How Do You Spell YOUR?

Pronunciation: [jˈɔː] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "your" may seem straightforward, but there are a few tricky aspects to it. Firstly, the "y" is pronounced as /j/ in IPA phonetic transcription, which is a palatal approximant sound. Secondly, the "ou" in "your" is pronounced as /ʊ/, which is a short "u" sound. Lastly, the "r" at the end is often not pronounced in American English. So when saying "your," remember to pronounce the "y" as /j/, the "ou" as /ʊ/, and to consider whether or not to pronounce the final "r."

YOUR Meaning and Definition

  1. "Your" is a pronoun that is used to indicate possessions or belongings that are associated with or belonging to the person or people being addressed. It is the possessive form of "you," the second-person pronoun. The word is often used to establish ownership or possession of something by the person being spoken to or referred to.

    In terms of usage, "your" is primarily used in addressing individuals or groups directly. It serves to refer to things, qualities, or relationships possessed by the person being addressed. For example, "Is this your book?" implies that the book belongs to the person being spoken to.

    Additionally, "your" can also be used to show relationships or qualities possessed by the person being addressed. For instance, "I appreciate your kindness" implies that the speaker values and acknowledges the kindness shown by the person being addressed.

    It is important to note that "your" also signifies a sense of familiarity and personal connection, establishing a relationship between the speaker and the person being spoken to. This pronoun is commonly used in formal and informal contexts, including both written and spoken language, and constitutes an essential element in effectively communicating possessive relationships.

Top Common Misspellings for YOUR *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for YOUR

Etymology of YOUR

The word "your" originated from Middle English, specifically from the possessive form of "ye" or "you", primarily used in the plural sense. In Old English, the second-person subject pronoun was "ge" or "eōw", which gradually changed to "ye" and eventually "you". The possessive form of "you" was constructed by adding "-es" or "-s" to indicate possession, similar to how other nouns were formed. Over time, "your" emerged as the possessive form of "you", and it has been used in that sense in modern English.

Idioms with the word YOUR

  • at the back of your mind The idiom "at the back of your mind" refers to something that is present in one's thoughts or awareness, although not at the forefront or immediately considered. It suggests that there is a subconscious or lingering awareness of something, even if it is not actively thought about or addressed.
  • about/on your person The idiom "about/on your person" means to have something in one's possession or carried with oneself at all times, typically referring to objects or items of importance or necessity.
  • do/try your level best The idiom "do/try your level best" means to make the greatest or utmost effort possible, giving complete dedication and striving to achieve the highest possible standard or result in a given task or situation. It suggests giving one's all and leaving no stone unturned in pursuit of success or excellence.
  • make sth/it worth your while The idiom "make something worth your while" means to ensure that the effort, time, or resources invested in doing something yield a satisfactory or significant outcome or reward. It suggests that the potential benefits or advantages of engaging in an activity, completing a task, or taking on a responsibility should outweigh the associated costs or effort.
  • from the corner of your eye The idiom "from the corner of your eye" refers to seeing something or being aware of something without directly looking at it. It implies peripheral or indirect observation, often suggesting a vague or secondary awareness of something happening or someone present.
  • talk through your hat The idiom "talk through your hat" means to speak about something without having sufficient knowledge or understanding of the topic, resulting in making false or exaggerated statements. It refers to someone expressing opinions or information that they do not fully comprehend or have accurate information about.
  • have your eye on somebody/something The idiom "have your eye on somebody/something" means to be watching or closely monitoring someone or something with interest or intent, often with the intention of obtaining or achieving it. It implies a focused attention or desire towards a particular person or object.
  • a blot on your escutcheon The idiom "a blot on your escutcheon" means that someone has done something that brings shame, dishonor, or discredit to themselves or their family's reputation. In heraldry, an escutcheon signifies a shield or a family's coat of arms, metaphorically representing their honor and lineage. A blot on the escutcheon implies a tarnish or stain that diminishes the individual's or family's standing or integrity.
  • catch your death The idiom "catch your death" means to become very cold or to be exposed to extreme cold weather conditions that could potentially lead to illness, usually used in a warning or concern for someone not dressed appropriately for the weather.
  • loosen your grip/hold The idiom "loosen your grip/hold" means to relax or release control over something, allowing it to be more flexible or giving others more freedom.
  • prove your mettle The idiom "prove your mettle" means to demonstrate or show one's true capability, strength, or worth, especially in challenging or demanding situations. It refers to overcoming obstacles or difficult circumstances and showcasing one's skills, resilience, or character to prove one's abilities or legitimacy.
  • your own worst enemy The idiom "your own worst enemy" refers to a person who unknowingly or intentionally causes harm or obstructs their own progress and success through their actions, behaviors, or decisions, often due to their own self-destructive tendencies, lack of self-awareness, or detrimental choices.
  • drop your trousers The idiom "drop your trousers" typically means to reveal one's true intentions, motivations or secrets, often in a confrontational or honest manner. It can also refer to being fully vulnerable or transparent in a situation.
  • your name in lights The idiom "your name in lights" refers to achieving fame, recognition, or notoriety. It implies that someone's name has become well-known and prominently displayed, often associated with success, stardom, or widespread attention. It is commonly used in reference to celebrities, performers, or individuals who have achieved a high level of public visibility and prominence in their field.
  • get your just deserts The idiom "get your just deserts" means to receive the appropriate punishment or reward for one's actions, usually implying that someone receives what they deserve, often in a negative or punitive sense.
  • be/get run/rushed off your feet The idiom "be/get run/rushed off your feet" is a figurative expression that means being extremely busy or overwhelmed with work or tasks. It suggests a state of being constantly on the move and having little time for rest or leisure. It implies being inundated with responsibilities and feeling overwhelmed by the demanding pace or workload.
  • eat your words The idiom "eat your words" means to admit that one was wrong or retract what one has said, typically in a humiliating or embarrassed manner.
  • drop/fall into your lap The idiom "drop/fall into your lap" refers to something unexpected or fortunate that happens to someone without any effort or planning on their part. It describes a situation where something desirable or advantageous seemingly appears effortlessly or conveniently, as if it were handed to them without any effort on their part.
  • eat your heart out The idiom "eat your heart out" is an expression used to convey a strong feeling of pride or satisfaction, often in a boastful or taunting manner. It implies that the speaker is superior or has achieved something remarkable, causing others to feel envious or regretful.
  • laugh up your sleeve (at somebody/something) The idiom "laugh up your sleeve (at somebody/something)" means to secretly or discreetly find something amusing or entertaining, usually at the expense of someone or something else. It suggests a hidden or suppressed laughter that is not openly expressed.
  • (have, get, want, etc.) your pound of flesh The idiom "(have, get, want, etc.) your pound of flesh" is derived from William Shakespeare's play "The Merchant of Venice." In the play, the character Shylock demands a pound of flesh from Antonio as collateral for a loan. The phrase refers to someone's insistence on getting what they are owed, often at the expense or detriment of others. It implies an unyielding pursuit of one's due, even if it involves exacting revenge or causing harm to another person.
  • feast your eyes on sth/sb The idiom "feast your eyes on something/someone" means to look at or observe something or someone with great pleasure, often because they are visually appealing or impressive. It implies taking great delight and enjoyment in the sight or appearance of the subject.
  • turn/spin on your heel The idiom "turn/spin on your heel" typically means to turn quickly and abruptly, usually with an air of defiance or anger. It refers to the action of pivoting on the ball of the foot, using the heel as the axis of rotation.
  • you pays your money and you takes your chance/choice The idiom "you pays your money and you takes your chance/choice" means that once you make a decision or take a risk, you must accept the consequences or outcomes that come with it. It suggests that you have chosen a particular course of action, and now you must face whatever results or circumstances arise as a result.
  • between your ears The idiom "between your ears" refers to someone's mind or intelligence. It suggests that the knowledge, understanding, or ability to think lies within a person's brain or mental capacity. It is often used to emphasize the importance of thought, reasoning, or intellect.
  • off the top of your head The idiom "off the top of your head" means to give a response or answer without much thought or preparation. It refers to providing information or making a guess based on one's immediate knowledge or intuition rather than thoroughly considering the subject.
  • get your hooks into somebody The idiom "get your hooks into somebody" means to exert control, influence, or manipulate someone in a way that makes it difficult for them to separate themselves or break free from that person's grip or hold. It implies a strong, often negative, hold on someone's attention, emotions, or actions.
  • do sth with one hand tied behind your back The idiom "do something with one hand tied behind your back" means to accomplish a task or activity with ease or without difficulty, despite facing some kind of hindrance or disadvantage. It implies that the task is so simple that even without using all available resources or exerting maximum effort, success is still easily achievable.
  • meet your eye The idiom "meet your eye" refers to making eye contact or catching someone's attention through eye contact, typically in a direct or forthright manner. It suggests a connection or mutual understanding established through visual interaction.
  • be your own man/woman/person The idiom "be your own man/woman/person" means to be independent, self-reliant, and resolute in making decisions or choices, without being influenced or controlled by others. It implies the ability to think and act freely, according to one's own beliefs, values, and interests, rather than conforming to societal expectations or following the opinions of others.
  • have something to your credit The idiom "have something to your credit" means that someone has accomplished or achieved something noteworthy or impressive. It signifies that the person has completed a particular task, achieved a positive result, or has something notable that can be attributed to their name. It can also be used to acknowledge and recognize someone's achievements or accomplishments in a specific field or area.
  • punch above your weight The idiom "punch above your weight" refers to a situation where someone or something surpasses or exceeds what is expected or achievable for their level of power, influence, or ability. It implies outperforming or exceeding one's usual capabilities or competing with someone or something stronger, larger, or more experienced.
  • beyond/outside your ken The idiom "beyond/outside your ken" means something that is beyond or outside of your understanding, knowledge, or familiarity. It refers to a topic, concept, or idea that is outside of your range of comprehension or expertise.
  • break your neck to do something The idiom "break your neck to do something" means to exert a great amount of effort or work very hard to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies a willingness to go to great lengths, often sacrificing comfort or personal well-being, in order to accomplish something.
  • a monkey on your back The idiom "a monkey on your back" refers to a problem, burden, or addiction that one carries or struggles with continuously. It alludes to the image of a person having a monkey clinging to their back, which represents the persistent and troublesome nature of the issue at hand.
  • lick/smack your lips The idiom "lick/smack your lips" means to show or express great pleasure, excitement or anticipation, usually in response to something desirable, delicious, or satisfying. It signifies the gratification one feels when looking forward to a pleasant experience or indulging in something delightful.
  • be set in your ways The idiom "be set in your ways" means to be accustomed to a particular way of thinking or behaving, and resistant to change or new ideas. It refers to a person who has established fixed habits, opinions, or routines, and is often unwilling to make adjustments, adapt, or try new things.
  • put/place your faith in sth/sb The idiom "put/place your faith in something/somebody" means to trust, have confidence, or rely on something or someone. It refers to the act of believing in the reliability, capabilities, or the positive outcome associated with a certain situation or person. It involves relying on something or someone to fulfill one's hopes or expectations.
