How Do You Spell TOO?

Pronunciation: [tˈuː] (IPA)

The word "too" is spelled with two letters "o". However, its phonetic transcription is "tu" /tuː/ in the General American English accent. In Received Pronunciation, it is pronounced with a slightly different sound, which is written as "tju" /tʃuː/. This word is used to express excess or similarity in a sentence, for example, "I ate too much cake" or "She is wearing the same dress too". It is also commonly used in conversation and writing.

TOO Meaning and Definition

Too is an adverb that primarily serves to indicate excess or inadequacy in relation to a particular condition or situation. It denotes a high degree, intensity, or extent beyond what is considered appropriate or desired. Too suggests that there is an imbalance, surpassing a reasonable limit or expectation.

When used to express excess, too often signifies an overabundance or surplus of something. For instance, if someone says they have had too much food, it implies that they have eaten an excessive amount, possibly causing discomfort or illness.

Conversely, if something is described as too little, it implies an insufficiency or dearth. If an individual has too little time to complete a task, it indicates that the available time is inadequate or insufficient for the assigned job.

Additionally, too can indicate that a particular action or behavior is inappropriate or unsuitable. For example, if someone becomes too emotional during a discussion, it implies that they are exceeding the accepted level of emotional response for that given situation.

Furthermore, too can express a sense of extremity or exaggeration. If an individual claims that they are too tired to continue an activity, it suggests that they have reached an extreme fatigue level and cannot proceed any further.

In summary, too serves to emphasize excess, inadequacy, imbalance, inappropriateness, or extremities in relation to a specific condition or circumstance.

Top Common Misspellings for TOO *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for TOO

Etymology of TOO

The word "too" originated from the Old English word "to", which meant "in addition, also, besides". This word traces back to the Proto-Germanic language, specifically the word "tō", with the same meaning. In Middle English, it evolved to "to", "too", and "tow", before settling on its current form, "too". The word has retained its original meaning throughout its history, signifying an addition, excess, or also.

