and intentions. It suggests that by looking into someone's eyes, one can gain insight into their innermost thoughts and personality.
  • anything of the kind The idiom "anything of the kind" refers to something similar or similar types or categories of things or ideas. It implies that the listener should not expect or assume the presence or occurrence of any similar or comparable things.
  • on the rocks The idiom "on the rocks" typically means that something, usually a relationship or a business, is experiencing difficulties or is in a state of trouble or decline.
  • be ahead of the pack The idiom "be ahead of the pack" means to be in a leading or superior position compared to others in terms of skills, achievements, or progress. It signifies being at the forefront and having an advantage over competitors or peers.
  • teeter on the edge of (something) The idiom "teeter on the edge of (something)" is used to describe a situation or someone's state where they are on the brink or very close to a particular outcome or condition, often a negative one. It implies a lack of stability, equilibrium, or certainty, as if one is about to fall or lose their balance.
  • on the face of the earth The idiom "on the face of the earth" is used to emphasize the absolute existence or presence of someone or something. It implies that there is no place or no one else in the entire world that compares or competes with the particular person or thing being referred to.
  • bottom of the heap The idiom "bottom of the heap" refers to someone or something being in the lowest or least favorable position or condition within a group or hierarchy. It suggests being at the very bottom or the lowest point of a perceived social, professional, or personal hierarchy. It conveys a sense of being at a disadvantage or experiencing inferiority compared to others.
  • at the mercy of sm The phrase "at the mercy of someone" means being completely under someone's control, authority, or power, with no ability to defend oneself or escape from their influence or actions. It implies being vulnerable and having no say or choice in a particular situation.
  • put in the way of The idiom "put in the way of" means to bring something or someone into another's path or to provide an opportunity or resource for someone. It typically implies facilitating or enabling someone to receive help, support, or access to something beneficial.
  • blow the doors off The idiom "blow the doors off" means to surpass or exceed expectations, achievements, or performance by a wide margin. It implies a significant and impressive accomplishment that leaves competitors or previous records far behind. It can also refer to an overwhelming victory or success.
  • jump in the deep end The idiom "jump in the deep end" means to start a new project or undertake a challenging task without any prior experience or preparation. It implies taking a risk or accepting a difficult situation head-on, often with limited knowledge or expertise.
  • on the barrelhead The idiom "on the barrelhead" means paying immediately and in cash at the time of purchase or agreement. It emphasizes the requirement of immediate payment without any delay or credit.
  • be (in) the nature of the beast The idiom "be (in) the nature of the beast" means that a certain behavior or occurrence is an inherent characteristic or unavoidable aspect of a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies that such behavior or occurrence is typical, expected, or unavoidable due to the inherent nature of the situation or individual involved.
  • feed (one) to the lions The idiom "feed (one) to the lions" refers to the act of sacrificing or offering someone as prey to an aggressive or hostile group, often for personal gain or protection. It symbolizes subjecting someone to a dangerous or difficult situation without consideration for their well-being.
  • sth of the sort The idiom "sth of the sort" is a shortened form of "something of the sort." It is used to indicate a general or approximate similarity to a particular thing or situation mentioned or implied. It implies that the described thing or situation is similar in some way, but not exactly the same.
  • take (one) to the cleaners The idiom "take (one) to the cleaners" means to defeat, rob, or financially exploit someone, often resulting in a significant loss for them. It is often used to describe situations where someone is taken advantage of or swindled out of their money or assets.
  • open the door to The idiom "open the door to" means to allow or provide an opportunity or possibility for something to happen or be explored. It generally implies offering access, initiating, or creating conditions that make an action, idea, or outcome feasible.
  • scare the life out of someone The idiom "scare the life out of someone" means to frighten or terrify someone to an extreme extent, causing them to lose their composure or be overcome with fear.
  • shake the dew off the lily The idiom "shake the dew off the lily" is an informal expression that means to dawdle or take your time, especially during the morning or at the beginning of a task. It can also be interpreted as a way to delay or procrastinate in getting started on something. The phrase alludes to the action of shaking dew off a flower, implying a sort of reluctance or hesitation to begin.
  • put the kibosh on someone or something The idiom "put the kibosh on someone or something" means to put an end to or prevent the success or progress of someone or something. It refers to stopping or thwarting a person or situation from proceeding further.
  • at the hands of sb The idiom "at the hands of someone" means to be harmed, hurt, or suffer from someone's actions or decisions. It implies that the person or group mentioned is responsible for causing the harm or negative outcome.
  • the best/better part of The idiom "the best/better part of" refers to the majority or the largest portion of something. It implies the main or most significant portion of a whole or the majority of a given period of time, event, or quantity. It suggests a considerable or significant amount, often emphasizing the fact that something is the largest or most important part.
  • the North The idiom "the North" typically refers to the northern region of a country or specific geographical location. It can also symbolize the concept of progress, modernity, or a more developed region within a country.
  • filled to the brim The idiom "filled to the brim" means that something is completely filled or at maximum capacity. It suggests that there is no more space or room for anything else.
  • the love of life "The love of life" is an idiom used to describe an individual who has an intense passion for, enjoyment of, and appreciation for life in all its aspects. It refers to a deep-seated desire to embrace and make the most out of every moment, finding joy, contentment, and fulfillment in various experiences and endeavors.
  • the bamboo curtain The idiom "the bamboo curtain" refers to the restriction and isolation imposed by the Chinese government, particularly during the Cold War era, on information and communication between China and the outside world. It reflects the opacity and censorship of information, as well as the limited access to foreign media and ideas that was enforced in China during that time.
  • the pick of the litter The idiom "the pick of the litter" is used to refer to the best or most outstanding member or option from a group or selection. It usually suggests the highest quality or most desirable choice. It originates from a phrase used in the context of selecting a puppy from a litter of puppies, where "pick" refers to selecting or choosing, and "litter" refers to a group of siblings born to the same mother at the same time.
  • the shivers The idiom "the shivers" refers to a feeling of fear or discomfort that causes one's body to shake involuntarily. It typically describes a strong sense of unease or apprehension, often associated with a creepy or eerie situation.
  • milk of human kindness, the The idiom "milk of human kindness" refers to a person's capacity for compassion, kindness, and empathy towards others. It suggests the innate and nurturing qualities that humans possess to care for one another.
  • fox guarding the henhouse The idiom "fox guarding the henhouse" refers to a situation where someone with potentially conflicting interests or ulterior motives is entrusted with protecting or regulating something, leading to a high risk of abuse, negligence, or corruption. It implies that the person responsible for the task is not genuinely committed to fulfilling their duty and is more likely to exploit the situation for personal gain at the expense of others.
  • There is no rest for the weary The idiom "There is no rest for the weary" means that someone who is tired or exhausted may not get a chance to rest because they are constantly dealing with more work or responsibilities. It implies that even in moments of fatigue, one must continue to persevere and be diligent.
  • jump on the bandwagon The idiom "jump on the bandwagon" means to join or support a popular trend or movement, often for the sole reason that it is currently popular or gaining momentum, without much consideration or personal conviction. It implies following the crowd without independently evaluating the merits or drawbacks of the idea or cause.
  • harder than the back of God's head The idiom "harder than the back of God's head" is a colorful way of describing something as extremely difficult or impossible to achieve. It implies that the task at hand is beyond challenging and implies that even God's head, being inaccessible, is an impenetrable barrier.
  • buy, get, etc. something off the shelf The idiom "buy/get something off the shelf" means to purchase or acquire a product that is readily available and in stock, without needing to be custom-made or specially ordered. It refers to selecting an item directly from a regular inventory or stock rather than requiring any additional efforts, modifications, or delays.
  • tickle/tinkle the ivories The idiom "tickle/tinkle the ivories" means to play the piano skillfully or playfully. It refers to the action of producing music by physically touching and manipulating the piano keys, which are often made of ivory.
  • there's no time like the present The idiom "there's no time like the present" means that the best time to do something is now or at this moment. It emphasizes the importance of taking action immediately rather than delaying or waiting for a better opportunity.
  • fall at the final hurdle The idiom "fall at the final hurdle" means to fail or experience a setback just before reaching the end or achieving success, often related to a specific goal or endeavor. It refers to stumbling or encountering difficulties in the last phase or crucial moments, preventing one from completing or accomplishing their objective.
  • shoot the dozens The idiom "shoot the dozens" refers to engaging in a playful or humorous exchange of insults or banter with someone, usually in a lighthearted and friendly manner. It involves cleverly and wittily exchange of teasing remarks or jokes back and forth.
  • the Dragon The idiom "the Dragon" typically refers to a powerful, dominant, or formidable force or entity. It can symbolize an individual or organization with great influence, strength, or authority, often used in a metaphorical or mythical sense. The term "the Dragon" may evoke imagery of a mythical creature known for its strength, wisdom, or ability to cause fear or destruction.
  • all over the board The idiom "all over the board" means something is scattered, disorganized, or inconsistent in various aspects or areas. It refers to a situation or action that lacks a clear or cohesive direction or pattern.
  • wear the trousers The idiom "wear the trousers" means to be the dominant or in control person in a relationship or situation. It typically refers to a woman who holds authority or makes decisions, suggesting a reversal of traditional gender roles.
  • into the background The idiom "into the background" refers to the act of fading or receding into obscurity or becoming less prominent or noticeable. It suggests a decrease in importance, attention, or significance, usually due to other people or things taking the spotlight or receiving more focus.
  • the lower orders "The lower orders" is an idiom that refers to the lower social classes or the common people. It portrays a distinction between social classes, with "the lower orders" typically being used to describe people who hold low-paying jobs or have limited social status.
  • drive around the bend The idiom "drive around the bend" means to cause someone to become extremely annoyed, frustrated, or irritated. It suggests that something or someone is pushing a person to their mental breaking point.
  • read someone the riot act The idiom "read someone the riot act" refers to giving someone a stern warning or reprimand, usually in a forceful or authoritative manner, in order to make them aware of their unacceptable behavior or actions. It originates from a historical British act, "The Riot Act of 1715," which authorized authorities to suppress (often violently) any gathering of more than twelve people that might lead to public disorder. Thus, "reading someone the riot act" has come to symbolize a severe admonishment or ultimatum given to someone.
  • one after the other The idiom "one after the other" means to occur consecutively or continuously in a sequence without interruption. It refers to a series of events, actions, or objects happening in quick succession, with each one following immediately after the previous one.
  • in the throes of something/doing something The idiom "in the throes of something/doing something" is used to describe a person who is deeply engaged or fully immersed in a particular activity, experience, or emotional state. It suggests that the individual is in the midst of a challenging, intense, or difficult situation that requires their full attention, effort, or focus.
  • the black sheep The idiom "the black sheep" refers to a person who is considered the odd or disreputable member of a group or family. It suggests that this individual does not conform to the expectations or standards set by others, often leading to their isolation or being viewed as a disappointment.
  • a place in the sun The idiom "a place in the sun" generally refers to achieving success, fame, or recognition in one's life or career. It implies a desire to have a prominent position or status, where one can enjoy the benefits and advantages of their achievements. It can also symbolize finding happiness, contentment, or a comfortable position in life.
  • have the shakes The idiom "have the shakes" refers to a condition where a person experiences trembling or shivering, often due to fear, nervousness, anxiety, or withdrawal symptoms from an addiction. The phrase implies an uncontrollable physical reaction characterized by shaking or trembling.
  • the heebie-jeebies "The heebie-jeebies" is an idiom that refers to a feeling of extreme nervousness, anxiety, or unease. It typically describes a sensation of discomfort, fear, or uneasiness that can be difficult to explain or rationalize.
  • the Argentine The idiom "the Argentine" refers to Argentina, a country located in South America. It may be used to describe something or someone related to Argentina.
  • give somebody/get the bum's rush The idiom "give somebody/get the bum's rush" refers to forcibly ejecting or expelling someone from a place or situation, often in a hasty or abrupt manner. It implies a lack of courtesy or consideration towards the person being removed.
  • what does that have to do with the price of tea in China The idiom "what does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" is a rhetorical question used to dismiss or question the relevance of a statement or information to a given context or conversation. It implies that the mentioned or discussed topic is not connected or has no significant impact on the current situation or discussion. It emphasizes the unrelated nature of the mentioned information or statement.
  • close the books on The idiom "close the books on" means to finalize or complete a particular matter or issue, often by reaching a resolution or making a conclusive decision. It implies putting an end to something, typically an activity, project, or investigation, by wrapping up all the necessary tasks and actions associated with it. It suggests a sense of finality and bringing something to an official conclusion.
  • grasp in the dark The idiom "grasp in the dark" refers to attempting to understand or solve a situation without having sufficient information or knowledge. It implies a sense of uncertainty or confusion, as one is trying to make sense of something without clear guidance or insight. It can also suggest a feeling of being lost or unaware of what to do.
  • give the cold shoulder The idiom "give the cold shoulder" means to intentionally ignore or show indifference towards someone, often by refusing to acknowledge them or their presence. It can also refer to treating someone with aloofness or lack of warmth, typically as a form of disapproval or as a way of expressing one's displeasure or dissatisfaction with them.
  • put the arm/bite on somebody The idiom "put the arm/bite on somebody" means to put pressure on someone or attempt to persuade them, often aggressively, into doing something or giving something, typically referring to money or favors. It implies using strong influence or coercion to extract desired outcomes from the person.
  • shuffle the cards The idiom "shuffle the cards" generally refers to the act of rearranging or changing the current situation, plans, or circumstances, often for the purpose of creating unpredictability, introducing variety, or shaking things up. It implies altering the existing order or routine to bring about new perspectives, outcomes, or opportunities.
  • be not for the faint-hearted The idiom "be not for the faint-hearted" means that something is challenging, difficult, or intense, and may require a strong, courageous, or resilient individual to face or handle it. It implies that only those with a strong will or endurance should attempt or engage in the particular task, experience, or situation.
  • the Commonwealth "The Commonwealth" refers to an association of independent countries, mostly former territories of the British Empire, that have come together voluntarily to promote political, economic, and cultural cooperation. It is an intergovernmental organization that aims to promote democracy, human rights, and development among member states, while also providing a platform for collaboration and exchange on various global issues.
  • beyond the veil The idiom "beyond the veil" typically refers to something that is hidden, mysterious, or inaccessible. It often refers to realms or knowledge that are beyond the understanding or perception of the ordinary world or consciousness. It can also be used to describe crossing over from life to death, suggesting a passage into the unknown or spiritual realm. Overall, it implies an existence or reality that is beyond what can be easily comprehended or experienced.
  • take the liberty of doing The idiom "take the liberty of doing" means to act or behave in a way that may be considered forward or presumptuous without seeking permission or approval. It often suggests a certain level of confidence, assertiveness, or familiarity in taking action without explicit authorization from others.
  • the odd man out, at the odd one out The idiom "the odd man out" or "the odd one out" refers to a person or thing that is different or doesn't fit in with the rest of a group or set. It signifies someone or something that is unique, distinct, or doesn't conform to the norm.
  • the Shires The idiom "the Shires" refers to a collective term used to describe the rural counties of England, typically consisting of Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Hertfordshire, Staffordshire, and Worcestershire. It represents the quintessential English countryside with its picturesque landscapes, small villages, and agricultural way of life. It is often used to evoke a sense of traditional and idyllic rural England.
  • turn up the heat on someone To "turn up the heat on someone" means to increase pressure, intensity, or scrutiny on someone in order to push them to take action, make a decision, or reveal information. It typically involves applying more forceful, assertive, or demanding tactics to provoke a response or achieve the desired outcome.
  • on the bottle The definition of the idiom "on the bottle" is usually used to describe someone who is addicted to alcohol or constantly consuming alcohol. It implies that the person is heavily dependent on alcohol and potentially unable to quit or control their drinking habit.
  • in the pay of The idiom "in the pay of" refers to someone being in the employment or under the control of someone else, especially in a manner that compromises their allegiance, loyalty, or independence. It implies that the person is being influenced or controlled by someone due to financial or other incentives.
  • Where is the restroom? "Where is the restroom?" is an idiom used to ask for the location of the toilet or bathroom in a public place.
  • give (one) the slip The idiom "give (one) the slip" means to successfully evade or leave someone behind, especially when being pursued or followed. It implies the act of escaping or eluding someone in a clever or elusive manner.
  • go, swim, etc. with/against the stream/tide The idiom "go, swim, etc. with/against the stream/tide" means to either conform or rebel against prevailing opinions, ideas, or societal norms. It refers to the act of either going along with the majority or going against it. Going with the stream implies following the popular trend or prevailing opinion, while going against the stream suggests going against popular opinion or taking an alternative path. Similarly, going with the tide means following the general consensus, while going against the tide suggests swimming against the current or resisting popular opinion.
  • pull the rug from under sb's feet To "pull the rug from under someone's feet" means to suddenly undermine or remove support, advantages, or stability from someone, leaving them in a vulnerable or helpless position. It refers to the act of figuratively pulling a rug out from under someone, causing them to stumble or fall.
  • Get your head out of the clouds! The idiom "Get your head out of the clouds!" typically means to stop daydreaming or being impractical and start paying attention to reality or practical matters. It is often used to encourage someone to be more focused, realistic, or grounded.
  • burn up the road The idiom "burn up the road" means to drive or travel at high speeds, typically in a reckless or speedy manner.
  • have (or get) by the short hairs The idiom "have (or get) by the short hairs" refers to having someone in a helpless or vulnerable position, usually through the exertion of control or authority over them. It implies having someone firmly under one's control, making it difficult for them to escape or resist.
  • ring off the hook The idiom "ring off the hook" is used to describe a situation where a telephone is constantly ringing due to a high volume of incoming calls. It implies a state of extreme busyness or popularity.
  • off the pace The idiom "off the pace" refers to someone or something that is not performing as well as others, lagging behind or falling behind in a competition, race, or any kind of competitive situation. It suggests being outmatched or not meeting the expected level of performance.
  • throw a (monkey) wrench in the works, at put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "throw a (monkey) wrench in the works" (or "put/throw a spanner in the works" in British English) means to cause disruption or interference in a plan or process, thereby hindering progress or stopping it altogether. It refers to an unexpected event or action that creates unexpected difficulties, obstacles, or complications.
  • take the wraps off sth The idiom "take the wraps off something" means to reveal or unveil something that was previously concealed or hidden. It refers to removing the coverings or protective layers that were keeping something hidden from view, allowing it to be fully seen or exposed.
  • the cat has got someone's tongue The idiom "the cat has got someone's tongue" means that the person is silent or unable to speak, typically because they are surprised, embarrassed, or unsure of what to say in a particular situation.
  • the straight and narrow The idiom "the straight and narrow" refers to living a morally upright, honest, and law-abiding lifestyle. It implies following a path of righteousness, staying away from vices, and adhering to the rules and ethics of society.
  • out of the (starting) gate The idiom "out of the (starting) gate" refers to a quick or prompt start or beginning of something, often referring to a competitive situation. It is derived from the image of a horse race or other competitive event where participants start from a gate or a starting line. It can imply being the first or one of the first to begin an activity or project, displaying a competitive advantage, or demonstrating a proactive approach.
  • does (exactly) what it says on the tin The idiom "does (exactly) what it says on the tin" means that something or someone lives up to its description or performs precisely as advertised, without any ambiguity or additional expectations. It implies that the item or person is straightforward and reliable, operating exactly as one would expect based on the given information. This idiom is often used to emphasize accuracy, honesty, and no-nonsense qualities.
  • burn the midnight oil To "burn the midnight oil" means to work or study late into the night, especially when it involves intense or diligent effort.
  • the unconscious The idiom "the unconscious" refers to the part of the mind that contains thoughts, feelings, desires, or memories that are not readily or consciously accessible to a person. It represents a reservoir of information and experiences that influence a person's thoughts, behavior, and emotions without their awareness. It is often associated with psychoanalytic theories developed by Sigmund Freud, where the unconscious plays a significant role in shaping individuals' behavior and psychological well-being.
  • full to the gills The idiom "full to the gills" means completely or very full. It originates from the image of gills, which are the breathing organs of fish, being full to the point of being stuffed or unable to hold anything more. In a figurative sense, it refers to someone or something being completely filled or overwhelmed with a certain thing or having no more capacity to accommodate any additional.
  • shut/lock/close the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "shut/lock/close the stable door after the horse has bolted" is a phrase used to describe a situation in which someone tries to protect or prevent something bad from happening, but it is already too late. It signifies taking action to rectify a problem or prevent further damage, but at a point when the damage has already been done and is irreversible. It implies that the person is reacting to a situation rather than being proactive and addressing it before it gets out of control.
  • To the victors belong the spoils. The idiom "To the victors belong the spoils" means that those who are victorious in a conflict or competition are entitled to the rewards or benefits that come with winning. It implies that the winners have the right to enjoy or take advantage of the spoils or prizes that result from their success.
  • yield the ghost The idiom "yield the ghost" means to die or give up one's life.
  • pay the piper The idiom "pay the piper" means to face the consequences of one's actions or to accept the necessary cost or price for something. It often implies that one cannot avoid or escape the payment or repayment required after enjoying certain benefits or committing certain actions.
  • be in the (right) ballpark The idiom "be in the (right) ballpark" means to be close to the correct answer, estimate, or range. It suggests that someone's guess or approximation is within reasonable proximity to the correct or expected value, even if it is not exact.
  • I take/plead the Fifth (Amendment) The idiom "I take/plead the Fifth (Amendment)" refers to invoking the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution, which allows a person to refuse to answer any questions in a legal proceeding that may incriminate them. It means to exercise the right to remain silent in order to avoid self-incrimination.
  • the dog's bollocks The idiom "the dog's bollocks" is a slang expression that originated in British English. It is used to describe something or someone as exceptionally good, impressive, or high quality. It can be used to convey admiration or praise for a particular thing or person. However, it is important to note that the phrase includes a strong expletive, so it is considered informal and may be considered rude or offensive in certain contexts.
  • can't for the life of me The idiom "can't for the life of me" is used to express extreme difficulty or inability to do or understand something, no matter how hard one tries. It conveys a deep sense of frustration or helplessness.
  • lead (one) down the garden path The idiom "lead (one) down the garden path" means to deceive, manipulate, or trick someone into believing something that is not true. It suggests that the person being led is being lured into a situation or idea that seems pleasant or enticing but is ultimately misleading or deceitful.
  • give (someone) the business The idiom "give (someone) the business" typically means to criticize, scold, or reprimand someone severely or forcefully. It can also refer to treating someone harshly or subjecting them to a challenging or difficult experience.
  • the check is in the mail The idiom "the check is in the mail" is used to express assurance or a promise that a payment will be sent soon or is already on its way, typically referring to a check being mailed as a form of payment for goods or services rendered. However, it is often used sarcastically or skeptically to imply that the promised payment is unlikely to arrive.
  • liar is not believed when he tells the truth The idiom "liar is not believed when he tells the truth" refers to a situation where someone who has a habit of lying or being untrustworthy is unable to convince others that they are telling the truth, even when they are actually being honest. This can be due to the person's reputation for dishonesty, which has created a lack of trust and credibility towards anything they say, regardless of its truthfulness.
  • buy the box The idiom "buy the box" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To purchase a complete set or collection of something, often referred to as buying all the items contained in a box or package together. Example: "She loves the TV show so much that she decided to buy the box set of all the seasons." 2. To willingly believe or accept something without questioning or seeking further information. Example: "Don't just buy the box when he promises you quick money. Make sure you do your research before investing."
  • connect the dots The idiom "connect the dots" means to draw logical connections or find patterns between different pieces of information or events in order to understand or solve something. It refers to the process of comprehending or linking various elements to form a coherent picture or conclusion.
  • the big one The idiom "the big one" typically refers to a significant or major event, moment, or accomplishment. It can be used to describe something of significant importance or magnitude. Additionally, it can also be used to refer to a specific highly desirable or anticipated goal or prize.
  • have the ball in court The idiom "have the ball in court" refers to a situation where someone has the power or control to make a decision or take action. It suggests that the person has the responsibility or authority to move things forward or make progress in a particular matter.
  • turn the heat on (someone or something) The idiom "turn the heat on (someone or something)" means to apply pressure, increase intensity, or provoke someone or something in order to make them perform better or react more strongly. It often involves creating a situation where the person or thing is faced with challenges or is compelled to take action.
  • howl at the moon The idiom "howl at the moon" means to engage in futile or pointless behavior, often used to describe someone expressing their frustration or anger in an exaggerated or ineffective way. It originated from the idea of wolves or dogs howling at the moon, which is considered a pointless activity since the moon does not respond or change anything.
  • laid to the bone The idiom "laid to the bone" typically means being extremely exhausted or fatigued to the point where one's energy or stamina has been completely depleted, leaving them physically or mentally drained. It implies a state of utter weariness or depletion.
  • joined at the hip The idiom "joined at the hip" refers to two or more people who are very closely connected or always together, indicating a strong bond or excessive attachment between them. It implies that they are inseparable or constantly in each other's company.
  • dressed to the teeth The idiom "dressed to the teeth" means to be extremely well-dressed or adorned, often with the implication of being extravagantly or elaborately attired. It denotes someone who is dressed stylishly and meticulously, paying attention to every detail of their appearance.
  • on the tiles The idiom "on the tiles" means to be out and about, particularly in the evening or at night, enjoying oneself and engaging in social activities, often involving drinking alcohol and partying.
  • have the time of your life The idiom "have the time of your life" means to have an incredibly enjoyable, exciting, or memorable experience. It signifies experiencing a period of joy, fun, and fulfillment.
  • drop in the bucket The idiom "drop in the bucket" refers to a small or insignificant amount or contribution in relation to the overall size or magnitude of a problem or situation. It implies that the effort or action is inadequate and does not make a significant impact or difference.
  • head for the last roundup The idiom "head for the last roundup" is a colloquial expression that refers to someone or something reaching the end or final stage of a situation or process. It often implies a sense of finality or inevitability, similar to a roundup of cattle or livestock before they are taken away or before a decisive event occurs. Essentially, it means approaching the last or final phase or conclusion of something.
  • not the sharpest tool in the shed The idiom "not the sharpest tool in the shed" is used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or clever. It implies that the person lacks mental acuity or sharpness, similar to a tool that is not as effective or efficient as others.
  • sister under the skin The idiom "sister under the skin" means to describe someone who may seem different, but deep down they share similar characteristics, beliefs, or values. It implies that there is a hidden or underlying connection between two people or things despite their visible differences.
  • give (one) the pip The idiom "give (one) the pip" means to annoy or irritate someone.
  • be thrown into the scale (of something) The idiom "be thrown into the scale" typically means to have something or someone added or introduced suddenly, unexpectedly, or without warning into a situation or decision-making process, which may impact the outcome or change the dynamics. It often connotes the element of surprise or disruption.
  • have one foot in the grave The idiom "have one foot in the grave" is used to describe someone who is extremely ill, weak, or close to death. It suggests that the person's health is deteriorating to such an extent that they are very close to passing away.
  • be asleep at the wheel The idiom "be asleep at the wheel" means to be inattentive or neglectful of one's responsibilities or tasks. It refers to the lack of awareness or alertness, often in a metaphorical sense, similar to someone being physically asleep while operating a vehicle. It implies a state of negligence or unawareness that can lead to mistakes or missed opportunities.
  • as/if/when the spirit moves you The idiom "as/if/when the spirit moves you" means to do something when one feels the desire, motivation, or inspiration to do so. It implies that the action or decision is entirely based on the individual's own internal inclination or will, rather than external pressure or obligations.
  • the knock at/on the door The idiom "the knock at/on the door" refers to an unexpected or alarming event or situation that brings sudden change or disruption to someone's life, often signaling the arrival of trouble, bad news, or an unforeseen opportunity. It suggests that a significant event or visitor is about to occur, potentially altering the course of one's life or circumstances.
  • in the hopper The idiom "in the hopper" refers to something that is currently being worked on or planned, usually in the process of development or completion. It is often used to describe tasks, projects, or ideas that are in progress or undergoing preparation before being executed.
  • at the outside The idiom "at the outside" typically means the maximum or the furthest limit of something. It is used when referring to an estimation or a prediction, suggesting that something will not exceed a certain point or time.
  • line of fire, in the The definition of the idiom "in the line of fire" is being in a situation where one is directly exposed to danger or criticism. It originates from military terminology, referring to being within range of enemy gunfire or in a hazardous position. In a figurative sense, it is used to describe someone who faces direct and potentially harmful consequences or scrutiny.
  • down the pan, at down the toilet The idiom "down the pan" or "down the toilet" is a colloquial expression used to indicate that something has been wasted, ruined, or failed. It is often used to describe a situation or effort that is unsuccessful or unsuccessful as expected, resulting in disappointment or frustration.
  • cost a bomb/the earth/a packet, at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idioms "cost a bomb/the earth/a packet" and "at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune" are used to describe something that is extremely expensive or comes at a high price. Here's how to define each idiom separately: 1. "Cost a bomb/the earth/a packet": This idiom indicates that something is very costly. The usage of "bomb," "earth," or "packet" emphasizes that the expense is significantly high. For example, "That luxury car costs a bomb" means the car is extremely expensive. 2. "Cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune": This idiom expresses that something is excessively expensive to the extent that it requires a significant sacrifice or expenditure. The phrases "arm and
  • can’t hit the (broad) side of a barn The idiom "can't hit the (broad) side of a barn" refers to someone's poor aim or lack of accuracy. It implies that the person is extremely inept at hitting a target, even one as large as the side of a barn, which would typically be an easy task for most people.
  • at the last gasp The expression "at the last gasp" is an idiom that means being at the point of complete exhaustion or near death. It refers to the final moments or stages of a person or thing's existence, often in a desperate or critical state.
  • see the colour of money The idiom "see the colour of money" means to physically or tangibly receive or obtain money. It implies the actual receipt of money rather than just the promise or possibility of it. It is often used to express the need for concrete financial transactions or the assurance of payment.
  • err on the right side The idiom "err on the right side" means to make a mistake or error by choosing an option or action that is considered safe, cautious, or morally acceptable. It suggests that it is better to be overly careful or conservative in decision-making rather than taking unnecessary risks or making regrettable choices.
  • in sth's name, at in the name of sth The idiom "in something's name" or "in the name of something" is used to indicate that an action or request is being performed on behalf of, or in the interest of, a particular person, group, or cause. It often implies that the action is done with authority or official sanction, as if representing the person or cause being identified.
  • be foaming at the mouth The idiom "be foaming at the mouth" typically means to be very angry, enraged, or agitated. It is often used to describe someone who is extremely furious or irate, as if they were literally foaming at the mouth like an angry animal.
  • lay (or put) it on the line The idiom "lay (or put) it on the line" means to be honest and upfront about something, often involving taking a risk or being open about one's thoughts, opinions, or intentions. It implies being direct, transparent, and not holding back in communication or action.
  • see something out of the corner of your eye The idiom "see something out of the corner of your eye" means to catch a glimpse or perception of something without directly focusing on it. It refers to noticing something in one's peripheral vision or perceiving something indirectly.
  • (do something) or get off the pot The idiom "(do something) or get off the pot" means to make a decision or take action rather than remaining indecisive or passive. It implies that one should either choose a course of action or stop wasting time and make way for others who are willing to act. The phrase originated from the saying "shit or get off the pot," which is a more explicit way of expressing the same sentiment.
  • bark at the moon The idiom "bark at the moon" means to engage in futile or pointless behavior, or to persistently complain or protest about something that cannot be changed or influenced. It often implies that the person or entity is wasting their energy or efforts on something that will not produce any meaningful results. The phrase may also be used to describe someone who is acting irrationally or unsuccessfully trying to accomplish something beyond their capabilities.