  • dip a/your toe in (the water) The idiom "dip a/your toe in (the water)" means to get a small or initial experience or exposure to something new or unfamiliar before fully committing to it. It implies testing or trying out a situation to gauge comfort or assess the potential risks or benefits.
  • keep you on the edge of your chair The idiom "keep you on the edge of your chair" means to engage or captivate someone's attention so intensely that they remain highly interested, excited, or anxious about what will happen next. It refers to a situation, event, or story that is extremely gripping or suspenseful, causing one to be physically or emotionally at the edge of their seat, anticipating the outcome.
  • feel something in your bones The idiom "feel something in your bones" means to have a strong intuition or sense about something, typically without any logical or tangible evidence. It implies having a deep or innate feeling about a situation or prediction, often suggesting a strong conviction or certainty.
  • have a good run for your money The idiom "have a good run for your money" means to derive value or satisfaction equivalent to the amount of effort, time, or money one has invested in something. It expresses the idea that even if one does not achieve the desired outcome, they have still obtained a worthwhile experience or reward.
  • not be able to do something to save your life The idiom "not be able to do something to save your life" means to be completely incapable of performing a specific task, activity, or skill, even under the most dire circumstances. It emphasizes a complete lack of skill, expertise, or competence in a particular area, so much so that one's inability to perform the task is compared to being unable to save one's own life.
  • have your cross to bear The idiom "have your cross to bear" means to have a significant burden or responsibility to carry or endure. It derives from the Christian story of Jesus carrying the cross to his crucifixion, symbolizing personal sacrifices or suffering that one must live with. The idiom refers to any challenging situation or duty that an individual must face and deal with throughout their life.
  • be rushed/run off your feet The idiom "be rushed/run off your feet" means to be extremely busy, overwhelmed, or continuously occupied with various tasks or responsibilities. It suggests a state of being excessively busy and not having enough time for oneself or to complete all the tasks at hand.
  • out of your gourd The idiom "out of your gourd" is used to describe someone who is behaving in a crazy, irrational, or eccentric manner. It implies that the person's behavior is so unusual that they must be mentally deranged or out of their mind, comparable to someone whose brain has been replaced with a gourd (a type of fruit or vegetable).
  • stick it/(something) up your ass! The idiom "stick it/(something) up your ass!" is an offensive and vulgar expression used to convey extreme hostility, disregard, or contempt towards someone or something. It is an aggressive way of telling someone to reject or discard something and is intended to offend and provoke anger or irritation.
  • have sth in your pocket The idiom "have something in your pocket" means to have a resource, plan, or advantage that can be used to your benefit or advantage, typically in a situation that requires quick thinking or problem-solving. It implies being prepared or having a backup plan that can give you an edge or provide a solution when needed.
  • have method in your madness The idiom "have method in your madness" means that although someone's actions or behavior may seem strange, there is a hidden purpose or logic behind it. It suggests that there is a deliberate or strategic plan behind their seemingly eccentric or unconventional ways.
  • your face falls The idiom "your face falls" refers to a sudden expression of disappointment, sadness, or disbelief that is visible on someone's face. It signifies a moment when someone's initial excitement or optimism quickly changes to an expression of discouragement or disappointment.
  • claw your way back, into something, out of something, to something, etc. The idiom "claw your way back" refers to persistently and determinedly struggling or fighting to regain a position, success, or control that has been lost or compromised. It often implies that the process is difficult and requires great effort, as if one were using their claws to climb back up. The phrase can be used in various contexts, such as working hard to regain financial stability, recovering from a setback, or reestablishing a reputation or relationship.
  • cover your ass, butt, backside, etc. The idiom "cover your ass, butt, backside, etc." refers to taking precautions or measures to protect oneself from potential negative consequences or criticism. It implies being cautious, thorough, or defensive in a situation to avoid any blame, accusation, or trouble. It is commonly used in informal or colloquial contexts.
  • have sth on your hands The idiom "have something on your hands" refers to having a problem, responsibility, or situation that requires one's attention or involvement. It implies that someone is dealing with a difficult or challenging matter that they must handle or solve. It suggests a sense of something burdensome or time-consuming that needs to be addressed.
  • put your finger on The idiom "put your finger on" means to identify or understand something exactly or accurately. It refers to the ability to pinpoint or recognize a particular thing or issue without any uncertainty.
  • split your sides (laughing/with laughter) The idiom "split your sides (laughing/with laughter)" refers to an instance or situation that is extremely funny, causing someone to laugh uncontrollably and so intensely that it feels like their sides (ribs) might literally split or hurt from the laughter.
  • get your teeth into The idiom "get your teeth into" means to thoroughly engage in or tackle a task or activity with enthusiasm and determination. It implies taking a firm grip or hold on something and committing oneself to doing it properly and with great effort.
  • be at your wits' end To be at your wits' end means to be extremely frustrated, confused, or desperate due to being unable to think of a solution or to cope with a challenging situation.
  • off your game The idiom "off your game" means to be performing or functioning at a lower level of skill or ability than usual. It is often used to describe someone who is not performing up to their usual standards or experiencing a temporary decline in their performance or abilities.
  • You've made your bed The idiom "You've made your bed" means that a person is being held responsible for their actions or decisions, particularly if those actions or decisions have resulted in negative consequences. It implies that the person has created their own situation and must now accept the outcomes or face the consequences of their choices.
  • before your time The idiom "before your time" is used to refer to something that happened or existed before someone was born or became old enough to be aware of it. It suggests that the person is not familiar with the specific event, era, or cultural reference being mentioned because they were not around or too young at that time.
  • cast your mind back (to something) The idiom "cast your mind back (to something)" means to make an effort to remember or recall something from the past.
  • your better nature The idiom "your better nature" refers to the higher or more noble qualities, virtues, or instincts that a person possesses. It implies acting with kindness, compassion, generosity, moral integrity, and making decisions that reflect one's best qualities. It often suggests choosing to do the right thing or showing empathy towards others.
  • have your say The idiom "have your say" means to express one's opinion or to participate in a discussion or decision-making process. It implies having the opportunity or right to speak, share thoughts, or contribute to a matter.
  • keep/put your nose to the grindstone The idiom "keep/put your nose to the grindstone" means to work diligently and persistently on a task or project, putting in a great amount of effort and focus. It suggests staying committed and dedicated to achieving a goal regardless of challenges or difficulties. The phrase is often used to encourage someone to continue their hard work or to emphasize the importance of staying focused and not getting distracted.
  • you’ve made your bed and you must lie in/on it The idiom "you’ve made your bed and you must lie in/on it" means that someone has made a decision or taken an action, and they must now face the consequences, whether positive or negative, of their choices. It implies that one is responsible for dealing with the outcomes of their own actions, even if they result in undesirable circumstances.
  • your blood's worth bottling The idiom "your blood's worth bottling" is a compliment that is used to describe someone as being exceptionally valuable, remarkable, or exceptional. It suggests that a person's qualities or characteristics are so unique and worthy that their blood, metaphorically speaking, should be preserved in a bottle as a precious and valuable substance.
  • with your tongue in your cheek The idiom "with your tongue in your cheek" is typically used to describe someone who is speaking in a sarcastic or ironic manner. It suggests that the person does not actually mean what they are saying and is instead employing humor or wit to express their point. It can also imply that there is an underlying subtext or hidden meaning in their words.
  • clip your wings The idiom "clip your wings" means to limit or restrict someone's freedom or ability to do something, often to prevent them from being too ambitious, adventurous, or independent. It can also refer to suppressing or curbing someone's aspirations, talents, or opportunities.
  • open your heart The idiom "open your heart" means to share your feelings, emotions, or personal experiences with someone, often by being honest, vulnerable, or receptive to their thoughts and emotions. It is about being receptive, understanding, and compassionate towards others and removing any barriers or reservations that may prevent genuine connection and understanding.
  • have butterflies (in your stomach) The idiom "have butterflies (in your stomach)" means to experience a feeling of nervousness, excitement, or anxiety, usually in anticipation of a specific event or situation. It is often used to describe the fluttering or uneasy sensation felt in the stomach region when one is both nervous and excited about something.
  • give sth your best shot The idiom "give something your best shot" means to put forth maximum effort or attempt something with all one's strength and ability in order to achieve the desired outcome or result. It implies giving something one's best attempt and not holding back any effort.
  • tug your forelock To "tug your forelock" is an idiomatic expression that refers to showing excessive deference, subservience, or excessive respect towards someone in a position of authority or high social status. It originates from the practice of pulling one's forelock, an act of removing one's hat or touching the front of one's head as a sign of respect or submission. The idiom is often used to criticize individuals who display servile or obsequious behavior towards those in power.
  • cast your net wide The idiom "cast your net wide" means to explore or search extensively and consider a wide range of options or opportunities. It implies that one should not limit themselves to a narrow or limited scope, but instead should broaden their approach in order to increase the chances of success.
  • set/put your mind to sth To set/put your mind to something means to make a strong determination to accomplish or achieve a particular goal or task. It implies focusing all your mental and physical efforts on that specific objective.
  • wipe the smile off your face The idiom "wipe the smile off your face" means to forcefully remove or diminish someone's smile or expression of happiness or satisfaction, usually through a harsh or critical comment or action that is intended to bring them down or make them feel less positive or confident.
  • pay your respects The idiom "pay your respects" means to show courtesy or honor by expressing sympathy, condolences, or admiration for someone, usually by attending their funeral or memorial service or by extending condolences to their family, friends, or loved ones. It can also refer to expressing admiration or acknowledgement of someone's achievements or contributions.
  • be up to your ears in something The idiom "be up to your ears in something" means to be extremely busy or heavily involved in a particular activity or work, to the point of being overwhelmed or fully occupied. It implies that the person has a large amount or excessive amount of something, whether it be work, responsibilities, commitments, or problems.
  • have/keep your finger on the pulse To "have/keep your finger on the pulse" means to be well-informed about the current or latest developments or trends in a particular field or area. It refers to being knowledgeable and aware of what is happening, often in a proactive manner, in order to stay updated and make informed decisions. It suggests having a keen sense of awareness and monitoring the situation closely.
  • I'll wring your neck! The idiom "I'll wring your neck!" is an expression used to convey extreme anger or frustration towards someone. It is a figurative phrase that suggests the speaker's desire to physically harm or punish the person they are addressing.
  • be frightened out of your wits The idiom "be frightened out of your wits" means to be so scared or terrified that it causes extreme fear or panic, often causing a person to lose their ability to think or react rationally.
  • take your hat off to sb The idiom "take your hat off to sb" means to show admiration, respect, or appreciation for someone or something. It implies acknowledging and giving credit to another person for their achievements, qualities, or actions.
  • set your sights high/low The idiom "set your sights high/low" means to establish ambitious or low goals for oneself. It encourages someone to aim for great achievements or settle for less demanding objectives.
  • don't hold your breath 2 The idiom "don't hold your breath" means not to expect something to happen or be true in the near future, as it is considered highly unlikely or improbable.