Idioms with the word TOO

  • I should think not/so (too)! The idiom "I should think not/so (too)!" is a phrase used to express strong disagreement or disbelief towards a statement or suggestion. It is a way to firmly reject or contradict something, emphasizing the speaker's conviction that the statement is incorrect or unacceptable.
  • miles too big, small, expensive, etc. The idiom "miles too big, small, expensive, etc." is used to emphasize that something is considerably too large, small, expensive, etc., to the extent that it is clearly inappropriate or unsuitable for a particular purpose or situation. This expression highlights a significant and noticeable excess or deficiency in size, cost, or other characteristics.
  • not so shabby/not too shabby "Not so shabby" or "not too shabby" is an idiom used to describe something as being quite good or satisfactory. It is often used to express a positive opinion or approval of something that may have been initially underestimated or seen as less impressive.
  • speak too soon The idiom "speak too soon" means expressing an opinion or making an assertion prematurely or before all the relevant information is available, usually resulting in a subsequent realization that one's initial statement was inaccurate or premature. It implies that one should have waited longer before speaking or making a judgment.
  • not a moment too soon The idiom "not a moment too soon" means that something has happened exactly at the right time, just before it was too late or just in time to prevent a negative consequence. It implies a sense of relief or gratitude that the event or action occurred when it did.
  • too many cooks spoil the soup, at too many cooks spoil the broth The idiom "too many cooks spoil the soup" means that when too many people are involved in a task or decision-making process, the outcome or result becomes worse or of lesser quality than if fewer people were involved. It suggests that too many opinions or contributions can create confusion, lack of coordination, or poor execution. The alternative version of the idiom, "too many cooks spoil the broth," has the same meaning but refers specifically to broth, a liquid used as a base for soups and sauces.
  • too many cooks spoil the broth The idiom "too many cooks spoil the broth" means that when too many people are involved in a task or decision-making process, it often leads to confusion, inefficiency, or negative results. It suggests that having too many people involved can complicate the situation and hinder the successful completion of a task.
  • spread yourself too thin The idiom "spread yourself too thin" means to take on too many tasks or responsibilities, to the point where you are unable to effectively handle them all. It implies that by attempting to do too much at once, you become less productive and unable to give proper attention or effort to any one thing.
  • before much longer, at before (very/too) long The idiom "before much longer" or "before (very/too) long" refers to a situation or event that will happen relatively soon or in a short amount of time. It implies that the time span until the occurrence of something is not extensive and will occur quickly or shortly.
  • before (very/too) long The idiom "before (very/too) long" means that something will happen or occur in a short period of time, often sooner than expected or anticipated.
  • too much of a good thing The idiom "too much of a good thing" means that although something may be enjoyable or beneficial, if it is experienced or consumed excessively, it can become negative or harmful. It suggests that an excessive quantity or duration can change a positive experience or situation into something less desirable.
  • in too deep The idiom "in too deep" typically means being involved in a situation or commitment that has become overwhelming or one cannot easily back out of. It refers to being extensively involved or attached to something, often in a negative or problematic way.
  • too bad The idiom "too bad" is an expression used to convey disappointment or regret about a situation or outcome. It implies that something unfortunate has happened, or that something desired or expected has not occurred.
  • too good to be true The idiom "too good to be true" refers to something that appears exceptionally excellent or advantageous, but is doubted or suspected to be unrealistically positive or deceptive. It suggests skepticism or disbelief towards something that seems too perfect or ideal to actually exist.
  • too good to miss The idiom "too good to miss" means that something is so excellent or advantageous that one should not pass up the opportunity to experience or benefit from it. It suggests that the event, situation, or opportunity is incredibly valuable and potentially rare, making it a worthy experience or investment.
  • too much like hard work The idiom "too much like hard work" means that a task or activity requires a lot of effort, difficulty, or is time-consuming, and therefore, is not worth the effort to undertake or complete. It implies that the task is perceived as being more demanding or tedious than the expected payoff or benefits.
  • none too The idiom "none too" means not very or not at all. It emphasizes a lack of a certain quality or degree of something.
  • too right The idiom "too right" is an informal expression commonly used in British and Australian English. It is used to agree emphatically with a statement or sentiment, conveying strong agreement or affirmation. It can also indicate complete certainty or correctness in a given situation. Essentially, it means "absolutely" or "definitely right."
  • go too far The idiom "go too far" refers to exceeding reasonable or acceptable boundaries, limits, or actions, often resulting in excessive or extreme behavior. It indicates that someone has crossed a line or taken something to an extreme level.
  • one too many The idiom "one too many" means to have consumed more than what is advisable or acceptable, usually referring to alcohol or drinks. It suggests being intoxicated or having reached the point of excessive indulgence. It can also be used to describe a situation where someone has made a mistake or error due to being tired, overwhelmed, or overwhelmed.