  • hang on the lips of The idiom "hang on the lips of" means that someone is eagerly listening and paying close attention to every word being said by another person. This can indicate a high level of interest or fascination with the speaker's words, often suggesting that what they say is captivating or important.
  • give sb/sth the onceover The idiom "give sb/sth the onceover" means to quickly inspect or examine someone or something in a cursory manner. It typically involves a brief and superficial assessment to get a general idea or impression without a thorough investigation.
  • (un)til the cows come home The idiom "(un)til the cows come home" means for a very long time or indefinitely, usually implying a delay or extended period of waiting or doing something. It suggests that something will continue to happen or take place without an immediate end in sight, similar to the time it takes for cows to return to the barn after grazing in the fields.
  • head the ball The idiom "head the ball" usually refers to someone who is foolish, stupid, or lacking common sense. It suggests that the person's thinking or decision-making abilities are questionable or inferior. It is often used in a derogatory manner to criticize someone's intelligence or judgment.
  • turn of the century The idiom "turn of the century" refers to a specific period of time when one century transitions into the next, usually indicating the change from the 19th to the 20th century or from the 20th to the 21st century. It signifies a pivotal moment in history or a significant shift in cultural, social, and technological aspects of society.
  • there's a turn-up for the book(s) The idiom "there's a turn-up for the book(s)" typically means that a situation or event has taken an unexpected or surprising turn, usually in a way that deviates from what was anticipated or predicted. It suggests that the outcome or development of a particular event is remarkable or noteworthy, potentially altering the course of a story or narrative, just like a twist in a book.
  • rap (one) over the knuckles The idiom "rap (one) over the knuckles" means to admonish, scold, or reprimand someone for a mistake or wrongdoing, typically in a stern or harsh manner. It can imply a light punishment or rebuke, similar to a quick strike on the knuckles.
  • at the back of beyond The idiom "at the back of beyond" refers to a place that is extremely remote, far away, or isolated from civilization or urban areas. It conveys the idea of being in a location that is very distant, hard to reach, or challenging to access.
  • like pigs to the slaughter The idiom "like pigs to the slaughter" refers to a situation where individuals or a group of people are blindly and willingly walking into a dangerous or harmful situation without being aware or cautious about the potential consequences, similar to how pigs are led to their slaughter without resistance or an understanding of their fate.
  • fill in the blank The definition of the idiom "fill in the blank" is to complete or provide missing information or details in a statement, question, or sentence. It refers to the act of inserting the appropriate word, phrase, or name into a designated space or position. It is commonly used when there is an omission deliberately left for the recipient to complete.
  • between you, me, and the gatepost The idiom "between you, me, and the gatepost" refers to a statement or information that is to be kept confidential and not shared with anyone else. It is an expression used to emphasize the importance of secrecy and trust between the speaker and the listener.
  • knock the habit The idiom "knock the habit" refers to the act of successfully quitting or overcoming a particular habit or addiction, especially in relation to substances such as drugs, alcohol, smoking, or even negative behavioral patterns. It implies putting an end to something that is considered harmful, unhealthy, or undesirable.
  • like you owned the place, at as if you owned the place The idiom "like you owned the place" or "as if you owned the place" refers to behaving with confidence, authority, or a sense of entitlement in a particular situation or location, as if one has complete control or ownership over it, regardless of their actual authority or ownership status. It implies acting as though one has the right to make decisions and behave freely as the owner would.
  • put one's head on the block (for sm or sth) The idiom "put one's head on the block (for someone or something)" means to take a great risk or put oneself in a dangerous or vulnerable position to support or defend someone or something. It refers to the act of sacrificing oneself, metaphorically offering one's head to be placed on a chopping block. The expression implies a willingness to face severe consequences or potential harm in order to protect or vouch for someone or something.
  • the Deluge The idiom "the Deluge" refers to a cataclysmic event or an overwhelming flood that causes chaos or destruction, much like the biblical flood described in the story of Noah's Ark. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a large amount or an overwhelming onslaught of something.
  • come out in the open with The idiom "come out in the open with" means to openly reveal or disclose something, usually a secret, information, or one's true feelings or intentions, that was previously hidden or kept private. It involves bringing something to light or making it known publicly.
  • go in the tank The idiom "go in the tank" is used to describe a situation where something or someone's performance or success significantly declines or fails completely. It often refers to a sudden and dramatic loss of competitiveness, productivity, or financial viability.
  • The lights are on but nobody's/noone's home. The definition of the idiom "The lights are on but nobody's/no one's home" refers to someone who appears to be physically present but is mentally or emotionally absent, lacking awareness, or not fully comprehending or engaging in a situation. It suggests that the person is vacant, disconnected, or not functioning at their usual level of intellect or consciousness.
  • the beautiful people The idiom "the beautiful people" refers to a concept or group of individuals who are considered attractive, glamorous, or elite in appearance, status, or lifestyle. It often implies physical beauty, wealth, and popularity, and is typically associated with those who are well-known, influential, or socially desirable.
  • arguing for the sake of arguing The definition of the idiom "arguing for the sake of arguing" is when someone engages in a debate or dispute not because they genuinely believe in a particular stance or seek to find a solution, but merely for the sake of enjoying the act of arguing or asserting their dominance in a conversation.
  • up the pole The idiom "up the pole" typically means to be confused, mistaken, or misinformed about something. It refers to a situation where someone is led astray, making a wrong assumption or belief. It can also imply a sense of being disoriented or lost in a particular situation.
  • pull the wool over eyes The idiom "pull the wool over eyes" means to deceive or trick someone by hiding the truth or one's true intentions. It involves deliberately misleading or manipulating others in order to gain an advantage or avoid detection.
  • give somebody/get/have the run of something The idiom "give somebody/get/have the run of something" means to be given unrestricted access or freedom to use or explore something. It implies being granted complete control, authority, or freedom within a specific area or situation.
  • cook the books The idiom "cook the books" refers to the act of deliberately manipulating financial records or accounts in order to present an inaccurate or misleading picture of a company's financial situation. It involves fraudulent practices such as falsifying or inflating numbers, hiding expenses or losses, or manipulating revenue figures in order to deceive stakeholders, investors, or regulators.
  • leap in the dark The idiom "leap in the dark" refers to taking a risk or making a decision without knowing or fully understanding the potential consequences or outcome. It involves taking a chance on something uncertain or unknown, often with a sense of bravery or audacity.
  • wave the bloody shirt The idiom "wave the bloody shirt" refers to a tactic used in politics or public discourse to evoke emotions from a past event, typically a tragic or violent one, in order to manipulate or rally support. It involves reminding or stirring up negative memories, grievances, or animosities in order to gain sympathy, incite anger, or achieve a political objective.
  • arrive on the stroke of sm time The idiom "arrive on the stroke of sm time" means to arrive exactly at the specified time, often emphasizing punctuality and precision. It suggests that the person is never late and arrives promptly at the scheduled moment.
  • for the fun of it The idiomatic phrase "for the fun of it" refers to doing something simply for enjoyment or amusement, without any particular purpose or serious intention. It suggests engaging in an activity purely for the pleasure and entertainment it offers, rather than striving for a specific outcome.
  • cut the ground out from under The idiom "cut the ground out from under" means to undermine, weaken, or destroy someone's position or support, typically by taking actions or making statements that discredit or invalidate their claims or arguments. It is often used to describe a deliberate or strategic move that undermines someone's authority, credibility, or position of power.
  • pay over the odds The idiom "pay over the odds" refers to the act of paying more than something is worth or more than the usual price for a particular item or service. It signifies an excessive or unfair amount of money being paid for something.
  • catch the wave The idiom "catch the wave" is generally used to mean taking advantage of a current trend or movement, specifically in business or pop culture. It refers to seizing an opportunity and successfully riding the wave of popularity or success.
  • at the top of voice The idiom "at the top of one's voice" refers to speaking or shouting loudly or with a raised volume. It implies utilizing one's full vocal capacity to make oneself heard.
  • the Cape The idiom "the Cape" typically refers to Cape Town, a city in South Africa, which is located on the Cape of Good Hope. However, without further context, the idiom can also refer to other capes in different geographic locations or be used metaphorically to represent the idea of reaching a destination or goal.
  • go/swim against the tide The idiom "go/swim against the tide" means to act or think in a way that is contrary to the prevailing or popular opinion, trend, or direction. It implies going against the general flow or resisting the popular current of thought or action.
  • you could cut the atmosphere with a knife The idiom "you could cut the atmosphere with a knife" is used to describe an incredibly tense or silent situation or atmosphere that is filled with tension, awkwardness, or anticipation. The phrase suggests that the atmosphere is so thick that it feels tangible, as if one could use a knife to physically cut through it.
  • toss (one's) name in the hat The idiom "to toss one's name in the hat" means to voluntarily nominate or offer oneself as a candidate for a particular position, opportunity, or competition. It implies that the person is taking a chance and expressing their interest or availability, often in a competitive or uncertain context.
  • run off at the mouth The idiom "run off at the mouth" means to talk excessively or uncontrollably, often without thinking or being aware of the effects of one's words. It refers to someone who speaks without restraint, often in a careless or inappropriate manner.
  • have the drop on The idiom "have the drop on" means to have a tactical advantage or to hold power over someone in a confrontational situation. It originates from the phrase "to have the drop on someone," which refers to having a firearm aimed and ready to shoot before the other person has a chance to react. Today, it is commonly used to describe having control or one-upping someone in a particular situation.
  • Today here, tomorrow the world. The idiom "Today here, tomorrow the world" typically means a person or a group that starts from a small or local position, but has ambitious aspirations to expand or conquer new territories or achievements in the future. It conveys the idea of starting small and gradually growing into something much bigger or more significant.
  • the L-bomb The idiom "the L-bomb" refers to the act of saying or declaring love to someone. It is often used to describe the moment when someone expresses their feelings of love towards another person. The term "L-bomb" is a playful and colloquial way of referring to this significant and impactful declaration.
  • on the firing line The idiom "on the firing line" typically refers to someone who is directly involved or responsible for a particular task, project, or situation and faces the most pressure, risk, or criticism. This person is in a vulnerable position, often dealing with high stakes or difficult circumstances. The phrase can also be interpreted as being at the forefront of a challenging situation, taking the brunt of criticism or blame.
  • sugar-coat the pill The idiom "sugar-coat the pill" means to make something unpleasant or difficult to accept seem more pleasant, appealing, or easy to take. It refers to the act of disguising or camouflaging a negative situation, criticism, or news by presenting it in a more positive or palatable way.
  • the common/general run The idiom "the common/general run" refers to the average or typical group of people or things within a particular category or context. It implies the standard or usual characteristics, behavior, or quality that can be expected from a majority or typical representation of something.
  • call (one) on the carpet The idiom "call (one) on the carpet" means to reprimand or scold someone sternly, typically in a formal or authoritative setting, for their actions or behavior. It implies holding someone accountable for their mistakes or misconduct.
  • kick someone in the teeth The idiom "kick someone in the teeth" means to figuratively harm or betray someone, often by taking advantage of their vulnerability or causing them a significant setback or disappointment. It implies an act of causing intentional harm or treating someone unfairly without remorse or consideration for their feelings.
  • by/through the back door The idiom "by/through the back door" means doing something indirectly or secretly, often bending or avoiding the rules, procedures, or normal routes to achieve a particular goal or gain an advantage.
  • break the buck The idiom "break the buck" typically refers to an action or event that causes disruption, failure, or the ruining of a successful streak or situation. It is often used in financial contexts to describe an event or decision that causes a decline in the value or stability of an investment or business.
  • on the cuff The idiom "on the cuff" typically means purchasing something on credit or without immediate payment, with the understanding or agreement to pay later. It often refers to a situation where someone receives goods or services without having the means to pay for them at the time of the transaction.
  • under the aegis of The idiom "under the aegis of" means being guided, protected, or sponsored by a particular authority, organization, or influential individual. It indicates that something is happening with the support and supervision of someone in a position of power or influence.
  • add fuel to the fire The idiom "add fuel to the fire" means to make a situation or conflict worse or more heated by saying or doing something that intensifies emotions or tensions. It implies exacerbating a problem or provoking further arguments or hostilities.
  • rise from the dead/grave The idiom "rise from the dead/grave" refers to the act of coming back to life or returning from a state of death or obscurity. It is often used figuratively to describe the resurrection or revival of something or someone that was thought to be gone or finished.
  • stretch the length of sth To "stretch the length of something" is an idiomatic phrase that means to extend or prolong the duration or size of something, typically beyond its usual or anticipated length. It implies making something longer or bigger than expected or planned.
  • the elderly The idiom "the elderly" refers to older individuals who are advanced in age, generally referring to people who are typically above the age of 65 or those who have reached retirement age. It is a way to describe and categorize the older population.
  • scratch the surface (of something) The idiom "scratch the surface (of something)" means to only explore or uncover a fraction of the true depth, complexity, or significance of something. It implies that one's understanding or knowledge about a particular subject or issue is shallow or limited, often indicating the need for further exploration or investigation.
  • the forties The idiom "the forties" typically refers to the period of time from 40 to 49 years of age. It can also be used more broadly to refer to the decade of the 1940s.
  • pick up the ball and run The idiom "pick up the ball and run" means to take over a task or responsibility that someone else has neglected or abandoned, and to proceed with it in a determined and proactive manner. It implies initiative, leadership, and being proactive in finding solutions or making progress.
  • in the altitudes The idiom "in the altitudes" typically refers to being in a high or elevated position, either literally or metaphorically. It can imply being in a state of success, power, or superiority.
  • live on the edge The idiom "live on the edge" refers to living in a risky or adventurous manner, often with a disregard for the potential consequences. It implies embracing an unconventional or non-conformist lifestyle where one constantly seeks excitement, novelty, and thrills. It can also suggest being daring, taking risks, and pushing one's own boundaries, both physically and metaphorically.
  • the almighty dollar The idiom "the almighty dollar" refers to the dominance and power that money holds over people and their decisions. It implies that money is all-powerful and can often be the primary motivating factor for individuals.
  • all the difference in the world The idiom "all the difference in the world" means a significant or profound distinction or contrast between two things or situations. It emphasizes the extreme disparity and importance of a specific factor in determining the outcome or nature of a situation.
  • be not playing the game The idiom "be not playing the game" refers to someone who is not conforming or adhering to the conventional rules or expectations of a situation or system. It implies that the person is not actively participating or engaging in the expected manner, possibly due to a lack of interest, disagreement, or a personal agenda.
  • not worth the trouble The idiom "not worth the trouble" means that someone or something is not deserving of the effort, inconvenience, or difficulties that may be involved. It implies that the potential benefits, rewards, or outcomes do not justify the time, energy, or problems that would arise from pursuing or engaging with it.
  • the great outdoors The idiom "the great outdoors" typically refers to the natural environment outside of buildings or urban areas. It encompasses various settings such as forests, mountains, lakes, and other areas influenced by nature. It signifies a connection to nature, adventure, and the freedom of being outside in open spaces.
  • the tide turns The expression "the tide turns" refers to a significant change or shift in a situation, often implying a reversal of fortunes or a change in the prevailing momentum. It suggests that a negative or unfavorable situation is beginning to improve or that circumstances are shifting in a more positive direction.
  • kick in the pants The idiom "kick in the pants" refers to a motivating or stimulating action or event that encourages someone to take action, make progress, or achieve something. It essentially means to receive a boost or inspiration to get moving or improve oneself.
  • hit the road The idiom "hit the road" means to begin a journey or to leave a place or situation. It often implies a sense of urgency or a desire to get going.
  • kick in the teeth The idiom "kick in the teeth" refers to a situation where someone experiences a sudden and unexpected setback, disappointment, or betrayal, often resulting in the feeling of being hurt, betrayed, or unfairly treated. It implies a metaphorical blow or attack to one's hopes, expectations, or trust.
  • laugh sm off the stage The idiom "laugh someone off the stage" means to mock or ridicule someone to such an extent that they are forced to leave or fail in their performance, presentation, or endeavor. It implies that the person's attempt to impress or entertain is met with scorn and derision from the audience, causing them to be humiliated and ultimately rejected.
  • a blot on the escutcheon The idiom "a blot on the escutcheon" refers to something that brings disgrace or dishonor to someone's reputation or family name. It originates from the world of heraldry, where an escutcheon is a shield displaying a family's coat of arms. A blot on the escutcheon implies a stain or mark on that shield, symbolizing a tainted reputation or a shameful act that tarnishes one's family legacy.
  • have an eye to/for the main chance The idiom "have an eye to/for the main chance" means to carefully observe or be focused on opportunities for personal gain or advancement. It often refers to someone who is always seeking and taking advantage of lucrative or advantageous situations.
  • get up on the wrong side of (the) bed The idiom "get up on the wrong side of (the) bed" means to wake up in a bad mood or start the day feeling irritable and grumpy. It implies that someone's mood or demeanor is negative right from the moment they wake up, often leaving them prone to being easily annoyed or frustrated throughout the day.
  • lie down on the job The idiom "lie down on the job" means to be lazy, negligent, or not putting effort into one's work or duties. It refers to someone who is not fulfilling their responsibilities or not performing tasks effectively.
  • in the blood The idiom "in the blood" refers to a trait, skill, or characteristic that is inherited or innate. It suggests that something is instinctual, deeply ingrained, or a fundamental part of one's nature or family history.
  • at the service of somebody/something "At the service of somebody/something" is an idiom used to describe someone or something that is willing and available to assist or help another person or organization. It implies being dedicated or devoted to serving someone's needs or fulfilling a particular purpose.
  • hold the stage The idiom "hold the stage" means to captivate and maintain the attention or interest of an audience, often referring to a performer or speaker who maintains a compelling presence on stage. It implies having the ability to command the spotlight, engage the audience, and maintain control or influence over the proceedings.
  • have the munchies The idiom "have the munchies" means to have a strong desire to eat or snack, especially when experiencing increased appetite due to the effects of marijuana or other substances. It signifies a craving for food, often associated with a heightened sense of hunger or an intense desire for specific types of snacks.
  • flip (one) the bird The idiom "flip (one) the bird" refers to the act of extending one's middle finger upward as a vulgar gesture of defiance, disrespect, or contempt towards someone. It is commonly used to express anger, annoyance, or to provoke a reaction.
  • play both sides against the middle The idiomatic expression "play both sides against the middle" refers to a strategy where someone manipulates or takes advantage of two opposing parties or groups for personal gain. This tactic involves pitting both sides against each other in order to maintain control, power, or achieve a desired outcome.
  • at the end of one's rope The idiom "at the end of one's rope" means to be in a state of extreme frustration, exhaustion, or desperation. It describes the feeling of having tried all options and being unable to find a solution or way out of a difficult situation.
  • be on the run The idiom "be on the run" means to be constantly moving or hiding in order to avoid being caught, usually by law enforcement or authorities. It implies being in a state of escape or evasion, often due to illegal activities or a desire to avoid consequences.
  • suit someone down to the ground The idiom "suit someone down to the ground" means that something is perfectly suited or ideal for a person, meeting their preferences or requirements precisely. It implies a high level of compatibility and satisfaction.
  • (that's the) way to go The idiom "(that's the) way to go" is a phrase that is used to express approval or praise for someone's excellent decision, action, or choice. It signifies that the person has made a good move or taken the correct course of action in a particular situation. It is often used to encourage or support someone's efforts or to acknowledge their achievement.
  • there is always room at the top The idiom "there is always room at the top" means that there is always space or opportunity for someone to rise to a higher position or achieve success, even if it seems crowded or competitive. It suggests that there is no limit to the number of people who can attain the highest level of achievement or become leaders in a particular field.
  • like the sound of (one's) own voice The idiom "like the sound of (one's) own voice" refers to someone who enjoys hearing themselves speak and tends to talk excessively, often without considering the thoughts or opinions of others. It implies a lack of self-awareness or consideration for others in conversation.
  • the ghost walks The idiom "the ghost walks" typically refers to a situation where something secretive, hidden, or unexpected is revealed or discovered. It conveys the idea that even when something appears to be dormant or concealed, there can still be evidence or traces that reveal its existence or truth.
  • the least said, the better The idiom "the least said, the better" means that it is best to say as little as possible about a particular topic, situation, or issue. It suggests that quietness or silence is preferable to discussing something that may be better left unsaid, as it could potentially cause more harm or trouble if brought up or discussed further.
  • Don't change horses in the middle of the river. The idiom "Don't change horses in the middle of the river" means to avoid making a drastic or impulsive change of plan or action when you are already in the midst of an ongoing task or situation. It emphasizes the importance of staying committed and seeing things through to completion, rather than abandoning or altering a course of action prematurely.
  • head for (or take to) the hills The idiom "head for (or take to) the hills" means to flee or escape from a dangerous or difficult situation, often referring to a countryside or remote area for safety. It can be used figuratively to express the act of seeking refuge or distancing oneself from a troubling or chaotic scenario.
  • never look a gift horse in the mouth The idiom "never look a gift horse in the mouth" means that one should not question or criticize a gift they have received, as it is impolite or ungrateful to find fault in something given to them out of generosity. The phrase originates from the practice of examining a horse's teeth to determine its age and overall condition, hence looking a gift horse in the mouth would suggest being overly critical or suspicious of a gift's value or usefulness.
  • get a/ foot in the door The idiom "get a foot in the door" means to secure an initial opportunity or position, often in a new industry or organization, in order to gain further access or advance one's career. It implies the importance of starting with a small or entry-level role as a means to open up more significant possibilities in the future.
  • at the top of one's lungs The idiom "at the top of one's lungs" means to shout or scream very loudly.
  • Hold the phone. The idiom "Hold the phone" means to pause or wait a moment, typically used to express surprise, disbelief, or the need to reassess a situation before making a decision or taking action. It suggests that one should pause and consider the information received before making any further judgments or decisions.
  • take the trouble The idiom "take the trouble" means to make the effort or go through the inconvenience of doing something. It implies that a person willingly or consciously puts in extra effort to accomplish a task or carry out an action.
  • (something) is the new (something) The idiom "(something) is the new (something)" refers to a situation where one thing or concept replaces another as the latest trend, style, standard, or popular choice. It implies that the new thing has gained more prominence, popularity, or relevance compared to what was previously considered fashionable or relevant.
  • fall off the roof The idiom "fall off the roof" typically refers to taking unnecessary risks or engaging in reckless behavior that can lead to negative consequences or harm. It can also imply behaving without caution or abandoning safety measures.
  • be snatched from the jaws of death The idiom "snatched from the jaws of death" means to be rescued or saved from a dangerous or life-threatening situation at the very last moment. It implies a narrow escape or a close call with death or disaster.
  • on the sick list The idiom "on the sick list" typically refers to someone who is unwell or indisposed, particularly referring to someone who is absent from work or unable to participate in daily activities due to illness or injury. It suggests that the person is on a list of those who are officially declared sick or unable to perform their regular duties.
  • have the world by the tail The idiom "have the world by the tail" means to be in a highly advantageous or successful position, having complete control or mastery over one's circumstances and experiencing great success or good fortune. It implies a feeling of being on top of the world and having everything going well.
  • give sb the boot The idiom "give someone the boot" means to dismiss or fire someone from their job or position. It implies the act of forcing someone to leave or cutting off their association or involvement in a particular situation.
  • go to the ends of the earth The idiom "go to the ends of the earth" means to make every effort possible, to go to great lengths, or to do whatever it takes to accomplish a goal or fulfill a commitment. It signifies a strong determination to go above and beyond the norm or conventional limits.
  • in the depth(s) of winter The idiom "in the depth(s) of winter" refers to the coldest and most severe part of the winter season. It signifies the period when temperatures are at their lowest and weather conditions are harshest. The phrase is often used metaphorically to describe the most difficult or challenging times in general, emphasizing the hardship and adversity one might face.
  • the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak The idiom "the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak" is a biblical phrase that refers to a situation where someone has the desire or intention to do something, but lacks the physical or mental strength, stamina, or willpower to follow through. It implies that although a person may have good intentions, their body or human nature may fail them in carrying out those intentions or desires.
  • give somebody the benefit of the doubt The idiom "give somebody the benefit of the doubt" means to believe someone's statement or explanation without any proof or evidence, offering them a presumption of innocence or trust, even if there may be doubts or uncertainties. It implies granting someone the leeway or understanding before forming a judgment or opinion about their intentions or actions.
  • the back-room boys The idiom "the back-room boys" refers to a group of anonymous individuals who work behind the scenes or in a support role, often in a technical or specialized capacity. These individuals are typically responsible for conducting research, managing operations, developing strategies, or executing tasks that are essential to the success of a specific project, organization, or endeavor. The term originated from its literal meaning, referring to male workers who operated unnoticed in back rooms or workshops. However, today it is used more broadly to encompass both genders and can be applied to any field or profession where individuals work diligently behind the scenes.
  • be (on) the right side of (an age) The idiom "be (on) the right side of (an age)" refers to being younger than a particular age or being at an age considered appropriate or desirable for a specific situation. It implies that being younger is advantageous or preferable in some way.
  • get the lead out The idiom "get the lead out" is an informal expression that means to hurry up or to move faster. It is often used to encourage someone to act more quickly or to stop procrastinating. The phrase originates from the concept of removing the weight of lead, which can slow down movement.
  • a flutter in the dovecote The idiom "a flutter in the dovecote" refers to a situation or event that causes unrest, disturbance, or agitation among a group of people. It usually implies that there is a commotion or upheaval in a previously peaceful or harmonious environment, similar to when startled doves take flight and create a flurry of movement in their dovecote (a structure or cage where doves are kept).
  • keep on the right side The idiom "keep on the right side" means to maintain a good relationship or stay on good terms with someone. It suggests avoiding conflict, disagreement, or any actions that may damage the relationship.
  • the body beautiful The idiom "the body beautiful" refers to an idealized or aesthetically pleasing physical appearance, often associated with physical fitness, health, and attractiveness. It suggests admiration for a well-proportioned and attractive body.
  • cook on the front burner The idiom "cook on the front burner" refers to giving priority or special attention to a specific task, project, or issue. It means to focus and dedicate significant effort to something, often implying that it is urgent or important. The phrase is often used metaphorically, drawing from the image of a stovetop with multiple burners, where the front burner represents the one receiving immediate attention.
  • lift the veil The idiom "lift the veil" typically means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden or unknown. It refers to the act of uncovering the truth or shedding light on a hidden aspect or mystery.
  • come to the job with sth The idiom "come to the job with something" refers to bringing or possessing a particular quality, skill, or characteristic when starting a job or task. It implies that the person is well-prepared, knowledgeable, or equipped with something valuable that can contribute to their performance or success in the job.
  • (Go) tell it/that to the marines. "(Go) tell it/that to the marines" is an idiom used to express disbelief or skepticism towards something that has been said or claimed. It implies that the speaker finds the statement highly unlikely or dubious. The phrase originates from the 18th century when the marines were considered gullible or easily fooled, making them an ideal target for tall tales or false information.
  • come to the end of the road "Come to the end of the road" is an idiomatic expression that means reaching a point where there are no more viable options or possibilities to pursue. It suggests that one has exhausted all avenues for progress or success in a particular situation. It signifies the end of a journey or endeavor, leaving no alternatives or future prospects.
  • the streets are paved with gold The idiom "the streets are paved with gold" is a metaphorical expression that suggests a place or situation, often associated with a big city or a prosperous country, where there are abundant opportunities for wealth, success, or a better life. It implies a perception of prosperity, prosperity, and endless possibilities in terms of financial gain or personal fulfillment.
  • don't rock the boat The idiom "don't rock the boat" means to avoid causing trouble or controversy, or to refrain from taking actions that might upset or disturb a situation or group dynamics. It implies the importance of maintaining stability and harmony by not challenging established norms or provoking conflicts.
  • leave somebody holding the bag To leave somebody holding the bag means to abandon or leave someone in a difficult, awkward, or unpleasant situation, often taking the blame or responsibility for something that was supposed to be shared or jointly done.
  • the highways and byways The idiom "the highways and byways" is used to refer to all the streets, roads, paths, or routes, typically in a particular area or region. It implies the entire network of thoroughfares, both major and minor, that connect various places. It often symbolizes exploration, travel, adventure, and the diverse paths that one can take in navigating through life or a particular situation.
  • rock the foundations of (something) The idiom "rock the foundations of (something)" means to cause significant changes or disruptions in a system, organization, belief, or established order, often resulting in instability or uncertainty. It implies a transformative or revolutionary impact that challenges the core principles or structures of something.
  • in the (or someone's) crosshairs The idiom "in the (or someone's) crosshairs" refers to being the target of someone's or something's focus or attention. It is often used to imply that someone or something is being closely watched or targeted for criticism, scrutiny, or potential harm. The phrase originates from crosshairs, which are the intersecting lines or marks in the reticle of a scope or sight, used to precisely aim at a target.
  • be left (out) in the cold The idiom "be left (out) in the cold" means to be excluded or neglected, often intentionally, from a group or situation. It refers to being alone or isolated, without the support, involvement, or access to something that others may have.
  • man is known by the company he keeps The idiom "a man is known by the company he keeps" means that a person's character and qualities can be judged by the type of people they associate with or spend time with. It implies that a person's reputation and values can be influenced by the influences and behaviors of their social circle.
  • more than meets the eye The idiom "more than meets the eye" refers to something or someone that is not as simple or obvious as they initially appear. It implies that there is a hidden or deeper meaning, quality, or complexity that can only be discovered upon further investigation or observation.
  • straight from the shoulder The idiom "straight from the shoulder" means to be direct, honest, and straightforward in speech or action, without hesitation or pretense. It refers to communication or behavior that is forthright, sincere, and without any hidden meaning or ulterior motive.
  • the shit out of sb/sth The idiom "the shit out of someone/something" is an informal expression used to describe an intense or excessive action that one person or thing does to another, often with a negative or harmful outcome. It signifies extreme intensity, aggression, or force.
  • get the wrinkles out The idiom "get the wrinkles out" means to fix or resolve any issues or problems that may exist, often referring to refining or smoothing out a process, plan, or situation to make it more effective or efficient. It suggests removing any obstacles or imperfections in order to achieve a perfected or polished outcome.
  • in the limelight The idiom "in the limelight" refers to being in the public attention or spotlight. It implies being the center of focus or receiving a great deal of public or media scrutiny and recognition.
  • on the front line of The idiom "on the front line of" typically refers to being in the forefront or directly involved in a particular activity, issue, or situation. It often denotes being at the most crucial or dangerous position, where one faces challenges, risks, or intense responsibilities. It can also imply being at the cutting edge or leading edge of a particular field or development.
  • raise sm or sth to the surface (of sth) The idiom "raise someone or something to the surface (of something)" generally refers to bringing someone or something up from a lower or hidden position to be visible or accessible. It can be used metaphorically to describe the action of bringing important information, issues, or concerns to attention or making them explicit.
  • come/crawl out of the woodwork The idiom "come/crawl out of the woodwork" refers to someone or something unexpectedly appearing or appearing in significant numbers, often after a long period of absence or unnoticed. It implies that these individuals or things seemingly emerge from hidden or obscure places, similar to insects or creatures that come out from the cracks and crevices of wooden structures.
  • bring out the best in (one) The idiom "bring out the best in (one)" means to encourage or inspire someone to display their most positive qualities or abilities. It implies that being in a certain situation or being around a particular person or influence helps to elicit the individual's maximum potential or superior traits.
  • dig the dirt (or dig up dirt) The idiom "dig the dirt" (or "dig up dirt") refers to the act of obtaining or uncovering information, often negative or scandalous, about someone or a specific topic. It implies conducting an investigation or searching for secrets and hidden details. It can also suggest attempts to discredit or expose someone's flaws or indiscretions.