  • written all over your face The idiom "written all over your face" means that a person's expression or body language clearly reveals their thoughts, emotions, or intentions, even before they speak or act. It suggests that the person's true feelings or reactions are so apparent that they can be easily understood or interpreted by others just by looking at their face.
  • like tryin' to scratch your ear with your elbow The idiom "like tryin' to scratch your ear with your elbow" is used to describe something that is extremely difficult or nearly impossible to accomplish. It emphasizes the impossibility of completing a task by comparing it to the physical impossibility of scratching one's ear with their elbow.
  • drag your/its feet The idiom "drag your/its feet" means to delay or hesitate in taking action, usually due to indecisiveness or lack of enthusiasm. It can also imply intentionally slowing down or stalling a process.
  • pit of your stomach The idiom "pit of your stomach" refers to a feeling of severe anxiety, fear, or uneasiness that manifests as a physical sensation in the area near your stomach or abdomen. It signifies a deep gut feeling or intuition about a certain situation or event.
  • Take your seat. The idiom "Take your seat" is a phrase commonly used as an instruction or request for someone to sit down in their designated place or chair. It is often used in settings such as classrooms, theaters, conferences, or events where seating arrangements are necessary.
  • within an inch of your life The idiom "within an inch of your life" refers to intentionally or violently causing severe harm or injury to someone, almost to the point of death. It suggests that the person has been attacked or hurt so severely that their survival was narrowly avoided.
  • have your (fair) share of sth The idiom "have your (fair) share of something" means to have an appropriate or equal portion of something. It implies that you have had enough or are entitled to your fair part of a particular thing, typically in reference to experiences, responsibilities, or troubles.
  • sell your soul (to the devil) The idiom "sell your soul (to the devil)" refers to a metaphorical concept where one compromises their principles, values, or integrity in exchange for personal gain or success. It implies making a morally questionable or ethically compromising decision for immediate or short-term benefits. This idiom often indicates a profound surrender of one's moral compass or conscience.
  • see your way (clear) to doing sth The idiom "see your way (clear) to doing something" means to be willing or able to do something, especially when it requires effort or compromise. It implies that the person has considered the situation and has found a way or reason to proceed with the said action.
  • hand in your dinner pail The idiom "hand in your dinner pail" is a colloquial expression that means to retire or quit a job, particularly in the context of ending one's working career. It refers to the action of surrendering or turning in one's literal dinner pail, which was a common way to carry meals to work. Thus, "hand in your dinner pail" signifies the act of giving up work or ending one's employment journey.
  • Get your buns over here! The idiom "Get your buns over here!" is an informal and slightly playful way of telling someone to come quickly or move to a specific location. It emphasizes urgency and a desire for immediate action, often used in a lighthearted or casual context.
  • Here’s mud in your eye The idiom "Here's mud in your eye" is an informal phrase used to cheer or toast someone, typically when drinking alcoholic beverages. It is an expression meant to convey goodwill and to wish the person success or enjoyment.
  • put your shirt on sth The idiom "put your shirt on something" typically means to have great confidence or certainty in the success or positive outcome of something. It suggests that one is willing to bet a significant amount or have complete trust in a particular outcome or situation.
  • I'll knock your block/head off! The idiom "I'll knock your block/head off!" is a figurative expression used to convey a threat or intent to physically harm someone. It suggests that the speaker will forcefully strike the other person's head or block (referring to the metaphorical term for a person's head). It implies a high level of aggression, anger, or determination to assert dominance over the other person.
  • put sb over your knee The idiom "put someone over your knee" is an expression that refers to the act of spanking or disciplining someone, typically a child, by making them lie across your knees and delivering physical punishment on their buttocks. It is often used metaphorically to convey the idea of reprimanding or exerting control over someone.
  • your salad days The idiom "your salad days" refers to a period in someone's life when they were young, inexperienced, and carefree, typically associated with their youth or early adulthood. It suggests a time of innocence, vitality, and idealism before the responsibilities and challenges of adulthood set in.
  • at (your) leisure The idiom "at (your) leisure" means to do something at one's own convenience or without hurry, taking one's time to complete a task or engage in an activity. It implies having the freedom to decide when and how to allocate one's time without any pressure or urgency.
  • shake the dust of somewhere from your feet The idiom "shake the dust of somewhere from your feet" refers to leaving a place or situation permanently, often due to dissatisfaction or a desire to move on. It signifies the act of leaving behind any negative experiences, influences, or memories associated with that place or situation and starting afresh elsewhere. It can also metaphorically imply leaving behind any attachments or emotional baggage, symbolized by the act of shaking off the dust from one's feet before continuing on their path.
  • sell your body The idiom "sell your body" is typically used metaphorically and colloquially to refer to the act of exchanging one's physical abilities, skills, or services for personal gain or profit. It implies offering oneself for various purposes, such as manual labor, performing certain tasks, or engaging in activities that may be deemed morally questionable or socially objectionable. This phrase is often employed to highlight the extent to which someone is willing to compromise their principles or dignity in order to achieve their desired outcome or financial compensation.
  • get your hands on something The idiom "get your hands on something" means to obtain or acquire something, whether it is tangible or not, often implying that the item or information is sought after or difficult to obtain.
  • watch your back The idiom "watch your back" means to be cautious and wary of potential dangers or threats that may come from behind. It suggests being mindful of others' actions and intentions, especially in a competitive or uncertain situation.
  • use your head The idiom "use your head" means to think carefully, make wise decisions, or use one's intelligence and common sense to solve problems or find solutions.
  • dip into your pocket The idiom "dip into your pocket" means to spend or contribute money, often unexpectedly or reluctantly.
  • set your sights on something/on doing something The idiom "set your sights on something/on doing something" means to have a specific goal or objective in mind and to focus your efforts and attention towards achieving it. It implies determination and a clear direction towards a desired outcome.
  • hit your stride, at get into your stride The idiom "hit your stride" or "get into your stride" means to reach a state of optimal performance, productivity, or efficiency. It refers to finding a comfortable rhythm or pace in any activity, task, or endeavor, where one operates at their best or achieves a smooth flow. It often implies a sense of confidence, competence, and being in control of one's abilities.
  • your gorge rises The idiom "your gorge rises" refers to a feeling of strong disgust, revulsion, or repulsion towards something or someone. It describes a situation or an experience that triggers a strong negative emotional reaction, often causing physical discomfort or nausea.
  • you’ve made your bed The idiom "you've made your bed" typically means that one has created or brought about their own problems or consequences due to their own actions or choices. It implies that someone has created a situation and must now deal with the negative outcomes or circumstances that arise from it.
  • count your chickens The idiom "count your chickens" means to anticipate or rely on future events or outcomes before they actually occur, often resulting in disappointment if the desired results do not materialize. It implies that one should not make assumptions or be overconfident about something that has not yet happened.
  • were your ears burning? The idiom "were your ears burning?" refers to a situation where someone is talking about you or mentioning your name, often in a positive or flattering way, and coincidentally you become aware of it or join the conversation. It suggests that the person being referred to might have had a sensation or intuition that others were discussing them.
  • bury/have your head in the sand The idiom "bury/have your head in the sand" means to deliberately ignore or avoid a problem, danger, or unpleasant situation by pretending it doesn't exist or by not acknowledging its existence. It refers to the behavior of an ostrich, which supposedly sticks its head in the sand when it feels threatened, mistakenly believing that if it can't see the danger, the danger doesn't exist.
  • leave a bad taste in your mouth The idiom "leave a bad taste in your mouth" means to have a negative or unpleasant experience, encounter, or memory that lingers and causes discomfort or dissatisfaction. It typically refers to something that has been morally, emotionally, or socially displeasing or distasteful, leaving a negative impression or feeling.
  • mind your p's and q's The idiom "mind your p's and q's" means to be cautious and mindful of one's behavior, specifically in terms of politeness, etiquette, and appropriate social conduct. It advises people to pay attention to their words, actions, and manners to avoid offending others or creating any unnecessary trouble or misunderstandings.
  • pull your finger out The idiom "pull your finger out" means to start working or making an effort in a more energetic and efficient manner. It implies that the person being addressed should stop procrastinating, become more diligent or committed, and begin accomplishing tasks or goals.
  • get/lay/put your hands on sb The idiom "get/lay/put your hands on sb" typically means to find, locate, or get in physical contact with someone, often with the intention of either causing harm or confronting them. It can also refer to gaining control or possession of someone or something.
  • a bit of how's your father The idiom "a bit of how's your father" is a British colloquial expression used to refer to sexual activity or a casual sexual encounter. It is often used humorously or euphemistically to allude to intimate or illicit relationships.
  • be your own person/woman/man The idiom "be your own person/woman/man" means to think and act independently, without being excessively influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes the importance of developing one's individuality, beliefs, and decision-making abilities, instead of conforming blindly to societal expectations or following others' opinions. It encourages self-assertion, self-confidence, and the ability to make choices based on personal values and aspirations.
  • your heart bleeds for someone The idiom "your heart bleeds for someone" is used to express extreme sympathy or compassion towards someone who is experiencing difficulty, pain, or suffering. It suggests that the person feels deeply empathetic towards the individual's situation, often to the point where it feels as though their heart is physically experiencing the pain.
  • put your face on The idiom "put your face on" typically means to apply makeup or enhance one's appearance in order to look more presentable or attractive.
  • your eyes nearly pop out of your head The idiom "your eyes nearly pop out of your head" means being extremely surprised, shocked, or amazed by something to the point that your eyes widen or bulge out of their sockets, often due to disbelief or astonishment.
  • twist/wrap sb around/round your little finger To have someone wrapped around your little finger means to have complete control or influence over someone, often through manipulation or charisma. It suggests that the person is easily influenced or manipulated by the speaker, as if they were being manipulated like a puppet.
  • collect your wits The idiom "collect your wits" means to gather one's thoughts or regain composure after a shock, surprise, or confusing situation. It refers to taking a moment to calm down, think clearly, and regain control of one's emotions or mental state.
  • get/have your fingers burned The idiom "get/have your fingers burned" means to suffer negative consequences or harm as a result of taking a risky or ill-advised action. It implies learning a lesson through a painful experience or by making a mistake that leads to unwanted or regrettable outcomes.
  • you pays your money and you takes your choice/chance The idiom "you pays your money and you takes your choice/chance" means that after paying for something, you have the freedom to make your own decision or take a risk. It implies that once you have committed to a course of action or made a purchase, you must accept any consequences that come with it.
  • get your courage up The idiom "get your courage up" means to gather or summon the necessary bravery and determination to face or overcome a challenging or intimidating situation. It implies mustering the inner strength and confidence needed to confront fears, take risks, or tackle difficult tasks.
  • you kiss your mother with that mouth? The idiom "you kiss your mother with that mouth?" is a sarcastic or admonishing remark used to criticize someone for using crude or offensive language. It suggests that the person's speech is inappropriate or disrespectful, implying that they should consider whether they would speak the same way in front of their own mother.