  • too little, too late The idiom "too little, too late" means that an action or effort is insufficient and occurs after the optimal or necessary time to have a significant impact or be effective. It denotes a situation where the attempted remedy or action is inadequate in relation to the problem or need, and it is enacted when it no longer holds much value or relevance.
  • protest too much The definition of the idiom "protest too much" refers to an expression used to describe when someone vehemently denies or defends something so excessively that it raises suspicion or doubt regarding their sincerity or truthfulness. It implies that the person's excessive protestations may suggest that they are attempting to hide the opposite of what they are claiming, or trying to divert attention from the truth.
  • too much information The idiom "too much information" (often abbreviated as TMI) is used to express that someone has shared more personal or intimate details than one wants or needs to know, making the situation uncomfortable or inappropriate. It is commonly used to discreetly request the speaker to stop sharing excessive or unneeded information.
  • be too hot to handle The idiom "be too hot to handle" means to be a situation or person that is extremely difficult, dangerous, or risky to deal with or control. It implies that the situation is challenging or overwhelming, often beyond one's ability to manage or handle successfully.
  • have a few (too many) The idiom "have a few (too many)" is typically used to refer to consuming more alcoholic beverages than one should, leading to a state of intoxication or drunkenness. It portrays the idea of surpassing the desired or acceptable limit of alcohol consumption.
  • be too clever by half To be too clever by half means to be excessively or unnecessarily clever or cunning, often resulting in self-defeat or unintended consequences. It implies that the individual's excessive intelligence or cleverness leads them to make mistakes or overlook simpler, more practical solutions. This idiom is often used to caution against overthinking or being overly complicated in an attempt to outsmart others.
  • be too close for comfort The idiom "be too close for comfort" means to be in a situation or proximity that is uncomfortably close or near to something or someone, usually resulting in a feeling of unease, vulnerability, or anxiety. It implies that the proximity is more than what is considered acceptable or desirable.
  • too big for your boots The idiom "too big for your boots" refers to someone who is arrogant, overconfident, or conceited due to their accomplishments or position, often exhibiting a sense of superiority and entitlement beyond what is justified.
  • a drop too much (to drink) The idiom "a drop too much (to drink)" refers to consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or a substance that leads to intoxication or impairment. It suggests that just one additional drink would be excessive, indicating that the person has already consumed enough to be intoxicated. This idiom emphasizes the idea of exceeding one's limit or going beyond what is reasonable or safe in terms of alcohol consumption.
  • too big for your britches, at too big for your boots The idiom "too big for your britches" (alternatively "too big for your boots") refers to someone who has an excessively high opinion of themselves or their abilities. It signifies arrogance, overconfidence, or a sense of superiority that exceeds one's actual capabilities or accomplishments. This idiom often highlights the need for humility and self-awareness.
  • not to put too fine a point on The idiom "not to put too fine a point on" means to express something directly or to be blunt and straightforward in conveying an idea or opinion. It is often used when someone wants to emphasize a point without being too subtle or diplomatic.
  • too many chiefs and not enough Indians The idiom "too many chiefs and not enough Indians" is used to describe a situation where there are too many people in a position of authority or management, but not enough people to carry out the necessary tasks or work. It implies a lack of balance in the distribution of responsibilities, with an excess of leaders compared to subordinates or workers. The idiom is often used to highlight the inefficiency, confusion, or ineffectiveness that can result from such a situation.
  • a bit (too) much The idiom "a bit (too) much" means that something is excessive, over the top, or beyond what is considered acceptable, reasonable, or appropriate in a given situation. It implies that someone or something has gone beyond the usual or expected limit and has become overwhelming, extreme, or even tiresome.
  • too rich for sm's blood The idiom "too rich for someone's blood" typically refers to something that is too expensive or costly for someone to afford or be willing to pay for. It suggests that the person being referred to is not able to financially or emotionally handle the expense or investment.
  • too hot to handle The idiom "too hot to handle" means a situation or person that is difficult or dangerous to deal with, often due to their volatile or unpredictable nature. It suggests that the person or situation may cause trouble or be challenging to manage.
  • not too shabby The idiom "not too shabby" is used to describe something as surprisingly good or impressive, often in a modest or understated way. It implies that something is better than expected or above average quality.
  • life's too short The idiom "life's too short" means that life is too brief or fleeting to waste on insignificant matters or unnecessary activities. It represents the belief that time is a valuable resource that should be used purposefully and not squandered on things that are not important.
  • Life is too short The idiom "Life is too short" means that life is brief and passes quickly, suggesting that one should not waste time on unimportant matters and instead focus on what truly matters and brings joy or fulfillment. It emphasizes the importance of making the most out of one's limited time on Earth.
  • About time too! The idiom "About time too!" is an expression used to convey satisfaction or relief that something has finally happened, often implying that it should have happened sooner. It suggests a sense of impatience or frustration prior to the event occurring.