  • run yourself into the ground The idiom "run yourself into the ground" means to work excessively hard or commit oneself to such an extent that it eventually leads to exhaustion, burnout, or physical and mental fatigue. It implies pushing oneself beyond reasonable limits or neglecting self-care in pursuit of goals or obligations.
  • a man of the people The idiom "a man of the people" refers to an individual who is relatable, approachable, and genuinely connected to the common people. It suggests that this person understands and sympathizes with the concerns, interests, and struggles of everyday individuals in society, rather than being aloof or disconnected from them. This idiom often implies a person who champions the rights and welfare of the general public and works towards their betterment.
  • be slow on the uptake To be slow on the uptake means to be slow in understanding or comprehending something, often lacking quick understanding or responsiveness to new information or ideas. It refers to a person who takes a longer time to grasp concepts or process information compared to others.
  • be bulging at the seams The idiom "be bulging at the seams" refers to something or someone that is extremely full or crowded to the point of overflowing or bursting. It implies that the capacity or limit has been exceeded and there is no more space available. This can be used to describe physical spaces, such as a room or a bag, as well as metaphorical situations, such as an event, a schedule, or a group of people.
  • pay the price The idiom "pay the price" means to face the consequences or suffer the negative outcomes of one's actions or decisions, often implying that these consequences are undesirable or burdensome. It refers to the idea that a person must bear the cost, whether it be physical, emotional, or financial, for the choices or mistakes they have made.
  • out of the clear blue sky The idiom "out of the clear blue sky" means that something unexpected or surprising happens suddenly and without any warning or explanation. It refers to a situation or event that comes completely out of nowhere, just like something falling from the sky on a clear, sunny day.
  • a shot across the bows The idiom "a shot across the bows" is used to describe a warning or indication of an impending conflict or confrontation. It originates from naval warfare, where firing a shot across the bow (the front of a ship) was a direct indication to an enemy ship that they were being challenged or threatened. In a broader sense, the phrase implies a clear signal or sign meant to deter or caution someone before taking more serious actions.
  • quick on the uptake The idiom "quick on the uptake" refers to someone's ability to understand or comprehend things quickly. It describes a person who grasps concepts, ideas, or instructions swiftly with minimal or no explanation.
  • hit the jackpot The idiom "hit the jackpot" means to achieve an unexpected and significant success or to acquire a large amount of money, usually through luck or good fortune.
  • close to the wind The idiom "close to the wind" means to act in a risky or dangerous manner, often pushing the limits of what is acceptable or legal, while being aware of potential consequences. It can also refer to managing a situation with careful precision, navigating a challenging or difficult course.
  • not be the marrying kind The idiom "not be the marrying kind" refers to someone who is not inclined or intended to get married or settle down as they do not possess the desire or suitability for a long-term committed relationship.
  • make way in the world The idiom "make way in the world" refers to the act of achieving success or progress in one's life or career. It implies overcoming obstacles, seizing opportunities, and establishing oneself in society. Essentially, it means to find one's place and be successful in the competitive and ever-changing world.
  • the bee’s knees The idiom "the bee's knees" is used to describe something or someone that is considered to be excellent, outstanding, or top-notch. It is often used to express admiration or praise for a particular thing or person.
  • chew the fat (or rag) The idiom "chew the fat (or rag)" means to have a casual and friendly conversation or chat, typically discussing unimportant or trivial matters. This term is often used to describe a casual, relaxed conversation among friends or acquaintances where the participants exchange stories, gossip, or simply catch up on each other's lives.
  • in the hip pocket of (someone) The idiom "in the hip pocket of (someone)" refers to being under someone's control, influence, or manipulation. It suggests a close relationship where one person has significant power or influence over another person, often implying that the person being influenced is subservient or excessively loyal to the person in control.
  • have the final/last word The idiom "have the final/last word" refers to the act of having the ultimate say or decision in a matter, typically ending a discussion or argument with no possibility of further debate or input. It suggests having the ultimate authority or control over a situation, where no one else can contribute or change the outcome.
  • point the finger at someone The idiom "point the finger at someone" means to blame or accuse someone of wrongdoing or being responsible for a particular situation or problem. It refers to the act of identifying someone as the culprit or holding them accountable for something.
  • the hard sell The idiom "the hard sell" refers to a forceful or aggressive sales technique used to persuade or convince someone to buy a product or service. It typically involves high-pressure tactics, such as relentless persuasion, exaggerated claims, or persistent attempts to close a deal.
  • hit someone below the belt The idiom "hit someone below the belt" means to behave unfairly or unethically by targeting someone's vulnerabilities, weaknesses, or personal issues during an argument or competition, which are considered off-limits or outside the realm of fair play. It refers to an action that is considered mean-spirited or unsportsmanlike, crossing the bounds of acceptable conduct.
  • lower the tone The idiom "lower the tone" usually refers to an action or behavior that diminishes the quality, appropriateness, or respectability of a particular situation or environment. It implies that someone's conduct, words, or attitude bring down the overall standard or decorum.
  • have (someone) by the balls The idiom "have (someone) by the balls" is a colloquial expression that means to have complete control or dominance over someone, often in a situation where they are completely at your mercy or unable to escape. It implies a position of power or leverage over the other person, where they are figuratively grasped or held by the testicles, symbolizing their vulnerability or submission.
  • do something till you are blue in the face The expression "do something till you are blue in the face" means to continue doing something with great effort or determination, even if it seems futile or unlikely to yield a desired result. It implies a sense of exhaustion or frustration associated with relentless and ineffective action.
  • caught on the hop The idiom "caught on the hop" means to be taken by surprise or caught off guard in a situation.
  • a slip of the tongue The idiom "a slip of the tongue" refers to an unintentional mistake or error made while speaking, where one says something different or unintended from what they had intended or planned to say. It often implies that the speaker revealed their thoughts, feelings, or intentions inadvertently.
  • blow/bomb/wipe etc. sth/swh off the map The idiom "blow/bomb/wipe etc. sth/swh off the map" is used to indicate complete destruction or elimination of something or somewhere. It implies the annihilation or eradication of a place or an object with great force, often caused by violent actions or catastrophic events.
  • hit the mark The idiom "hit the mark" generally means to achieve the intended goal or objective accurately or effectively. It refers to successfully accomplishing what was intended or desired.
  • give somebody/get the green light The idiom "give somebody/get the green light" means to provide someone with permission or approval to proceed with a particular action, plan, or project. It signifies an endorsement or authorization to move forward. The term "green light" is derived from traffic signals, where green indicates permission to proceed.
  • pick up the phone The idiom "pick up the phone" typically means to answer or respond to a phone call or to take action or initiate communication with someone through a phone conversation.
  • trick of the trade The idiom "trick of the trade" refers to a skill, technique, or secret method that is known and used by experts or experienced individuals in a particular industry or profession. It refers to the specialized knowledge or insights that allow someone to perform their work more effectively or efficiently.
  • (reach) the end of the line/road The idiom "(reach) the end of the line/road" means to come to the furthest point, limit, or conclusion of a situation, journey, or process. It signifies that there are no further options or possibilities available, and that one has reached the final stage or outcome. It implies that progress or advancement is no longer possible beyond this point.
  • bun in the oven The idiom "bun in the oven" is a colloquial expression used to refer to someone who is pregnant.
  • be/go over the top The idiom "be/go over the top" refers to behaving or acting in an exaggerated, excessive, or extreme way. It can imply going beyond the normal or expected limits, often to the point of being unreasonable or unnecessary. This idiom is commonly used to describe someone who is being overly dramatic, intense, extravagant, or showing excessive enthusiasm or emotions.
  • in the worst way The idiom "in the worst way" means to want or desire something very intensely or desperately. It implies a strong, overwhelming desire or need for something.
  • bang/beat the drum The idiom "bang/beat the drum" refers to actively and enthusiastically promoting or advocating for something, often by making repeated and forceful statements or actions in support. It suggests creating attention, raising awareness, or declaring loudly about a cause, idea, or viewpoint.
  • keep the ball rolling The idiom "keep the ball rolling" means to continue an activity or process in order to maintain progress or momentum. It suggests the importance of ongoing engagement and effort to ensure that things stay in motion or remain productive.
  • The scales fall from eyes The idiom "The scales fall from eyes" refers to a moment of enlightenment or realization, where someone suddenly sees or understands something clearly and without any previous biases or illusions. It signifies a sudden and often profound change in perspective or understanding. The phrase can be derived from the biblical story of Saul of Tarsus, whose sight was restored by divine intervention, and the scales, representing his previous blindness, fell from his eyes.
  • before the mast The idiom "before the mast" refers to serving as a common sailor or crew member on a ship. It originates from the time when sailing vessels had a vertical spar (mast) at the front end, dividing the ship into two sections: the officers and nobles would stay behind the mast, while the crew and common sailors worked or resided in front of it. Therefore, "before the mast" metaphorically implies being part of the lower ranks or the working class on a ship.
  • Don't let the fox guard the henhouse. The idiom "Don't let the fox guard the henhouse" means the cautionary advice to not allow someone with a conflict of interest or ulterior motives to have control over a situation. It implies that allowing a potentially harmful or untrustworthy entity to oversee a vulnerable situation is unwise and could result in undesired outcomes. The phrase draws from the analogy of a fox (known for preying on hens) being entrusted with protecting a henhouse (where the fox would naturally exploit the situation).
  • over the hills and far away The idiom "over the hills and far away" refers to being in a distant or unknown place, typically in pursuit of adventure, freedom, or escape. It often suggests a desire to explore new horizons or to leave behind one's current circumstances or challenges.
  • make all the difference The phrase "make all the difference" is an idiom used to express the significant impact or influence that someone or something has on a particular situation or outcome. It emphasizes how a particular action, decision, or factor can completely change the course or result of a given scenario.
  • separate the sheep from the goats The idiom "separate the sheep from the goats" means to distinguish between different types of people or things and sorting them into distinct categories or groups based on their qualities or characteristics. It refers to the act of determining or identifying the better or superior ones from the less desirable or inferior ones.
  • the nightmarecase scenario The idiom "the nightmare case scenario" refers to the worst possible outcome or situation that one can imagine or anticipate. It represents a situation or event that is filled with fear, dread, and extreme difficulty, often causing distress or anxiety.
  • the father of sth The idiom "the father of something" is used to describe someone who is considered to be the originator, founder, or pioneer of a certain thing, concept, or idea. This person is often credited with being the first or most influential figure in the development of that particular field or area.
  • off the grid The idiom "off the grid" refers to being completely disconnected from public utilities and modern technology, particularly in terms of electricity, water, and communication systems. It means living or operating independently, typically in a remote or secluded area, without relying on conventional infrastructure.
  • on the receiving end The idiom "on the receiving end" refers to being the person or group that experiences or receives the effects, consequences, or actions of something, often in a negative or unpleasant way. It implies being in a passive position and being subjected to whatever is being directed towards them.
  • the shudders The idiom "the shudders" refers to a state of fear, anxiety, or uneasiness that causes one to physically tremble or shiver. It can be used to describe a strong and uncontrollable reaction to something frightening or disturbing.
  • Don't swap horses in the middle of the stream. The idiom "Don't swap horses in the middle of the stream" means to not change or abandon a course of action or make a major decision while in the midst of a project or task. It advises against making changes or switching to a different approach when already deeply committed or halfway through something.
  • look sb in the face The idiom "look sb in the face" means to confront or directly confront someone in a straightforward manner, making eye contact while speaking or behaving in a way that does not hide or avoid the situation. It can also imply being honest and sincere in one's actions and not shying away from difficult conversations or situations.
  • beg the question The idiom "beg the question" refers to a logical fallacy where a conclusion or statement is assumed to be true or valid without providing evidence or reasoning to support it. It occurs when an argument relies on a premise that is itself in need of proof. It essentially means to avoid addressing or answering the fundamental issue or question at hand.
  • make the best of a bad situation The idiom "make the best of a bad situation" means to do what you can to improve or find something positive in an unfavorable or difficult circumstance. It involves adapting, accepting the situation, and finding ways to make the most out of it despite its negative aspects.
  • knight of the road The idiom "knight of the road" refers to a person who travels frequently or hitchhikes as their mode of transportation, typically referring to a truck driver or someone who ventures out on the road and assists others in need. The term conveys the idea of someone who is chivalrous and helpful while traversing the highways and byways.
  • strike off the rolls The idiom "strike off the rolls" typically refers to the act of formally removing someone's name or record from an official list or register, most commonly in a professional or membership context. It can indicate the termination or exclusion of an individual from a particular group, organization, or authority.
  • slip of the lip The idiom "slip of the lip" refers to an unintentional or accidental disclosure of information or a secret. It occurs when someone says something they did not mean to say, often revealing something that could have been kept hidden or confidential.
  • on the rack The idiom "on the rack" typically refers to a person who is experiencing extreme physical or mental torture or distress. It can also be used to describe a person who is under great pressure or facing intense scrutiny or interrogation. The phrase originated from the medieval torture device known as the rack, which involved stretching a person's body to cause extreme pain and torment.
  • against the collar The idiom "against the collar" describes someone who is feeling angry, agitated, or frustrated due to a particular situation or person. It originates from the image of a dog or cat being restrained by a collar, pulling against it in resistance or irritation. Thus, "against the collar" refers to the feeling of being provoked or bothered.
  • hold the road The idiom "hold the road" typically refers to a vehicle's ability to maintain stability and control while driving, especially on challenging or uneven surfaces. It means that the vehicle remains steady and firmly grips the road, enabling the driver to have an efficient and safe journey. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone's ability to maintain stability and resilience in difficult situations.
  • start off on the wrong foot The idiom "start off on the wrong foot" means to begin a relationship, conversation, or situation in a negative or unfavorable way, usually resulting in difficulties or misunderstandings. It implies that the initial impression or interaction was not smooth or positive, potentially leading to a problematic outcome.
  • the point of no return The idiom "the point of no return" refers to a decision or action that has been made, leading to a situation where it is impossible to turn back or reverse the consequences that will inevitably follow. It relates to a critical moment or milestone where progress or commitment has reached a stage that cannot be undone, leading to an irreversible course of action or outcome.
  • get the shivers The idiom "get the shivers" typically means to experience a sudden feeling of fear, coldness, or unease, often accompanied by a shivering sensation. It can also refer to a genuine physical reaction to something uncomfortable or scary.
  • be right in the head When someone is described as "being right in the head," it means that they are mentally stable, rational, and sound-minded. This idiom emphasizes a person's sanity and mental clarity, suggesting that they possess good judgment and logical thinking abilities.
  • morning after (the night before) The idiom "morning after (the night before)" refers to the period of time following a night of excess, often involving indulgence in alcohol or other pleasurable activities. It typically implies feelings of regret, hangover, or consequences arising from the previous night's events.
  • take the law into your own hands The idiom "take the law into your own hands" means to act in a vengeful or justice-seeking manner outside the boundaries of legal authority. It refers to someone bypassing the established legal system and resorting to self-imposed justice or enforcement of their own rules.
  • the one/a ray of hope The idiom "the one/a ray of hope" means a small sign or indication that there is a possibility of better circumstances or a favorable outcome, providing a sense of optimism and encouragement amid challenging or bleak situations.
  • there are plenty/lots more fish in the sea The idiom "there are plenty/lots more fish in the sea" means that if one opportunity or romantic relationship does not work out, there are many other options available. It suggests that there are plenty of other potential partners or opportunities to explore, implying that one should not get discouraged by setbacks or failures.
  • the nouveau riche The idiom "the nouveau riche" refers to individuals or a social class of people who have acquired wealth and affluence relatively recently, often through business or financial success, but lack the cultural refinement or sophistication typically associated with inherited wealth or a privileged upbringing. The term is often used to describe individuals who display their newfound wealth ostentatiously and in a flashy manner, often leading to criticism or ridicule.
  • the same old same old The idiom "the same old same old" refers to a situation or routine that is repetitive, monotonous, or unchanging. It implies a lack of novelty or excitement in the circumstances being described.
  • let the chips fall (where the may) The idiom "let the chips fall (where they may)" means to let events or circumstances unfold naturally, without trying to control or manipulate the outcome. It suggests allowing things to happen as they will, regardless of any potential consequences or difficulties.
  • give (one) the fig The idiom "give (one) the fig" means to express contempt or disrespect toward someone, typically by making a rude gesture. The gesture involves making a fist with the thumb poking out between the index and middle fingers, resembling a fig. It is usually considered offensive and is used to show disdain or derision.
  • (as) cocky as the king of spades The idiom "(as) cocky as the king of spades" refers to someone who is excessively confident, arrogant, or conceited. It implies a high level of self-assurance, often bordering on overconfidence or even hubris. The phrase is often used to convey a negative connotation towards someone who displays an exaggerated sense of superiority.
  • kick the tin "Kick the tin" is an idiom that means to make a financial donation or contribution, typically towards a shared goal or cause. It often refers to giving money or lending support to a collective effort or fundraising initiative.
  • (one's) ass is on the line The idiom "(one's) ass is on the line" refers to a situation where someone's reputation, job, or future is at stake and could be in serious jeopardy. It implies that the person is in a vulnerable position and will face severe consequences if they fail or make a mistake. It is often used to convey a sense of urgency, pressure, or accountability.
  • press all the (right) buttons The idiom "press all the (right) buttons" means to say or do something that has the desired effect or response, often by using the right words, actions, or strategies to persuade or please someone. It implies successfully appealing to someone's interests, preferences, or desires to achieve a positive outcome.
  • put your finger in the dyke The idiom "put your finger in the dyke" refers to taking immediate action to prevent a catastrophe or to temporarily fix a problem before it worsens. The phrase originates from the Dutch folklore tale of "The Little Dutch Boy," in which a young boy stops a leak from a hole in a dyke by sticking his finger in it until help arrives. As an idiom, it is used metaphorically to describe the act of addressing a small issue to prevent a larger disaster.
  • have many irons in the fire The idiom "have many irons in the fire" means to be involved in or have a lot of different projects, tasks, or responsibilities simultaneously.
  • play the field The idiom "play the field" means to date or have romantic or sexual relationships with multiple people without committing to any one person exclusively; to explore various options before settling down.
  • have your fingers/hand in the till The idiom "have your fingers/hand in the till" means to be stealing money, usually from a cash register or funds belonging to an organization or business, often by someone who is in a position of trust. It suggests dishonesty and unauthorized access to financial resources for personal gain.
  • in the vicinity of sth The idiom "in the vicinity of something" means to be near or close to a particular place or thing, but without specifying an exact or precise location. It suggests a general proximity without giving an accurate measure or distance.
  • take the easy way out The idiom "take the easy way out" means choosing the simplest or least challenging option in a given situation, often disregarding the hard work, effort, or potential consequences involved. It implies avoiding the necessary effort, decision-making, problem-solving, or responsibility that may be required for a more desirable outcome.
  • under the sod The idiom "under the sod" refers to someone or something being buried in the ground, usually referring to the passing of a person. It symbolizes someone's death and their final resting place beneath the soil.
  • give (someone or something) the benefit of the doubt To give someone or something the benefit of the doubt means to believe or assume that they are innocent or good, even when there may be some doubts or uncertainties. It is to give favorable judgment or to trust someone's words or actions without immediately assuming negative intentions or wrongdoings.
  • bring (someone) in from the cold The idiom "bring (someone) in from the cold" generally means to help or rescue someone who has been isolated, neglected, or excluded from a particular situation, group, or society. It implies providing support or offering an opportunity for rejuvenation and acceptance.
  • take the bull by its horns The idiom "take the bull by its horns" means to confront or tackle a problem or challenge directly and confidently, without hesitation or fear. It implies taking control of the situation and facing difficulties head-on rather than avoiding or delaying them.
  • What was the name again? The idiomatic phrase "What was the name again?" is typically used to indicate forgetfulness or a failure to recall someone's name despite having been previously introduced. It expresses a desire to have the person's name repeated or clarified to help jog one's memory.
  • That's the stuff! The idiom "That's the stuff!" is an exclamation used to express enthusiasm, approval, or satisfaction with something. It typically signifies that something is exactly what is needed or desired, or that it is of exceptional quality or effectiveness.
  • the mark of Cain The idiom "the mark of Cain" refers to a symbolic sign or stigma that represents the sign of a guilty or wicked person. It originates from the biblical story of Cain, who was marked by God after killing his brother Abel in an act of jealousy. The mark represented God's protection for Cain, but also served as a sign to others of his wrongdoing and the consequences of his actions. The idiom is used to describe someone who has committed a grave offense or bears a lasting stain on their character.
  • hold a wolf by the ears The idiom "hold a wolf by the ears" means to find oneself in a difficult and dangerous situation that is equally challenging to let go of or to continue holding on to. It implies being stuck or trapped in a predicament that is daunting and potentially harmful, with no easy solution in sight.
  • if it’s the last thing I do The idiom "if it’s the last thing I do" means that a person is determined to achieve their goal, no matter what the cost or effort required. It signifies great determination, resolve, and a willingness to go to any lengths necessary to accomplish something.
  • give somebody the shaft The idiom "give somebody the shaft" means to treat someone unfairly or to mistreat them by providing them with less than what they deserve or by denying them something they are entitled to. It implies a sense of betrayal or being purposefully disregarded or excluded.
  • be just the job The idiom "be just the job" means that something is exactly what is needed or required for a particular situation or purpose. It implies that the thing being referred to is perfect, fitting, or suitable in every way.
  • beat about/around the bush The idiom "beat about/around the bush" means to avoid getting to the main point or to speak indirectly instead of addressing a topic directly. It refers to someone who hesitates, dances around, or prolongs a conversation without getting to the essential or relevant information or subject.
  • the villain of the piece The idiom "the villain of the piece" refers to a person who is responsible for causing trouble or wrongdoing within a particular situation, event, or story, usually casting them as the primary antagonist or antagonist figure. This phrase is often used to describe someone who plays a negative or disruptive role, creating conflict or difficulties for others involved.
  • groan with/under (the weight of) sth The idiom "groan with/under (the weight of) sth" refers to being under a great amount of pressure or burden caused by something. It suggests that something is causing strain or heaviness, often resulting in a visible expression of discomfort or unhappiness.
  • today North America, tomorrow the world The idiom "today North America, tomorrow the world" refers to an ambitious or confident aspiration to conquer or dominate a specific region or market, implying that success in a smaller territory will pave the way for global dominance. It signifies a determination to expand influence, control, or achievements beyond the initial boundaries.
  • the whole nine yards The idiom "the whole nine yards" typically means to go all out, to do something to the fullest extent, or to give maximum effort or information.
  • give (oneself or someone) a pat on the back The idiom "give (oneself or someone) a pat on the back" means to praise or congratulate oneself or someone else for an accomplishment, achievement, or a job well done. It is a way of showing appreciation and recognition for a task or success.
  • not worth the paper it's written on The idiom "not worth the paper it's written on" means that something is completely worthless or lacking in value, reliability, or credibility. It implies that a written agreement, document, or promise holds no real significance or cannot be trusted.
  • the fact/truth of the matter The idiom "the fact/truth of the matter" refers to the undeniable or indisputable reality or truth about a particular situation or issue. It emphasizes that the information being presented is not a matter of opinion, perception, or interpretation, but rather an objective truth that cannot be disputed or ignored.
  • back in the game The idiom "back in the game" refers to someone or something returning to a competitive situation, often after a setback, and becoming an active participant again. It implies that the individual or entity has regained their confidence, abilities, or position and is ready to compete or succeed.
  • a lot, not much, etc. in the way of something The idiom "a lot, not much, etc. in the way of something" is used to describe the amount or level of something that is available or present. It implies the extent or degree of what is being referred to. For example: - "There isn't much in the way of entertainment in this town" means that there are limited options or offerings for entertainment. - "We have a lot in the way of resources to complete this project" indicates that there is a substantial amount of resources available. - "There isn't anything in the way of evidence to support his claims" suggests that there is no significant or substantial evidence to back up the claims being made.
  • the final straw The idiom "the final straw" refers to a situation or event that becomes the last in a series of undesirable or challenging occurrences, causing one's tolerance or patience to be completely exhausted. It is the breaking point or the last factor that ultimately leads to a drastic or irreversible action or decision.
  • like the devil (or a demon) The idiom "like the devil (or a demon)" is used to describe an action or behavior that is done with exceptional speed, intensity, energy, or enthusiasm. It suggests that someone is doing something very quickly, fiercely, or aggressively, as if possessed by a devil or a demon.
  • order of the day The idiom "order of the day" means the accepted or expected practice or course of action in a particular situation or at a particular time. It refers to what is currently popular, customary, or regularly done.
  • the light of somebody’s life The idiom "the light of somebody’s life" refers to a person who brings immense joy, happiness, and purpose to someone's existence. The individual referred to as the "light of someone's life" is often significant, cherished, and brings feelings of positivity and fulfillment.
  • If Mohammed will not go to the mountain, the mountain must come to Mohammed. The idiom "If Mohammed will not go to the mountain, the mountain must come to Mohammed" means that if a person cannot or is unwilling to make an effort to achieve something, then it is necessary for others or the circumstances to accommodate them or make it easier for them. It implies that if someone cannot come to a particular place or situation, then that place or situation needs to be brought to them instead.
  • at the same time The idiom "at the same time" means that two or more things are occurring simultaneously or in conjunction with each other. It refers to the concept of multiple actions or events happening at once.
  • leave sm in the lurch The idiom "leave someone in the lurch" means to abandon or desert someone in a difficult position or predicament, without offering any support or assistance.
  • have both oars in the water The idiom "have both oars in the water" means to be sensible, rational, or mentally balanced. It refers to having a good sense of judgment and being fully engaged or focused on a task or situation. It implies that someone is attentive, aware, and able to make sound decisions or judgments.
  • it’s (all) water under the bridge The idiom "it's (all) water under the bridge" means that whatever happened in the past is no longer important or relevant. It suggests that any disagreements, mistakes, or negative experiences from the past are now forgiven, forgotten, or resolved, and should not continue to affect the present or future. It implies moving on and not dwelling on past grievances.
  • fall into the trap The idiom "fall into the trap" means to unknowingly or unwittingly become ensnared in a situation or circumstance that is intended to deceive, manipulate, or harm you. It refers to being tricked or lured into a situation where negative consequences or undesirable outcomes become inevitable.
  • hold the reins The idiom "hold the reins" means to have control or be in charge of a situation or a group of people. It originates from horseback riding, where holding the reins means controlling the direction and speed of the horse. In a figurative sense, it refers to having authority, responsibility, or the ability to guide or lead others.
  • see the colour of someone's money The idiom "see the color of someone's money" refers to the act of examining or verifying someone's financial capability or willingness to pay before entering into any business agreement, making a purchase, or providing a service. It implies that one wants to ensure that a person has the necessary funds or resources to fulfill their financial obligations.
  • be in the family way The idiom "be in the family way" is an older euphemism that refers to a woman being pregnant or expecting a child.
  • on the case The idiom "on the case" refers to someone being actively engaged or diligently investigating and working on a task or problem. It implies that a person is diligently attending to a matter and taking responsibility for resolving it or finding a solution.
  • in (or out of) the running The idiom "in (or out of) the running" means having (or not having) a chance or likelihood of success in a competition, race, or endeavor. It refers to being considered as a potential contender or no longer being considered as a contender. It often implies the level of competitiveness or possibility of achieving a desired outcome.
  • sleep the sleep of the just The idiom "sleep the sleep of the just" means to have a peaceful and contented sleep, typically referring to someone who has done no wrong or has a clear conscience. It implies a sense of profound serenity and tranquility while sleeping, free from guilt or regret.
  • take the brunt of (something) The idiom "take the brunt of (something)" means to bear, endure, or suffer the most significant impact or force of a particular situation, event, or action. It implies being at the forefront of the negative consequences or bearing the heaviest share of the burden.
  • live off the backs of (someone) The idiom "live off the backs of (someone)" means to rely on or benefit from someone else's hard work, efforts, or resources without making an equal or fair contribution oneself. It suggests that the person is taking advantage of others' labor or efforts for personal gain.
  • be glad/happy/pleased etc. to see the back of sb/sth The idiom "be glad/happy/pleased etc. to see the back of someone/something" means to feel relieved or pleased that someone or something is leaving or gone. It indicates a sense of wanting to be rid of the person or thing, usually due to a negative experience or a desire for change.
  • a leap in the dark The idiom "a leap in the dark" refers to taking a risky or uncertain course of action without knowing the potential consequences or outcome. It can also describe an act of blindly or decisively pursuing something despite the lack of information or understanding. It implies a willingness to take a chance even without any certainty or clear understanding of the situation.
  • have back against the wall The idiom "have back against the wall" means to be in a difficult or desperate situation with no options or alternatives available. It refers to feeling trapped or pressed against a wall, typically due to external circumstances or challenges.
  • hand on the baton The idiom "hand on the baton" means to pass a responsibility, position, or leadership role to the next person in line or succession, usually implying a smooth transition where the work or task is continued without interruption. It originates from relay races, where the baton is handed from one runner to another to maintain the team's momentum and speed. This idiom conveys the idea of continuity and the passing of authority or control to someone else.
  • give (one) the runaround The idiom "give (one) the runaround" refers to the act of intentionally evading or procrastinating in order to avoid providing information, an answer, or a clear resolution to someone. It implies a sense of frustration or annoyance on the part of the person receiving the runaround as they may be constantly redirected, misled, or delayed in their attempts to obtain a satisfactory response or outcome.
  • get off the ground (or get something off the ground) The idiom "get off the ground" or "get something off the ground" typically means to start or initiate something successfully. It refers to the initial stages of a project, plan, or venture, usually in a business or organizational context. It implies progressing from the planning or conceptual phase to actually making it happen or operational, often overcoming initial obstacles or challenges.
  • eyes in the back of your head The expression "eyes in the back of your head" is an idiomatic phrase that is used to describe someone who is very watchful, alert, and aware of their surroundings. It implies that the person has an exceptional ability to perceive or sense things that others might miss.
  • get/start off on the right/wrong foot The idiom "get/start off on the right/wrong foot" means to begin a task, relationship, or situation in a positive or negative way respectively. It refers to the initial impression or approach taken, which can greatly influence the outcome or progress.
  • the last chance saloon The idiom "the last chance saloon" refers to a final opportunity or a last attempt to achieve or succeed at something before it is too late. It signifies a critical stage where failure is not an option and it represents the final opportunity to make things right.
  • the best-laid schemes go astray The idiom "the best-laid schemes go astray" means that even the most carefully planned actions or intentions can often fail or go wrong unexpectedly. It emphasizes that despite meticulous planning, unforeseen circumstances can derail one's plans or objectives.
  • fear the worst The idiom "fear the worst" means to expect or anticipate the most negative or undesirable outcome or result in a given situation. It implies that one is feeling anxious or apprehensive about what might happen, often assuming that something bad will occur.
  • take time by the forelock The idiom "take time by the forelock" means to seize an opportunity, take prompt action, or make the most of one's time. It often refers to being proactive, taking the initiative, or not wasting valuable opportunities.
  • like something the cat brought in The idiom "like something the cat brought in" is used to describe someone or something that appears dirty, disheveled, or unkempt. It suggests a comparison to a cat's prey, which may be messy or undesirable.
  • a kick up the arse The idiom "a kick up the arse" refers to a metaphorical expression suggesting a strong motivation or incentive to act, typically used to push someone to get moving, take action, or make an effort to accomplish something. It implies the need for a figurative "kick" to overcome laziness, procrastination, or hesitation.
  • labor under the delusion of/that The idiom "labor under the delusion of/that" means to hold on to a false belief or misconception despite evidence or reasoning that contradicts it. It refers to persistently maintaining an incorrect perception or perspective despite the truth or reality of a situation.