  • bring sb out of their shell, at come out of your shell The idiom "bring somebody out of their shell" or "come out of your shell" refers to the act of helping someone to become more socially confident, outgoing, or less reserved. It metaphorically compares a person who is introverted or shy to being inside a protective or isolated shell, and the idiom signifies the process of encouraging them to be more open, interactive, and comfortable in social situations.
  • fall flat on your/its face The idiom "fall flat on your/its face" means to experience complete failure, usually in a manner that is embarrassing or humiliating. It refers to an unsuccessful attempt or endeavor that produces unsatisfactory results.
  • take something in your stride To take something in your stride means to handle or deal with a difficult or challenging situation calmly and without much effort or concern. It implies that you are able to accept and manage the situation without being overly affected or overwhelmed by it.
  • haul/pull yourself up by your bootstraps The idiom "haul/pull yourself up by your bootstraps" means to improve or succeed by one's own efforts, without any assistance from others. It implies being self-reliant, resilient, and determined in overcoming obstacles or difficult situations. The phrase originated from the idea of lifting oneself off the ground by pulling on the straps or loops attached to one's boots.
  • an albatross round your neck The idiom "an albatross round your neck" refers to a burden or a heavy responsibility that one must carry. It is derived from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," in which the narrator is forced to wear a dead albatross around his neck as a punishment, representing the weight of his guilt and remorse.
  • cudgel your brains The idiom "cudgel your brains" means to think deeply or rack your brain in order to find a solution or answer to something. It implies a deliberate and strenuous mental effort to solve a problem or come up with an idea.
  • I’ll knock your block/head off! The idiom "I'll knock your block/head off!" is a threatening statement used to express the intention of striking someone with great force, typically resulting in the removal of their head or block (head). It is a figurative expression used to convey anger or aggression towards someone.
  • take your (own) life The idiom "take your (own) life" is an expression used to refer to the act of intentionally causing one's own death. It generally pertains to suicide or self-harm.
  • do something at your own risk "Doing something at your own risk" is an idiom that means taking full responsibility for the potential consequences or dangers that may arise from an action or decision. It warns individuals that they are choosing to proceed despite knowing the risks involved, implying that any negative outcome will be their sole responsibility.
  • be banging, etc. your head against a brick wall The idiom "be banging your head against a brick wall" means to experience frustration or futility in attempting to achieve something or convince someone who is stubborn, unresponsive, or resistant to change. It implies a situation where all efforts seem to be in vain or ineffective, similar to physically hitting one's head against an unyielding surface like a brick wall.
  • do something standing on your head The idiom "do something standing on your head" means to do something easily or effortlessly, implying that the task is so simple that it could be achieved even with minimal effort or while engaging in another activity.
  • slip your mind The idiom "slip your mind" means to forget or fail to remember something.
  • put your cards on the table To "put your cards on the table" is an idiom that means to be honest and open about your intentions, thoughts, or feelings, especially in a discussion or negotiation. It refers to the act of revealing your true position or motivations, just like a poker player who strategically shows their cards to other players.
  • the apple of your eye The idiom "the apple of your eye" refers to a person or thing that is greatly cherished, loved, or highly valued. It is used to describe someone or something that is considered especially precious or dear to someone.
  • a tiger in your tank The idiom "a tiger in your tank" refers to having a great or extraordinary amount of energy, strength, or power. It symbolizes having an abundance of motivation, vigor, or enthusiasm to accomplish something. The phrase originates from an old advertising slogan used by Esso (now Exxon) in the mid-20th century, which promoted their gasoline as being so powerful that it could make one feel as if they had a tiger (a formidable and energetic animal) in their vehicle's fuel tank.
  • Go chase your tail! The idiom "Go chase your tail!" is typically used as a metaphorical expression, often in an admonishing or dismissive tone. It refers to the actions of a dog chasing its own tail in circles, signifying a futile and pointless endeavor or being caught up in a cycle of unproductive activities. It can be used to suggest that someone is engaging in meaningless or fruitless actions, wasting time and energy without accomplishing anything meaningful.
  • (more than) your fair share of something The idiom "(more than) your fair share of something" means to possess or receive a disproportionately large amount or portion of something, often implying that the quantity received is more than what is considered equitable or fair in a given situation.
  • draw/pull your horns in The idiom "draw/pull your horns in" means to become cautious, reserved, or less aggressive in behavior or actions. It often refers to someone who is adjusting their approach or attitude to avoid conflict, controversy, or trouble. It can also indicate someone retracting from a situation or taking a step back to reassess and avoid further complications.
  • be in your face The idiom "be in your face" refers to someone or something that is confrontational, aggressive, or obtrusive in a way that is difficult to ignore or escape from. It typically describes a situation where someone is assertively demanding attention, often in a forceful or intrusive manner.
  • get your fingers burned The idiom "get your fingers burned" means to experience negative consequences or suffer harm as a result of one's actions, decisions, or involvement in a particular situation. It implies that the person has learned a lesson through a painful or negative experience.
  • to save your life The idiom "to save your life" is used to emphasize the extreme importance or necessity of something. It suggests that if a certain action or behavior is not done, it could result in serious consequences or even death.
  • wash your mouth out (with soap/soapy water) The idiom "wash your mouth out (with soap/soapy water)" is an expression used to reprimand someone for using offensive, vulgar, or inappropriate language. It suggests that the person's speech is so inappropriate or offensive that they should clean their mouth with soap as a form of punishment or to remove the offensive words.
  • end your days/life (in something) The idiom "end your days/life (in something)" refers to the act of spending the final years or remaining time of one's life in a particular place or condition. It implies the idea of permanently settling or finding one's final resting place in a specific location or situation.
  • doff your hat to sb/sth The idiom "doff your hat to sb/sth" means to show respect, admiration, or acknowledgment to someone or something. It originated from the act of removing one's hat as a sign of respect or greeting. In a figurative sense, it implies showing appreciation or giving credit to someone or something deserving of recognition.
  • dip your wick The idiom "dip your wick" typically refers to having sexual intercourse or engaging in sexual activity. It is considered a slang expression and is often used in a casual or humorous context.
  • you'll catch your death The idiom "you'll catch your death" is used to express a warning or concern regarding someone's health and the potential consequences of their actions. It typically implies that if they continue with a certain behavior or exposure to unfavorable conditions, they may become seriously ill or suffer severe consequences.
  • make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand The idiom "make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand" means to personally create or complete something using one's own skills, effort, or craftsmanship. It implies taking personal responsibility and pride in the work done without seeking assistance from others.
  • be up to your eyes/eyeballs in something The idiom "be up to your eyes/eyeballs in something" means to be deeply involved or overwhelmed by a certain task, responsibility, or situation, typically to the point of being excessively busy or unable to handle any additional workload. It implies a state of being completely occupied or heavily burdened with a particular matter.
  • have/keep your eye on the clock, at be watching the clock To "have/keep your eye on the clock" or "be watching the clock" means to continuously pay attention to the time or be mindful of the passing time. This expression often implies that someone is eagerly waiting for a specific event or moment to occur or trying to ensure that they do not run out of time for a particular task or appointment. It emphasizes the importance of being aware of the time and not letting it slip away unnoticed.
  • show your colours The idiom "show your colours" means to openly display or reveal one's true beliefs, loyalties, or intentions, especially in a situation where they may have been previously hidden or unknown. It refers to the act of proudly and confidently exhibiting one's true character or identity, often in the face of adversity or opposition.
  • be a weight off your mind The idiom "be a weight off your mind" means to remove or alleviate a burden, worry, or concern that has been bothering or preoccupying a person, thus bringing a sense of relief, freedom, or peace of mind.
  • do your share The idiom "do your share" means to contribute, participate, or fulfill your responsibilities in a fair and equitable manner within a group or collective effort. It implies that everyone should play an equal and proportionate part in completing a task or reaching a goal.
  • be not in your right mind The idiom "be not in your right mind" means to be mentally or emotionally unstable, irrational, or not thinking clearly. It suggests that someone's thoughts, decisions, or actions are influenced by confusion, madness, or an impaired state of mind.
  • have someone eating out of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually by manipulating or persuading them to do whatever you want.
  • be/act your age The idiom "be/act your age" means that someone should behave in a manner that is appropriate and mature for their current age or level of maturity. It is often used when someone is acting immature, childish, or not living up to the responsibilities or expectations commonly associated with their age.
  • carry your bat The idiom "carry your bat" typically refers to the act of being the last person to remain or succeed in a particular activity or competition. It originated from cricket, where "carrying your bat" means a batsman remains not out until the end of their team's innings. Therefore, outside the context of cricket, the phrase is often used metaphorically to indicate that someone has achieved something on their own or is the sole survivor or winner in a situation.
  • get your feet wet The idiom "get your feet wet" means to participate or engage in something for the first time, usually to gain initial experience or to take a cautious, introductory step into a new activity or field.
  • have your head screwed on right The idiom "have your head screwed on right" means to be sensible, practical, and rational in your thinking or decision-making. It suggests that an individual has a logical and intelligent approach to life, displaying good judgment and the ability to make sensible choices.
  • Get your nose out of my business! The idiom "Get your nose out of my business!" means that someone is interfering or prying into someone else's personal matters or affairs without being invited or having a legitimate reason to do so. It is an expression used to tell someone to mind their own business and stop meddling in someone else's private affairs.
  • an ace up your sleeve The idiom "an ace up your sleeve" refers to having a secret advantage or resource that can be used to gain an advantage in a situation. It stems from the practice in card games where players would hide an ace card up their sleeve to cheat and eventually use it to secure a winning move. It signifies having a hidden or unexpected asset that can be revealed at a crucial moment.
  • go soak your head The idiom "go soak your head" is an informal and slightly impolite phrase used to dismiss or reject someone's suggestion, request, or statement. It implies that the person should take some time to reflect on their idea or to cool off before speaking again. It can also be used humorously to suggest that someone is being foolish or bothersome.
  • dip your toe in the water The idiom "dip your toe in the water" means to cautiously or tentatively test or try something new or unfamiliar before fully committing to it. It often implies taking a small step or engaging in a preliminary exploration to assess the feasibility, suitability, or potential outcomes of an action or decision.
  • take your time The idiom "take your time" means to not rush or hurry and to take as much time as needed to complete something without feeling pressured. It suggests that one should go at their own pace, ensuring thoroughness and accuracy in their actions or decisions.
  • lower your sights The idiom "lower your sights" means to decrease one's ambitions, expectations, or goals. It implies being more realistic or practical in setting one's targets or aspirations.
  • cast your bread upon the waters The idiom "cast your bread upon the waters" is a biblical phrase derived from Ecclesiastes 11:1, which states: "Cast your bread upon the waters, for after many days you will find it again." Figuratively, it means to do good deeds or acts of kindness without expecting immediate or personal gain, trusting that they will bring positive outcomes or rewards in the future. It suggests that selfless actions, generosity, and benevolence will eventually yield fruitful results.
  • don't give up your day job The idiom "don't give up your day job" is a humorous or sarcastic way of advising someone to continue pursuing their current profession rather than attempting a different career or activity that may not be as successful or suitable for them. It implies that the person's current job is more reliable or better suited to their skills and abilities.