  • too big for britches The idiom "too big for britches" means someone who has an excessively inflated sense of their own importance or abilities, often leading to arrogance or overconfidence. It suggests that the person's ego or confidence has outgrown their actual accomplishments or position.
  • too big for boots The idiom "too big for boots" refers to someone who has an excessive sense of self-importance or an inflated ego. It implies that the person thinks highly of themselves and believes they are more talented, skilled, or important than they actually are.
  • Yesterday wouldn't be too soon. The idiom "Yesterday wouldn't be too soon" means that something is urgent or long overdue and the speaker desires it to happen as soon as possible, preferably yesterday. It emphasizes impatience and the need for immediate action or resolution.
  • I spoke too soon. The idiom "I spoke too soon" means that someone made a statement or expressed an opinion prematurely, only to have the situation change in a way that contradicts or invalidates their previous statement. It implies that the speaker should have waited longer before speaking or should have been more cautious in making their assertion.
  • too rich for blood The idiom "too rich for blood" generally means that something is too expensive or costly for someone to afford or desire. It implies that the price or value of a particular thing is beyond someone's means or willingness to pay.
  • Too many cooks spoil the stew. The idiom "Too many cooks spoil the stew" means that when too many people are involved in a task or decision-making process, their conflicting ideas and actions can lead to chaos, mistakes, or a poor end result. It implies that too many opinions or contributions can hinder progress or quality.
  • spread (yourself/itself too) thin The idiom "spread (yourself/itself too) thin" refers to a situation where a person or an entity is involved in too many activities or tasks simultaneously, often resulting in reduced effectiveness or the inability to give proper attention to any of them. It implies that by trying to handle multiple responsibilities or commitments, the individual or organization becomes overextended and overwhelmed.
  • spread oneself too thin The idiom "spread oneself too thin" means to become involved in or undertake too many activities, tasks, or responsibilities simultaneously, usually to the point where one's attention or efforts are insufficient to effectively accomplish any of them. It implies a lack of focus or overextending oneself beyond their capacity.
  • too big for one's britches The idiom "too big for one's britches" means to be excessively arrogant, conceited, or self-important, often behaving in a way that exceeds one's abilities or accomplishments. It suggests that someone is overestimating their abilities or position in a way that is not warranted or justified.
  • have your cake and eat it too The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two conflicting or mutually exclusive things or situations at the same time. It refers to the desire to have it all, even when those desires contradict each other or are impossible to achieve simultaneously.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it (too). The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it (too)" means that you cannot have or enjoy the benefits of two conflicting options or choices simultaneously. It implies that one must make a decision between two mutually exclusive things and cannot possess or experience both at the same time.
  • have one's cake and eat it too The idiom "have one's cake and eat it too" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two contradictory things or situations simultaneously, without realizing that they conflict with each other or are mutually exclusive. It suggests a desire for impossible outcomes or unrealistic expectations where one tries to have the best of both worlds.
  • too close to call The idiom "too close to call" means a situation where it is difficult or impossible to determine who is winning or has the advantage. It often refers to a close competition or election where the outcome is uncertain, and the margin between the competitors is minimal or negligible.
  • didn't care too hard The idiom "didn't care too hard" means to exert minimal effort or not put much enthusiasm or concern into something. It implies a lack of interest or indifference towards a particular task, goal, or situation.
  • have one too many The idiom "have one too many" means to consume more alcoholic beverages than one can handle, leading to intoxication or drunkenness.
  • spread too thin The idiom "spread too thin" refers to a situation where a person, organization, or resource is overextended and trying to do too many things simultaneously, resulting in a decrease in effectiveness or quality. It implies that the person or entity has exceeded their capacity or ability to adequately handle all the tasks or responsibilities they have taken on.
  • have too much of a good thing The idiom "have too much of a good thing" means to have an excessive or surplus amount of something that is usually enjoyable or advantageous. It suggests that an excess of something positive can actually become negative or undesirable.
  • (it's) too bad The idiom "(it's) too bad" is used to express sympathy or disappointment about a situation or outcome. It indicates that something unfortunate or regrettable has occurred.
  • (that's) too bad The idiom "(that's) too bad" is an expression used to convey sympathy or regret about an unfortunate situation or outcome. It expresses disappointment or sadness over something that has happened or will happen.
  • too close for comfort The idiom "too close for comfort" refers to a situation that is uncomfortably near, dangerous, or threatening. It implies that the proximity or intimacy is unsettling, causing discomfort or anxiety.
  • be too good to be true The idiom "be too good to be true" means that something or someone appears so perfect, remarkable, or beneficial that it seems unlikely or unbelievable. It implies a sense of suspicion or doubt towards the genuineness or authenticity of the situation or person.
  • push too far The idiom "push too far" means to exceed the acceptable or reasonable limit or boundary, often resulting in negative consequences. It refers to going beyond what is considered appropriate or tolerable in a particular situation, often causing discomfort, anger, or resistance from others.