  • pave the way (for sm or sth) (with sth) The idiom "pave the way (for someone or something) (with something)" means to prepare or create favorable conditions or circumstances for someone or something. It is often used when indicating that something is done in order to make it easier for someone or something else to happen or succeed. The phrase "pave the way" often implies making progress or removing obstacles to enable a smoother path forward.
  • sb's butt is on the line The idiom "sb's butt is on the line" means that someone's reputation, job, or personal well-being is at stake and they are in a precarious or risky situation where they could face negative consequences or be held accountable for their actions or decisions.
  • get the goods on (someone) The idiom "get the goods on (someone)" means to obtain or gather information or evidence that can be used to expose someone's secrets, wrongdoings, or provide proof of their guilt, typically in a negative or incriminating way. It can refer to uncovering hidden information or a person's true intentions.
  • cut the cord The idiom "cut the cord" means to end a dependency or break free from someone or something that has provided support or control. It often refers to the act of becoming financially or emotionally independent.
  • take the edge off sth The idiom "take the edge off something" means to lessen the intensity, severity, or sharpness of a situation, feeling, or experience. It implies reducing the negative or challenging aspects of something, making it a bit more bearable or manageable.
  • blow/take the lid off sth The idiom "blow/take the lid off sth" refers to the act of revealing or exposing something secret, hidden, or previously unknown. It often implies uncovering a scandal, a misconduct, or unveiling the truth about a situation or person.
  • who, what, where, etc. the devil... The idiom "who, what, where, etc. the devil..." is used to express surprise, frustration, or irritation about a person or thing that causes confusion or bewilderment. It is often used to emphasize the intensity of one's feeling towards something or someone.
  • the Indian sign The idiom "the Indian sign" refers to a supposed curse or sign of bad luck attributed to Native Americans. It is used to describe a situation where one seems to be plagued by a series of unfortunate events or difficulties that cannot be easily explained or overcome. It implies a sense of persistent misfortune or jinx.
  • see the writing on the wall The idiom "see the writing on the wall" means to recognize the signs or indications that something unfavorable or unavoidable is about to happen or occur in the near future. It refers to being able to understand or predict an impending negative outcome or a clear indication of an inevitable consequence.
  • put the squeeze on somebody (to do something) The idiom "put the squeeze on somebody (to do something)" means to apply pressure or put someone under duress in order to compel them to do something. It involves exerting influence, often through coercion or manipulation, in order to achieve a specific outcome or result desired by the person applying the squeeze.
  • be one in the eye for sb The idiom "be one in the eye for someone" means to cause surprise, embarrassment, or disappointment to someone, typically by outperforming or surpassing their expectations or achievements. It is often used to describe an action or outcome that undermines or challenges another person's position or reputation.
  • be in the driving seat The idiom "be in the driving seat" means to be in a position of control or power, where a person has the authority to make decisions and influence the course of events. It is often used to describe situations where someone is in charge or has control over a particular situation or outcome.
  • throw somebody under the bus The idiom "throw somebody under the bus" refers to the act of betraying or sacrificing someone else, often for personal gain or to avoid blame or criticism for one's own actions. It involves shifting blame or responsibility onto another person, typically in a situation where they are left to face the consequences.
  • fly in the teeth of The idiom "fly in the teeth of" means to openly defy or go against something, especially societal norms or expectations, in a bold or defiant manner. It implies taking a stand contrary to popular opinion or established conventions.
  • on the coattails of The idiom "on the coattails of" typically means to achieve success or recognition by associating oneself with someone else's accomplishments or popularity. It implies that one is benefiting from the success or actions of another person, often without much effort or merit of their own.
  • one for the books, at turnup for the book(s) The idiom "one for the books" or "a turnup for the book(s)" is an expression that refers to an extraordinary, unexpected, or remarkable event or occurrence. It signifies something so unusual or remarkable that it should be recorded or remembered as an exceptional event. It suggests that the event is noteworthy or memorable, and worth recounting or sharing with others.
  • stack the deck, at stack the cards The idiom "stack the deck" or "stack the cards" refers to a situation in which one unfairly manipulates or arranges circumstances or conditions in order to achieve a desired outcome or ensure an advantage. It implies a deceptive or rigged approach that favors a specific individual or party, usually at the expense of others involved.
  • a shot (or stab) in the dark The idiom "a shot (or stab) in the dark" refers to a guess or attempt that is made with little or no knowledge of the subject matter, resulting in uncertain or unpredictable outcomes. It implies taking a chance or making an educated guess in a situation where the chances of success are low or unknown.
  • to the end of (one's) days The idiom "to the end of (one's) days" means until the end of one's life or until one dies. It implies a lifelong commitment or dedication to something, often accompanied by unwavering determination or loyalty.
  • brush (something) under the rug The idiom "brush (something) under the rug" means to ignore, conceal, or avoid dealing with a problem or issue, typically in order to prevent it from causing trouble or inconvenience. It refers to the act of physically brushing dirt or debris under a rug, keeping it out of sight and pretending it does not exist.
  • on the way The idiom "on the way" refers to something that is in progress or about to happen. It implies that something is imminent or in the process of being achieved, accomplished, or delivered. It can also indicate that someone or something is en route to a specific location or destination.
  • go out (of) the window The idiom "go out (of) the window" implies that something is disregarded, abandoned, ignored, or no longer considered important or relevant. It suggests the situation or an agreement has changed dramatically or been completely disregarded.
  • worthy of the name The idiom "worthy of the name" means that something or someone lives up to the expectations, qualities, or standards associated with a specific name or title. It implies that the person or thing possesses the authentic characteristics or traits that are commonly attributed to that name or title. It signifies that the individual or object is deserving of the recognition or honor associated with the given name.
  • get on the horn The idiom "get on the horn" means to make a phone call or contact someone using a telephone. It is often used when emphasizing the need for immediate communication or when urgency is required in relaying information or discussing a matter with someone.
  • the organ grinder's monkey The definition of the idiom "the organ grinder's monkey" refers to a person who is controlled or manipulated by someone else, usually in a subordinate or subservient position. It alludes to the image of a monkey that performs tricks or tasks under the direction and control of the organ grinder, symbolizing the lack of autonomy or independence.
  • spin the bottle The idiom "spin the bottle" typically refers to a popular party or parlour game where a bottle is spun in the center of a circle, and the person towards whom the bottle's neck points when it stops spinning is chosen for a variety of purposes, often a romantic or playful one.
  • cull the herd The idiom "cull the herd" refers to the act of eliminating or removing the weaker or less desirable individuals or elements from a group, organization, or population in order to improve overall quality or performance. It often implies selectively getting rid of inefficient, incompetent, or unwanted members or things to enhance the efficiency, productivity, or overall health of a group.
  • on the inside The idiom "on the inside" typically refers to someone's true thoughts, feelings, or emotions that are hidden or not readily apparent outwardly. It implies understanding what lies beneath the surface or knowing someone's real intentions or qualities.
  • get the drop on someone The idiom "get the drop on someone" means to gain an advantage over someone by surprising or outmaneuvering them, usually by being the first to draw a weapon or take a decisive action.
  • comes to the crunch The idiom "comes to the crunch" refers to a situation or moment of truth when a decision or action needs to be taken, typically under circumstances where a problem or difficulty becomes more intense or urgent. It suggests that it is the crucial moment when a situation reaches a critical stage or when there is no more time for delay or hesitation.
  • all quiet on the Potomac The idiom "all quiet on the Potomac" is an expression that originally referred to a situation of calm and tranquility, particularly in relation to the military engagements or political activities around the Potomac River. It originated during the American Civil War to denote a period of temporary peace or lack of significant action. Over time, the phrase has evolved to have a broader meaning, referring to any situation or place where there is a perceived calm and absence of conflict or turmoil.
  • the butterfly effect The idiom "the butterfly effect" refers to the concept in chaos theory that a small and seemingly insignificant action or event can have far-reaching and unforeseen consequences. It suggests that even a tiny disturbance or change can set off a chain of events that amplify and ultimately lead to significant outcomes in complex systems or situations. The term "butterfly effect" comes from the idea that the flap of a butterfly's wings in one part of the world could potentially cause a hurricane or another major weather event in another part of the world.
  • nuts and bolts, the The idiom "nuts and bolts" refers to the basic or essential elements or information of a particular subject, task, or concept. It signifies the practical and fundamental aspects or details, often related to how something works or operates.
  • what's the magic word? The idiom "what's the magic word?" is a rhetorical question commonly asked when someone wants to remind another person, usually a child, to use polite words such as "please" or "thank you." It implies that the speaker expects the person to use courteous language or manners when making a request or expressing gratitude.
  • till the cows come home The idiom "till the cows come home" means for a very long time or indefinitely. It refers to the idea of waiting or continuing an activity until the cows return from grazing in the fields, which implies a considerable amount of time.
  • give sb the kiss of life The idiom "give someone the kiss of life" refers to the act of administering artificial resuscitation, specifically mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, to revive someone who has stopped breathing or is unconscious. It implies providing immediate aid or reviving someone in a critical situation, often involving a life-threatening emergency.
  • Brevity is the soul of wit. The idiom "Brevity is the soul of wit" means that being concise and succinct in communication or expression is a sign of intelligence, cleverness, or wit. It suggests that the ability to convey ideas effectively with minimal words is more valuable and impressive than long-winded or verbose speech.
  • wake the dead The idiom "wake the dead" is a phrase used to describe an extremely loud noise or commotion that is so intense it is comparable to arousing the deceased from their eternal slumber. It implies a level of noise or disturbance that is impossible to ignore or overlook.
  • be on the game The idiom "be on the game" typically refers to the act of being involved in or engaged in prostitution. It implies that a person is offering sexual services in exchange for money or other forms of compensation.
  • the nightmare/worstcase scenario The idiom "the nightmare/worst-case scenario" refers to the most unpleasant or undesirable outcome or situation that could possibly occur in a given situation. It is often used to emphasize the potential consequences or to express fear or worry about a specific event or situation.
  • over the wall The idiom "over the wall" typically refers to doing something in secret or without permission. It implies the act of bypassing rules, regulations, or restrictions. It can also suggest acting independently or without the knowledge of others involved. The origin of this idiom can be traced back to escaping or breaking out of prison by climbing over the surrounding wall.
  • go to the mat (with somebody) (for somebody/something) The idiom "go to the mat (with somebody) (for somebody/something)" refers to forcefully defending or supporting someone or something, often by engaging in a confrontation or a determined effort. It implies being willing to fight or struggle, even if it requires great effort or sacrifice. The phrase originates from wrestling, where going to the mat indicates engaging in a direct physical contest.
  • be on the warpath The idiom "be on the warpath" means to be very angry, hostile, or ready to start a confrontation or fight. It is often used to describe someone who is in a fierce and aggressive mood, determined to take action or seek revenge.
  • a deer in the headlights The idiom "a deer in the headlights" is used to describe a person who is frozen or paralyzed with fear, surprise, or confusion, typically in a difficult or unexpected situation. It originates from the image of a deer being caught in the glare of headlights at night, becoming momentarily transfixed and unable to move.
  • perish the thought The idiom "perish the thought" is used to dismiss or reject a disturbing or unwelcome idea or suggestion. It is an emphatic way of indicating that one strongly hopes or wishes for something to not happen or be considered.
  • don’t sweat the small stuff The idiom "don't sweat the small stuff" means not to worry or obsess over minor or trivial matters. It advises people not to get worked up or stressed out about things that are not significant in the grand scheme of things.
  • have one’s mind in the gutter The idiom "have one’s mind in the gutter" means that someone has vulgar or indecent thoughts or ideas. It implies that the person's thinking is focused on lewd or inappropriate subjects, often involving sexual or offensive content.
  • catch the drift The idiom "catch the drift" means to understand the underlying meaning or intention of a situation, conversation, or message, even if it is not explicitly stated. It refers to grasping the implied or subtle message and comprehending the overall idea without needing explicit clarification.
  • knock something on the head The idiom "knock something on the head" means to put an end to something or to stop a particular activity, plan, or idea. It can also refer to dismissing or rejecting a proposal or suggestion.
  • not be the end of the world The idiom "not be the end of the world" means that a situation or event is not as catastrophic or dire as it may seem. It implies that there are still chances for improvement or that there will be other opportunities in the future, emphasizing that the situation is not irreversible or irreversible.
  • smooth the path/way The idiom "smooth the path/way" means to make something easier or eradicate potential obstacles in order to facilitate progress or create a more favorable situation. It implies removing any difficulties or complications that could hinder the achievement of a goal or the completion of a task.
  • leave the field clear for (one) The idiom "leave the field clear for (one)" means to remove oneself from a situation or competition so that someone else can proceed without any competition or hindrance. It implies stepping aside, giving up, or removing any obstacles to allow another person to succeed or make their own decisions without interference.
  • up to the gills The idiom "up to the gills" is used to describe a person or situation that is completely full or overwhelmed with something. It refers to the idea of being filled up to the point where there is no more capacity left, similar to how gills refer to the respiratory organs of fish which can only hold a certain amount of water or air.
  • the tip of an iceberg The idiom "the tip of an iceberg" refers to a situation where only a small or visible part of a problem, issue, or situation is known or seen, while the majority of it remains hidden or undiscovered. It implies that there is much more to something than what is initially apparent or obvious.
  • the damage is done The idiom "the damage is done" means that harm or negative consequences have already occurred and cannot be changed or reversed. It implies that the situation or event has already taken place, and there is no point in trying to undo the harm caused.
  • put your head into the lion's mouth The idiom "put your head into the lion's mouth" refers to voluntarily placing oneself in a dangerous or risky situation, often with full awareness of the potential consequences or harm that may arise. It implies taking unnecessary risks or acting recklessly without considering the potential dangers involved.
  • not have the foggiest (idea/notion) The idiom "not have the foggiest (idea/notion)" means to have no understanding or knowledge about something. It indicates a complete lack of awareness or comprehension of a particular subject or matter.
  • the men in grey suits The idiom "the men in grey suits" typically refers to a group of anonymous, powerful, and authoritative figures, often associated with government or corporate institutions. These individuals are known for making important decisions behind the scenes, often with little transparency or accountability. They wield considerable influence and are often portrayed as detached from public opinion or democratic processes.
  • take up the cudgel The idiom "take up the cudgel" means to vigorously defend or support a cause or person, often involving engaging in a heated argument or debate. It implies the willingness to fight or take action in defense of something or someone.
  • put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "put/throw a spanner in the works" refers to an action or event that causes disruption or interference, resulting in the failure of a plan, project, or system. It implies someone intentionally causing problems or obstacles that hinder the smooth progress or success of something. The term "spanner" refers to a wrench tool that is used to tighten or loosen nuts and bolts, and by throwing or putting it into the works, the machinery or mechanism stops working properly.
  • gone to the big something in the sky The phrase "gone to the big something in the sky" is an idiom used to euphemistically refer to someone or something that has died or passed away. It is mostly used in a lighthearted or humorous way to discuss death in a more indirect or less serious manner. The "big something in the sky" is often substituted with terms like "big farm in the sky," "big birdcage in the sky," or other similar variations, adding an element of imaginative whimsy.
  • at the beck and call of The idiom "at the beck and call of" means to be in a position of constantly being available to fulfill someone's requests or demands. It implies being at someone's absolute disposal or constantly ready to serve their needs.
  • on top of the world The idiom "on top of the world" means to feel incredibly happy, accomplished, or successful. It conveys a sense of being in a position of triumph, confidence, or elation.
  • by the back door The idiom "by the back door" means to accomplish something or gain entry to a place or position in a secretive or indirect manner, often bypassing established rules or proper channels. It implies a sense of doing something in a sneaky or underhanded way, rather than openly or through legitimate means.
  • in (or into) the open The idiom "in (or into) the open" means out in the open or exposed conditions, especially in a visible or easily noticed way. It refers to a situation where something is no longer hidden or concealed but becomes visible, apparent, or known to others.
  • read the small print The idiom "read the small print" means to carefully examine the details or terms and conditions of a contract, agreement, or document before agreeing to or signing it. It emphasizes the importance of paying attention to the fine print and understanding all the implications and potential consequences of the agreement.
  • word to the wise The idiom "word to the wise" means to offer useful advice or a warning to someone who may not be aware of a particular information or situation. It implies sharing knowledge or guidance for their benefit or to prevent them from making a mistake.
  • put the skids under sm or sth The idiom "put the skids under someone or something" means to undermine or sabotage someone or something, causing them to fail or decline. It implies the act of creating obstacles or hindrances that impede progress or success.
  • tip sb the wink The idiom "tip sb the wink" can be defined as giving someone a subtle hint or secret information about a particular situation or event. It involves discreetly informing or warning someone about something without explicitly stating it.
  • get around the table The idiom "get around the table" means to come together or gather in order to discuss or negotiate a particular matter or issue. It implies a collaborative effort to exchange ideas, opinions, or information to reach a resolution or make decisions collectively.
  • grab the bull by the horns To "grab the bull by the horns" is an idiomatic expression that means to confront or tackle a difficult or challenging situation head-on, with determination and direct action, rather than avoiding or ignoring it. It implies taking control or leadership of a situation, being proactive, and confidently dealing with any obstacles or issues that may arise.
  • get the wrong idea (about someone or something) The idiom "get the wrong idea (about someone or something)" means to develop a mistaken or inaccurate understanding or impression about someone or something, often based on misinterpretation or incomplete information.
  • swallow the bait The idiom "swallow the bait" means to willingly or naively accept a deception or false information without questioning or being aware of the true intention behind it. It refers to someone falling for a trap or being easily manipulated or fooled.
  • jump the queue The idiom "jump the queue" means to skip ahead of others who have been waiting in line or to disregard the order or sequence that was established. It typically implies someone's attempt to gain an unfair advantage or to bypass the proper procedure.
  • put your neck on the line The idiom "put your neck on the line" means to take a risk or put oneself in a vulnerable or dangerous position for the sake of a goal or belief. It refers to being willing to accept potential consequences or personal sacrifice to ensure the success or advancement of a cause.
  • in the catbird seat The idiom "in the catbird seat" is used to describe someone who is in a favorable or advantageous position or situation. It signifies being in control, having an upper hand, or having the power and advantage over others in a particular situation.
  • where the sun don’t shine The idiom "where the sun don't shine" is a euphemism used to describe a place or situation that is considered private, embarrassing, inappropriate, or unpleasant to discuss. It is often used sarcastically or humorously to dismiss or reject a suggestion or request.
  • for the worse The idiom "for the worse" refers to a change or situation that has worsened or deteriorated compared to a previous state or condition. It implies that something has gone downhill or become less favorable, usually concerning a negative outcome or consequence.
  • the men in suits The idiom "the men in suits" refers to a group of people, typically men, who dress in formal attire, usually consisting of suits, often to convey an image of power, authority, or corporate influence. It implies a certain level of formality, professionalism, and sometimes, a sense of elitism or bureaucracy. The idiom is used to portray a group of individuals who are involved in decision-making, executive positions, or high-ranking roles within a business or political context.
  • give someone the brushoff The idiom "give someone the brushoff" means to dismiss or ignore someone in a rude or abrupt manner, typically in order to avoid further contact or conversation. It implies a lack of interest or willingness to engage with the person, often conveying the feeling of being rejected or treated with indifference.
  • know the time of day The idiom "know the time of day" means to be aware of or knowledgeable about a particular situation or to have a good understanding of what is happening. It implies being well-informed or well-connected, often in a specific context or industry.
  • king of the hill The idiom "king of the hill" refers to a person who is in a position of power, superiority, or dominance over others in a particular situation or competition. It signifies being at the top or the highest point in a hierarchy or social status, often achieved through successful competition or overcoming challenges.
  • be on the dole The idiom "be on the dole" means to receive regular financial assistance from the government, typically in the form of unemployment benefits or welfare. It implies that someone is dependent on these government handouts for their income or livelihood.
  • be on the scene The idiom "be on the scene" means to be present or at the location where something noteworthy or an event is happening. It typically implies being physically present and actively engaged in observing, investigating, or participating in the given situation. It can be used to describe someone who arrives promptly after an incident or someone who is always present at the site of an incident or event.
  • put (one's) hat in(to) the ring The idiom "put (one's) hat in(to) the ring" means to declare or enter oneself as a candidate or participant in a contest, competition, or opportunity. It refers to showing one's willingness or ambition to compete or be considered for a certain position or opportunity.
  • the right hand doesn't know what the left hand's doing The idiom "the right hand doesn't know what the left hand's doing" means that two or more people or departments within an organization are not properly communicating or coordinating with each other, often leading to confusion, inefficiency, or contradictory actions. It highlights a lack of coordination or cohesion within a group or system.
  • knock the (living) daylights out of sm The idiom "knock the (living) daylights out of someone" means to severely beat or defeat someone, often to the point of rendering them unconscious or incapacitated.
  • give somebody the cold shoulder The idiom "give somebody the cold shoulder" means to intentionally ignore or treat someone in an unfriendly and dismissive manner, typically as a way to display disapproval or to convey one's indifference or aloofness towards the other person.
  • put the skids under somebody/something To "put the skids under somebody/something" means to undermine or cause the downfall of someone or something. It refers to taking actions or measures that bring about a sudden decline or failure.
  • take the rap The idiom "take the rap" means to accept responsibility or punishment for a crime or wrongdoing, even if one is not solely responsible for it. It often implies sacrificing oneself to protect someone else or to preserve a collective goal.
  • bring (one) to the test The idiom "bring (one) to the test" means to challenge someone to prove their abilities, skills, or character by putting them in a difficult or demanding situation, typically through a test or trial. It refers to the act of assessing or evaluating someone's capabilities or suitability in a specific situation.
  • one foot in the grave The idiom "one foot in the grave" is used to describe someone who is very old, seriously ill, or near death. It implies that the person is close to the end of their life or in a state of extreme weakness or decline.
  • castle in the air The idiom "castle in the air" refers to a dream or an imagined situation that is unlikely to happen or is unrealistic. It suggests that a person's thoughts or plans are based on fantasies or wishful thinking rather than on practical or achievable goals.
  • put your head over/above the parapet To "put your head over/above the parapet" is an idiom that refers to taking a risk or standing up for something despite potential consequences or criticism. It is often used to describe an act of bravery, speaking out, or taking a leadership role even when it may lead to facing opposition or exposing oneself to danger. The idiom originates from the image of soldiers in battles who would literally raise their heads above the protective wall or parapet, making themselves vulnerable to enemy fire.
  • the chattering classes "The chattering classes" is an idiomatic expression referring to a particular group of people in a society who are often seen as affluent, educated, and opinionated, and engage in lively and constant discussions about various topics, especially politics, culture, and current affairs. They are typically found in urban areas and are known for their articulate and verbose conversations, but the term can also imply a sense of shallowness or self-importance in their communication.
  • set the tone (for sth) The idiom "set the tone for something" means to establish or create the initial atmosphere, mood, or character that will influence the rest of a situation, event, or experience. It involves setting a precedent or creating an example that others are likely to follow or be influenced by.
  • with the best of intentions The idiom "with the best of intentions" refers to someone doing or saying something with good or positive intentions, even if the outcome or result may not necessarily be successful or well-received. It implies that the person genuinely meant well, even if things did not turn out as planned.
  • down the toilet The idiom "down the toilet" means that something has gone completely wrong or has been ruined. It is often used to describe a situation or plan that has failed or been unsuccessful.
  • the rough and tumble of sth The idiom "the rough and tumble of something" refers to the chaotic, unpredictable, and sometimes aggressive nature of a particular situation or activity. It embodies the idea of being physically and mentally challenged, encountering difficulties, and dealing with intense competition or conflict. This expression is often used to describe demanding and challenging scenarios that require resilience and the ability to withstand rough conditions or challenging circumstances.
  • go for all the marbles The idiom "go for all the marbles" means to make a decisive or all-out effort to win or achieve something significant, often with high stakes or a final attempt to attain a desired outcome. It implies giving one's best effort, leaving no room for holding back or playing it safe.
  • on the wrong foot The idiom "on the wrong foot" means to begin or establish a relationship or interaction in an unfavorable or unpleasant manner. It refers to starting or approaching something in a way that creates a negative impression or results in a less than smooth start.
  • the black ox has trod upon (one's) toe The idiom "the black ox has trod upon (one's) toe" is an expression used to convey that someone has experienced a misfortune or a sudden, unexpected hardship in their life. It suggests that an unfortunate event, symbolized by the black ox stepping on one's toe, has caused distress or suffering.
  • snatch sm out of the jaws of death The expression "snatch (something/someone) out of the jaws of death" is an idiom that means to save or rescue someone or something from a dangerous or life-threatening situation at the last possible moment. It refers to a dramatic and miraculous act of saving or salvaging from imminent disaster or death.
  • green around the gills The idiom "green around the gills" typically means that someone looks pale or sickly, often as a result of feeling nauseous or unwell. It is commonly used to describe someone who appears physically unwell or uneasy.
  • do the job/trick The idiom "do the job/trick" means to accomplish a specific task successfully or to achieve the desired result. It implies that something or someone has effectively fulfilled its purpose or function.
  • sweeten the kitty The idiom "sweeten the kitty" typically refers to contributing or adding money to a communal fund or pool in order to increase the potential winnings or rewards for everyone involved. It is often used in gambling or betting contexts, where individuals contribute money to a central pot to increase the overall stakes and potential payout.
  • take someone to the cleaners The idiom "take someone to the cleaners" means to deceive, trick, or take advantage of someone by extracting a large amount of money from them, usually through cunning or dishonest means. It can also refer to achieving a resounding victory over someone in a competition or a contest.
  • above/below the fold The idiom "above/below the fold" refers to the placement of an article or content in a newspaper, magazine, or website. It originated from the physical folding of newspapers, where important articles and headlines were prominently placed "above the fold" on the front page to grab readers' attention. Content placed "below the fold" was less visible as it required unfolding or scrolling. In the digital era, it refers to the portion of a webpage visible without scrolling, with "above the fold" being the most prominently visible area and "below the fold" requiring scrolling to access. It is commonly used to describe the positioning of important information or key elements in a publication or website to ensure maximum visibility and engagement.
  • fall between the cracks The idiom "fall between the cracks" refers to a situation where something or someone is overlooked, forgotten, or ignored due to a lack of attention or proper care. It means that something or someone has not been properly dealt with or taken care of, often due to a mistake, negligence, or a system failure. This can happen when something or someone does not fit neatly into established categories or processes, resulting in being overlooked or disregarded.
  • the man on the street The idiom "the man on the street" typically refers to an ordinary or average person, often an anonymous member of the public. It is used when describing the opinions, perspectives, or experiences of everyday people who are not necessarily experts or professionals in a specific field.
  • a rap across/on/over the knuckles The idiom "a rap across/on/over the knuckles" refers to a reprimand or punishment that serves as a warning or reminder to someone who has made a mistake or engaged in inappropriate behavior. It implies a light but impactful form of discipline or criticism, often aiming to correct the person's conduct or prevent further wrongdoing.
  • fray at the edges The idiom "fray at the edges" means to show signs of wear or deterioration, usually in a physical, emotional, or mental sense. It refers to something or someone that is gradually losing their strength, stability, or coherence, resembling an object or fabric that is starting to unravel or come apart at the edges. This can apply to various aspects, such as a person's mental health deteriorating, an organization struggling to maintain its efficiency, a relationship on the verge of breaking down, or anything that is beginning to show signs of weakness or instability.
  • the British disease The idiom "the British disease" refers to a phrase originally coined in the 1970s, referring to the economic decline and underperformance of the British economy during that time. It implies a sense of chronic economic problems, lack of industrial competitiveness, inadequate productivity, and a resistance to change. However, over time, the phrase has been more broadly used to describe any systemic problem or cultural tendency that impedes progress or hampers success in various aspects of British society.
  • the Pleistocene The idiom "the Pleistocene" refers to a geological epoch that occurred from about 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago. It is often used to describe a very long time ago or an ancient era.
  • have your head in the clouds To have your head in the clouds means to be daydreaming or not paying attention to reality. It refers to someone who is not focused or engaged in their surroundings, often lost in their own thoughts or fantasies.
  • be the butt of the joke The idiom "be the butt of the joke" means to be the target of ridicule, mockery, or laughter in a humorous situation. It refers to being the person on whom jokes or playful teasing is directed, often at their expense.
  • take, claim, seize, etc. the moral high ground The idiom "take, claim, seize, etc. the moral high ground" refers to adopting a morally superior position or asserting moral superiority in a particular situation or argument. It means presenting oneself or one's viewpoint as more just, ethical, or virtuous than others involved, often to gain an advantage or to undermine opposing perspectives. It involves portraying oneself as having a stronger moral foundation, which can be used to criticize or invalidate opposing viewpoints.
  • put the fear of God in (one) The idiom "put the fear of God in (one)" refers to the act of intentionally instilling a great sense of fear or dread into someone. It implies creating a strong, intimidating presence that causes the person to be very afraid or apprehensive.
  • the glass ceiling The idiom "the glass ceiling" refers to an invisible barrier or limitation that prevents individuals, particularly women or minorities, from advancing to higher positions or reaching their full potential within an organization or society due to prejudice, discrimination, or institutional biases.
  • applaud (or cheer) someone to the echo The idiom "applaud (or cheer) someone to the echo" means to wholeheartedly support, acknowledge, or praise someone, typically in an enthusiastic and emphatic manner. It suggests that the applause or cheers are so loud and prolonged that they reverberate or echo throughout the surroundings. This idiom conveys an overwhelming show of approval or admiration for the person's actions, achievements, or qualities.
  • there's one law for the rich and another for the poor The idiom "there's one law for the rich and another for the poor" refers to a perceived double standard in the justice system, where different rules and treatment apply based on an individual's wealth or social standing. It conveys the notion that the wealthy or influential people are often treated more leniently or are exempt from consequences compared to those who are less privileged or economically disadvantaged.
  • quick (or slow) on the uptake The idiom "quick (or slow) on the uptake" is typically used to describe someone's intelligence or ability to understand or grasp information quickly (or slowly). It refers to how quickly or slowly a person is able to comprehend or perceive things. If someone is "quick on the uptake," they are considered to be intelligent and able to understand things swiftly. On the contrary, if someone is "slow on the uptake," they may require more time or explanation to understand something.
  • one's nose is in the air The idiom "one's nose is in the air" means that someone is behaving in a pompous or arrogant manner. It implies that the person is displaying an attitude of superiority or looking down on others.
  • at the end of the rainbow The idiom "at the end of the rainbow" refers to an elusive or unattainable goal or treasure that is believed to exist but is difficult or impossible to find or reach. It is often used to describe something that is elusive, imaginary, or too good to be true.
  • set the Thames alight The idiom "set the Thames alight" means to achieve something remarkable or extraordinary; to do something so astonishing that it becomes the talk of the town or captivates people's attention. It refers to the idea of setting the River Thames in London on fire, which would be an unbelievable and impossible feat.
  • put the word about/around/out/round The idiom "put the word about/around/out/round" refers to spreading information or gossip to a wide range of people. It means to circulate news or rumors in order to make sure as many people as possible are aware of something, typically with the intention of influencing opinions or actions.
  • go all the way (or the whole way) The idiom "go all the way (or the whole way)" means to fully commit or devote oneself to an action, plan, or relationship, without holding back or stopping halfway. It implies giving complete effort, taking a task to its fullest extent, or pursuing a course of action to its ultimate conclusion.
  • the curtain falls The idiom "the curtain falls" refers to the moment when an event or situation comes to an end, often indicating the conclusion of a performance or the final stages of a project, relationship, or career. It signifies the closing or completion of something, usually with a sense of finality and the beginning of a new phase or chapter.
  • be the talk of smw The idiom "be the talk of smw" refers to being the subject of conversation or gossip among a particular group or community. It denotes being the center of attention or discussion, often due to notable or significant events, actions, or characteristics.