  • you can bet your boots The idiom "you can bet your boots" means that something is very certain or guaranteed to happen. It implies a high level of confidence in a particular outcome or assertion.
  • blow/knock your socks off The definition of the idiom "blow/knock your socks off" is to surprise or impress someone greatly. It refers to experiencing something so incredible or shocking that it figuratively knocks one's socks right off.
  • lend an ear (or your ears) The idiom "lend an ear (or your ears)" means to listen attentively and give someone your full attention. It implies being willing to hear out or offer support to someone who wants to express their thoughts, feelings, or concerns.
  • out of/off your head The idiom "out of/off your head" typically means to be extremely intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, resulting in delirium, confusion, or altered mental state. It suggests being in an irrational or illogical state of mind.
  • hitch your wagon to sb/sth The idiom "hitch your wagon to sb/sth" means to attach or align oneself with someone or something in order to benefit from their success or to be associated with their achievements. It signifies forming a partnership or association to achieve mutual goals or to take advantage of an advantageous situation.
  • take your chances The idiom "take your chances" means to accept a risk or opportunity without knowing the outcome or consequences. It implies willingly engaging in a situation with uncertain or unpredictable outcomes, often relying on luck or personal judgment.
  • raise/lower your sights The idiom "raise/lower your sights" means to reassess or adjust your goals, ambitions, or expectations. When you raise your sights, you aim for higher or more ambitious objectives. Conversely, when you lower your sights, you set your goals or expectations at a more realistic or achievable level.
  • have a bee in your bonnet (about something) The idiom "have a bee in your bonnet (about something)" means to be obsessed or greatly preoccupied with a particular idea or issue. It refers to a persistent, often irrational, fixation on a specific topic, similar to a bee buzzing around inside a bonnet (a type of hat) which could be irritating and distracting.
  • get your wires crossed The idiom "get your wires crossed" means to misunderstand or misinterpret something due to a miscommunication or confusion, often resulting in a mistake or conflict. It refers to the idea of crossed wires in electrical circuits, where signals become mixed or distorted.
  • change your tune The idiom "change your tune" means to alter one's opinion, attitude, or behavior, often in a sudden or drastic manner. It implies a shift in perspective or approach, usually towards a more favorable or cooperative stance.
  • more power to your elbow! The idiom "more power to your elbow" is an expression of encouragement or approval for someone's efforts or activities. It is often used to wish someone good luck or success in their endeavors. The phrase is a colloquial way of saying "keep going" or "keep up the good work."
  • cling on/hang on by your fingertips The idiom "cling on/hang on by your fingertips" refers to a situation where someone is barely able to hold on or keep their grip on something precarious or challenging. It implies that person is in a vulnerable position or facing difficulty, but is desperately trying to maintain their hold or control.
  • call in your chips The idiom "call in your chips" refers to the act of redeeming or cashing in on one's accumulated favor, credit, or resources, usually gained through previous actions or relationships. It is often used when someone decides to utilize or claim the benefits or privileges they have earned or accumulated. The phrase is derived from the practice of exchanging poker chips for their monetary value at the end of a game.
  • haul your wind The idiom "haul your wind" means to change direction by adjusting the sails of a ship in order to sail into the wind or change course. It is often used metaphorically to imply altering one's plans, adapting to a new situation, or changing the direction of a conversation or argument.
  • Keep your chin up. The idiom "Keep your chin up" means to stay positive, hopeful, and optimistic in difficult or challenging situations. It encourages someone to maintain a confident and determined attitude, even in the face of adversity or disappointment.
  • go your separate ways The idiom "go your separate ways" means to part or separate, usually due to a disagreement or a divergence in goals, paths, or interests. It suggests that individuals or groups involved will pursue different courses or engage in distinct activities, leading to a separation or ending of a shared situation or bond.
  • at your command The idiom "at your command" means to be completely under someone's control or at their disposal, ready to do whatever they ask or demand. It implies that the person has full authority or power over whatever or whomever is involved.
  • do something in your own sweet time/way The idiom "do something in your own sweet time/way" refers to doing something at one's own preferred pace, without being rushed or influenced by others. It implies taking one's time to complete a task or make a decision without any external pressure.
  • set out your stall The idiom "set out your stall" means to establish or display your goods, abilities, or intentions in order to attract attention, gain recognition, or promote yourself or your ideas. It often implies showcasing one's skills, knowledge, or accomplishments to create a positive impression and win favor or support from others. It can also refer to making clear your position or stated goals to others.
  • lie through your teeth The idiom "lie through your teeth" refers to the act of purposely telling a blatant or bold lie while consciously being aware of the deception. It implies that someone is shamelessly and confidently fabricating information, often with the intent to manipulate, deceive, or protect themselves.
  • do sth with your eyes closed To do something with your eyes closed means to perform a task or activity effortlessly and without difficulty or needing to pay much attention. It implies that the action is so familiar and easy for you that you can complete it with very little effort or concentration.
  • put your head/neck on the block The idiom "put your head/neck on the block" means to take a significant risk or make a bold prediction, action, or decision that could result in negative consequences or backlash. It involves taking personal responsibility or accountability for a potentially controversial or risky situation despite potential criticism or adverse outcomes.
  • close your ears The idiom "close your ears" usually refers to the act of intentionally ignoring or disregarding something that is being said or heard. It implies blocking out certain information or opinions to avoid being influenced or affected by them.
  • shovel sth into your mouth The idiom "shovel something into your mouth" refers to the act of eating food quickly, voraciously, or without much thought or enjoyment. It suggests that the person is consuming their food hastily, often in large portions, without proper manners or savoring the taste.
  • make your blood boil The idiom "make your blood boil" means to cause great anger, fury, or extreme irritation. It implies a situation or action that is highly infuriating or infuriates someone to the point where their emotions are heated, similar to the sensation of blood boiling.
  • cut your teeth The idiom "cut your teeth" means gaining initial experience or proficiency in a particular field or activity. It refers to the process of learning and developing essential skills or expertise, usually by starting with simpler or less challenging tasks before progressing to more complex ones. It can also imply acquiring necessary qualifications or qualifications through practical experience.
  • bless your heart The phrase "bless your heart" is often used in the Southern United States, and it can have different meanings depending on the context and tone of voice. Typically, it is used as a polite way to express sympathy, empathy, or understanding towards someone. However, it can also be used sarcastically or condescendingly to indirectly criticize or belittle someone.
  • lose your heart (to sb/sth) To "lose your heart (to someone/something)" means to become deeply infatuated or captivated by someone or something, often resulting in strong feelings of love or admiration. It implies a sense of being completely enamored and emotionally invested in that person or thing.
  • punch above/below your weight The idiom "punch above your weight" means to achieve a level of success or accomplishment that exceeds what would typically be expected based on one's abilities, resources, or position. It is often used to express someone or something outperforming and exceeding expectations. Conversely, "punch below your weight" means to perform at a level that is lower than what would be expected or desired.
  • be hanging on by your fingernails The idiom "be hanging on by your fingernails" means to barely manage or barely survive in a difficult or challenging situation. It refers to a state of desperation or clinging to something, much like hanging off a ledge by one's fingertips. It implies that a person is in a precarious position and is struggling to maintain their grip or hold on to something, both literally and metaphorically.
  • break your heart The idiom "break your heart" is used to describe a situation or a person's action that causes deep emotional distress or sadness. It refers to experiencing intense disappointment, grief, or sorrow, typically as a result of a romantic relationship, loss, betrayal, or any other devastating event.
  • sit on your ass, at sit on your arse The idiomatic expression "sit on your ass" or "sit on your arse" is a colloquial phrase used to convey the idea of someone being inactive, lazy, or not taking action or responsibility for a particular task or situation. It implies that the person is doing nothing productive or beneficial and is content with being idle.
  • get your own back The idiom "get your own back" means to take revenge or seek retribution against someone who has previously wronged or harmed you. It refers to the act of retaliating to restore justice or balance.
  • keep/break your word The idiom "keep/break your word" refers to an individual's commitment or promise to do something. Keeping your word means fulfilling or honoring your promise or agreement, while breaking your word implies failing to fulfill or going back on your promise or agreement.
  • be up to your eyeballs in something The idiom "be up to your eyeballs in something" means to be deeply or fully involved or overwhelmed with a particular situation or task. It implies being completely engrossed or overwhelmed by something, often to the point of being unable to manage or handle it all.
  • need, want, etc. your head examined The idiom "need, want, etc. your head examined" is a phrase used to suggest that someone is behaving irrationally or illogically. It implies that the person's thoughts or actions are so strange or irrational that they may require a mental evaluation or examination of their sanity.
  • drop/lower your guard To "drop/lower your guard" means to become less vigilant, cautious, or defensive. It refers to the act of relaxing one's defenses or being less alert, often exposing oneself to potential risks or threats. It implies letting one's guard down and becoming more open or vulnerable in a particular situation.
  • keep/lose your cool The idiom "keep/lose your cool" means to remain calm and composed in a challenging or frustrating situation, or conversely, to become agitated, angry, or upset in such a situation.
  • blow your lid/top/stack The idiom "blow your lid/top/stack" means to lose control of one's temper or to become extremely angry and upset. It suggests that someone's emotions have reached a boiling point, causing them to release their frustration in an explosive manner.
  • pay your money and take your choice The idiom "pay your money and take your choice" means that one has to make a decision and live with the consequences, knowing that they must accept the outcomes of their choice regardless of their preferences or desired outcome. It implies that once a decision is made and actions are taken, there is no guarantee of a perfect or ideal result, and one must accept the inherent uncertainties and risks involved.
  • play your ace The idiom "play your ace" means to use your greatest strength or best strategy at the most opportune or crucial moment in order to gain an advantage or achieve success. It refers to playing a winning card (ace) in a card game when the outcome of the game is at stake.
  • wring your hands The idiom "wring your hands" refers to the act of twisting or squeezing one's hands together due to unease, worry, or distress. It often indicates a state of anxiety, frustration, or helplessness in a particular situation.
  • be laughing up your sleeve The idiom "be laughing up your sleeve" means to secretly or quietly find something amusing or humorous, often when others are unaware of it. It implies a sense of concealed amusement or satisfaction.
  • gird (up) your loins, at gird yourself The idiom "gird (up) your loins" or "gird yourself" is a phrase that originates from biblical times but is now commonly used figuratively. It means to prepare oneself mentally, physically, or emotionally for a challenging or difficult task ahead. The phrase is derived from the practice in ancient times of wearing long robes or tunics that needed to be gathered and tucked into a belt or girdle before engaging in vigorous activities or running to allow freedom of movement. So, "gird (up) your loins" or "gird yourself" signifies getting ready, summoning strength or courage, and being fully prepared for whatever lies ahead.
  • take the bit between your teeth, at get the bit between your teeth To "take the bit between your teeth" or "get the bit between your teeth" is an idiomatic expression that refers to someone taking control or taking charge of a situation. It originates from horse riding, where the bit is a metal piece placed in a horse's mouth to control its movements. When a horse takes the bit between its teeth, it means it has seized control and is no longer under the rider's control. Similarly, when a person takes the bit between their teeth, it implies that they have taken control of a situation, asserting their own authority or making decisions independently.