  • be in too deep The idiom "be in too deep" typically means that someone is involved or committed to a situation or an activity to such an extent that it becomes difficult or impossible to extricate themselves. It often implies a sense of being overwhelmed, overwhelmed, or in over one's head.
  • know only too well The idiom "know only too well" means to have personal experience and understanding of something, typically a difficult or unpleasant situation or feeling. It implies a deep familiarity with a particular matter, often suggesting that the speaker has faced or encountered it before and therefore understands it all too clearly.
  • too funny for words The idiom "too funny for words" means that something is extremely funny or humorous, to the point where it leaves you speechless or unable to describe it adequately. It suggests that the laughter or amusement it evokes is so intense that words fail to do justice in expressing its comedic value.
  • too for words The idiom "too for words" means that something is so extraordinary, astonishing, or impressive that there are no words to adequately describe or express it. It implies that the speaker is left speechless or overwhelmed by the magnitude or beauty of something.
  • to put too fine a point on it The idiom "to put too fine a point on it" means to be excessively specific, precise, or detailed when expressing something, often to the point of being blunt or insensitive. It implies that the speaker is being overly meticulous or pedantic in their explanation, perhaps disregarding the nuances or emotions involved.
  • put too fine a point on The idiom "put too fine a point on" means to be excessively precise or detailed about something, often to the point of causing discomfort or offending others. It suggests that someone is being overly specific or explicit, potentially lacking tact or sensitivity in their communication.
  • not to put too fine a point on it The idiom "not to put too fine a point on it" means to state something directly or clearly without using excessive or unnecessary details. It suggests that the speaker wants to be precise or blunt in their statement without being overly graphic or elaborate.
  • It is never too late to learn. The idiom "It is never too late to learn" means that there is no age limit or deadline for acquiring new knowledge or skills. It emphasizes that one can always continue learning and improving, regardless of their stage in life.
  • You give up too easy The idiom "You give up too easy" suggests that a person tends to surrender or quit too easily when faced with challenges or difficulties. It implies that the individual lacks perseverance, determination, or the willingness to endure hardships to accomplish their goals.
  • have cake and eat it too The phrase "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting the benefits or advantages of two conflicting options or outcomes without having to choose one over the other or experiencing any negative consequences. It refers to the desire to enjoy two things simultaneously that are mutually exclusive or contradictory.
  • have too many irons in the fire The idiom "have too many irons in the fire" means to have too many tasks or projects to handle simultaneously, which can potentially lead to being overwhelmed or having a lack of focus on any one particular task. It suggests being involved in too many commitments or responsibilities, making it difficult to manage them effectively.
  • have too much on one's plate The idiom "have too much on one's plate" means to have more tasks, responsibilities, or obligations than one is able to handle effectively or comfortably. It implies being overwhelmed or having a heavy workload.
  • Not (too) much,
  • have finger in too many pies The idiom "have a finger in too many pies" means to be involved in or have influence over too many different activities or projects simultaneously. It refers to someone who is spread too thin or overly involved in various things, often to the detriment of their effectiveness or focus.
  • none too sth The idiom "none too sth" is used to describe a condition or state in which something is not as desired or expected. It implies that the quantity or degree of something is insufficient or inadequate, often suggesting a negative or unsatisfactory outcome. For example, "He was none too pleased with the results," means he was not pleased or satisfied with the results.
  • make (too) much of sm or sth To "make (too) much of someone or something" means to overemphasize or attach excessive importance or attention to a particular person or thing. It implies that someone is giving unnecessary significance or exaggerating the significance of the person or thing being discussed.
  • It is never too late to mend. The saying "It is never too late to mend" means that there is always an opportunity to correct past mistakes or improve oneself, regardless of how much time has passed. It emphasizes the belief that it is never too late to make positive changes or seek redemption in one's actions or behavior.
  • have too much on plate The idiom "have too much on one's plate" refers to being overloaded or overwhelmed by tasks, responsibilities, or problems. It indicates that a person has a lot to deal with or manage, often to the point where it becomes difficult or impossible to handle everything effectively.
  • Too many cooks The idiom "too many cooks" refers to a situation where there are too many people involved in a task or decision-making process, which can lead to confusion, inefficiency, or a lack of coordination. It suggests that when too many individuals are involved, the overall outcome or progress may be negatively affected.
  • too many chiefs The idiom "too many chiefs" refers to a situation where there are too many individuals in a leadership or decision-making role, resulting in a lack of coordination, confusion, or inefficiency. It implies that there are multiple people issuing orders, giving instructions, or asserting authority, without a clear hierarchy or organized structure, which ultimately hampers progress or productivity.