  • drown the shamrock The idiom "drown the shamrock" refers to the act of celebrating St. Patrick's Day by consuming excessive amounts of alcohol, typically Irish whiskey or beer, to the point of inebriation. It symbolizes a festive and often raucous manner of celebrating the Irish heritage and signifies indulging oneself in the spirit of the holiday.
  • nearer the church, the farther from God The idiom "nearer the church, the farther from God" is a proverbial expression that conveys the idea of how religious hypocrisy or false piety can exist among those who are closely associated with religious institutions. It suggests that proximity to the church or religious practices does not necessarily equate to a genuine connection with spiritual or moral values. Rather, it implies that individuals who are excessively preoccupied with external appearances of religious devotion may be lacking true faith or a deep understanding of their religious teachings.
  • on the agenda The idiom "on the agenda" refers to something that is planned or scheduled to be discussed, considered, or addressed during a meeting, event, or a person's list of tasks or priorities. It implies that the particular topic, issue, or item is of importance and needs attention or action.
  • the front office The idiom "the front office" refers to the area of a business or organization where public interactions occur or the administrative and management functions are carried out. It is often used to describe the department or group of individuals responsible for customer service, communications, and overall organization within a company or institution.
  • hit the sawdust trail The idiom "hit the sawdust trail" typically refers to a person's decision to become a devout follower of Christian faith. It originally derived from the practice of laying sawdust on the ground during evangelical revival meetings as a substitute for sawdust in sawmills, creating the sound of a trail when walked upon. Therefore, "hitting the sawdust trail" implies someone committing to or embarking on a religious journey or evangelistic mission.
  • do the spadework The idiom "do the spadework" means to complete the preliminary or necessary groundwork for a task or project, often involving research, preparation, or physical labor. It refers to the initial efforts or groundwork required to lay a foundation or set the stage for further progress or development.
  • slam the door in face The idiom "slam the door in someone's face" means to rudely or abruptly reject someone, typically by dismissing their request, proposal, or opinion in an unkind or abrupt manner. It metaphorically refers to the action of forcefully closing a door in someone's face, symbolizing the abrupt termination of any further interaction or communication.
  • Don't change horses in the middle of the stream. The idiom "Don't change horses in the middle of the stream" means to not change plans, strategies, or decisions midway through a project or task. It advises against making sudden alterations or switching to a different approach when one is already in the middle of executing a plan. It suggests that it is better to stick with the original course of action until completion rather than switching to something new halfway through.
  • a feast for the eyes The idiom "a feast for the eyes" refers to something that is visually stunning or captivating, bringing great pleasure or enjoyment to the observer. It suggests that the sight is so appealing and impressive that it feels like indulging in a lavish feast.
  • out of the corner of one's eye The idiom "out of the corner of one's eye" means to see or notice something indirectly or without looking directly at it. It refers to a situation where something is observed or perceived unintentionally or in a peripheral manner.
  • life in the raw The idiom "life in the raw" refers to the natural and unfiltered way of living, without any disguises or pretense. It implies experiencing life in its most authentic and unrefined state, without any artificial enhancements or alterations. It emphasizes a genuine, unadulterated existence, often associated with a basic and elemental approach to life.
  • off the mark The idiom "off the mark" refers to something that is incorrect, inaccurate, or not on target in terms of ideas, opinions, statements, or predictions. It suggests that the information or understanding provided is not accurate or does not align with the truth or reality.
  • bit on the side The idiom "bit on the side" refers to a person with whom someone engages in a secret or extramarital relationship. It implies a relationship that is not the person's main or primary one.
  • the bare bones (of something) The phrase "the bare bones (of something)" refers to the most basic and essential elements or details of something, lacking any additional or unnecessary elements. It implies stripping away all the extras and focusing only on the fundamental aspects or structure.
  • at the best of times The idiom "at the best of times" refers to a specific time or situation being considered as the most favorable or optimal conditions possible. It signifies that even in ideal circumstances, the mentioned event or condition may still be challenging or less than desirable.
  • in the event of The idiom "in the event of" means if or in the case that something specific happens or occurs. It is often used to describe potential future scenarios or possibilities and is typically followed by a noun or an action.
  • take the mickey out of The idiom "take the mickey out of" means to mock, tease, or make fun of someone or something, often in a playful or lighthearted manner. It involves ridiculing or imitating someone or something for amusement or entertainment purposes.
  • get a/(one's) leg in the door The idiom "get a/(one's) leg in the door" means to establish a small opportunity or connection that could potentially lead to more substantial opportunities or advancement in a particular field, industry, or organization. It refers to getting the initial chance or making the first contact that allows someone to start building a relationship or making progress toward a desired goal. It often implies that once the initial connection or opportunity has been gained, further efforts and abilities can be used to capitalize on it and achieve more significant success or advancement.
  • the cradle of sth The idiom "the cradle of something" refers to the place or region where something originated or was first established. It is often used metaphorically to denote the birthplace or initial development of a particular idea, culture, skill, or innovation. The term "cradle" signifies the nurturing and fundamental nature of the place, much like a literal cradle is the initial source of care and growth for a baby.
  • have several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have several irons in the fire" means to be involved in or working on multiple projects or activities simultaneously. It refers to a situation where someone has numerous tasks, opportunities, or responsibilities that they are actively pursuing or managing at the same time.
  • take the floor The idiom "take the floor" typically means to become the center of attention, often by speaking or performing in front of a group of people, especially during a meeting, event, or public gathering. It refers to the act of being given the opportunity to have the spotlight or take control of a situation.
  • be away with the fairies The idiom "be away with the fairies" is a figurative expression that means someone is daydreaming, not paying attention, or lost in their own thoughts and not fully present in the current situation. It suggests that the person's mind is wandering as if they were in a fantasy world or dreamland.
  • run in the family The idiom "run in the family" refers to a trait, characteristic, or behavior that is common among members of a particular family. It suggests that the trait or characteristic is likely inherited or passed down through generations.
  • There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip The idiom "There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip" means that even with careful planning and hopeful expectations, things can still go wrong or not turn out as intended before a task or goal is completed. It highlights the uncertainty and unpredictability of achieving a desired outcome, emphasizing that obstacles, mistakes, or unforeseen events can occur at any stage of a process.
  • pat someone on the back The idiom "pat someone on the back" means to praise, congratulate, or encourage someone for their achievements or efforts. It conveys the idea of showing approval or recognition for someone's hard work or accomplishments.
  • on the bandwagon The idiom "on the bandwagon" refers to joining or endorsing a popular trend, movement, or opinion, often without critical thinking or true commitment. It implies going along with the majority in order to fit in or gain acceptance, rather than forming one's own judgment or beliefs.
  • downhill all the way The idiom "downhill all the way" means that a situation or task becomes increasingly easier or less difficult as time goes on. It refers to a progression or journey that becomes smoother and requires less effort or struggle.
  • the dozens The idiom "the dozens" refers to a playful, competitive exchange of insults or verbal jabs between two or more individuals. It often involves humorous, exaggerated, or creative insults aimed at mocking or teasing one another. The aim is to outwit and best the opponent through clever wordplay and quick thinking.
  • get sb's/the drift The idiom "get sb's/the drift" means to understand or grasp someone's intended meaning or the general idea or point they are trying to convey in a conversation or situation. It refers to comprehending the underlying message or understanding the subtle nuances or implications of what someone is saying or doing.
  • the butt of a/the joke The idiom "the butt of a/the joke" refers to a person or thing that becomes the target of ridicule, teasing, or mockery in a humorous situation. It conveys the idea of being the object of amusement or being made fun of by others.
  • have all the cares of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have all the cares of the world on your shoulders" means to feel burdened or overwhelmed by a multitude of problems, responsibilities, or concerns. It implies the feeling of carrying the weight of the entire world's worries and difficulties, often leading to stress and anxiety.
  • the blessed event The idiom "the blessed event" is an informal and somewhat humorous way of referring to the birth of a baby. It conveys the idea that a baby's arrival is a special and joyous occasion.
  • lead someone up the aisle The idiom "lead someone up the aisle" typically refers to the act of escorting or guiding someone, usually a bride, down the aisle during a wedding ceremony. It suggests taking responsibility for assisting and supporting someone through an important life event or decision, particularly in a romantic or relationship context.
  • be/go on the scrounge The idiom "be/go on the scrounge" means to go around asking or looking for things for free or with the intention of borrowing without returning. It typically refers to seeking or collecting things, especially money or goods, by trying to obtain them from others rather than purchasing or acquiring them in a conventional manner. It often implies a sort of resourcefulness or reliance on others' generosity.
  • yield the palm to The idiom "yield the palm to" means to relinquish one's position or acknowledge someone else as superior, especially in terms of skill, achievement, or expertise. It implies acknowledging the superiority of someone else in a particular domain or field.
  • the bottom drops out of the market The idiom "the bottom drops out of the market" refers to a significant and sudden decline in prices, value, or demand in the financial market or an industry. It implies a situation where the market experiences a sudden and drastic loss, leading to a steep decline in investment returns or business prospects.
  • spit (out) the dummy The idiom "spit (out) the dummy" is commonly used in British and Australian English, and it refers to an overreaction or an emotional outburst in response to a situation, often characterized by anger, frustration, or a sense of being overwhelmed. The term "dummy" in this context refers to a pacifier or a baby's teething toy, and "spitting out" implies throwing it forcefully from the mouth. Therefore, the idiom suggests a tantrum-like behavior exhibited by an adult, akin to a baby throwing a fit by spitting out their pacifier.
  • keep it on the down-low The idiom "keep it on the down-low" means to keep something a secret or to refrain from disclosing or sharing information with others in order to maintain confidentiality or avoid drawing attention or unwanted consequences.
  • the real deal The idiom "the real deal" means something or someone that is genuine, authentic, or of exceptional quality. It is often used to describe something or someone that is not an imitation or a fraud but the actual or true version.
  • hoist the blue peter The idiom "hoist the blue peter" refers to raising a blue flag, specifically the Blue Peter flag, which is a signal used in maritime activities. It is often used to communicate to crew members aboard a ship that it is preparing to set sail imminently. Additionally, "hoist the blue peter" can also figuratively mean getting ready to commence an action or start a journey.
  • for the high jump The idiom "for the high jump" is commonly used to express that someone is in trouble or is likely to face punishment or consequences for their actions. It implies that someone will be held accountable for their behavior or mistakes.
  • the last of the big spenders "The last of the big spenders" is an idiom used to describe someone who spends money extravagantly or lavishly, especially when compared to others who are more frugal or cautious with their spending. It typically refers to someone who indulges in luxurious or high-priced items or experiences without concern for the cost.
  • play to the whistle The idiom "play to the whistle" means to continue and make an effort until a situation or activity is officially finished or ended, even in the face of setbacks, distractions, or unfair circumstances. It typically encourages someone to persevere, stay focused, and not give up prematurely. The phrase originates from sports, particularly team sports, where participants are expected to continue playing until the final whistle or signal from the referee, regardless of any perceived unfairness or controversy. In a broader context, it can also convey the idea of staying committed and not being deterred by obstacles or unexpected challenges in any situation.
  • put (something) on the long finger To "put (something) on the long finger" is an idiomatic expression commonly used in Ireland and means to delay or postpone doing something, often indefinitely. It refers to the act of purposely and systematically procrastinating or putting off a task or responsibility, allowing it to linger or remain unresolved for an extended period of time.
  • be at the helm The idiom "be at the helm" means to be in a position of leadership, control, or authority. It is often used to describe someone who is in charge or has ultimate responsibility for making decisions and guiding the course of an organization, project, or group.
  • be in the hole The idiom "be in the hole" typically means to be in a difficult or disadvantaged situation, often referring to a financial or debt-related predicament. It indicates being in a position where one owes more money than they possess or have the ability to pay back.
  • in the public eye The idiom "in the public eye" refers to a person or thing that is widely observed, noticed, or scrutinized by the general public. It implies being subject to public attention, recognition, or scrutiny due to fame, popularity, or a prominent position.
  • juggle balls in the air The idiom "juggle balls in the air" means to manage or handle multiple tasks or responsibilities simultaneously or skillfully, often suggesting a busy or hectic lifestyle. It implies the need to keep various things in motion, much like a juggler tossing and catching multiple objects in the air.
  • down for the count The idiom "down for the count" is used to describe someone who is physically or emotionally defeated or unable to continue, especially after a struggle or setback. It originates from boxing, where a boxer who is knocked down by their opponent is given a count of ten seconds to get back up and resume the fight. If they are unable to do so within the designated time, they are considered "down for the count" and lose the match. Therefore, the idiom is often used metaphorically to indicate a situation where someone is completely overcome or defeated.
  • Cast bread upon the waters The idiom "Cast bread upon the waters" means to do good deeds or acts of charity without expecting anything in return. It is based on a biblical reference from the book of Ecclesiastes, suggesting that by performing selfless acts, one may receive unexpected rewards or blessings in the future.
  • wouldn't know if it hit in the face The idiom "wouldn't know if it hit in the face" means that someone is completely oblivious or unaware of something, even if it is obvious or right in front of them. This expression suggests that the person lacks the ability to recognize or understand something even if it were to directly impact or affect them. It highlights a lack of awareness or perceptiveness.
  • take the blame (for doing something) The idiom "take the blame (for doing something)" means to accept responsibility or be held accountable for a mistake, wrongdoing, or negative consequence, even if it was not entirely one's fault or if others were involved. It implies willingly shouldering the burden of blame and facing the consequences without trying to shift it onto someone else.
  • the lion’s den The idiom "the lion's den" refers to a dangerous or challenging situation or environment where one is likely to face extreme scrutiny, opposition, or criticism. It is often used to describe a place or circumstance that presents great risks or where one needs to be extremely cautious and alert. It originates from the biblical story of Daniel, who was thrown into a den of lions as punishment for defying the king's orders but miraculously survived unharmed.
  • run the blockade The idiom "run the blockade" typically refers to the act of successfully bypassing or evading a blockade, often in a military or economic context. It describes a situation where someone or something manages to escape or penetrate a blockade put in place by authorities or enemies.
  • in the unlikely event The idiom "in the unlikely event" refers to a situation or circumstance that is not expected to happen or is highly improbable. It is usually used to imply that something is highly unlikely to occur, but it is being mentioned for precautionary or informational purposes.
  • not know the half of it The expression "not know the half of it" is used to emphasize that someone is unaware of the full extent or truth of a situation or information. It implies that what the person knows or is stating is only a fraction or incomplete knowledge of the reality.
  • catch the next wave The idiom "catch the next wave" refers to the act of recognizing and taking advantage of a new trend, innovation, or opportunity ahead of others. It suggests being proactive and staying ahead by being prepared to embrace or capitalize on upcoming changes or advancements. Similar to catching a wave in surfing, it involves being in the right place at the right time to ride the wave of success.
  • lead someone down the garden path The idiom "lead someone down the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone, usually by providing false or misleading information, with the intention of tricking or manipulating them. It refers to intentionally leading someone astray, much like coaxing them to take a scenic route through a garden with no real destination or purpose.
  • take the air The idiom "take the air" typically means to go outside, usually for a walk or to spend time in open spaces. It is commonly used to describe the act of getting fresh air or enjoying the outdoors.
  • knock the daylights out of The phrase "knock the daylights out of" is an idiomatic expression that means to beat or hit someone very severely or forcefully, to the point of causing them to lose consciousness or severely weakening them. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate defeating or overwhelming someone in a non-physical sense.
  • in the long run (or term) The idiom "in the long run (or term)" means over a long period of time or considering the ultimate outcome or consequences of something. It implies that the true result or effect of a situation may only become apparent after a significant amount of time has passed.
  • the beautiful The phrase "the beautiful" does not have a specific idiom or figurative meaning. It is a term used to describe something that possesses qualities of beauty or is aesthetically pleasing. It refers to something that is visually attractive or appealing in terms of its form, appearance, or design.
  • bring (someone or something) to the bargaining table The idiom "bring (someone or something) to the bargaining table" refers to the act of getting individuals or groups who have conflicting interests or opposing views to engage in negotiation or discussion in order to reach a mutually acceptable agreement or resolution. It implies initiating a conversation or dialogue to facilitate compromise or resolution of a dispute.
  • free as the air The idiom "free as the air" means to be completely unrestricted, unconstrained, or unburdened, just like the air that is not confined or controlled by any physical boundaries. It implies a sense of total freedom and independence, devoid of any limitations or obligations.
  • be up with the chickens The idiom "be up with the chickens" means to wake up or be active very early in the morning. It refers to being awake and active at the same time as chickens, which are known for waking up at the break of dawn.
  • give the eye The idiom "give the eye" refers to the act of looking at someone in an interested or flirtatious manner, typically accompanied by eying them up and down. It can also imply giving someone a suggestive or seductive look, often with the intention of expressing attraction or interest.
  • not bear the sight of (someone or something) The idiom "not bear the sight of (someone or something)" means to dislike or feel strong aversion towards someone or something, to the extent that one finds it intolerable or unbearable to look at or be in the presence of them.
  • build castles in the sky The idiom "build castles in the sky" is used to describe someone who has unrealistic dreams or ambitions that are unlikely to be achieved or realized in reality. It refers to creating elaborate plans or expectations that have no basis in practicality or feasibility.
  • the gapes The idiom "the gapes" refers to a state of astonishment or disbelief, often characterized by an open-mouthed expression. It can also indicate a condition of being extremely surprised or awestruck.
  • take the slack up The idiom "take the slack up" means to assume responsibility or complete a task that someone else has neglected or failed to do. It involves stepping in to resolve a problem or fill a gap left by others. It denotes taking action and addressing a situation that requires attention or effort.
  • square the circle The idiom "square the circle" refers to attempting to accomplish a task or solve a problem that is considered impossible or extremely difficult due to conflicting or contradictory factors. It symbolizes the pursuit of an unattainable or impractical goal that goes against logic or reason.
  • hit the spot The idiom "hit the spot" means to satisfy a particular need or desire, typically referring to food or drink that tastes particularly good or provides a sense of fulfillment or refreshment. It implies that the consumed item has fulfilled a specific craving or served its purpose effectively.
  • get off the ground The idiom "get off the ground" means to start or initiate something, especially a project or plan. It refers to the initial stages or early progress of an endeavor before it becomes fully established or successful.
  • turn the tables on sb The idiom "turn the tables on someone" means to reverse a situation or change the roles in a way that puts the other person at a disadvantage, usually after being in a weaker or disadvantaged position oneself. It involves shifting the power dynamics, usually to one's own advantage, and often takes the other person by surprise or catches them off guard.
  • pull the rug out (from under sm) The idiom "pull the rug out from under someone" typically means to unexpectedly or suddenly deprive someone of support, stability, or an advantage that they heavily relied upon, causing them to be in a difficult or disadvantageous situation. It refers to the act of abruptly and surprisingly removing a metaphorical "rug" that was providing assistance or security, leaving the individual vulnerable and destabilized.
  • can't see the wood for the trees The idiom "can't see the wood for the trees" means being so focused on the small details or individual parts of a situation that one fails to understand or recognize the overall context or bigger picture. It refers to a situation where someone gets too immersed in the specifics, losing sight of the main point or objective.
  • break the Sabbath The idiom "break the Sabbath" refers to the act of violating or not adhering to the rules or practices of a religious day of rest, specifically in Christianity, Judaism, and some other religions. It typically involves engaging in secular activities, work, or any actions that are not considered appropriate or in line with the principles and customs associated with observing the Sabbath. It is often used metaphorically to describe any action that goes against established religious or moral principles or norms.
  • bat for the other side The idiom "bat for the other side" is usually used to describe someone who is not heterosexual, meaning they are attracted to people of the same gender. It implies that the person is gay or lesbian. The phrase is derived from the sport of cricket, where each team takes turns batting and fielding. In this context, "batting for the other side" means playing on the opposing team.
  • pick up the pieces The idiom "pick up the pieces" means to restore order or stability after a crisis or a difficult situation has occurred. It refers to the act of recovering from a setback or mishap and trying to rebuild or repair what has been damaged.
  • make the bed The idiom "make the bed" typically refers to the act of tidying up or preparing a bed by arranging the sheets, blankets, and pillows in an orderly manner. In a broader sense, it can also signify taking responsibility for one's actions or completing a task diligently and systematically.
  • come down to the line The idiom "come down to the line" can have a few different meanings depending on the context: 1. To reach a critical or decisive point where a final action or decision needs to be made. It refers to a situation where all the factors have been considered, and now it's time to make a choice or take action. Example: "After weeks of negotiations, it has come down to the line, and they must decide whether to accept the proposal or walk away." 2. To approach the culmination or conclusion of a process or event. It indicates that a certain situation or event has reached its final stages or is nearing its end. Example: "The competition has been fierce, but it's coming down to the line, with only two
  • steal the spotlight The idiom "steal the spotlight" means to attract attention and receive the most praise or recognition, often by outshining others in a particular situation or event. It refers to someone who becomes the center of attention, diverting the focus from others.
  • the avant-garde The idiom "the avant-garde" refers to a group of people or ideas that are innovative, experimental, or cutting-edge, particularly in the field of art, culture, or fashion. It often refers to those who challenge traditional norms and push the boundaries of what is considered accepted or mainstream. The avant-garde is characterized by a willingness to break away from established conventions and explore new territories with a forward-thinking approach.
  • take the wind out of sb's sails The idiom "take the wind out of someone's sails" means to diminish someone's confidence, enthusiasm, or momentum by saying or doing something that deflates or demoralizes them.
  • He that would the daughter win, must with the mother first begin. The idiom "He that would the daughter win, must with the mother first begin" means that in order to build a successful relationship with someone, it is essential to establish a positive connection with their family or those close to them. It emphasizes the importance of gaining the approval, trust, or support of the person's mother or family members before pursuing a romantic relationship with them.
  • set the world alight The idiom "set the world alight" means to achieve great success or recognition, often by doing something outstanding or extraordinary. It refers to making a significant impact or creating a sensation in a particular field or area of interest.
  • speak/talk of the devil The idiom "speak/talk of the devil" is used when someone is talking about or referring to a person and that person unexpectedly appears or enters the conversation. It is often used humorously or to express surprise at the timing of the person's arrival.
  • the fuzz The idiom "the fuzz" typically refers to the police or law enforcement agencies. It is commonly used informally to refer to the authorities or police officers. It may also be used to describe a feeling of confusion or blurriness.
  • rap over the knuckles The idiom "rap over the knuckles" typically refers to a mild punishment or reprimand given to someone for their incorrect behavior or mistakes. It is similar to a gentle admonition or a form of discouragement to avoid repeating the same error.
  • give the lie to (something) The idiom "give the lie to (something)" means to prove that something is false or to contradict a statement or belief by presenting evidence or facts that show it to be untrue. It implies exposing the falsehood or inconsistency of a claim or statement.
  • leave out in the cold The idiom "leave out in the cold" means to purposely exclude, disregard, or neglect someone, leaving them in a situation without support, attention, or involvement. It implies that the person is left feeling isolated, ignored, or unimportant.
  • blow with the wind The idiom "blow with the wind" means to be easily influenced or swayed by external factors or changing circumstances. It implies a lack of firmness or determination in decision-making, often resulting in a person changing their opinion or position frequently depending on the prevailing circumstances.
  • give sb the heaveho The idiom "give someone the heaveho" means to dismiss, fire, or remove someone from a position or situation, often abruptly or unceremoniously. It signifies the act of getting rid of someone or ending their involvement.
  • at the helm The idiom "at the helm" refers to being in a position of leadership or control, often referring to being in charge of a project, organization, or company. It signifies having the responsibility and authority to make important decisions and guide the direction of something.
  • not let the grass grow under feet The idiom "not let the grass grow under feet" means to be constantly active or proactive, taking immediate action or making decisions without delay. It implies the avoidance of wasting time or being idle.
  • be easy on the eye The idiom "be easy on the eye" refers to something that is visually appealing or aesthetically pleasing. It describes someone or something that is attractive or pleasant to look at.
  • touch all the bases The idiom "touch all the bases" refers to making sure that all necessary steps or elements are considered or addressed, often in a thorough or methodical manner, to ensure nothing is overlooked or forgotten. It typically implies completing or covering all aspects of a task or situation. The phrase originates from the sport of baseball, where runners on a batting team are required to touch each of the four bases in order to legally score a run.
  • dip (one's) toe in the water To "dip one's toe in the water" means to cautiously or hesitantly try something new or unfamiliar, often to test the waters or get a feel for it before fully committing or making a decision. It refers to the act of dipping one's toe into a pool or body of water as a preliminary step to gauge the temperature or assess the situation.
  • sweep the board The idiom "sweep the board" means to win or achieve complete and total victory or success in a particular competition, endeavor, or situation. It often implies that the individual or group has not only won but also surpassed all competitors or obstacles, leaving no room for others to succeed.
  • be a figment of your/the imagination The idiom "be a figment of your/the imagination" means that something or someone is not real, but rather a creation or product of one's own mind. It implies that the person or thing being referred to does not exist in reality, but only in the imagination or thoughts of the individual.
  • get on the end of (something) The idiom "get on the end of (something)" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position in a particular situation. It implies being positioned or placed at the most advantageous point or position in a specific context.
  • in the market for The idiom "in the market for" refers to the situation where someone is interested in purchasing or acquiring a particular item or service. It indicates that the person is actively looking or considering options in order to make a purchase.
  • get (or have) the jump on The idiom "get (or have) the jump on" means to gain an advantage by acting or starting before others. It implies taking the initiative or getting ahead in a particular situation, often by being prepared or acting quickly.
  • That brings me to the point The idiom "That brings me to the point" is used to indicate that the speaker is transitioning or moving towards the main or most important point of discussion, often following a series of related or preceding statements. It signifies the speaker's intention to focus on the primary issue or argument at hand.
  • ride the crest of something The idiom "ride the crest of" means to be at the highest point of success, popularity, or advantage. It refers to being in a favorable position or enjoying great success, often after overcoming difficulty or navigating through challenges. Just like riding atop the crest or peak of a wave, it signifies being in a position of achievement or advancement.
  • be in the throes of sth/doing sth The idiom "be in the throes of sth/doing sth" means to be deeply immersed or engaged in something, especially a difficult or challenging task or situation. It refers to a state of intense involvement, often with a sense of struggle or turmoil.
  • in the throes of (something) The idiom "in the throes of (something)" means being deeply or intensely involved in a difficult or challenging situation or experience. It implies that someone is in the midst of something overwhelming, often with a sense of struggle or turmoil.
  • It's easy to be wise after the event The idiom "It's easy to be wise after the event" means that it is simple to analyze and understand a situation or make the right decision after it has happened, but it is much more difficult to predict or foresee the outcome beforehand. It highlights the tendency for people to offer insightful advice or judgment on a situation that has already occurred, while failing to provide the same level of wisdom or foresight in similar circumstances beforehand.
  • feed the kitty The idiom "feed the kitty" typically means to contribute money or resources to a common pool or fund, often used within a group or community. It can also refer to making a financial contribution or payment towards a specific goal or expense. This phrase is often used to signify cooperation and shared responsibility.
  • send the helve after the hatchet The idiom "send the helve after the hatchet" is an old expression that means to attempt to recover something that is already lost or irretrievable. The phrase comes from an old folk tale in which a man loses his hatchet in a river and then throws the helve (the handle) after it, hoping to recover the whole hatchet. It implies a futile or unnecessary effort to regain something that has already been lost.
  • fire in the (or your) belly The idiom "fire in the (or your) belly" typically refers to having a strong and passionate determination or motivation for something. It implies a deep-seated and intense desire to achieve a goal or pursue a certain path.
  • doped to the gills The idiom "doped to the gills" typically refers to someone who is heavily under the influence of drugs or substances, usually to an excessive or extreme degree. It implies that the person is thoroughly or completely intoxicated.
  • honest as the day is long The idiom "honest as the day is long" means someone or something that is incredibly truthful, reliable, and trustworthy. It emphasizes the notion that just as the length of the day symbolizes trustworthiness and integrity, the person or thing being described possesses these qualities without question.
  • argue the toss The idiom "argue the toss" means to continue arguing or debating a point, even when it is clear that a decision or conclusion has already been made. It refers to persisting in a futile or unnecessary argument, often disregarding the facts or evidence presented.
  • quick and the dead The idiom "quick and the dead" typically refers to the contrast between living and non-living entities or the distinction between those who are alive and those who are not. It often implies that time is passing quickly, and one must seize opportunities, as life is fleeting.
  • take the high ground The idiom "take the high ground" means to adopt a morally, ethically, or intellectually superior position or perspective in a conflict or debate. It suggests choosing a more virtuous, honorable, or advantageous stance, often emphasizing the importance of integrity, principles, and wisdom.
  • get on the stick The idiom "get on the stick" means to start working or acting more quickly, efficiently, or effectively. It can be used to urge someone to focus, be proactive, or speed up their efforts.
  • shut the door in (someone's) face The idiom "shut the door in (someone's) face" means to abruptly or rudely reject or exclude someone, often when they are seeking help, support, or acknowledgment. It implies intentionally closing off any opportunity or interaction with that person.
  • a pillar of the community The idiom "a pillar of the community" refers to an individual who is highly respected, valued, and influential within their community. This person is often known for their active involvement in community affairs, contributing positively to the well-being and progress of the community as a whole. They are seen as a reliable, dependable, and trustworthy member who supports and uplifts others, making them an integral part of the community’s foundation.
  • the going thing The idiom "the going thing" refers to something that is currently popular, trendy, or in style. It indicates something that is widely accepted or practiced during a specific time period.
  • cover the field The idiom "cover the field" means to thoroughly or comprehensively address or explore all aspects or possibilities of a particular subject or topic. It implies leaving no stone unturned and ensuring that every relevant detail or angle is investigated or considered. It is often used in discussions, research, or problem-solving to denote an extensive and exhaustive analysis or examination of a particular subject matter.
  • (just) for the record The definition of the idiom "(just) for the record" is: to emphasize that something is being stated or clarified in order to ensure accurate information, often to prevent any misunderstanding or misinterpretation in the future. It is used to highlight that the statement is being formally recorded or noted for the sake of accuracy.
  • leave the door open for To "leave the door open for" means to keep a possibility or opportunity available for someone or something in the future. It signifies not closing off options or ending a situation definitively, allowing for the potential for future developments or actions.
  • reach for the stars The idiom "reach for the stars" means to set ambitious goals or aspirations, aiming for great success or achievement. It signifies reaching beyond one's current capabilities or limitations and having high aspirations and dreams.
  • in the lump The idiom "in the lump" refers to taking or dealing with something as a whole or amass, rather than in separate parts or individually. It can be used to describe a collective or unified approach to handling a situation or considering its components.
  • the goods on The idiom "the goods on" means to possess detailed, reliable information or evidence about someone or something, usually used in the context of having incriminating or revealing information. It suggests having knowledge or evidence that can expose the truth, wrongdoing, or secrets about someone or something.
  • pass the smell test The idiom "pass the smell test" means that something appears to be legitimate, believable, or acceptable upon closer inspection or scrutiny. It refers to relying on one's intuition or instinct to determine if a person, situation, or explanation is genuine or trustworthy. Similar to how something that emits a foul odor might arouse suspicion, figuratively, if a particular thing or situation doesn't "pass the smell test," it suggests that there may be something dishonest, questionable, or deceitful about it.
  • when (or if) it comes to the crunch The idiom "when (or if) it comes to the crunch" refers to a situation where a decision or action needs to be made, especially when faced with a difficult or challenging circumstance. It implies that when the moment of truth arrives, one's true abilities, skills, or determination will be tested.