  • be free with your favours The idiom "be free with your favours" means to be generous and liberal in offering help, support, or favors to others without expecting anything in return. It implies being readily available and willing to assist others whenever they need it or whenever it seems appropriate. This idiom emphasizes the idea of selflessness and a willingness to go out of one's way to help others.
  • couldn't fight your way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't fight your way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who lacks physical strength, courage, or assertiveness. It implies that the person is unable to successfully confront or handle even the simplest challenges or conflicts.
  • your two cents' worth The idiom "your two cents' worth" means to offer one's opinion or contribute one's thoughts on a particular matter, often when it was not specifically requested or necessary. It implies that the individual is sharing their thoughts or viewpoint, even if it may not hold significant value or be asked for.
  • sit (around) on your backside The idiom "sit (around) on your backside" refers to someone being idle, doing nothing productive, or being lazy. It implies a lack of action, motivation, or engagement in meaningful activities.
  • give your life to sth The idiom "give your life to sth" generally means to dedicate oneself completely and wholeheartedly to a particular cause, activity, or pursuit. It implies an extreme level of commitment and implies that a person is willing to sacrifice their time, energy, and even personal goals for the sake of what they are giving their life to.
  • find it in your heart/yourself to do something The idiom "find it in your heart/yourself to do something" means to make an effort to do something, especially if it requires kindness, forgiveness, or generosity. It suggests pleading with someone to find the compassion, understanding, or motivation to carry out a particular action.
  • at the top of your voice "At the top of your voice" is an idiomatic expression that means shouting or speaking loudly or screaming at maximum volume.
  • live your own life The idiom "live your own life" refers to the act of making independent choices and pursuing personal goals without being influenced or controlled by others. It encourages individuals to assert their autonomy, make decisions that align with their own values and desires, and ultimately take ownership of their actions and experiences.
  • rest on your oars The idiom "rest on your oars" means to stop making efforts, to become complacent, or to relax after achieving success, often leading to a decline in motivation or quality of work. It is derived from the act of rowing or paddling a boat, where resting on the oars means to stop rowing and take a break.
  • know your stuff The idiom "know your stuff" means to have a deep and thorough knowledge or expertise in a particular subject or field. It suggests that someone is highly knowledgeable, skilled, or experienced in a given area and can demonstrate proficiency and competence.
  • you can bet your life bottom dollar The idiom "you can bet your life bottom dollar" means being completely certain or confident about something, often used to emphasize a strong belief or assurance that something will happen or is true. It suggests absolute certainty or willingness to stake one's life on the truth or outcome of the statement being made.
  • push something to the back of your mind The idiom "push something to the back of your mind" means to intentionally ignore or suppress a thought, worry, or concern and not give it immediate attention. It refers to mentally or emotionally disregarding something and choosing not to focus on it, typically with the intention of dealing with it at a later time, if at all.
  • have your cake and eat it The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting to have the benefits or advantages of two conflicting or mutually exclusive options simultaneously, even though it is not logically possible. It describes the desire to possess or enjoy two things that are usually incompatible.
  • work your/its magic The idiom "work your/its magic" means to use one's or something's special abilities or skills to create a desired or positive outcome, often in a way that seems miraculous or inexplicable. It implies that the person or thing mentioned can achieve impressive results or solve problems effectively.
  • be on your mettle The idiom "be on your mettle" means to be prepared, alert, and ready to perform at your best, especially in a challenging or competitive situation. It implies being mentally and physically focused, displaying one's abilities, skills, or competence to face a particular test or task.
  • have/keep your options open The idiom "have/keep your options open" means to refrain from making a final decision or commitment in order to maintain flexibility and explore different possibilities. It implies not being bound or restricted to a particular choice, allowing room for alternative paths or opportunities.
  • shut/close your ears to something The idiom "shut/close your ears to something" means to deliberately ignore or refuse to listen to something, usually unpleasant or unwanted, in order to avoid being influenced or affected by it.
  • spin your wheels The idiom "spin your wheels" means to expend a lot of effort, time, or energy on a task or activity without making any progress or achieving any meaningful results. It refers to the idea of a vehicle's wheels spinning rapidly in place, generating noise and wasting energy, while remaining stationary. It implies a sense of frustration and futility associated with unproductive or ineffective actions.
  • egg on your face The idiom "egg on your face" means to feel embarrassed or humiliated due to one's own foolish or embarrassing actions or statements. It refers to the idea of having egg on one's face, which would be a visible sign of embarrassment.
  • beat your meat The idiom "beat your meat" is a vulgar and explicit phrase that refers to the act of masturbation.
  • be hanging on by your fingertips The idiom "be hanging on by your fingertips" is used to describe a situation wherein someone is barely managing to hold on or remain in a difficult or precarious position. It signifies a state of vulnerability or imminent failure, where one's grip is tenuous and any slight setback could potentially lead to a loss or downfall.
  • be on the tip of your tongue The idiom "be on the tip of your tongue" means that you are aware of something or have a specific word or idea in mind, but you are struggling to remember or express it at that moment. It describes the sensation of having information within reach and feeling that it is almost within your grasp, but just out of reach or out of immediate recall.
  • have eyes in the back of your head The idiom "have eyes in the back of your head" refers to the ability to be aware of or notice things happening behind you or in your surroundings, even without physically seeing them. It implies a high level of vigilance, alertness, or awareness of one's surroundings.
  • can't get your head around sth The idiom "can't get your head around sth" means being unable to understand or comprehend something, even after making an effort to do so. It indicates difficulty in grasping a concept, idea, or situation.
  • drag your feet The idiom "drag your feet" means to delay or procrastinate, to go slowly or be hesitant in taking action or making progress on something.
  • blow your stack/top The idiom "blow your stack/top" refers to losing one's temper or becoming extremely angry and expressing it in a sudden and explosive manner. It implies a state of furiousness or frustration that leads to an outburst or an emotional eruption.
  • Who’s your friend? The idiom "Who's your friend?" is an interrogative phrase used to question someone about the true intention or motivation of a person they're associating with or supporting. It implies suspicion or skepticism towards the individual in question, suggesting that they may not be a trustworthy or genuine companion.
  • turn your back on sth The idiom "turn your back on sth" means to purposely ignore, reject, or abandon something or someone. It implies intentionally disregarding or cutting ties with a situation or person.
  • Close your eyes and think of England The idiom "Close your eyes and think of England" is a phrase often used humorously to advise someone to endure an unpleasant or uncomfortable situation and find a way to mentally distance themselves from it. Originally associated with the stoic attitude Victorian-era women were expected to adopt during unwanted sexual encounters within their marriages, the idiom implies that one should divert their attention or thoughts elsewhere in order to get through something undesirable.
  • Shut your cake hole! The idiom "Shut your cake hole!" is a slang expression that is used to tell someone to be quiet or stop talking. It is an informal and somewhat rude way of asking someone to keep quiet or stop speaking.
  • stir your stumps The idiom "stir your stumps" means to rouse oneself into action, to start moving or doing something. It is often used as an encouragement or a command to motivate someone to stop being idle and begin doing what needs to be done. The phrase "stir your stumps" has its origins in the literal meaning of "stumps," which refers to the lower part of the legs, particularly the feet or legs of a person who is not moving.
  • laugh yourself silly, at laugh your head off The idioms "laugh yourself silly" and "laugh your head off" both refer to laughing very hard or uncontrollably. It suggests a situation in which something is so humorous or amusing that it becomes difficult to stop laughing.
  • dig in your heels The idiom "dig in your heels" means to firmly resist or refuse to change or give in, especially when faced with opposition or pressure to do so. It refers to adopting a stubborn and determined stance, similar to a person digging their heels into the ground to hold their position firmly.
  • breathe your last The idiom "breathe your last" means to die or take your final breath. It refers to the moment when someone's life comes to an end.
  • your considered opinion The idiom "your considered opinion" refers to an individual's thoughtful and carefully formulated viewpoint or judgment on a particular matter, based on consideration of various factors and perspectives. It suggests that the person has taken time to reflect, analyze, and weigh different aspects before forming their opinion.
  • act/be your age The idiom "act/be your age" means to behave in a manner that is appropriate for someone of your age or maturity level. It is often used when someone is behaving immaturely or irresponsibly and needs to show more maturity and responsible behavior.
  • cast your eye The idiom "cast your eye" refers to the act of quickly and casually looking at something or someone. It implies a brief observation or examination, often done with little attention to detail.
  • be past your sellby date The idiom "be past your sell-by date" means that someone or something is no longer useful, relevant, or valuable. It typically implies that a person or thing is outdated, out of touch, or no longer in their prime. It often refers to being past the ideal or optimal time for selling or utilizing something.
  • set your cap at The idiom "set your cap at" refers to deliberately aiming to attract or pursue someone romantically or as a potential partner. It is often used to describe someone's intention to pursue someone they are attracted to or interested in forming a romantic relationship with.
  • leave, go off, etc. with your tail between your legs The idiom "leave, go off, etc. with your tail between your legs" is typically used to refer to someone departing from a situation or encounter in a manner that displays embarrassment, defeat, or humiliation. It suggests that the person is leaving with their confidence diminished or feeling ashamed of their actions or the outcome. The phrase often stems from the behavior of dogs, as they tend to lower their tails and cower when they are feeling submissive or defeated.
  • check your six The idiom "check your six" derives from aviation and military jargon. It means to be vigilant and aware of what is happening behind you, specifically referring to the area six o'clock on a clock dial, which corresponds to directly behind someone or something. The expression is commonly used to advise someone to be cautious and watch out for potential threats or dangers approaching from behind.
  • a taste/dose of your own medicine The idiom "a taste/dose of your own medicine" means experiencing the same negative treatment or situation that one has inflicted upon others, typically as a form of retaliation or karma. It suggests that someone is being treated the way they have treated others, allowing them to understand the consequences of their actions.
  • on your own hook The idiom "on your own hook" refers to being independent or self-reliant. It means taking responsibility for one's own actions, decisions, or activities without relying on others for assistance or guidance.
  • get/have your money's worth The idiom "get/have your money's worth" means to receive or experience something that is equal to or exceeds the value of money paid for it. It implies that the item or experience is worth the cost and provides satisfactory or valuable benefits.
  • Quit your bellyaching! The idiom "Quit your bellyaching!" is a direct and witty way of telling someone to stop complaining or whining about something. It is often used to express annoyance or impatience with someone's constant griping or dissatisfaction.
  • tighten your belt The idiom "tighten your belt" means to reduce one's expenses or live more frugally in order to save money or adjust to financial hardships. It suggests the need for self-discipline and adopting a more modest lifestyle.
  • put in your two pennyworth To "put in your two pennyworth" is an idiomatic expression used to describe offering one's opinion or contributing to a conversation, often even if it is not particularly valuable or sought after. It implies giving input or sharing thoughts on a matter, regardless of its significance or relevance. It generally suggests that the person is eager to express their viewpoint, even if others may not necessarily consider it valuable or important.