  • have one's finger in too many pies The idiom "have one's finger in too many pies" refers to a situation where a person is involved in or trying to involve themselves in too many different activities or projects at the same time, often to the detriment of their ability to effectively manage or focus on any of them. It suggests spreading oneself too thin and not being able to give proper attention or dedication to any specific endeavor.
  • You're too much! The idiom "You're too much!" is an expression used to convey that someone's actions, behavior, or personality are exceeding what is considered normal, expected, or acceptable in a humorous or affectionate way. It is often used to express amusement, admiration, or surprise towards someone's extraordinary qualities or over-the-top nature.
  • too much The idiom "too much" refers to an excessive or an extreme amount of something, usually beyond what is necessary or reasonable. It suggests that a particular quantity or quality exceeds the desired or acceptable level, resulting in a negative or unfavorable situation.
  • That's too much! The idiom "That's too much!" is an expression used to convey that something is excessive or more than what is reasonable or necessary. It generally implies that the quantity, price, intensity, or any other aspect of something is more than what is considered acceptable or desirable.
  • take too much on The idiom "take too much on" refers to the act of accepting or assuming an excessive amount of responsibilities, tasks, or obligations, beyond one's capacity to handle efficiently or effectively.
  • too big for one's breeches The idiom "too big for one's breeches" means that someone is behaving arrogantly or with an exaggerated sense of self-importance, considering themselves more accomplished or superior than they actually are. It suggests that the person's self-perception is inflated beyond their actual abilities or status.
  • be (one) too many for someone The idiom "be (one) too many for someone" refers to a situation where someone is overwhelmed or unable to handle a particular person, task, or situation. It implies that the person or thing in question is too much to handle or to cope with.
  • only too "Only too" is an idiomatic expression used to emphasize a strong agreement or willingness to do something. It suggests that the speaker is more than willing or eager to engage in a particular action or situation.
  • too cool for school The idiom "too cool for school" refers to someone who behaves or presents themselves as being superior, confident, or detached, often with an air of indifference or nonchalance, particularly in situations involving education, authority, or societal norms. This phrase is typically used to describe individuals who appear uninterested or unaffected by conventional rules, expectations, or social pressures.
  • be too late The idiom "be too late" means to miss or not have the opportunity to act, speak, or do something at the appropriate or desired time, resulting in an unfavorable outcome or missed chance. It suggests that a particular moment or opportunity has passed and can no longer be seized.
  • too late The idiom "too late" means that the opportunity, chance, or action that should have been taken has passed or is no longer possible. It indicates that the appropriate time has already elapsed, and further actions or efforts would be futile or irrelevant.
  • life’s too short The idiom "life's too short" means that life is too brief or transient to waste time or energy on negative emotions, grudges, or insignificant matters. It emphasizes the importance of making the most out of life and prioritizing meaningful experiences and relationships.
  • a (damn, etc.) sight too good, etc. The idiom "a (damn, etc.) sight too good, etc." is an expression used to indicate that something is significantly better, larger, or more impressive than expected or desired. It often conveys a sense of surprise or disbelief regarding the exceptional quality, quantity, or magnitude of something. The phrase is typically used in informal contexts to emphasize an excessive or extraordinary degree.
  • carry/take something too far The idiom "carry/take something too far" means to exaggerate, overdo, or overextend a particular action, behavior, or concept beyond the acceptable or reasonable limit. It implies going beyond what is deemed appropriate or necessary, often resulting in negative consequences or outcomes.
  • be/get too big for your boots The idiom "be/get too big for your boots" generally means to have an inflated sense of importance or superiority, often due to achieving some level of success or power. It implies someone who becomes arrogant, overconfident, or pompous, exceeding the appropriate or fair level of self-esteem.
  • you can’t be too careful The idiom "you can't be too careful" is used to express the idea that it is important to exercise caution and not take unnecessary risks in order to avoid any potential harm or negative consequences. It emphasizes the need for being extra cautious or vigilant in various situations.
  • too many balls in the air The idiom "too many balls in the air" refers to a situation where a person has a lot of tasks or responsibilities to handle simultaneously, often to the point that it becomes overwhelming or difficult to manage efficiently. It implies that the person has taken on more than they can handle or is juggling numerous commitments, resulting in potential chaos or decreased effectiveness.
  • this too shall pass (away) The idiom "this too shall pass (away)" means that no matter how difficult or challenging a situation may be, it will eventually come to an end. It emphasizes the temporariness of hardships and encourages patience and optimism.
  • not too bad The idiom "not too bad" is used to describe something that is satisfactory or acceptable, though it may not be outstanding or excellent. It typically suggests a degree of modest praise or a lack of disappointment.
  • all too (something) The idiom "all too (something)" is used to convey the idea that something is more undesirable, frequent, extreme, or excessive than desired or anticipated. It emphasizes an excessive or negative quality of the described situation or experience.
  • too big for (one's) boots The idiom "too big for (one's) boots" refers to someone who is behaving arrogantly or showing an inflated sense of self-importance, often thinking they are more capable or important than they actually are.