  • throw someone in at the deep end The idiom "throw someone in at the deep end" means to place or put someone into a challenging or difficult situation without any prior experience, preparation, or guidance. It refers to exposing someone to a daunting task or responsibility without offering any assistance or support, forcing them to quickly adapt and learn in a high-pressure situation.
  • give someone the worst of it The idiom "give someone the worst of it" means to cause someone physical or verbal harm, inflict punishment, or treat them in a harsh and unfair manner. It refers to a situation where someone is on the receiving end of negative consequences or suffering due to someone else's actions or words.
  • be/get in on the ground floor The idiom "be/get in on the ground floor" means to be involved or enter into something new or exciting at an early stage, typically referring to an opportunity or venture that has the potential for future success or growth. It implies being present from the beginning, which may give one a better chance to benefit or succeed in the long run.
  • Sarcasm is the lowest form of wit. The idiom "Sarcasm is the lowest form of wit" means that using sarcasm as a form of humor or communication is considered to be crude or unimpressive. It suggests that there are more sophisticated, intelligent, or refined ways to express wit or humor than resorting to sarcasm.
  • or die in the attempt The idiom "or die in the attempt" is used to describe one's determination and willingness to accomplish a certain goal or objective, even if it involves great risks or challenges. It emphasizes the person's perseverance and commitment, suggesting that they will continue striving towards success without giving up, even if it means facing severe consequences.
  • be (sitting) in the catbird seat The idiom "be (sitting) in the catbird seat" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position of control or power. It suggests that someone is in a position of advantage, often by being well-informed or having control over a situation, giving them an upper hand over others.
  • pull out of the fire The idiom "pull out of the fire" means to rescue or save someone or something from a difficult or dangerous situation. It refers to getting someone or something out of trouble or jeopardy, often in the nick of time, just like rescuing something from a burning fire.
  • jump in at the deep end The idiom "jump in at the deep end" means to start a new and challenging activity or situation without any preparation or prior experience. It refers to diving into deeper water instead of gradually easing into it. In a figurative sense, it suggests taking on a task or responsibility head-on, without hesitation or fear, regardless of potential difficulties or consequences.
  • reality of the situation The idiom "reality of the situation" refers to understanding or acknowledging the true or actual circumstances and conditions of a particular situation or scenario. It implies facing the facts and accepting the truth, often be it pleasant or unpleasant, rather than relying on assumptions or wishful thinking.
  • go down the gurgler The idiom "go down the gurgler" is an informal expression that means to be wasted, ruined, or lost irretrievably. It is often used to describe a situation or effort that ends in failure or collapse. The term "gurgler" refers to a drain or a pipe, illustrating the imagery of something being flushed away or disappearing down the drain.
  • be slow off the mark The idiom "be slow off the mark" means to be slow to react or respond to something, missing an opportunity, or being late in taking action. It refers to someone or something being sluggish, hesitant, or delayed in initiating an action or making a decision.
  • put the bite on The idiom "put the bite on" means to ask or demand for money or contributions from someone, typically in a forceful or persistent manner. It refers to the act of pressuring or extorting someone for financial support.
  • home, James (, and don't spare the horses) The idiom "home, James (, and don't spare the horses)" is an expression typically used to tell a driver to go very fast or to go home quickly. It originated from the practice of wealthy people in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who would have a private coachman named James so that when they were ready to leave an event, they would say "home, James" as an instruction to start driving the carriage back home. The phrase "and don't spare the horses" was added to emphasize the urgency and desire for the driver not to hold back in terms of speed.
  • stab somebody in the back The idiom "stab somebody in the back" refers to the act of betraying or harming someone, often by showing disloyalty or deceitfulness towards them when they least expect it. It involves breaking trust or sabotaging someone's confidence or well-being behind their back, without their knowledge or consent.
  • fly the nest The idiom "fly the nest" refers to the act of leaving one's parents' home or departing from a situation of dependency or guidance in order to become self-reliant and independent. It is often used to describe young adults or offspring leaving their parents' house to start their own life.
  • knock sth on the head The idiom "knock something on the head" means to put an end to or stop an activity, plan, or idea. It usually implies one's decision to cease or abandon something.
  • the common, general, ordinary, usual run (of something) The idiom "the common, general, ordinary, usual run (of something)" refers to the typical or normal state or occurrence of something. It denotes the regular or average condition, type, or occurrence of a particular thing or situation. It implies that there is nothing exceptional, unique, or extraordinary about that specific object, event, or circumstance.
  • lance the boil The idiom "lance the boil" refers to the action of addressing and resolving a problem or conflict that has been causing discomfort or distress. It implies the need to directly confront and deal with an issue, often in a decisive or forceful manner, in order to alleviate the pain or tension it is causing.
  • in/out of the running (for something) The idiom "in/out of the running (for something)" means being considered as a potential candidate or participant or being eliminated or no longer considered as a contender for a particular position, opportunity, or competition. It implies either being actively in contention or being ruled out from consideration.
  • give somebody the runaround The idiom "give somebody the runaround" means to purposely give someone vague or confusing replies, make excuses, or delay taking action in order to avoid providing them with a direct or clear answer or resolution to a problem or request.
  • one's heart is in the right place The idiom "one's heart is in the right place" is used to describe someone who may have good intentions or good moral character, even if their actions or decisions do not always reflect this. It suggests that the person means well or has a genuine desire to do what is right, even if they make mistakes or have shortcomings.
  • pick up the tab The idiom "pick up the tab" means to pay for someone else's expenses or bill in a social gathering or a business context. It refers to taking financial responsibility for the costs incurred by others.
  • the order of the day The idiom "the order of the day" refers to an idea, topic, or activity that is currently considered to be popular, important, or necessary, often in a specific context or situation. It can also imply the prevailing attitude or expectation within a particular group or society at a given time.
  • tread the boards The idiom "tread the boards" refers to someone performing on stage in a theatrical production, particularly as an actor or actress. It is commonly used in reference to the act of engaging in live theater performances.
  • drive to the wall The idiom "drive to the wall" typically refers to putting someone or something in a difficult or desperate situation with little or no options or resources left. It implies pushing someone or something to their limits or forcing them into a corner, leaving them with no choice but to confront a difficult situation head-on.
  • end justifies the means, the The definition of the idiom "the end justifies the means" is that the desired or intended outcome or result of an action or situation is so important or significant that any method, no matter how morally or ethically questionable, is acceptable to achieve it. It implies that the consequence or final result justifies any action taken to achieve it, regardless of the means employed.
  • bet the farm/ranch on something The idiom "bet the farm/ranch on something" means to risk everything or all of one's resources on a particular action, decision, or outcome. It implies putting all of one's confidence, money, or assets at stake in a high-stakes gamble or venture.
  • get someone by the short and curlies The idiom "get someone by the short and curlies" means to have someone firmly under control or in a vulnerable position, typically through manipulation or coercion. It suggests having power over someone or having leverage to ensure their compliance.
  • be spitting in the wind The idiom "be spitting in the wind" is a metaphorical expression that means engaging in a futile or pointless endeavor, where one's efforts will likely have no effect or yield unfavorable results. It implies wasting time, energy, or resources on a task that is unlikely to succeed or make a difference. It originates from the literal act of spitting into the wind, which would only lead to the spit being blown back into the person's face.
  • the Highlands The idiom "the Highlands" typically refers to the mountainous region in Scotland, characterized by its stunning landscapes, rugged terrain, and distinct cultural heritage. It is often used metaphorically to represent a remote or distant place, evoking a sense of mystery, beauty, and isolation.
  • be sacrificed on the altar of sth The idiom "be sacrificed on the altar of sth" means to suffer harm, loss, or negative consequences for the sake of or in the pursuit of something else, typically a higher purpose or goal. It implies one's willingness to make personal sacrifices for the achievement or advancement of a particular cause, principle, or objective.
  • an arrow in the quiver The idiom "an arrow in the quiver" refers to having a valuable resource, skill, or option available for use when needed. It comes from the literal meaning of a quiver, which is a container used to hold arrows, indicating that one has a range of options or strategies at their disposal. This idiom suggests being prepared or having a backup plan for various situations.
  • on the fence The idiom "on the fence" refers to a state of indecision or uncertainty, where someone is unable or unwilling to choose between two options or take a definite stance on a particular issue. It suggests being in a position of neutrality or being torn between conflicting choices or opinions.
  • hold one's end of the bargain up The idiom "hold one's end of the bargain up" means to fulfill one's obligations or promises in a mutual agreement or deal. It suggests that a person is keeping their part of a deal or commitment, typically implying that others involved should do the same. It emphasizes personal responsibility and reliability in honoring one's commitments.
  • the light of day The idiom "the light of day" refers to the appearance or exposure of something that was previously concealed or hidden. It signifies bringing something into public view, revealing the truth or making something known.
  • always the bridesmaid, never the bride The idiom "always the bridesmaid, never the bride" refers to a person, typically a woman, who consistently finds herself in a supporting or secondary role rather than achieving the main or desired objective. It implies that the person frequently experiences repeated disappointment or failure in attaining a particular goal, similar to how a bridesmaid attends weddings, but is never the one getting married.
  • the better of The idiom "the better of" is generally used to describe a situation where someone gains an advantage or prevails over someone or something else. It implies that out of two options or choices, one is preferred or superior in some way.
  • err on the side of caution The idiom "err on the side of caution" means to choose a more cautious or safe course of action, usually in order to avoid risks or potential harm, even if it may seem unnecessary or excessive.
  • the devil looks after his own The idiom "the devil looks after his own" means that those who are inclined towards evil or engage in nefarious activities often receive unexpected protection or assistance that allows them to escape consequences or come out ahead. It implies that sometimes, people who engage in immoral or unethical behavior seem to be favored or protected by outside forces, enabling them to avoid punishment or failure.
  • on the point of The idiom "on the point of" means to be very close to doing something or at the moment of doing something. It implies that someone is just about to do or say something or an event is about to happen.
  • learn from the bottom up The idiom "learn from the bottom up" means to gain knowledge or understanding of a subject or field by starting with the basics or fundamentals and gradually working towards more complex or advanced concepts. It emphasizes the importance of mastering foundational skills before progressing to higher levels of expertise.
  • the real McCoy The idiom "the real McCoy" refers to something or someone that is genuine, authentic, and of excellent quality. It is used to emphasize that the referred object or person is the true and original version, and not an imitation or inferior alternative.
  • see the last of The idiom "see the last of" means to witness the final or ultimate occurrence of something or someone, often implying that it will not be seen or encountered again. It suggests that a certain event, person, or situation is coming to an end or concluding forever.
  • go on the fritz The idiom "go on the fritz" means that something, usually an electronic device or machinery, has stopped working properly or experiencing malfunctions.
  • Aim for the stars! The idiom "Aim for the stars!" means to set ambitious goals or aspirations that are beyond one's current capabilities or expectations. It encourages striving for excellence and reaching for the highest levels of achievement.
  • eye of the beholder The idiom "eye of the beholder" is often used to convey the idea that perceptions and judgments about beauty or value are subjective and vary from individual to individual. It suggests that beauty or value is in the eye of the person viewing or experiencing something, and can differ greatly among different people.
  • parting of the ways The idiom "parting of the ways" refers to a situation in which two or more individuals or groups decide to end their association, relationship, or cooperation because of disagreements, differences in opinions, or diverging paths. It signifies the moment when people go their separate ways due to irreconcilable differences or a mutual decision to pursue different goals or directions.
  • in the offing The idiom "in the offing" means that something is likely or anticipated to happen soon or is expected to occur in the near future.
  • to the best of The idiom "to the best of" means doing something or providing information to the maximum extent or ability that one has, based on their knowledge, understanding, or capabilities. It implies a sincere effort to accomplish or convey something accurately, given the resources or skills available.
  • go the way of the dodo The idiom "go the way of the dodo" means that something is becoming extinct or obsolete. It refers to the dodo bird, which was a flightless bird native to Mauritius. The dodo bird became extinct in the late 17th century due to human activities, and the phrase implies that something is headed towards a similar fate of being outdated or disappearing entirely.
  • the high point/spot of something The idiom "the high point/spot of something" refers to the most exciting, significant, or enjoyable part of an experience or event. It signifies the moment or aspect that stands out as the pinnacle or climax.
  • be not (quite) right in the head The idiom "be not (quite) right in the head" means to be mentally unstable or mentally impaired. It suggests that someone's thoughts, behavior, or actions are abnormal or irrational.
  • the goose hangs high The idiom "the goose hangs high" typically refers to a situation that is favorable, promising, or prosperous. It implies that there is an abundance of good fortune or opportunity available. It often suggests that one should take advantage of the situation while it lasts.
  • get (something) off the shelf The idiom "get (something) off the shelf" typically means to obtain or acquire something easily and readily available, without much effort or difficulty. It often implies that the item or solution being acquired is pre-existing and readily accessible, without the need for customization or special order.
  • beat the hell out of The idiom "beat the hell out of" means to physically assault or strike someone with great force and intensity. It can also be used metaphorically to describe defeating or outperforming someone or something in a competition or task.
  • take the heat The idiom "take the heat" means to accept or face criticism, blame, or consequences for a particular action, decision, or situation. It refers to being willing to withstand the pressure or negative attention that comes from being in a difficult or challenging position.
  • give (someone or something) the run of (some place) The idiom "give (someone or something) the run of (some place)" means to allow someone or something to freely move around and explore a particular area or place without any restrictions or limitations. It implies giving complete freedom or unrestricted access to the person or thing mentioned.
  • be glad to see the back of someone or something The idiom "be glad to see the back of someone or something" means feeling relieved or happy when someone or something has left or is no longer present. It implies that the person or thing has been causing annoyance, trouble, or inconvenience, and their departure brings a sense of relief.
  • cheer sb to the echo The idiom "cheer sb to the echo" means to applaud, support, or enthusiastically cheer for someone, especially in a loud and resounding manner. It implies showing strong and unwavering encouragement towards an individual or their actions.
  • the idea The idiom "the idea" does not have a specific definition on its own. It can be interpreted based on the context in which it is used. However, it is often a colloquial expression used to convey surprise, disbelief, or disagreement. For example, if someone suggests something that is considered absurd, someone else may respond with "the idea!" meaning they find it hard to believe or are strongly opposed to it.
  • lock the barn door after the horse has bolted The idiom "lock the barn door after the horse has bolted" means to take action to prevent a problem or mitigate its consequences, but when it is already too late to make a significant difference. It refers to the futility of trying to fix a situation that has already gone wrong or preventing something that has already occurred.
  • dot the i's and cross the t's The idiom "dot the i's and cross the t's" means to pay meticulous attention to small details and ensure that everything is done correctly and completely. It implies completing tasks, documents, or procedures with extreme thoroughness, leaving no room for error or oversight.
  • a cut above the rest The idiom "a cut above the rest" refers to someone or something that is superior or of higher quality compared to others in the same category or group. It indicates a level of excellence or distinction that sets it apart from the average or ordinary.
  • along for the ride The idiom "along for the ride" typically refers to someone who is passively participating or going along with something, often without actively contributing or taking any control. It implies that the person is simply observing or taking part in an activity without fully understanding or having a significant role in it.
  • better the devil you know (than the devil you don't) The idiom "better the devil you know (than the devil you don't)" means that it is preferable to deal with a familiar or known problem, even if it is unpleasant or undesirable, than to risk encountering a new or unknown problem that may be worse. It suggests that familiarity with a situation or person, even if negative, can be more manageable or predictable compared to an uncertain or potentially more dangerous alternative.
  • the ghost in the machine The idiom "the ghost in the machine" refers to the concept of an intangible or inexplicable force or presence within a system (usually a mechanical or digital one), which influences its behavior or functions in unpredictable ways. It suggests that there is an underlying human or spiritual element that affects the operation of a machine, often resulting in unexpected or unexplained outcomes.
  • jump the track(s) The idiom "jump the track(s)" means to deviate from the planned or expected course, to go astray, or to lose control. It originates from the idea of a train derailing when it jumps off its tracks, causing disruption and chaos. In a figurative sense, it refers to a situation or a person going off course or encountering unexpected complications that can lead to failure or chaos.
  • the other side of the tracks The idiom "the other side of the tracks" refers to a metaphorical division or contrast between two socio-economic or cultural groups, often implying a difference in social status or level of privilege. It suggests a separation between wealthier or more privileged areas (often associated with one side of railroad tracks) and poorer or less privileged areas (associated with the other side of railroad tracks).
  • the whole caboodle The idiom "the whole caboodle" refers to everything or the entire assortment of something. It implies an entirety or completeness of a particular situation, group of things, or all aspects related to a certain matter.
  • not for the life of me, etc. The idiom "not for the life of me" is used to express absolute certainty that one cannot or will not do something, despite any efforts or persuasion. It indicates a strong negative determination or refusal towards a particular action or decision.
  • too many chefs in the kitchen The idiom "too many chefs in the kitchen" refers to a situation where there are too many people involved in making decisions or giving instructions, causing confusion, inefficiency, or a lack of direction. It implies that having too many individuals trying to control or influence a situation can result in disorganization or hinder progress.
  • wrong side of the blanket The idiom "wrong side of the blanket" is a metaphorical expression used to describe an individual who is born out of wedlock or is considered illegitimate. It refers to a person's parentage being questionable or their birth being socially unacceptable due to their parents not being married at the time of conception.
  • beat someone to the punch The idiom "beat someone to the punch" means to pre-empt or outsmart someone by acting or achieving something before they have a chance to do so. It refers to being quicker or more assertive in completing a task or gaining an advantage, often leaving the other person without a chance to act.
  • have the law on (someone) The idiom "have the law on (someone)" means to take legal action or pursue a legal case against someone. It suggests that the person taking legal action has a strong and justifiable case supported by the law.
  • hit the right note The idiomatic expression "hit the right note" means to say or do something perfectly appropriate or fitting for a particular situation, often making a positive impression on others. It refers to achieving a perfect balance or resonance, much like playing the correct musical note that enhances the harmony of a composition.
  • be pissing in the wind The idiom "be pissing in the wind" is an expression used to convey the futility or pointlessness of an action. It suggests that one's efforts or intentions are ultimately in vain or wasted, much like urinating into the wind, which will only result in the urine being blown back towards the person.
  • wipe the smile off someone's face The idiom "wipe the smile off someone's face" means to make someone stop feeling happy or proud, typically by saying or doing something that upsets or embarrasses them. It is an expression that describes the act of taking away someone's joy or satisfaction.
  • go off the hooks The idiom "go off the hooks" means to become extremely angry or lose control of one's emotions. It implies a state of intense frustration or agitation where someone's emotions are no longer under control, often resulting in a outburst of anger or distress.
  • scare the hell out of The idiom "scare the hell out of" means to frighten or terrify someone to a great degree. It implies causing extreme fear or anxiety.
  • with the naked eye The idiom "with the naked eye" refers to the ability to see something without the aid of a magnifying device or any additional assistance. It implies observing something with one's unaided vision, typically referring to something visible to the unassisted human eye.
  • rolling on the floor laughing The idiom "rolling on the floor laughing" is a hyperbolic expression used to indicate that something is extremely funny. It suggests that the person finds something so amusing that they cannot contain their laughter and exaggerates the idea of laughing to the extent of literally rolling on the floor.
  • best-laid plans go astray, the The idiom "best-laid plans go astray" means that even the most carefully thought out or meticulously prepared plans can go wrong or not turn out as expected. It implies that despite careful planning and effort, unforeseen circumstances or factors can derail or interfere with one's intentions or goals.
  • talk, etc. nineteen to the dozen The idiom "talk nineteen to the dozen" means to speak rapidly, in a very animated or excited manner, without pausing or stopping. It suggests a person speaking at a fast and furious pace, often unable to control their words or thoughts.
  • blow the lid off The idiom "blow the lid off" means to reveal or expose hidden or secret information or truth, often causing a significant and shocking impact or outcome.
  • have, etc. your fingers in the till The idiom "have your fingers in the till" means to steal money from an organization or business that one is responsible for managing or overseeing, often in a dishonest or secretive manner. It suggests unauthorized access or improper use of funds for personal gain.
  • turn the air blue The idiom "turn the air blue" refers to someone using foul language or swearing excessively. It implies that the person is using offensive and vulgar words that may make others uncomfortable or offended.
  • castles in the sky The idiom "castles in the sky" refers to a fanciful or unrealistic dream or ambition that is unlikely to ever be realized. It signifies the act of imagining or planning something that is highly unlikely or impossible to achieve or materialize. It often suggests an impractical or idealistic daydream that is disconnected from reality.
  • get the wind up The idiom "get the wind up" means to become fearful, anxious, or panicked, often due to a particular situation or impending danger. It is often used to describe a state of unease or dread.
  • put (one's) ass on the line To "put one's ass on the line" is an idiom that means to take a significant risk or put oneself in a vulnerable position in order to achieve something or to support a cause. It implies going beyond one's comfort zone and potentially facing negative consequences or personal sacrifice for the sake of one's beliefs, goals, or responsibilities.
  • chew up the scenery The idiom "chew up the scenery" is used to describe someone, typically an actor or performer, who excessively and dramatically overacts or hogs the attention in a theatrical or performative setting. It refers to the act of figuratively "devouring" the scenery or environment around them due to their exaggerated and extravagant behavior.
  • take the bait To "take the bait" means to fall for or react to something intended to provoke or deceive someone, usually leading them to an unfavorable situation or outcome. It originated from the practice of using bait, such as food, to entice animals into traps. In a figurative sense, it refers to someone being easily provoked or manipulated into doing or saying something that they later regret.
  • fly in the face of something The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to directly oppose or contradict a widely accepted belief, rule, or expectation, often with a deliberate intention to challenge authority or convention. It denotes acting or behaving in a way that challenges or goes against the prevailing opinion or societal norms.
  • the old guard The idiom "the old guard" refers to a group of people who have been in a particular position or organization for a long time and have a traditional, often conservative, approach to their work. It can also refer to those who resist or are hesitant about accepting new ideas or changes.
  • the man/woman/sth of your dreams The idiom "the man/woman/sth of your dreams" refers to an ideal partner or situation that one envisions, often with qualities or characteristics that they desire or find perfect. It implies finding someone or something that surpasses all expectations and fulfills one's deepest desires or aspirations.
  • have the jump on The idiom "have the jump on" refers to having an advantage or head start over someone or something, typically in terms of time, information, or position. It implies being in a favorable position or having the opportunity to act or make a move before others do.
  • off the ground The idiom "off the ground" means to begin a task or project, or to make progress in a particular endeavor. It suggests that something has started successfully and is in motion or making steady advancement.
  • between the devil and the deep blue sea The idiom "between the devil and the deep blue sea" is used to describe a situation where a person feels trapped between two equally difficult or unfavorable options. It suggests being faced with a choice between two undesirable alternatives with no apparent positive outcome.
  • Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse The idiom "Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" refers to a biblical concept from the Book of Revelation, specifically chapter 6, in which four horsemen are described as harbingers of the end of the world. Each of the horsemen rides on a different-colored horse and represents a different cataclysmic event or force: pestilence, war, famine, and death. Metaphorically, the idiom is often used to refer to four agents of destruction or disaster that signal impending doom or major devastation.
  • catch sb on the hop The idiom "catch sb on the hop" means to surprise or take someone off guard, often by doing something unexpectedly or at an inconvenient time.
  • stack the deck The idiom "stack the deck" means to intentionally arrange circumstances or manipulate a situation in a way that gives someone an unfair advantage or increases the likelihood of a desired outcome, usually by placing favorable factors in one's favor while disadvantaging others.
  • sound/toll the death knell The idiom "sound/toll the death knell" is used to indicate or symbolize the end or downfall of something. It originated from the practice of ringing a bell, known as a death knell, to inform people within a community of someone's demise. When applied metaphorically, the idiom suggests that a particular event, concept, or situation is entering its final stages or approaching an irreversible end.
  • the company (one) keeps The idiom "the company (one) keeps" refers to the idea that people tend to be influenced by or associated with others who have similar characteristics, behaviors, or values. It implies that a person's choice of friends, associates, or companions reflects their own values, interests, beliefs, or reputation. It suggests that judging someone by the company they keep can give insights into their personality or character.
  • the best part of (something) The idiom "the best part of (something)" usually refers to the most enjoyable, favorable, or valuable aspect of a particular situation, experience, or object. It highlights the idea that there is one exceptional aspect or element that stands out and surpasses the rest in terms of quality, enjoyment, or significance.
  • give sm the raspberry To "give someone the raspberry" is an idiomatic expression that means to make a derisive or dismissive sound by sticking out the tongue and blowing a noise, usually in order to express disapproval, scorn, or disbelief towards someone or something. It is often used sarcastically or playfully to show mockery or show that someone's actions or words are not impressive or taken seriously.
  • point the finger at sb The idiom "point the finger at someone" means to blame or accuse someone of something, generally without concrete evidence or proof. It refers to the gesture of pointing one's finger in someone's direction, as a symbolic action indicating that they are responsible for a particular situation or wrongdoing.
  • wet behind the ears The idiom "wet behind the ears" refers to someone who is inexperienced, naive, or lacking in life or professional skills. It is often used to describe a person who is new to something or has just started a particular job or activity. The expression implies that the person is still young or immature, as if they are not fully dried off from birth, or still wet behind their ears.
  • give the rough side of tongue The idiom "give the rough side of one's tongue" means to scold, berate, or reprimand someone harshly and severely. It implies speaking to someone in a stern, critical, and blunt manner, often using strong language or expressing anger, disappointment, or disapproval.
  • suck the big one The idiom "suck the big one" is considered vulgar and offensive slang. It is typically used to express dissatisfaction, disappointment, or frustration towards a situation or event. It implies a negative sentiment and is equivalent to saying that something is profoundly unpleasant or terrible.
  • close the book on something To "close the book on something" means to conclude or finish something, especially in a final or decisive manner. It refers to putting an end to a situation, issue, or chapter of one's life, often implying that there is no need for further consideration or discussion.
  • in the first flush The idiom "in the first flush" typically means in the early stages or at the beginning of something, often referring to a time of enthusiasm, excitement, or peak condition. It can be used to describe a person's initial experience, a relationship, or the early stages of a project or endeavor.
  • speak of the devil, and he appears The idiom "speak of the devil, and he appears" means that someone who was being talked about or mentioned suddenly shows up or appears in that very moment. It is often used humorously or coincidentally when someone appears right after they were being discussed.
  • pop the bubble of (someone) The idiom "pop the bubble of (someone)" means to burst someone's illusion, fantasy, or optimistic outlook by introducing them to reality or presenting disappointing or harsh facts or information. It refers to destroying the person's pleasant state of mind or belief by exposing them to a less ideal truth.
  • all cats are grey in the dark The idiom "all cats are grey in the dark" means that in certain circumstances where specific details are not discernible or noticeable, everything or everyone is essentially the same or equal. It implies that when visual characteristics are not visible or distinguishable, it becomes difficult to differentiate or judge between various things or individuals. It suggests that appearances are not always significant or reliable when evaluating something or someone's true worth or qualities.
  • wipe/mop the floor with somebody The idiom "wipe/mop the floor with somebody" means to defeat or dominate someone in a competition or conflict, typically to an extremely overwhelming degree. It implies total superiority or a complete victory over the opponent.
  • come down/out on the side of somebody/something The idiom "come down/out on the side of somebody/something" means to support or favor a particular person, group, or idea in a dispute or debate. It suggests taking a definite position or stance in support of someone or something.
  • all of the above The idiom "all of the above" means that every option or choice presented is correct or applicable. It indicates the selection of multiple options rather than just one specific choice.
  • in the context of something The idiom "in the context of something" refers to considering or discussing something while taking into account its surrounding circumstances, background, or relevant factors. It emphasizes the importance of understanding a particular subject in relation to its specific context or setting.
  • have the devil to pay The idiom "have the devil to pay" means to face severe consequences or to be in a difficult, challenging situation that is hard to resolve. It often implies that dealing with the situation will involve great effort, trouble, or punishment.
  • What's sauce for the goose The idiom "What's sauce for the goose" means that what is considered acceptable or fair for one person or group should also be acceptable or fair for another person or group in a similar situation. It implies that equality and consistency should be applied to all parties involved.
  • it all comes out in the wash The idiom "it all comes out in the wash" means that eventually, the truth or facts about a situation or a person's character will be revealed or become known, usually after a period of time. It suggests that even if a situation seems unclear or confusing at the moment, everything will be resolved and understood in due course.
  • in the same breath The idiom "in the same breath" is typically used to describe a situation where contradictory statements or actions are made or mentioned simultaneously or very closely together. It implies that two things are being said or done in a manner that is inconsistent or contradictory with each other.
  • bounce off the walls The idiom "bounce off the walls" refers to someone being excessively energetic, excited, or restless, typically due to extreme anticipation, enthusiasm, or caffeine intake. It describes a state of hyperactivity or agitation that makes a person seem as if they could physically bounce off the walls, unable to keep still or calm.
  • lift the curtain on The idiom "lift the curtain on" means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden or unknown. It is often used to describe the act of revealing the truth or shedding light on a particular situation, event, or secret.
  • into the pot The idiom "into the pot" typically refers to contributing money or resources to a common pool or fund, usually for a shared purpose or goal. It suggests someone's willingness to contribute their fair share or make a collective effort. It can also be used metaphorically in situations that involve sharing responsibilities, risks, or benefits with others.
  • fortune favors the bold The idiom "fortune favors the bold" means that those who take risks and act with confidence are more likely to be successful and achieve good fortune. It encourages individuals to be courageous and bold in their endeavors, as they may be rewarded with favorable outcomes or fortunate circumstances.
  • rake someone over the coals The idiom "rake someone over the coals" means to severely reprimand or criticize someone, usually in a public or harsh manner. It suggests subjecting someone to strong criticism, scrutiny, or interrogation, often in an unpleasant or condemnatory manner.
  • the squeaky wheel gets the grease/oil The idiom "the squeaky wheel gets the grease/oil" means that a person who complains or makes their needs or problems known is more likely to receive attention or assistance. It emphasizes the idea that those who speak up or make their concerns heard are more likely to get what they want or need, while those who remain silent or passive may be overlooked or ignored.
  • be (something) to the good The idiom "be (something) to the good" means to have a surplus or gain of something, often in a financial or advantageous sense. It suggests that one has benefited or acquired more than what they had originally or expected.
  • go off the boil The idiom "go off the boil" refers to losing interest, enthusiasm, or momentum in an activity or situation. It implies a decline in energy, motivation, or effectiveness. It is often used to describe a decline in performance or productivity.
  • a hair in the butter The idiom "a hair in the butter" refers to a small problem or imperfection that spoils an otherwise satisfactory situation. It signifies the presence of a minor annoyance or issue that diminishes the overall enjoyment or perfection of something.
  • live off/on the fat of the land The idiom "live off/on the fat of the land" refers to a person or a group of people enjoying a luxurious or abundant lifestyle, often made possible by the resources, wealth, or prosperity of a particular place or situation. It implies living in a comfortable and prosperous manner, typically without having to work hard or face financial hardship.
  • junk in the trunk The idiom "junk in the trunk" refers to having a well-rounded or large buttocks. It is commonly used in a light-hearted or humorous manner to describe someone's curvaceous figure.
  • above the curve The idiom "above the curve" means to perform or excel better than expected, surpassing the average or normal standards. It implies being ahead of the competition or exceeding the average level of achievement.
  • go to the top The idiom "go to the top" refers to seeking assistance, help, or advice from a person in a position of authority or someone who holds a high rank or power. It suggests bypassing intermediate levels or channels and directly approaching someone with the ultimate decision-making or influential capacity.