  • turn in your grave The idiom "turn in your grave" refers to a figurative expression indicating that if someone who has passed away was aware of a particular event, action, or situation happening in the present, it would greatly shock, upset, or disappoint them. It implies a strong disapproval or dismay from the deceased individual, as if their very remains were reacting to the news or development.
  • count your blessings The idiom "count your blessings" means to appreciate and be grateful for the good things in one's life, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It emphasizes the importance of acknowledging and valuing the positives, even when faced with adversity.
  • have (sb's) blood on your hands The idiom "have (sb's) blood on your hands" means to be responsible or accountable for causing someone's injury, harm, or death. It implies that the person has directly or indirectly contributed to a tragic or fatal outcome.
  • have your doubts (about something) The idiom "have your doubts (about something)" means to be uncertain or skeptical about something. It suggests that one is not fully convinced or has reservations regarding a particular person, idea, concept, or situation.
  • make your flesh creep/crawl The idiom "make your flesh creep/crawl" means to experience a feeling of extreme disgust, fear, or uneasiness that causes one's skin to tingle or shiver. It refers to a sensation where something is so disturbing or eerie that it provokes an uncomfortable physical response.
  • of your acquaintance The idiom "of your acquaintance" refers to someone whom you know personally or are familiar with. It typically implies that you have met or interacted with that person at some point in time.
  • can't tell your arse from your elbow The idiom "can't tell your arse from your elbow" is a colloquial expression primarily used in British English. It is often used to humorously convey someone's lack of understanding, confusion, or incompetence in a particular situation. It implies that the person is unable to differentiate between two obvious or straightforward things, showing a complete lack of awareness or common sense.
  • shut your eyes to The idiom "shut your eyes to" means intentionally ignoring or refusing to acknowledge something, usually because it is inconvenient, unpleasant, or morally wrong.
  • (right) up your alley The idiom "(right) up your alley" means that something is well-suited or perfectly matched to someone's interests, preferences, or areas of expertise. It implies that the person in question will enjoy or excel at the particular activity, topic, or situation being discussed.
  • bare your teeth The idiom "bare your teeth" means to show aggression, hostility, or anger, typically by displaying one's teeth, often as a warning or a sign of dominance. It can be used both in literal and figurative contexts.
  • whatever floats your boat The idiom "whatever floats your boat" means that individuals are free to do what makes them happy or satisfied, regardless of whether it aligns with one's own preferences or standards. It implies being accepting of different choices and perspectives.
  • throw your weight behind someone The idiom "throw your weight behind someone" typically means to give strong support, influence, or backing to someone or their cause, especially by using one's power, authority, or resources. It implies using one's influence or position to help someone succeed or achieve their goals.
  • do (or try) your damnedest The idiom "do (or try) your damnedest" means to exert the utmost effort, use all available resources or abilities, and do everything possible to achieve a goal or complete a task, often in the face of difficulties or challenges. It signifies a strong determination and commitment to giving one's best effort.
  • get your head down The idiom "get your head down" means to rest or sleep.
  • bide your time The idiom "bide your time" means to patiently wait for the right opportunity or moment, often in a situation where taking immediate action may not be in one's best interest.
  • have a gun to your head The idiom "have a gun to your head" typically describes a situation in which someone is under extreme pressure or facing imminent danger that leaves them with no choice but to act in a certain way or make a specific decision. It signifies a high-stakes scenario where the individual's life or well-being is at risk, creating a sense of urgency or desperation. However, it is important to note that this is an idiom and does not imply an actual physical threat involving a gun.
  • have your cake and eat it too The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means to want or expect to have the benefits or advantages of two conflicting things simultaneously, without making any sacrifices or compromises. It implies a desire to have things both ways, despite the impossibility or impracticality of such a situation.
  • keep your distance (from somebody/something) The idiom "keep your distance (from somebody/something)" means to maintain a suitable physical or emotional separation from someone or something, usually to avoid potential harm, conflict, or involvement. It suggests keeping a safe or cautious distance to minimize risk or avoid unwanted interactions or consequences.
  • have sb eating out of the palm of your hand, at have sb in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of the palm of your hand" or "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, typically due to one's charm, persuasive abilities, or power. It implies that the person is very obedient, submissive, or willing to do whatever the other person wants.
  • cry your heart out The idiom "cry your heart out" means to cry or weep intensely and without restraint. It expresses the act of releasing emotions, typically sadness or grief, in a way that allows a person to express their pain fully.
  • be a shadow of your former self The idiom "be a shadow of your former self" means to be in a significantly diminished or weakened state compared to how one used to be physically, mentally, or in terms of achievements or capabilities. It implies a noticeable decline or deterioration in a person's overall condition or abilities.
  • get your brain into gear The idiom "get your brain into gear" means to start thinking clearly, conscientiously, or actively. It suggests the idea of engaging one's mental faculties and becoming focused and attentive.
  • have your day in court The idiom "have your day in court" means to have the opportunity to present one's case or argument in a formal legal setting, where a judge or jury will hear and evaluate the evidence and ultimately make a decision or provide justice. It signifies the right to a fair trial or hearing to settle a dispute or seek justice.
  • put your head over/above the parapet The idiom "put your head over/above the parapet" refers to taking a risk or showing courage by standing out from the crowd or voicing an unpopular opinion. It typically implies speaking up or taking a visible stance on a controversial issue, even if it may result in criticism or backlash. It can also suggest that one is willing to assume responsibility or accountability for their actions or decisions.
  • gaze at/contemplate your navel The idiom "gaze at/contemplate your navel" refers to a figurative expression that means to be excessively introspective or self-absorbed, often to the point of being oblivious to one's surroundings or the concerns of others. It suggests a tendency to focus on one's own thoughts, emotions, or problems without considering the bigger picture or engaging with the world outside oneself.
  • throw your weight around/about The idiom "throw your weight around/about" means to use one's influence, power, or authority in a forceful or arrogant manner to get what one wants or to control others. It refers to imposing one's dominance or asserting oneself in a way that intimidates or bullies others into submission.
  • get/take it into your head that... To "get/take it into your head that..." means to suddenly and firmly believe or decide something, often without any logical reason or evidence. It refers to having a fixed idea or notion in one's mind, typically something unusual or impractical.
  • find/meet your match The idiom "find/meet your match" means to encounter or come face to face with someone who is just as skilled, capable, or equally matched as oneself, often in terms of ability, intelligence, or strength. It implies that the person or entity being referred to has met their equal or someone who is just as challenging to contend with.
  • keep your eyes open/peeled/skinned The idiom "keep your eyes open/peeled/skinned" means to remain vigilant, alert, and attentive, typically to notice or be aware of any potential dangers, opportunities, or relevant information in a given situation. It implies the need to pay close attention to the surroundings or circumstances.
  • your heart leaps The idiom "your heart leaps" means to feel sudden excitement, joy, or thrill; often referring to a moment of intense happiness or anticipation.
  • at your wits' end The idiom "at your wits' end" means to be extremely confused, frustrated, or desperate because you have tried everything possible to solve a problem or deal with a difficult situation, but nothing has worked.
  • have/get your snout in the trough The idiom "have/get your snout in the trough" refers to the behavior of greedily seizing or taking advantage of opportunities or resources, often in a selfish or unethical manner. It originates from the image of pigs, which have a reputation for voraciously dipping their snouts into a trough to consume food.
  • (It's) good to hear your voice. The idiom "(It's) good to hear your voice" is an expression typically used when someone is pleased or relieved to be speaking or reconnecting with someone they haven't had contact with for some time. It conveys a sense of happiness, warmth, or nostalgia in hearing the familiar sound of the person's voice.
  • drag your feet (or heels) The idiom "drag your feet (or heels)" means to delay or procrastinate in starting or completing a task, action, or decision, often as a result of reluctance, unwillingness, or lack of enthusiasm. It implies that one is intentionally slow or hesitant in their progress, potentially causing frustration or impatience for others involved.
  • pull (or drag) yourself up by your own bootstraps The idiom "pull (or drag) yourself up by your own bootstraps" refers to the concept of achieving success or improving one's situation through one's own efforts, without any external help or assistance. It implies taking personal responsibility and relying solely on one's own resources and abilities to overcome challenges or obstacles. The idiom generally conveys the idea of self-reliance and determination.
  • get/sink your teeth into something The idiom "get/sink your teeth into something" means to become fully engaged or involved in something, especially a challenging task or project. It implies committing yourself to tackle something with enthusiasm and determination.
  • wash your hands of sb/sth The idiom "wash your hands of sb/sth" means to disassociate oneself from someone or something, typically to avoid responsibility or to distance oneself from a difficult or problematic situation. It implies a decision to no longer be involved or concerned.
  • twiddle your thumbs The idiom "twiddle your thumbs" means to engage in unproductive and idle behavior, often out of boredom or impatience, by mindlessly moving one's fingers or hands in a circular motion as if turning a non-existent object. It conveys the idea of having nothing better to do or waiting aimlessly without accomplishing anything purposeful.
  • your heart skips a beat The idiom "your heart skips a beat" means to feel a sudden, strong emotional or physical reaction, typically characterized by a brief pause or increase in heart rate due to excitement, fear, surprise, or intense attraction to someone or something.
  • on your person The idiom "on your person" means to have something with you or on your body at all times. It refers to carrying something or keeping it within immediate reach or in close proximity, typically referring to personal belongings such as documents, keys, wallet, or any item that is important or required to be readily accessible.
  • lend your name to something The idiom "lend your name to something" means to associate or publicly align oneself with a person, cause, or organization by allowing them to use your reputation, status, or endorsement. It primarily suggests that you are giving credibility, support, or prestige to that person, cause, or organization by lending your reputation or name.
  • on your toes The idiom "on your toes" means being alert, attentive, and ready to react quickly to any situation. It implies being fully aware and prepared for unexpected changes or challenges.
  • speak with a plum in your mouth The idiom "speak with a plum in your mouth" refers to the act of speaking in a way that emphasizes one's high social status or pretentiousness. It suggests that someone is speaking with an exaggerated posh accent or tone, often associated with elitism or snobbishness.
  • work your fingers to the bone The idiom "work your fingers to the bone" means to work extremely hard or tirelessly, often to the point of exhaustion.
  • against your better judgment The idiom "against your better judgment" refers to the act of doing something or making a decision that goes against your own instinct, knowledge, or common sense. It implies ignoring what you know to be right or wise and acting in a way that may likely have negative consequences.
  • have blood on your hands The idiom "have blood on your hands" means to be responsible for someone's injury, suffering, or death. It refers to someone who has directly or indirectly caused harm to another person, typically involving a moral or ethical wrongdoing. Having blood on your hands implies guilt, remorse, or the consequences of a person's actions.
  • flog your guts out The idiom "flog your guts out" typically means to work extremely hard or make an intense effort to achieve something. It implies putting in maximum effort, often to the point of exhaustion or extreme physical exertion.