  • a bridge too far The idiom "a bridge too far" refers to a situation where someone or something attempts to exceed their limitations or capabilities, often resulting in failure or negative consequences. It suggests reaching or aiming for a goal or objective that is unrealistic, unattainable, or beyond one's reach. The phrase originated from the title of the 1974 movie "A Bridge Too Far," which portrays an unsuccessful military operation during World War II that attempted to capture several bridges in the Netherlands.
  • too big for your britches The idiom "too big for your britches" refers to someone who is arrogant, pompous, or self-important, often exhibiting excessive confidence or an inflated sense of their own abilities or importance. It suggests that the person's ego has grown beyond what is appropriate or deserved.
  • too many cooks in the kitchen The idiom "too many cooks in the kitchen" means that there are too many people involved in a task or project, causing confusion, inefficiency, or chaos. It implies that having too many individuals trying to manage or contribute to a situation can hinder progress or result in conflicting ideas and actions.
  • eat one's cake and have it, too The idiom "eat one's cake and have it, too" refers to a situation where someone wants to have or enjoy the benefits of two contradictory options simultaneously or to have or achieve incompatible things at the same time. It highlights the impossibility of satisfying conflicting desires or obtaining all the advantages without any consequences.
  • can too The idiom "can too" is an informal expression typically used to assert or affirm one's ability or capability in response to a challenge or doubt. It is often used to counter someone's disbelief or skepticism.
  • you can have too much of a good thing The idiom "you can have too much of a good thing" means that even something enjoyable or beneficial in moderation can become unpleasant or harmful when taken to excess.
  • you can't be too careful The idiom "you can't be too careful" means that it is always important to be cautious and take extra measures to prevent any potential problems or risks. It emphasizes the need for increased caution and the belief that it is better to be overly careful than to take unnecessary risks.
  • carry too far The idiom "carry too far" means to exceed the acceptable or reasonable limit, to exaggerate or overextend something to an excessive degree. It implies going beyond what is necessary or appropriate, often resulting in negative consequences or unintended outcomes.
  • too rich for someone’s blood The idiom "too rich for someone's blood" means that something is too expensive or costly for someone's budget or financial means. It suggests that the item or situation is beyond what the person can afford or is willing to spend.
  • too many chefs in the kitchen The idiom "too many chefs in the kitchen" means that when there are too many people involved in decision-making or giving instructions, it leads to confusion, inefficiency, or chaos. It suggests that having too many people involved can hinder the completion of a task or project effectively.
  • too clever by half The idiom "too clever by half" refers to someone who is overly confident in their intelligence or abilities. It suggests that the person’s attempts to appear clever or outsmart others often result in misjudgment, overcomplication, or an overly complex approach that hinders their success or effectiveness. In other words, they tend to be excessively clever or cunning to the point of being counterproductive.
  • too close/high, etc. for comfort The idiom "too close/high, etc. for comfort" means being too near or at a level that causes uneasiness, worry, or anxiety. It implies that a situation or proximity has crossed a threshold where it becomes unsettling or distressing for someone.
  • too for comfort The idiom "too close for comfort" means a situation or experience that makes someone feel worried, anxious, or uneasy because it is potentially dangerous or threatening, or because it involves being too intimate, personal, or close for comfort. It implies that something is beyond a person's comfort zone or crosses a boundary, making them feel uneasy or concerned.
  • too many cooks spoil the soup The idiom "too many cooks spoil the soup" means that when too many people are involved in a task or decision-making process, it becomes chaotic and ineffective. It suggests that when there are too many individuals trying to control or contribute to a task, the end result is often of lower quality or contradictory due to conflicting ideas or actions.
  • pay too dearly for (one's) whistle The idiom "pay too dearly for (one's) whistle" refers to someone paying a high price or suffering significant consequences for pursuing a particular desire or ambition. It implies that the individual pursued something at great cost or effort, only to realize later that it was not worth the sacrifices made.
  • too long; didn't read The phrase "too long; didn't read" is an informal and colloquial internet acronym commonly abbreviated as "TL;DR." It is used to express a summary or brief version of a lengthy piece of text or content that the person did not have the patience or time to read entirely. It can also convey disinterest or a lack of motivation to engage with lengthy information.
  • a sight too good, too much, etc. The idiom "a sight too good, too much, etc." is used to express astonishment, surprise, or overwhelming appreciation for something that exceeds one's expectations or is extraordinary in a positive way. It implies that whatever is being described is beyond what is considered normal or usual, often in a way that is almost unbelievable or remarkable.
  • only too glad, ready, etc. The idiom "only too glad, ready, etc." means to be extremely willing or eager to do something. It emphasizes a strong and enthusiastic desire or willingness to help, assist, or participate in a particular task or activity.
  • too funny, sad, etc. for words The idiom "too funny, sad, etc. for words" is used to express a strong feeling or emotion that is difficult to articulate or describe. It suggests that the situation or event in question is so extreme or extraordinary that it surpasses the capacity of language to capture its full impact.