  • the bubble bursts The idiom "the bubble bursts" refers to a situation where an optimistic or unrealistic belief, expectation, or speculation is proven to be false or unsustainable. It usually implies the sudden and often dramatic collapse of a particular circumstance, plan, or market, exposing its flaws, risks, or inherent instability. This idiom is commonly used to describe the moment when an economic or financial bubble, such as a stock market bubble, experiences a sharp decline or crash.
  • be staring (one) in the face The idiom "be staring (one) in the face" means that something is very obvious or evident, so much so that it cannot be ignored or overlooked. It refers to a situation or fact that is directly in front of someone's eyes or in clear view, yet they fail to recognize or acknowledge it.
  • have the face to The idiom "have the face to" refers to having the audacity or daring to do something, usually referring to behaving in a way that is considered inappropriate, disrespectful, or impudent. It implies a brazenness or lack of shame.
  • come up in the world The idiom "come up in the world" means to attain a higher social or financial status than one previously had, or to achieve greater success and improve one's circumstances in life. It refers to the process of rising from a lower position or a lower level of success to a higher one.
  • get/take the bit between your teeth The idiom "get/take the bit between your teeth" typically means to take control of a situation by firmly grasping the opportunity or acting determinedly and independently. It originates from horse-riding phrases, where a horse that takes the bit between its teeth becomes difficult to control, forcefully taking charge of its direction. So, when someone gets or takes the bit between their teeth, they show a strong and forceful initiative to pursue their goals or assert their authority.
  • get a/(one's) foot in the door The idiom "get a/(one's) foot in the door" means to establish an initial opportunity or connection that allows someone to enter or gain access to a certain field, organization, or industry. It implies taking the first step towards achieving a larger goal or securing a position by securing a small opening or opportunity.
  • on the alert The idiom "on the alert" means to be watchful, attentive, or vigilant in order to detect and respond quickly to any potential danger, threat, or unexpected situation. It refers to a state of readiness or preparedness for action.
  • a roll in the hay (or the sack) The idiom "a roll in the hay (or the sack)" is a colloquial expression used to refer to engaging in a casual or passionate sexual encounter. It implies a spontaneous or non-committal sexual relationship.
  • the laborer is worthy of his hire The idiom "the laborer is worthy of his hire" means that a person who works or provides a service should receive fair compensation or payment for their efforts. It emphasizes the importance of recognizing and remunerating individuals based on the value and quality of their work or contributions.
  • a drop in the ocean The idiom "a drop in the ocean" refers to something that is a very small or insignificant part of a larger whole or problem. It suggests that the contribution or impact one makes is so minimal that it is unlikely to have any significant effect on the overall situation.
  • leave (one) holding the bag The idiom "leave (one) holding the bag" means to intentionally or unintentionally leave someone responsible or accountable for a situation, problem, or blame, while abandoning them without support or assistance. It implies that the person is left alone to face the consequences or deal with the aftermath of a situation that others have deliberately or inadvertently escaped.
  • the apple of somebody's eye The idiom "the apple of somebody's eye" typically refers to a person or thing that someone cherishes, adores, or considers to be of great importance. It often implies a deep affection or a strong attachment to someone or something.
  • do the unthinkable The idiom "do the unthinkable" refers to performing an action that is considered unusual, surprising, or outside of societal norms or expectations. It typically implies going against conventional wisdom or doing something that is seemingly impossible or exceedingly difficult.
  • into the gutter The idiom "into the gutter" refers to a situation or behavior that is vulgar, immoral, or lowbrow. It suggests a descent into base instincts, indecency, or depravity.
  • have the deck stacked against The idiom "have the deck stacked against" means to face circumstances or situations that are intentionally arranged or biased against someone or something, making it difficult for them to succeed or achieve a desired outcome. It implies that the odds are unfairly and unfavorably against a person or a group.
  • see no further than the end of nose The idiom "see no further than the end of one's nose" means to have a narrow perspective or limited understanding, often implying a lack of foresight or the inability to see beyond one's immediate situation or personal interests. It suggests a person's inability to consider long-term consequences, explore alternative options, or think beyond the present moment.
  • the proprieties The idiom "the proprieties" refers to the social customs, manners, or rules of correct behavior and etiquette that are generally accepted and expected in a particular society or situation. It relates to the appropriate conduct or behavior that adheres to societal norms and conventions.
  • look like the cat that ate the canary The idiom "look like the cat that ate the canary" is an expression used to describe someone who appears smug, self-satisfied, or pleased with themselves after having achieved or gotten away with something, often a mischievous or secretive act. It implies an attitude of contentment or satisfaction, often accompanied by a mischievous smirk or secretive smile.
  • the masses The idiom "the masses" refers to a large and diverse group of people within a society, typically representing the general population or ordinary individuals. It often implies a collective or uniform behavior, opinion, or outlook shared by the majority.
  • run out the clock The idiom "run out the clock" means to intentionally waste time or delay in order to ensure that no further progress can be made or significant changes can occur. It is often used when discussing a situation where someone is trying to prevent or avoid something by continuously stalling until the time runs out.
  • what's the big idea? The idiom "what's the big idea?" is an expression used to question or challenge someone's intentions, actions, or plans. It implies a sense of annoyance or frustration, seeking an explanation for what someone is doing or proposing.
  • choose the path of least resistance The idiom "choose the path of least resistance" refers to the act of selecting the easiest or most effortless option when faced with a decision or challenge. It suggests taking the route that involves the least amount of difficulty or opposition, often to avoid conflict or exertion.
  • push something to the back of your mind The idiom "push something to the back of your mind" means to consciously or unconsciously ignore or forget about a certain issue, concern, or thought. It refers to deliberately placing something out of one's immediate focus or attention, often due to discomfort or the desire to avoid dealing with it.
  • estimate the cost at (something) The idiom "estimate the cost at (something)" means to approximate or calculate the expense or price of something at a particular amount or figure. It refers to the act of making an educated guess or assessment regarding the financial aspect of a certain item, project, or undertaking.
  • play the ponies To "play the ponies" means to bet on horse races, usually at a racetrack or through off-track betting. It refers to the act of participating in horse race gambling by wagering money on different horses with the hope of winning.
  • the wheel has come/turned full circle The idiom "the wheel has come/turned full circle" means that a situation or series of events has returned to its original starting point or has gone through a complete cycle, ending up where it began. It suggests that history repeats itself or that things have returned to a previous state or condition.
  • hot on the heels of The idiom "hot on the heels of" is used to describe something that closely follows or comes immediately after another event or action. It implies that the second event is happening or occurring quickly in succession to the first event, often indicating a sense of pursuit, urgency, or close proximity.
  • be (strictly) for the birds The expression "be (strictly) for the birds" means that something is considered to be worthless, unimportant, or irrelevant. It suggests that whatever is being referred to is not worth attention or concern. The phrase can also convey a sense of disdain or dismissiveness towards something.
  • play your cards close to the vest The idiom "play your cards close to the vest" means to keep one's intentions, plans, or thoughts secret or hidden from others. It typically suggests being cautious and not revealing too much information or showing vulnerability.
  • cut (one) off at the pass The idiom "cut (one) off at the pass" refers to the act of preventing or interrupting someone's plans or actions before they have a chance to proceed or carry them out. It is often used to describe a proactive or strategic move to stop or hinder someone from achieving their goals or advancing their agenda. The phrase originates from the concept of cutting off or intercepting someone on a path or route before they can reach their intended destination or objective.
  • be off the grid The idiom "be off the grid" refers to being disconnected from the public utilities or infrastructure, such as power, water, or communication networks. It can also refer to living or operating independently without reliance on conventional systems or technology. It implies a state of being self-sufficient and living in a more remote or secluded manner.
  • not by any stretch (of the imagination) The idiom "not by any stretch (of the imagination)" is used to emphasize that something is not true or likely, regardless of how one tries to imagine or stretch the possibilities. It conveys the idea that there is no way to perceive or understand a certain situation or statement as valid or reasonable.
  • show someone the door The idiom "show someone the door" means to ask someone to leave or to dismiss them, usually in a forceful or direct manner.
  • go round the bend The idiom "go round the bend" refers to someone behaving in a crazy or irrational manner, often due to frustration, stress, or other extreme emotions. It implies that the person has reached a breaking point or has become mentally unstable.
  • It's all over but the shouting. The idiom "It's all over but the shouting" means that a situation or outcome is already decided or inevitable, and the only thing left is to celebrate or express joy or relief.
  • at the ready The idiom "at the ready" refers to being prepared or in a state of readiness to act or respond immediately when needed or requested. It suggests being equipped or available for any situation that may arise.
  • hit the brakes The idiom "hit the brakes" means to suddenly stop or slow down, typically in a literal or figurative sense. It refers to the action of forcefully pressing the brakes in a vehicle to slow or halt its movement. In a broader context, it can be applied to situations where someone needs to abruptly pause or reduce their pace, whether it be in speech, work, decision-making, or any other activity.
  • drive (one) (a)round the bend The idiom "drive (one) (a)round the bend" is an expression that means to irritate, frustrate, or annoy someone to the point of exasperation or insanity. It refers to behavior or circumstances that push someone to the edge of their patience, causing them to become extremely annoyed or mentally overwhelmed.
  • the/a devil of a sth The idiom "the/a devil of a sth" is used to emphasize the extreme or challenging nature of something. It suggests that the thing being referred to is difficult, troublesome, or remarkable in a negative sense.
  • between the pipes The idiom "between the pipes" is typically used in the context of ice hockey and refers to the position of a goaltender or goalie. It signifies the area or space occupied by the goalie inside the goal crease, which is bounded by two vertical goalposts. Therefore, "between the pipes" primarily implies being in the position of a goaltender, actively defending the goal.
  • Shut the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "shut the stable door after the horse has bolted" means taking action or implementing a solution when it's already too late or pointless, as the damage or consequences have already occurred. It refers to a situation where someone tries to prevent a negative outcome after it has already happened, similar to attempting to secure a horse that has already escaped from the stable.
  • sing the same tune The idiom "sing the same tune" means to express the same opinion or viewpoint as someone else; to agree with another person or group.
  • the bare bones The idiom "the bare bones" refers to the most basic or essential elements of something, without any elaboration or extra details. It means focusing only on the necessary and fundamental aspects, stripping away any frills or extras.
  • get into the swing of it The idiom "get into the swing of it" means to become comfortable with or accustomed to a new activity, routine, or situation. It refers to the process of adapting and getting into the rhythm or groove of something.
  • a bite of the cherry The idiom "a bite of the cherry" refers to having an opportunity or a chance to participate in or benefit from something. It originates from the idea of taking a literal bite of a cherry, which indicates getting a small but significant part of something desirable or valuable.
  • claim the moral high ground The idiom "claim the moral high ground" refers to asserting or presenting oneself as morally superior or ethically right in a particular situation or argument. It involves positioning oneself as the morally correct or principled party, often to gain an advantage or persuade others to support their point of view.
  • in the eyes of the law "In the eyes of the law" is an idiomatic expression that means from a legal perspective or according to the principles and regulations of the legal system. It refers to how something or someone is judged or perceived by the law or legal authorities.
  • all the way to The idiom "all the way to" refers to going to the fullest extent or to the farthest point possible in a particular action or endeavor. It implies completing or achieving something entirely, without any compromise or halfway measures.
  • pay a person back in the same coin The idiom "pay a person back in the same coin" means to respond to someone's action or behavior by doing something similar or treating them in the same way they treated you. It implies retaliating or seeking revenge in a similar manner.
  • test the keeper The idiom "test the keeper" typically refers to a metaphorical situation in sports, especially in soccer or hockey, where a player attempts to challenge or evaluate the skills and abilities of the opposing team's goalkeeper. It suggests that the player is attempting a difficult or powerful shot on goal to see how skilled or capable the goalkeeper is in order to gauge their performance. This idiom can also be used more generally to describe any situation where someone is trying to gauge another person's strength, skill, or abilities.
  • the laugh is on me The idiom "the laugh is on me" means to be the subject of ridicule or mockery, usually because of one's own foolishness or mistakes. It implies being made a fool of or being the object of amusement for others.
  • play (or act) the (giddy) goat The idiom "play (or act) the (giddy) goat" refers to someone misbehaving, acting foolishly, or doing silly things. It implies that the person is behaving in an unruly or unpredictable manner, similar to how a goat might hop around or act unpredictably.
  • do the honours The idiom "do the honours" means to assume responsibility or perform a significant action or task. It often refers to someone taking charge, performing a special duty, or carrying out an important role.
  • the flower of sth The idiom "the flower of something" is commonly used to refer to the best or most admirable part of something, often describing young, talented, or outstanding individuals or things within a particular group or category. It conveys the idea of the highest quality or the prime example of something.
  • all to the good The idiom "all to the good" means that a particular event or situation is favorable or beneficial. It implies that the outcome or result is positive and desirable.
  • the something to end all sths The idiom "the something to end all" is typically used to refer to something that is the best or greatest of its kind and surpasses all previous or future examples. It implies that the thing being described is so exceptional or impressive that it cannot be surpassed or improved upon.
  • have the sniffles The idiom "have the sniffles" refers to having a mild cold or experiencing symptoms such as a runny or blocked nose, sneezing, or slight congestion. It typically implies having a minor illness or feeling slightly unwell due to a cold or allergy.
  • a cuckoo in the nest The idiom "a cuckoo in the nest" refers to someone who does not belong or is out of place in a particular situation or environment. It derives from the behavior of cuckoo birds, which lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species, forcing them to care for their young.
  • never let the sun go down on your anger The idiom "never let the sun go down on your anger" means that it is important to resolve conflicts or address feelings of anger before the end of the day. It suggests not allowing disputes or resentments to linger overnight, as doing so can often lead to further complications or difficulties in finding resolution. The idiom emphasizes the importance of resolving conflicts promptly and not letting negative emotions fester.
  • the beginning of the end The idiom "the beginning of the end" refers to the point in time or event that marks the start of a process or series of events that will ultimately lead to the end or downfall of something. It implies that from that specific moment or occurrence, the gradual decline or unraveling of a situation, relationship, or institution will begin, leading to its eventual conclusion or demise.
  • for the present The idiom "for the present" refers to the current or immediate situation, typically indicating that a specific state or arrangement will remain in effect temporarily, but may change in the future.
  • take the edge off Idiom: Take the edge off Meaning: To reduce or lessen the intensity, harshness, or severity of something, typically a difficult or unpleasant situation or emotion. It refers to taking measures that make a situation or feeling more bearable or manageable. Example: Having a cup of tea in the evening helps me take the edge off my stress from work.
  • from the wrong side of the tracks The idiom "from the wrong side of the tracks" refers to someone who comes from a socially disadvantaged or rough background. It typically suggests that the person grew up in a neighborhood or environment associated with crime, poverty, or a lower social class.
  • at the time The idiom "at the time" refers to a specific moment or period in the past when referring to past events or situations. It signifies that the following statement or action took place during that particular period or moment and may not be applicable or accurate in the present context.
  • at the last chance saloon The idiom "at the last chance saloon" refers to a situation where someone is running out of opportunities or options, and it is their final opportunity to accomplish or achieve something. It implies that there will not be any more chances after this point.
  • in the club (or the pudding club) The idiom "in the club (or the pudding club)" refers to someone being pregnant. This slang term is often used informally or humorously to indicate that a woman is expecting a baby.
  • what use is...?, at what's the use of...? The idiom "what use is...?, at what's the use of...?" refers to expressing doubt or questioning the practicality or purpose of something. It implies wondering about the usefulness or value of a specific thing or action.
  • the survival of the fittest The idiom "the survival of the fittest" refers to the principle in nature that asserts that the organisms best adapted to their environment are the ones most likely to survive and reproduce. In a broader sense, it can also be used to describe a situation where only the strongest or most capable individuals or entities prevail and succeed.
  • for the most part The idiom "for the most part" is used to indicate that something is generally true or applies in the majority of cases, though there may be exceptions or variations.
  • run down the clock The idiom "run down the clock" refers to the act of purposely occupying time or delaying progress in order to ensure that time expires or a deadline is met without any major changes or further developments happening. This can be done to maintain a status quo, prevent negative outcomes, or simply avoid taking risks.
  • the life of Riley The idiom "the life of Riley" refers to a carefree and enjoyable way of living, usually characterized by comfort, ease, and indulgence. It implies a person who has a relaxed and luxurious lifestyle, often without having to exert much effort or face significant challenges.
  • be in the black The idiom "be in the black" means to have a positive financial status or to be profitable. It refers to a situation where someone or something, typically a business or individual, has more money coming in than going out, indicating a surplus or profit. The phrase is often used in the context of financial statements or reports.
  • fox in the henhouse The idiom "fox in the henhouse" refers to a situation or individual that is potentially dangerous or deceitful, typically when someone with ill intentions gains access or influence over a group or organization. It implies a threat to the well-being, security, or integrity of a particular group, organization, or system.
  • the one that got away The idiom "the one that got away" refers to a person or thing that one had a chance to obtain or have a relationship with, but missed or lost that opportunity. It is often used to describe a romantic interest or a missed opportunity in general.
  • give sb the shits The idiom "give someone the shits" is a colloquial expression that means to annoy or irritate someone, often to an extreme degree. It implies that something or someone has caused strong feelings of frustration, anger, or discomfort in an individual. The idiom is informal and carries a slightly vulgar connotation.
  • the minute (that) The idiom "the minute (that)" means to do something immediately or as soon as a specific event or condition happens. It signifies acting without delay or wasting any time.
  • kick in the rear The idiom "kick in the rear" refers to an action or event that motivates or drives someone to take action or make a change. It often implies a forceful or sudden push that brings about progress or improvement.
  • have the run of (some place) The idiom "have the run of (some place)" means to have unrestricted or free access to a particular place. It implies having the freedom to move, explore, or use that place without any limitations or restrictions.
  • be dressed up to the nines To be dressed up to the nines means to be wearing extremely stylish or fancy clothing, often in a way that is overly formal or extravagant. It suggests that someone is elegantly or meticulously dressed for a special occasion or event.
  • be waiting in the wings The idiom "be waiting in the wings" means to be prepared or ready to take action or assume a role when the opportunity arises. It originates from the theater, where actors who are not currently on stage remain offstage in the wings, ready to enter when their presence is required. In a broader sense, it refers to being poised or on standby for a future task or opportunity.
  • be left in the lurch The idiomatic expression "be left in the lurch" means to be abandoned, stranded, or left alone in a difficult or troublesome situation, typically by someone who was expected to provide assistance or support. It refers to feeling betrayed, disappointed, or let down when someone fails to fulfill their obligations or commitments, leaving the person without any help or options.
  • If the shoe fits The idiom "If the shoe fits" is used to suggest that if a statement or description applies to someone, they should accept it. It implies that the person should acknowledge or embrace a criticism or characterization that is applicable to them.
  • bad to the bone The idiom "bad to the bone" refers to someone who is inherently or intrinsically tough, rebellious, or cool. It describes a person's innate nature or character that possesses qualities of fearlessness, strength, and a disregard for rules or conventions.
  • not beat around the bush The idiom "not beat around the bush" means to speak directly or get straight to the point without wasting time or using unnecessary words. It refers to being straightforward, honest, and avoiding excessive or vague conversation.
  • be off the mark The idiom "be off the mark" means to be inaccurate, incorrect, or mistaken about something. It often refers to a statement, prediction, or assumption that does not correspond to the reality or truth of a situation.
  • get the best of (one) The idiom "get the best of (one)" means to gain an advantage over someone or to overpower them, often in a competitive or confrontational situation. It suggests that someone has become overwhelmed or defeated by another person's actions, skills, or circumstances.
  • belly up to the bar The idiom "belly up to the bar" refers to approaching or sitting at a bar counter, usually facing it directly and placing one's belly in close proximity to the bar. It signifies the act of joining others at the bar to socialize, order drinks, or engage in conversation. It can also imply a sense of relaxation, casualness, or camaraderie associated with the bar environment.
  • be first past the post The idiom "be first past the post" refers to a situation where someone or something emerges as the winner or leader by reaching a specific goal or milestone before anyone else. It originates from horse racing, where the winner is determined based on being the first horse to cross the finish line.
  • the Fiend The idiom "the Fiend" refers to a wicked or evil person, often used to describe someone who is extremely ruthless, malevolent, or diabolical in nature. It can also be used to describe a person who is highly mischievous or capable of causing harm or trouble. This idiom portrays someone as a villainous character with exceptionally malicious intentions or behavior.
  • From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step. The idiom "From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step" means that something can easily transition from being awe-inspiring or impressive to being absurd or ridiculous. It highlights how a profound or impressive concept can seem absurd or nonsensical when taken to an extreme or in a different context.
  • the cherry on the cake The idiom "the cherry on the cake" refers to something that makes a situation or an accomplishment even more perfect, enjoyable, or satisfying. It symbolizes the final addition or enhancement that makes an already good thing even better.
  • play to the gallery The idiom "play to the gallery" means to behave or speak in a way that seeks attention or approval from the audience or spectators, often by appealing to their emotions or ingratiating oneself with them. It commonly refers to acting or expressing oneself in a manner that may lack sincerity, but is intended to win applause or support.
  • work (oneself) into the ground The idiom "work (oneself) into the ground" means to work excessively hard, to the point of exhaustion or physical and mental breakdown. It implies pushing oneself to the limits without taking adequate breaks or rest, ultimately leading to physical or emotional burnout.
  • be wearing the armband The idiom "be wearing the armband" refers to the act of being in a position of authority, leadership, or responsibility. It originates from the practice of wearing an armband as a symbol of authority or leadership, often seen in contexts such as a captain or leader of a team or organization.
  • in the dust The idiom "in the dust" typically means to be left behind or surpassed by someone or something else. It implies being outperformed, outpaced, or overshadowed, often in a competitive or comparative context.
  • honeymoon is over, the The idiom "the honeymoon is over" means that the initial period of harmony, bliss, or excitement in a situation or relationship has come to an end. It implies that the reality of challenges, disagreements, or difficulties have replaced the initial euphoria or positive experiences.
  • take it to the street The idiom "take it to the street" means to bring a dispute, argument, or disagreement into public view or involvement, often through protesting, demonstrating, or engaging in public activism to seek resolution or support for a cause. It refers to taking action outside of private or formal settings and bringing it to a broader audience for attention or resolution.
  • beat/bore/charm etc. the socks off sb The idiom "beat/bore/charm etc. the socks off someone" means to greatly impress, bore, charm, or astonish someone. It indicates an extreme level of impact or influence on the person, leaving them either amazed, uninterested, or deeply captivated. The phrase is often used to describe the effect that someone or something has on another person, emphasizing the significant or overwhelming nature of the experience.
  • the Old Bill The idiom "the Old Bill" is a colloquial term used in British English to refer to the police or law enforcement authorities. It originated from the nickname "Old Bill" used for the Metropolitan Police Service of London, whose full official title is "The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis" or "Metropolitan Police Service." The term has been widely adopted to represent any law enforcement agency in the United Kingdom.
  • throw caution to the wind (or winds) The idiom "throw caution to the wind (or winds)" means to engage in risky or reckless behavior without considering the possible consequences. It suggests a complete disregard for caution, prudence, or careful judgment.
  • out of the doldrums The idiom "out of the doldrums" refers to escaping a period of lethargy, boredom, or a lack of motivation. It indicates a state of renewed energy, enthusiasm, or productivity after a period of stagnation or inactivity.
  • bell the cat, who will The idiom "bell the cat, who will?" means to propose or suggest a difficult or risky task that needs to be undertaken, without anyone stepping up or volunteering to do it. It highlights the challenge of finding someone willing to take on a dangerous or challenging responsibility.
  • point the way The idiom "point the way" means to show someone the direction or path to take, typically in a literal sense, or in a figurative sense, to provide guidance or indicate a course of action.
  • in the neighborhood of The idiom "in the neighborhood of" means approximately or around a certain amount or number. It is used to give a general approximation or estimate of something without providing an exact figure.
  • a bird in the hand The idiom "a bird in the hand" means that it is better to hold onto something you already have, rather than taking the risk of getting something better that might not materialize. It suggests that it is wiser to be content with what you currently possess rather than pursuing uncertain gains.
  • what's the score? The idiom "what's the score?" typically refers to wanting to know the current situation or status of a particular situation, event, or competition. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts. In a literal context, it may refer to knowing the current points or goals in a sports game. In a figurative context, it can imply asking for an update on a particular situation or asking for information about how something is progressing.
  • take the King's (or Queen's) shilling The idiom "take the King's (or Queen's) shilling" refers to accepting payment or a bribe from those in power in exchange for loyalty, obedience, or allegiance. It originated from the practice of giving a shilling to soldiers as a token of acceptance into military service. By accepting the shilling, individuals would essentially commit themselves to serve the King or Queen, hence symbolizing their willingness to follow authority without question.
  • liar is not believed (even) when he tells the truth The idiom "liar is not believed (even) when he tells the truth" means that someone who has a reputation for being dishonest or untrustworthy will struggle to convince others of their honesty, even when they are telling the truth. It implies that a person's past behavior greatly influences the way others perceive their current statements, making it difficult for them to gain credibility or trust.
  • put somebody on the spot The idiom "put somebody on the spot" means to place someone in a difficult or uncomfortable situation where they are required to answer a question or make a decision, often in front of others, without having much time to prepare or think about it. It can also refer to the act of intentionally pressuring or challenging someone in order to see how they will react or respond.
  • carry the message to Garcia The idiom "carry the message to Garcia" originated from an essay written by Elbert Hubbard in 1899, which tells the story of a soldier who is assigned a seemingly impossible task of delivering a message to a rebel leader named Garcia. In the context of the idiom, "carry the message to Garcia" means to take it upon oneself to complete a challenging or difficult task without seeking excuses or guidance, displaying a sense of initiative, determination, and resourcefulness. It signifies a person's ability to take responsibility and overcome obstacles in order to accomplish a given mission or objective.
  • be off the rails The idiom "be off the rails" typically refers to someone or something that has lost control or become unpredictable, deviating from the expected or proper course. It often implies a decline in behavior or a departure from normalcy or order.
  • first hundred years are the hardest The idiom "first hundred years are the hardest" is an expression used humorously to imply that the initial phase of a long-term project, endeavor, or lifespan is typically the most challenging. It suggests that once one overcomes the difficulties faced in the beginning, subsequent years or phases become relatively easier or smoother.
  • which way the wind lies The idiom "which way the wind lies" refers to the act of determining or understanding the prevailing direction of opinion, trend, or public sentiment on a particular matter or issue. It implies trying to figure out the current or popular sentiment on a subject in order to make informed decisions or gauge the potential outcomes.
  • the cat is out of the bag The idiom "the cat is out of the bag" means that a secret or truth has been revealed or made known. It implies that information that was once hidden or unknown has been exposed.
  • be twice the man/woman that (someone) is The idiom "be twice the man/woman that (someone) is" means to be significantly superior or exceptionally accomplished in comparison to someone else, often emphasizing qualities like strength, courage, skills, or achievements. It implies being twice as capable, admirable, or respected as the person being referred to.
  • drag (one's) name through the mud The idiom "drag (one's) name through the mud" means to tarnish or disgrace someone's reputation by spreading negative or damaging information or rumors about them. It suggests that someone's name or reputation is being publicly defamed or brought down, often through false accusations or malicious intent.
  • fray around/at the edges The idiom "fray around/at the edges" is typically used to describe something that is starting to deteriorate or show signs of wear and tear, particularly in regards to a person or an organization. It suggests that there are small but noticeable problems or weaknesses emerging in the overall structure or functioning. It can also imply that someone or something is becoming less effective, reliable, or stable over time.
  • go to the wall (on something) The idiom "go to the wall (on something)" refers to an individual's determination or commitment to support or defend a particular cause or belief, even if it means facing challenges or difficulties. It implies a willingness to make sacrifices or take risks for the sake of what one believes in.
  • set the heather alight The idiom "set the heather alight" is typically used to describe someone or something that generates a lot of excitement, enthusiasm, and energy. It suggests igniting or starting a fire on the heather (which is a plant native to Europe) to symbolize a powerful, fiery, and impactful action or event. It is often applied to individuals or situations that create a significant impression or leave a lasting impact.
  • live under the cat's foot The idiom "live under the cat's foot" refers to a situation where someone is under the control or dominance of another person or entity, just like how a cat can dominate and control its prey by trapping it under its paw. It implies a lack of freedom, independence, and being subject to someone else's authority or power.
  • have the (good) grace to (do something) The idiom "have the (good) grace to (do something)" means to have the decency or courtesy to do something, especially when it is expected or the right thing to do. It implies showing proper manners, respect, or consideration.
  • sign on the dotted line The idiom "sign on the dotted line" is a phrase used to indicate the act of agreeing to or accepting something, usually by signing a contract or legal document. It implies finalizing an agreement or commitment, often involving the formal endorsement of terms or conditions by affixing one's signature at a specific place.
  • get the upper hand The idiom "get the upper hand" refers to gaining control or advantage over a situation, often by outwitting or overpowering others involved. It implies having the dominant or stronger position, allowing one to dictate terms or exert influence over the outcome.
  • the sleep of the just The idiom "the sleep of the just" refers to a peaceful and undisturbed sleep, often associated with someone who has a clear conscience or a virtuous character. It implies that such individuals can sleep soundly and without any worries or guilt.
  • Does a bear crap in the woods? The idiom "Does a bear crap in the woods?" is a rhetorical question used to sarcastically express that something is extremely obvious or self-evident. It implies that the answer to the question is an obvious "yes," as bears are known to defecate in the woods.
  • price sm or sth out of the market The idiom "price someone or something out of the market" refers to the act of setting a price for a product or service that is so high that it makes it unaffordable or undesirable for potential buyers, causing them to seek alternative options. This pricing strategy aims to eliminate competition or discourage customers from purchasing a particular item or engaging with a certain business.
  • to the ends of the world The idiom "to the ends of the world" refers to going to great lengths or doing whatever it takes to achieve or accomplish something. It implies a strong determination, persistence, or commitment to go as far as possible in pursuit of a goal, often indicating an unwavering devotion or dedication.
  • flirt with the idea of doing sth The idiom "flirt with the idea of doing something" means to consider or entertain the possibility of doing something without fully committing to or seriously pursuing it. It implies a casual or superficial interest in the idea, often accompanied by a sense of curiosity, but not necessarily intending to follow through with it.
  • see (one) to the door The idiom "see (one) to the door" means to accompany someone to the exit or see them off, often indicating that the person is no longer welcome or being asked to leave a place or situation.
  • the end of the rainbow The idiom "the end of the rainbow" refers to an imaginary place or situation that is somehow elusive and unattainable. It suggests something that is highly desired, but ultimately impossible to reach or achieve. This phrase is derived from the optical phenomenon where a rainbow appears to touch the ground, creating an illusion that there may be something valuable or magical at that spot. However, since rainbows are formed by the refraction and dispersion of light, they do not have a physical end point, making it an impossible feat to locate the end of a rainbow. Thus, when someone says "the end of the rainbow," they typically mean something that is beyond reach or unattainable.
  • separate/sort out the men from the boys The idiom "separate/sort out the men from the boys" means to distinguish between those who are truly mature, experienced, or capable, and those who are less mature, inexperienced, or incapable. It implies a process of identifying the most competent or skilled individuals among a group.
  • wipe the floor up with someone The idiom "wipe the floor up with someone" means to defeat or dominate someone completely in a competition or conflict, usually with ease or superiority. It suggests that one completely outperforms or outmatches their opponent, leaving them figuratively "wiped" or overwhelmed.
  • be dead in the water The idiom "be dead in the water" means to be completely stalled or unable to progress, usually due to a lack of progress, resources, or support. It implies a state of being stuck or unable to move forward.
  • the Pandects The idiom "the Pandects" refers to a collection or compilation of laws or legal principles. Specifically, it refers to the Digest or Pandects of Justinian, an ancient Roman legal text that consists of excerpts from various legal writings and commentaries. It was compiled under the orders of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD and served as a comprehensive source of legal knowledge. Thus, "the Pandects" can be used to signify an authoritative or complete collection of laws in a particular legal system.
  • forbidden fruit is the sweetest The idiom "forbidden fruit is the sweetest" means that something that is prohibited or off-limits tends to be more alluring and appealing to people. It suggests that there is often heightened desire or temptation associated with things that are forbidden or restricted.
  • beat the pants off The idiom "beat the pants off" is an informal expression used to describe a situation where someone or something is overwhelmingly better, superior, or victorious compared to another person or thing. It suggests a highly competitive scenario in which one entity outperforms or defeats another by a significant margin.
  • the Pampas The idiom "the Pampas" refers to a vast grassy plain that stretches across the South American countries of Argentina and Uruguay. It is characterized by its fertile soil, moderate climate, and extensive livestock farming. The Pampas is often used metaphorically to represent an open, wide, and flat area.
  • to (or at) the top of one's bent The idiom "to (or at) the top of one's bent" refers to doing something with the utmost intensity or to the absolute limit of one's abilities or efforts. It suggests that someone is giving their maximum effort or performing at their highest capability. It can be used to describe someone who is fully engaged, giving their all, and not holding back in what they are doing.
  • the 64,000 dollar question "The 64,000 dollar question" is an idiom used to refer to an extremely important or difficult question that someone is seeking an answer to. The phrase originated from the American TV quiz show "The $64,000 Question" that aired in the 1950s. The show featured contestants answering increasingly difficult questions in hopes of winning the top prize of $64,000, which was a considerable sum at the time. Hence, the idiom came to represent any significant or challenging question.
  • kick in the butt The idiom "kick in the butt" refers to a figurative action of providing a source of motivation, encouragement, or push to someone in order to spur them into action, improve their performance, or achieve a desired goal. It implies providing a sudden jolt of urgency or determination to someone who may be lagging or lacking motivation.
  • lead (one) around by the nose To "lead someone around by the nose" means to have complete control over someone, often using manipulation or dominance, to the point where they unquestioningly comply with one's wishes or demands. It implies that the person being led is easily manipulated or controlled and lacks the ability to assert their own will or make independent decisions.
  • in the final/last analysis The idiom "in the final/last analysis" means when all factors and aspects have been considered and evaluated. It indicates that after careful examination and examination of all available information, this is the ultimate conclusion or judgment.
  • ring the changes (on) The idiom "ring the changes (on)" means to make variations or alterations to something in order to keep it interesting or avoid monotony. It can refer to changing one's routine, strategy, or approach to a certain situation, activity, or relationship. It implies introducing new elements or ideas to bring about diversity and prevent boredom.
  • be out on the tiles The idiom "be out on the tiles" means to be out socializing, usually in a lively and entertaining manner. It refers to being out and about, enjoying oneself by going to parties, bars, clubs, or any other social gathering.
  • on the junk The idiom "on the junk" typically refers to being under the influence of drugs or narcotics, particularly in a continuous or habitual manner. It implies a state of addiction or dependency on substances.
  • chase the dragon The idiom "chase the dragon" is a slang term that originated in the 1960s in reference to drug use, specifically heroin. It describes the act of pursuing or seeking an ever-elusive or unachievable high from drug consumption. This idiom portrays the addictive nature of drug use, as the individual keeps trying to recreate the initial intense experience, often leading to a downward spiral of dependency and self-destruction.
  • the Commune "The Commune" refers to a historical event that occurred during the French Revolution. It specifically refers to the brief and revolutionary government established in Paris in 1871, known as the Paris Commune. The Paris Commune was characterized by the collective control of the city by its citizens, who sought social and political reforms. The idiom is often used to refer to any radical or revolutionary movement that promotes communal or collective values.
  • the Orient The idiom "the Orient" refers to the eastern part of the world, specifically the countries in Asia. It typically encompasses regions such as China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. The term is often used to describe the cultures, people, and traditions of these Eastern countries.
  • cut (sb) to the quick The idiom "cut (sb) to the quick" refers to deeply hurting or affecting someone emotionally. It signifies causing extreme emotional distress or offense, often by making a harsh or cutting remark that strikes at the core of a person's vulnerabilities or weaknesses.
  • the stink eye The idiom "the stink eye" refers to giving someone a hostile or disapproving look, often with a glare or a scowl. It conveys a strong sense of disdain or disapproval towards the person being directed.
  • the ox is in the ditch The idiom "the ox is in the ditch" is used to describe a situation where there is an urgent problem or obstacle that needs immediate attention or resolution. It implies that an unexpected difficulty has arisen, requiring immediate action to address it, similar to rescuing an ox stuck in a ditch. The phrase emphasizes the need for prompt action to overcome the obstacle or resolve the problem.
  • the company somebody keeps The idiom "the company somebody keeps" refers to the idea that the character or reputation of an individual can be judged by observing the people they choose to associate with or spend time with. It implies that a person's friends or companions can potentially influence or reflect their values, behavior, or social standing.
  • get (out) while the gettin(g)'s good The idiom "get (out) while the gettin(g)'s good" means to take advantage of a favorable opportunity or situation before it disappears or becomes more difficult to do so. It suggests seizing the moment and making the most of the current advantageous circumstances before they change or fade away.
  • hit the high spots The idiom "hit the high spots" means to briefly or quickly mention the most important or noteworthy points of something. It refers to highlighting or focusing on the key aspects or significant occurrences without going into too much detail.
  • be over the moon The idiom "be over the moon" means to be extremely happy or delighted about something. It expresses a feeling of joy and excitement.
  • call sm on the carpet The idiom "call someone on the carpet" refers to the act of summoning or confronting someone, usually in a position of authority, in order to reprimand, criticize, or question their actions or behavior. It typically implies a formal or stern meeting where the individual is held accountable for their actions.
  • give away the store "Give away the store" is an idiomatic expression that means to give or offer too much in a negotiation or transaction, typically resulting in a significant loss or disadvantage for oneself. It indicates an excessive willingness to make concessions or sacrifices, often due to poor judgment, inexperience, or desperation.
  • hit the gas The idiom "hit the gas" means to accelerate or increase speed, typically in a vehicle. It can be used literally when referring to pressing the accelerator pedal in a car, or figuratively to describe taking action and increasing or intensifying efforts.
  • What's the scam? The idiom "What's the scam?" typically refers to a skeptical or suspicious inquiry about someone's true intentions or hidden motives. It implies a cautious attitude in trying to determine if someone is trying to deceive, manipulate, or take advantage of another person.
  • stab sb in the back The idiom "stab someone in the back" means to betray or deceive someone, often someone who trusts and relies on you, by acting disloyally or treacherously behind their back. It refers to a metaphorical act of attacking someone from a position of trust or friendship.
  • take the helm The idiom "take the helm" means to assume control or leadership, especially in a situation where important decisions need to be made or significant actions need to be taken. It originates from maritime terminology, where the "helm" refers to the steering mechanism on a ship or boat, and taking the helm implies assuming command of the vessel's direction.
  • the bottom drops/falls out of the market The idiom "the bottom drops/falls out of the market" refers to a situation when the value or prices of goods, services, stocks, or any other market commodity suddenly and significantly decline or collapse. This idiom conveys a sudden and dramatic drop in market demand, resulting in a substantial loss of value or prices.
  • on the gravy train The idiom "on the gravy train" refers to a situation where someone is enjoying an easy or profitable position, often without putting in much effort or work. It implies that the person is benefiting from favorable circumstances or opportunities without having earned or deserved them.
  • (the) eternal triangle The idiom "the eternal triangle" refers to a complex romantic or sexual relationship involving three individuals, typically where two people are in love with or vying for the affections of a third person. This phrase implies an ongoing and often conflicted situation where each person involved is connected and affected by the others, creating a dynamic triangle.
  • be riding/on the crest of a wave The idiom "be riding/on the crest of a wave" means to be experiencing a period of great success, popularity, or good fortune. It refers to being at the peak or pinnacle of one's achievements, where everything is going exceptionally well.
  • force sm to the wall The idiom "force someone to the wall" typically means to put someone in a difficult or desperate situation where they have no choice but to take decisive action or make a dramatic change. It can imply creating a scenario where someone is left with no other options but to confront a problem head-on or make a difficult decision in order to resolve a complicated situation.
  • be (sitting) on top of the world The idiom "be (sitting) on top of the world" means to be in a state of extreme happiness, satisfaction, or success. It refers to feeling triumphant, accomplished, and as if one has achieved everything desired. It suggests a feeling of being on the highest point and having the world at one's feet.
  • not worth the paper sth is printed on The idiom "not worth the paper something is printed on" means that something is completely worthless or lacks any value or significance. It implies that whatever is being referred to is so insignificant that even the paper it is printed on holds more worth.
  • look somebody in the eye(s)/face The idiom "look somebody in the eye(s)/face" means to maintain direct eye contact with someone while speaking or being spoken to, as a sign of honesty, confidence, or sincerity. It suggests that one is not avoiding or hiding anything and is willing to face the other person directly.
  • toll the death knell The idiom "toll the death knell" means to announce or signal the end or impending demise of something or someone, often symbolically or metaphorically, as if a funeral bell is ringing.
  • through the wringer The idiom "through the wringer" means subjecting someone to extreme stress, pressure, or hardship. It refers to the process of putting clothes through a wringer, which was a mechanical device used to squeeze water out of wet clothes.
  • the hot ticket The idiom "the hot ticket" refers to something that is highly sought after or in high demand, often due to its popularity, exclusivity, or desirability. It is used to describe an event, product, or opportunity that everyone wants to be a part of or possess.
  • the worm turns The idiom "the worm turns" refers to a situation in which someone who is usually submissive or oppressed finally stands up for themselves or fights back against those who have mistreated them. It signifies a reversal of power dynamics or a shift in someone's attitude from passive to assertive.
  • the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder" refers to a person's current position or level in a hierarchical system, career, or any kind of progression. The idiom suggests that there are multiple steps or levels, and the mentioned rung represents the immediate one that a person has reached. It implies that there are further steps or advancements to be pursued beyond the current position.
  • in the strict(est) sense The idiom "in the strict(est) sense" refers to something being interpreted or understood in the most precise or narrow way possible, adhering strictly to the technical or literal definition. It indicates a very specific and rigorous interpretation or understanding of a concept or term.
  • praise to the skies The idiom "praise to the skies" means to express excessive or enthusiastic admiration or recognition for someone or something. It signifies giving extremely high praise or commendation to the point of exaggeration.
  • by the seat of one's pants The idiom "by the seat of one's pants" means to do something by relying on one's instincts, intuition, or experience rather than following a planned or calculated approach. It implies making decisions or taking actions quickly and based on momentary judgment rather than careful analysis.
  • the in thing (to do) The idiom "the in thing (to do)" refers to something that is currently fashionable, trendy, or popular. It suggests that engaging in or following a particular activity, trend, or style is considered to be the most desirable or socially acceptable thing to do at a given time.
  • hear (sth) on/through the grapevine The idiom "hear (sth) on/through the grapevine" means to learn information, often rumors or gossip, from an informal or unofficial source, typically through an informal network of communication. It refers to receiving news or information through word of mouth, without a direct or formal source.
  • be of one mind, at be of the same mind The idiom "be of one mind" or "be of the same mind" means to have a shared opinion or agreement on a particular matter. It suggests that all individuals involved in a discussion or decision-making process have reached a consensus, showing unity and harmony in their thoughts or beliefs.
  • put yourself on the line The idiom "put yourself on the line" means to take a risk or put oneself in a vulnerable position for the sake of achieving something or expressing one's beliefs or opinions. It involves taking a stand or a decisive action, often with uncertain outcomes or potential consequences.
  • laugh out of the other side of one's mouth The idiom "laugh out of the other side of one's mouth" means to have a sudden change in attitude or perspective, often from excessive confidence or arrogance to disappointment or humiliation. It indicates a complete reversal of fortunes or a realization that one's initial beliefs or expectations were misguided.
  • the Eternal City The idiom "the Eternal City" refers to the city of Rome, Italy. It is used to emphasize the timeless and enduring qualities of Rome, highlighting its rich history, cultural significance, and lasting influence in the Western world.
  • What's the good of? The idiom "What's the good of?" is used to express skepticism or doubt about the value or usefulness of something or someone. It suggests questioning the practicality, purpose, or benefit of a certain action, item, or situation. For example, "What's the good of going to the party if nobody I know will be there?"
  • beard the lion (in his/her den) The idiom "beard the lion (in his/her den)" means to confront or challenge a powerful or intimidating person or situation directly and in their own domain, despite the risks involved. It often refers to facing someone or something formidable, typically known for aggression or dominance, on their home turf or in a situation where they have the advantage.
  • be in the pipeline The idiom "be in the pipeline" means that something is currently in progress or being developed and will be completed or made available in the future. It refers to something that is in the process of being worked on or planned to happen, but it has not yet reached its final stage or been released.
  • as the actress said to the bishop The idiom "as the actress said to the bishop" is a British euphemism used to point out the unintentional sexual innuendo in a statement or remark. It often serves as a humorous way to highlight a suggestive or risqué undertone in a conversation.
  • at sb's expense, at at the expense of sb The idiom "at someone's expense" or "at the expense of someone" refers to something that is done or enjoyed by one person, but is paid for or suffered by another person. It suggests that someone is being taken advantage of or having to bear the cost or burden of another person's actions or choices.
  • in the house The idiom "in the house" is often used to indicate the presence or arrival of someone or something at a specific location, typically a place where they are expected or intended to be. It is often used informally to announce or acknowledge the presence of someone or something, emphasizing their immediate availability or participation.
  • put the clocks forward/back The idiom "put the clocks forward/back" refers to the act of adjusting the time displayed on clocks to match the time changes caused by daylight saving time. When the clocks are put forward, it means advancing them by one hour, typically in the spring when daylight saving time begins. Conversely, when the clocks are put back, it means setting them back by one hour, typically in the fall when daylight saving time ends. This idiom is commonly used to indicate the need to adjust clocks to synchronize with the new time schedule.
  • the law is a ass The idiom "the law is a ass" refers to a criticism or observation that the legal system can be unreasonably strict, inflexible, or unjust. It implies that the law can be flawed or inadequate in addressing certain situations or circumstances. This idiom originated from Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist, where the character Mr. Bumble exclaims, "The law is a ass – a idiot."
  • be asleep at the switch To be asleep at the switch idiomatically means to be negligent or inattentive in a situation that requires vigilance or action. It refers to someone who fails to act or react appropriately, especially in times of urgency or responsibility. The idiom is often used to describe a situation where someone is not properly monitoring or attending to important tasks or duties, resulting in a negative outcome or missed opportunity.
  • the Creation The idiom "the Creation" typically refers to the belief in or the act of the divine creation of the universe, as described in various religious and mythological traditions. It is often used to signify the origin or the beginning of everything.
  • above (or below) the salt The idiom "above (or below) the salt" refers to a social hierarchy or ranking system where individuals of higher importance or status are seated closer to the head of the table, or "above the salt," while those of lower position are seated farther away, or "below the salt." This expression originated from the practice of placing a salt cellar, or salt shaker, at the center of a dining table during medieval times, with important guests being seated closest to it. Today, it is often used metaphorically to describe someone's social standing or rank in a particular context.
  • far and away the best The idiom "far and away the best" is used to describe something or someone that is significantly superior or the outright best compared to all others. It emphasizes a clear and significant distinction in terms of quality, performance, or excellence.
  • clean the floor up with The idiom "clean the floor up with" means to defeat or win overwhelmingly against an opponent in a competition, argument, or other situations. It implies a dominant victory or a complete superiority over someone or something.
  • under the auspices of somebody/something The idiom "under the auspices of somebody/something" means that something is happening or being carried out with the support, protection, or guidance of a particular person or organization. It suggests that the person or organization is taking responsibility for ensuring the success or proper execution of the activity.
  • into the red The idiom "into the red" refers to a financial state where a person or business has incurred a debt, or their expenses exceed their income, resulting in a negative balance or deficit. It is commonly used to describe situations where individuals or organizations have financial difficulties or are operating at a loss.
  • lower the boom on someone To "lower the boom on someone" is an idiomatic expression that means to take decisive, harsh action against someone to punish, reprimand, or discipline them severely. It refers to delivering a stern and forceful retribution or consequence upon an individual for their actions or behavior.
  • the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world The idiom "the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world" means that the influence and power of a mother or a caregiver in shaping and molding a child's character and values is significant. The phrase suggests that those who have the responsibility of raising and nurturing children ultimately have the ability to shape the future and have a profound impact on society.
  • have the patience of Job The idiom "have the patience of Job" refers to someone who has an extraordinary and remarkable level of patience, endurance, or forbearance, especially during difficult or challenging circumstances. It is derived from the biblical story of Job, who endured immense suffering and hardships with unwavering patience and faith.
  • wipe the floor with To "wipe the floor with" someone means to thoroughly defeat or outperform them, often in a competitive setting. It suggests that the victory is so complete and decisive that it resembles cleaning the floor with the defeated opponent. This idiom is commonly used in sports, debates, or any situation where one person or team effortlessly dominates another.
  • drop the writ The idiom "drop the writ" refers to the act of formally initiating a legal or political process, usually in the context of calling for an election. It is commonly used in parliamentary systems, where the governing body, such as the prime minister or the head of state, announces the dissolution of the parliament and calls for new elections by "dropping the writ." This phrase signifies the start of the election process and the dissolution of the current political establishment.
  • be/lie at the bottom of something The idiom "be/lie at the bottom of something" typically means to be the cause or underlying reason for a particular situation or problem. It suggests that the true or root cause of something can be traced back to a specific factor or event.
  • the likes of sb/sth The idiom "the likes of sb/sth" refers to a particular person or thing, usually used in a negative or disdainful manner. It implies that the person or thing mentioned is not worthy, significant, or deserving of respect, comparing them unfavorably to others.
  • put the hard word on (someone) The idiom "put the hard word on (someone)" means to exert pressure or to demand something forcefully from someone. It typically involves using strong language or making intimidating requests in order to make the person comply with one's demands or expectations.
  • pull something/a rabbit out of the hat The idiom "pull something/a rabbit out of the hat" refers to accomplishing or producing something unexpectedly or magically, usually in a challenging or difficult situation. It is often used to describe a surprising or impressive solution, skill, or result that was not anticipated. This idiom is derived from the idea of a magician pulling a rabbit out of a hat, which is an unexpected and awe-inspiring feat.
  • ice the puck The idiom "ice the puck" is a term used in ice hockey to describe the act of deliberately shooting or clearing the puck from one's own defensive zone towards the opponent's end of the rink in order to prevent the opposing team from scoring. This act usually occurs when a team is under pressure or being heavily attacked by the opponents, providing a brief respite and allowing the players to regroup and reorganize their defensive strategy.
  • at the top of the tree The idiom "at the top of the tree" refers to being in the highest or most prominent position in a particular field, organization, or hierarchy. It signifies being the most successful, influential, or powerful individual in a given context.
  • the cellar The idiom "the cellar" typically refers to a place that is hidden, neglected, or unexplored. It implies that something is kept out of sight or disregarded, usually with negative connotations.
  • get the worst of it The idiom "get the worst of it" means to be at a disadvantage or receive the most negative outcome in a particular situation, often in a conflict or confrontation. It implies losing, suffering, or being harmed more than the opposing party.
  • take the stage The idiom "take the stage" means to step or come forward to perform, speak, or present in front of an audience. It is often used to describe a person who assumes a prominent or leading role in a particular situation or event. This expression originates from the literal act of stepping onto a stage, which is typically associated with being the center of attention and having the spotlight on you.
  • do, mean, etc. something for the best The idiom "do, mean, etc. something for the best" means to do or say something with good intentions or in the belief that it will have a positive outcome or result, even if it may not be immediately apparent or well-received. It implies making a decision or taking an action based on one's genuine belief that it will ultimately benefit someone or a situation, regardless of any difficulties or initial doubts.
  • go on the sick list The idiom "go on the sick list" refers to the act of taking time off work or school due to illness or injury. It means to officially notify or inform the relevant authorities or entities that one will be absent from their usual duties due to health reasons.
  • there is/lies the rub The idiom "there is/lies the rub" is used to acknowledge or highlight a particular problem or difficulty that arises in a situation. It refers to a point of contention or obstacle that complicates or hinders the desired outcome.
  • a diamond in the rough The idiom "a diamond in the rough" refers to a person or thing that possesses exceptional qualities or potential, despite appearing ordinary, unpolished, or lacking refinement at first glance. It suggests that there is untapped talent, beauty, or value waiting to be discovered or developed.
  • in the palm of your hand The idiom "in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone or something. It refers to having power and authority, as if holding the object or individual in the palm of one's hand.
  • way/direction the wind blows The idiom "way/direction the wind blows" typically means the current popular opinion or trend, or the prevailing attitude or overall mood in a certain situation or context. It refers to being aware of the dominant influence or the general sentiment of a particular group or society.
  • jam the brakes on The idiom "jam the brakes on" typically means to forcefully apply the brakes of a vehicle in order to slow down or stop suddenly. It can also be used metaphorically to describe taking immediate and drastic action to halt progress, momentum, or a course of action.
  • the whole shebang The idiom "the whole shebang" is used to refer to the entirety or everything related to a particular thing or situation. It means all the parts or elements that make up a complete entity or package. It is often used to emphasize the inclusiveness or comprehensiveness of something.
  • in the biblical sense The idiom "in the biblical sense" is typically used to refer to sexual intercourse. It is derived from a euphemistic expression mentioned in the Bible, particularly in the Old Testament, sometimes used to indicate sexual relations between individuals.
  • A woman's place is in the home. The idiom "A woman's place is in the home" implies the belief that a woman's primary or traditional role is to take care of domestic responsibilities, such as managing the household and raising children, rather than pursuing a career or other interests outside of the home.
  • know where the bodies are buried The idiom "know where the bodies are buried" refers to having a comprehensive understanding of secret or sensitive information, typically involving a person's wrongdoing or hidden actions. It implies having knowledge about someone's secrets, misconduct, or scandalous activities that they would prefer to remain hidden.
  • a cog in the machine The idiom "a cog in the machine" refers to a person who is a small, insignificant part of a larger organization or system. It portrays the idea that the individual is merely a replaceable component without much influence or importance in the overall functioning of the system.
  • put back the clock The idiom "put back the clock" means to go back in time or revert to a previous era or state. It suggests undoing progress or returning to a less advanced or desirable situation.
  • the odds are against something/somebody doing something The idiom "the odds are against something/somebody doing something" means that it is unlikely or highly improbable for something or someone to succeed or achieve a particular outcome due to unfavorable circumstances, predictions, or probabilities.
  • take up the cudgels (on behalf of someone or something) To "take up the cudgels (on behalf of someone or something)" means to passionately defend or support someone or something, especially in a public or vigorous manner. It implies standing up for their rights, advocating for their cause, or voicing their opinions when they are unable to do so themselves. The phrase originates from the literal meaning of "cudgel," which is a short, thick stick used as a weapon, suggesting a forceful or combative approach in defending or championing another's interests.
  • a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "a pain in the arse/backside" refers to a person, situation, or thing that is extremely irritating, bothersome, or difficult to deal with. It describes someone or something causing frustration, inconvenience, or discomfort.
  • be/go out on the tiles The idiom "be/go out on the tiles" means to go out and enjoy oneself by going to various social events, parties, or entertainment venues, typically in the evening or at night. It implies a lively and fun-filled night out, often involving eating, drinking, and dancing.
  • cut/untie the Gordian knot The idiom "cut/untie the Gordian knot" refers to solving a complex problem or overcoming a seemingly unsolvable situation through a decisive or bold action. It alludes to the legend of Alexander the Great, who supposedly unraveled an intricate knot tied by King Gordius of Phrygia with a single stroke of his sword, when no one else could. By cutting or untying the Gordian knot, it implies finding a simple and direct solution to a complicated and convoluted problem.
  • the crest of a/the wave The idiom "the crest of a/the wave" refers to being at the highest point or peak of a successful or productive period. It is used to describe someone or something that is at the pinnacle of success, popularity, or influence. The phrase is often associated with progress, accomplishments, or a surge of positive momentum.
  • the ball is in someone’s court The idiom "the ball is in someone’s court" means that it is now someone else's turn to take action or make a decision in a particular situation. It suggests that responsibility or initiative has been passed on to someone else, and it is up to them to respond or make the next move. This idiom is often used in conversations to indicate that someone is waiting for a response or decision from another person.
  • be cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey The idiom "be cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey" is an exaggerated expression used to describe extremely cold weather. It implies that the temperature is so low that it could freeze the spherical or round objects that are typically found on a brass monkey, a term commonly used to refer to a type of cannonball holder on a warship or other vessel. However, it is important to note that this idiom is considered to be crude and vulgar in nature.
  • If the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the ... The idiom "If the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain" means that if a desired or necessary outcome cannot be achieved easily, then one must adjust their approach or make an effort to reach their goal. It emphasizes the importance of adaptability and taking initiative instead of waiting for circumstances to change. The phrase originates from a story about the Islamic prophet Muhammad, also known as Mahomet, who was told to move a mountain to make way for worship. Instead of waiting for the mountain to move on its own, he chose to visit the mountain and engage in the necessary actions himself.
  • of the highest magnitude The phrase "of the highest magnitude" is an idiom that means something is of the greatest or utmost importance, intensity, or significance. It is often used to emphasize the exceptional level or scale of something.
  • the runs The idiom "the runs" refers to a colloquial term used to describe a case of diarrhea, which is a condition characterized by frequent and loose bowel movements.
  • Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil The idiom "Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil" means that if someone who is unqualified or lacking in character is given power or wealth, they will likely misuse or abuse it, leading to their downfall or destruction. It highlights the belief that elevating someone unprepared or undeserving to a position of authority or prosperity will only result in negative consequences.
  • put shoulder to the wheel The idiom "put shoulder to the wheel" means to apply oneself diligently and make a strong effort to accomplish a task or objective. It suggests the idea of working hard and pushing forward, similar to how one might exert force to move a heavy object by putting their shoulder against it.
  • be in the middle of something/of doing something The idiom "be in the middle of something/of doing something" means to be actively working on or engaged in a task or activity when interrupted or while something else is happening simultaneously. It refers to a situation where someone is neither finished with their current activity nor able to start a new one.
  • (deep) into the weeds The idiom "(deep) into the weeds" refers to being deeply or excessively involved in small details or trivial matters, often to the point of losing sight of the main objective or becoming overwhelmed by insignificant details. It indicates being caught up in unnecessary complexities or getting off track from the main focus.
  • begin to see the light The idiom "begin to see the light" means to start to understand or realize something after a period of confusion or ignorance. It implies gaining clarity, insight, or comprehension about a particular situation or concept.
  • a change for the better/worse The idiom "a change for the better/worse" refers to a situation or event that brings about an improvement or deterioration in circumstances or conditions. It implies a significant shift or alteration that results in things becoming either more advantageous or more unfavorable.
  • stay the course The idiom "stay the course" refers to the act of persisting or continuing on a chosen path or course of action, despite difficulties, challenges, or temptations to deviate or change direction. It suggests maintaining focus and commitment toward a goal or objective without being deterred or giving up.
  • drive into the ground The idiom "drive into the ground" means to excessively overuse, exploit, or exhaust something until it is completely worn-out, ineffective, or destroyed. It often refers to constantly pushing or working something beyond its limits, resulting in negative consequences or diminishing returns. This can be applied to various scenarios, including physical objects, resources, ideas, projects, or even people.
  • have the cares of the world on (one's) shoulders The idiom "have the cares of the world on one's shoulders" means to be burdened with heavy responsibilities or worries, typically referring to someone who is carrying a lot of stress or feeling overwhelmed by various concerns or problems. It implies that the person feels as though they are carrying the weight of the entire world's troubles on their shoulders.
  • on the verge (of) The idiom "on the verge (of)" means to be very close or almost at the point of doing or experiencing something. It indicates being on the brink or threshold of an action or situation.
  • take the (long) count The idiom "take the (long) count" refers to a boxing term used when a boxer has failed to get up before a specific count by the referee, resulting in their opponent winning the match by knockout. It is used figuratively to describe someone who suffers a significant setback or defeat, often giving up or losing hope entirely.
  • be dead from the neck up The idiom "be dead from the neck up" is a figurative expression used to describe someone as lacking intelligence, common sense, or awareness. It implies that the person is mentally or intellectually incompetent, suggesting a complete absence of cognitive abilities or rationality.
  • be bitten by the bug The idiom "be bitten by the bug" refers to having a sudden and strong enthusiasm or passion for something. It means to become deeply interested, involved, or obsessed with a particular activity or pursuit.
  • on the scrounge The idiom "on the scrounge" refers to the act of seeking or searching for something, typically in a manner that is needy or desperate. It usually implies a person who is trying to obtain something, often goods or money, without spending their own resources or making proper effort themselves. This idiom is commonly used to describe someone who is constantly looking for freebies or favors from others.
  • to the tune of $500, etc. The idiom "to the tune of $500, etc." means to indicate or specify a cost or amount, often used to express the high price or significant value associated with something. It suggests that the mentioned amount, such as $500, serves as a measure or reference point for assessing the magnitude or extent of something.
  • be on the ropes The idiom "be on the ropes" refers to a situation where someone or something is in a difficult or vulnerable position, usually in a state of near defeat or failure. It originates from the sport of boxing, where being on the ropes means being trapped in a corner of the ring and being subjected to a relentless attack from the opponent. This idiom is often used to describe someone who is struggling, facing adversity, or on the brink of collapse.
  • put the arm on (one) The idiom "put the arm on (one)" means to pressure, persuade, or convince someone to do something, usually by using forceful or manipulative tactics. It can also refer to extorting or demanding money or favors from someone.
  • icing on the cake The idiom "icing on the cake" refers to something additional or extra that enhances an already good situation or outcome. It implies that the additional element is a pleasant surprise or bonus that adds to the overall enjoyment or satisfaction of the situation.
  • not in the slightest The idiom "not in the slightest" means not at all or not even a tiny amount. It is used to emphasize that something is absolutely or completely not true or relevant.
  • warm the cockles of sm's heart To warm the cockles of someone's heart means to make them feel happy, pleased, or deeply satisfied, often by an act of kindness, love, or generosity. It refers to a feeling of warmth or contentment that radiates from the heart metaphorically.
  • dip a/your toe in (the water) The idiom "dip a/your toe in (the water)" refers to testing or trying something new or unfamiliar, usually in a cautious or tentative manner. It often involves taking a small, initial step or making a minimal commitment to explore or engage with a particular situation or activity before fully committing to it. The phrase is usually used metaphorically and can apply to various contexts, such as trying a new hobby, pursuing a new career, or engaging in a new relationship.
  • talk nineteen to the dozen The idiom "talk nineteen to the dozen" means to talk very fast, often in a rapid and animated manner, without pause or hesitation. It implies speaking at an extremely rapid pace, not allowing others to interject or contribute to the conversation.
  • there is reason in the roasting of eggs The idiom "there is reason in the roasting of eggs" means that there is a valid and logical explanation for seemingly absurd or contradictory actions or beliefs. It suggests that even seemingly irrational behavior or ideas can have a purpose or reason behind them, and one should not dismiss them without understanding the underlying rationale.
  • on the dole The idiom "on the dole" refers to someone who is receiving financial assistance or welfare benefits from the government or an organization. This phrase is typically used to describe individuals who are unemployed and dependent on government support for their livelihood.
  • take sm to the cleaners The idiom "take someone to the cleaners" means to completely defeat or outwit someone, especially by winning a large amount of m