  • too far north The idiom "too far north" typically refers to a situation where someone has gone beyond an acceptable limit, boundary, or tolerance level. It implies that someone or something has crossed a line or become excessive in some way. It is often used to indicate that someone's behavior or actions have become extreme, unreasonable, or unacceptable.
  • put too fine a point on it The idiom "put too fine a point on it" means to be excessively precise or detailed in explaining or emphasizing a matter, often to the point of being overly literal or pedantic. It implies that the speaker is overly focused on a minor or insignificant aspect of a situation, instead of understanding the broader context or meaning.
  • irons in the fire, too many The idiom "irons in the fire, too many" refers to having too many tasks, projects, or commitments ongoing simultaneously or in progress. It suggests being overwhelmed or overloaded with responsibilities or obligations.
  • be too many for The idiom "be too many for" means to overwhelm or overpower someone or something due to their inability to handle or cope with a situation, task, or challenge. It suggests that the person or thing is faced with more than they can handle or manage effectively.
  • only too (something) The idiom "only too (something)" means that one is willing or eager to do or experience something, often to an excessive degree or in a negative sense. It conveys a strong desire or enthusiasm for what is being mentioned.
  • a good job/thing too The idiom "a good job/thing too" is typically used to express agreement or affirmation about a previous statement or piece of information. It implies that the mentioned job or thing is indeed good, suitable, or appropriate in the given context. It emphasizes approval or satisfaction with the outcome or solution being discussed.
  • have had one too many The idiom "have had one too many" typically refers to being intoxicated or drunk, implying that someone has consumed more alcohol than they can handle or that it has negatively affected their behavior or judgement.
  • too (something) by half The idiom "too (something) by half" is used to emphasize an excessive or exaggerated amount or quality of something. It suggests that the level or degree of a particular characteristic or attribute is beyond what is necessary or desirable. It implies that the person or thing being described is excessively or overly intense, extreme, or extreme in a negative sense.
  • wear too many hats The idiom "wear too many hats" means to have or take on too many responsibilities or roles simultaneously. It implies that a person is attempting to handle multiple tasks or jobs, often beyond their capacity or expertise. This can lead to stress, reduced effectiveness, or difficulty in managing everything adequately.
  • spread (something or oneself) too thin The idiom "spread (something or oneself) too thin" means to divide one's time, resources, or energy among too many activities or responsibilities, resulting in an inability to effectively accomplish any of them. It refers to the act of stretching oneself or something too thin, like spreading a thin layer of butter on too much bread, which leads to ineffectiveness or lack of focus.
  • too (something) for comfort The idiom "too (something) for comfort" is used to describe a situation or action that makes someone uncomfortable or uneasy because it goes beyond what is considered acceptable, safe, or normal. It suggests that a certain aspect or level of something exceeds a person's comfort zone or raises concern.
  • be too many for (someone) The idiom "be too many for (someone)" means to overwhelm or overpower someone mentally, emotionally, or physically due to the excessive demands, challenges, or difficulties of a situation or task. It implies that a person is unable to cope or handle what is required or expected of them.
  • be too much (for one) The idiom "be too much (for one)" means that something is overwhelming or more than one can handle. It refers to a situation or task that is too difficult or intense for a person to manage alone.
  • too hot to hold (someone) The idiom "too hot to hold (someone)" generally means that someone is so popular or in high demand that they are difficult to control, contain, or manage. It can refer to a person who possesses an overwhelming level of charm, attractiveness, talent, or influence, causing them to attract a lot of attention and admiration. This idiom implies that the person is in great demand and may be challenging to keep under control or manage due to their desirable qualities.
  • too hot to hold you The idiom "too hot to hold you" implies that someone or something is extremely attractive or desirable, to the point where it becomes difficult to resist or control one's feelings towards them. It suggests intense physical or emotional allure that is almost overwhelming.
  • too hot for (one) The idiom "too hot for (one)" means a situation or task that is too challenging, difficult, or intense for someone to handle or endure. It implies that the person is overwhelmed or unable to cope with the situation or task.
  • too hot for somebody The idiom "too hot for somebody" means that something is too difficult, challenging, or intense for someone to handle or cope with. It implies that the person in question is overwhelmed or unable to handle the situation or task at hand.
  • carry (something) too far The idiom "carry (something) too far" means to go to an excessive or extreme extent with something, often resulting in negative consequences or overstepping boundaries. It implies that someone has taken a particular action, belief, or situation beyond what is reasonable or acceptable.
  • know too much The idiom "know too much" refers to a situation where someone possesses knowledge or information that is sensitive, confidential, or could potentially cause trouble or harm if revealed or acted upon. It implies that knowing certain things can be burdensome or dangerous.
  • It is never too late The idiom "It is never too late" means that there is no specific or fixed time limit for starting or achieving something. It suggests that one should not feel discouraged or limited by their age or circumstances and can still pursue goals or aspirations regardless of their current situation.

Similar spelling words for TOO

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