  • give your word The idiom "give your word" means to make a promise or assurance. It implies that one is giving their personal guarantee or commitment to fulfill a particular action or to act in a specific way.
  • feast your eyes on something/someone The idiom "feast your eyes on something/someone" means to look at or observe something or someone with great pleasure or admiration. It implies experiencing visual satisfaction or indulgence in the beauty, attraction, or impressive qualities of what or who is being observed.
  • cross your fingers (or keep your fingers crossed) The idiom "cross your fingers (or keep your fingers crossed)" means to hope for good luck or success in a situation. It is typically a gesture performed by literally crossing the middle finger over the index finger, symbolizing a wish for positive outcomes.
  • be burning a hole in your pocket The idiom "be burning a hole in your pocket" means that someone has a strong desire to spend money or an impulse to make purchases. It suggests that a person feels restless or eager to spend the money they have.
  • be down on your luck The idiom "be down on your luck" is used to describe a person who is experiencing a period of misfortune or difficulty in their life. It implies that the individual is facing a string of unfortunate events or circumstances that are negatively affecting their well-being or success.
  • sully your hands The idiom "sully your hands" is a figurative expression that means to involve oneself in a morally or ethically questionable activity or to engage in dirty or degrading work. It implies a tarnishing of one's reputation or integrity by association or participation in something unsavory.
  • ball's in your court, the The idiom "ball's in your court" is commonly used to convey that it is now someone else's turn or responsibility to act or make a decision in a particular situation. It implies that the person addressed needs to take action or make a move in response to a previous action or request.
  • incline your ear To "incline your ear" is an idiomatic expression that means to pay close attention or listen attentively to something or someone. It implies being fully engaged and focused on the words or information being communicated.
  • be music to your ears The idiom "be music to your ears" means that something is extremely pleasant or satisfying to hear. It refers to a situation or news that brings joy, relief, or comfort to someone.
  • sink your differences The idiom "sink your differences" means to set aside disagreements or conflicts in order to reconcile or come to an agreement with someone. It suggests putting aside personal animosity or conflicting opinions in order to achieve a common goal or maintain a harmonious relationship.
  • throw your hat into the ring The idiom "throw your hat into the ring" means to announce one's intention to participate in a competition, contest, or a particular venture. It implies that one is willing to actively engage and take part in a challenge or opportunity.
  • undress sb with your eyes The idiom "undress someone with your eyes" refers to a person looking at someone else in a way that makes them feel as if their clothing is being removed or as if they are being intensely stared at in a suggestive or sexually objectifying manner.
  • put you in your place The idiom "put you in your place" means to assert one's authority or superiority over someone in order to make them feel humbled or subservient. It implies reminding someone of their lower status or position in comparison to oneself, often done as a means of scolding or reprimanding.
  • bet your life The idiom "bet your life" refers to expressing absolute confidence in a statement or decision, to such an extent that one is willing to risk their own life on it. It conveys a strong sense of certainty and conviction.
  • laugh up your sleeve The idiom "laugh up your sleeve" means to secretly or discreetly find amusement or pleasure in someone else's misfortune, mistake, or embarrassing situation, without expressing it openly. It implies that the person takes pleasure in the misfortune privately, as if they were hiding their laughter by covering their mouth with their sleeve, making it not visible to others.
  • thumb your nose at sb/sth The idiom "thumb your nose at someone/something" means to show contempt, disrespect, or disregard towards someone or something. It involves making a defiant or mocking gesture, typically by placing the thumb against the tip of the nose and wiggling the fingers. Figuratively, it is used to convey a sense of defiance, scorn, or mockery towards a person, a group, or a situation.
  • risk your neck The idiom "risk your neck" means to endanger oneself or take a significant chance, often implying the possibility of harm or even death. It suggests engaging in a dangerous or risky activity despite the potential consequences.
  • recharge your batteries The idiom "recharge your batteries" means to take a break or rest in order to regain energy and rejuvenate oneself, both physically and mentally. It refers to the need to replenish and renew one's energy levels after expending a lot of effort or going through a stressful period.
  • plough a lonely (or your own) furrow The idiom "plough a lonely (or your own) furrow" means to pursue one's own path or way of doing something, despite the disapproval, lack of support, or different approach of others. It refers to a person who chooses to go their own way, often independent of the mainstream or popular opinion, in pursuit of their goals or ideas.
  • the man/woman/sth of your dreams The idiom "the man/woman/sth of your dreams" refers to an individual or a thing that embodies one's ideal or perfect vision; someone or something that embodies all the desired qualities or characteristics sought after. It often indicates an individual or object that is considered to be the perfect match or the ultimate goal.
  • have a monkey on your back The idiom "have a monkey on your back" refers to experiencing a persistent and burdensome problem or addiction that is difficult to get rid of or overcome. It represents a metaphorical weight or burden that constantly follows or troubles someone.
  • call something your own The idiom "call something your own" means to consider something as belonging exclusively to oneself and take pride in it, possess or claim ownership or control over it.
  • put your hand to the plough The idiom "put your hand to the plough" means to steadfastly commit to a task or venture and remain dedicated and focused on it, without getting distracted or giving up along the way. It often implies a sense of perseverance, diligence, and determination to carry out a task until its completion, regardless of any difficulties or obstacles encountered.
  • stay your hand The idiom "stay your hand" means to hold back or restrain oneself from taking action, especially from being aggressive or violent. It suggests exercising self-control and refraining from acting impulsively or aggressively.
  • get your goat The idiom "get your goat" means to annoy, irritate, or provoke someone.
  • shrug your shoulders The idiom "shrug your shoulders" means to express indifference, uncertainty, or lack of knowledge about a situation or question. It typically involves raising and lowering the shoulders in a gesture that suggests a lack of concern or a lack of ability to answer.
  • sit on your hands The idiom "sit on your hands" means to refrain from taking action or doing anything, often out of indecision, passivity, or a lack of motivation. It implies remaining idle or inactive when there is a need or opportunity to act.
  • another string to your bow The idiom "another string to your bow" means having an additional skill, ability, or option that can be used to one's advantage. It refers to the idea of adding more arrows (skills) to your bow (capabilities) in order to expand opportunities or increase competitiveness.
  • Your secret is safe with me. The idiom "Your secret is safe with me" means that the person assures complete confidentiality and will not disclose or reveal any confidential information shared with them. They can be trusted to keep the secret confidential and not share it with anyone else.
  • have your hand in the till The idiom "have your hand in the till" refers to someone who is embezzling or stealing money from a business or organization they are associated with, typically by secretly accessing or misappropriating funds. It implies a breach of trust and dishonest behavior.
  • off your own bat The idiom "off your own bat" means to do something on your own initiative or without being prompted or influenced by anyone else. It implies taking responsibility or action independently, without any outside help or encouragement.
  • get sth off your chest The idiom "get something off your chest" means to express or reveal something that has been bothering or troubling you, usually a secret or a pent-up emotion. It refers to the act of sharing or confessing something in order to relieve oneself from the burden or stress associated with keeping it to oneself.
  • play your cards close to your chest The idiom "play your cards close to your chest" means to keep one's thoughts, plans, or intentions secret or hidden from others. It is derived from the game of poker, where holding cards close to the chest prevents opponents from seeing or guessing one's strategy or hand.
  • on the edge of your seat The idiom "on the edge of your seat" means to be in a state of extreme anticipation or suspense, eagerly awaiting the outcome of a particular event or situation. It suggests being fully engaged or engrossed in something and feeling a heightened sense of excitement or tension.
  • have someone in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone. It refers to the ability to manipulate or persuade someone easily and effortlessly.
  • talk your way into/out of sth The idiom "talk your way into/out of something" means to use persuasive or fluent speech to either gain entry or be granted permission (talk your way into something) or to successfully avoid or be excused from a situation or responsibility (talk your way out of something). It implies the ability to convincingly communicate and influence others through speech in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • keep your breath to cool your porridge The idiom "keep your breath to cool your porridge" is a figurative expression that means to remain silent or refrain from giving unnecessary advice or opinions. It suggests not wasting one's words on unimportant or trivial matters, similar to the act of saving one's breath to cool down a hot meal instead of using it to speak.
  • deprive sb of your company The idiom "deprive sb of your company" means to prevent or deny someone the opportunity to spend time with you or enjoy your presence.
  • in the hollow of your hand The idiom "in the hollow of your hand" refers to having complete control or power over someone or something, often implying that one has the ability to handle or manipulate the situation to their advantage. It suggests holding something or someone firmly within one's grasp, as if they were contained within the hollow of their hand.
  • be a figment of your/the imagination The idiom "be a figment of your/the imagination" means that something or someone is not real, but rather a creation of one's own thoughts or imagination. It refers to something that exists only in the mind and has no basis in reality.
  • mix your metaphors The idiom "mix your metaphors" refers to the act of combining or blending different metaphors in a way that creates confusion or inconsistency. It means using multiple unrelated metaphors together, often leading to an illogical or unclear expression. In writing or speaking, it is advisable to avoid mixing metaphors as it can undermine the intended message or create confusion for the listener or reader.
  • dig (deep) into your pocket(s)/resources/savings The idiom "dig (deep) into your pocket(s)/resources/savings" means to expend or use a significant amount of one's own money, assets, or reserves, often in a difficult or urgent situation. It suggests that a person must make a substantial financial sacrifice or effort to fulfill a need or solve a problem. It implies that the individual must delve deeply into their financial resources, whether it be actual cash, available funds, or other valuable assets.
  • be up to your eyeballs in sth To be up to your eyeballs in something means to be extremely overwhelmed or fully occupied with a particular task, situation, or responsibility. It implies being deeply involved to the point where one is completely engrossed or burdened with it.
  • your bread and butter The idiom "your bread and butter" refers to the main source of income or the primary means of making a living. It represents the essential and reliable element that sustains one's livelihood or provides financial stability.
  • stand on your own feet The idiom "stand on your own feet" means to be self-sufficient, independent, and able to take care of oneself without relying on others for support or assistance. It refers to the ability to be self-reliant and responsible for one's own actions and decisions.
  • have your work cut out (for you) The idiom "have your work cut out (for you)" means to have a difficult or challenging task ahead that will require a lot of effort, skill, or perseverance to accomplish. It implies that the task is already planned or defined, making it clear that significant effort and dedication will be needed to complete it successfully.
  • set your hand to The idiom "set your hand to" means to start doing or working on something. It implies taking action or actively engaging in a task or project.
  • put your back into The idiom "put your back into" means to give a task, project, or activity your full effort, energy, and focus. It implies working with dedication, persistence, and physical exertion to accomplish something successfully.
  • I'll wring your/his/her neck! The idiom "I'll wring your/his/her neck!" is an expression used to convey extreme anger or frustration towards someone. It is a metaphorical statement emphasizing the desire to physically harm or punish the person. However, it is important to note that the idiom is not meant to be taken literally, but rather as a strong way to express annoyance or anger.
  • get your ducks in a row The idiom "get your ducks in a row" means to get organized or prepared in a systematic and orderly manner before taking action. It implies arranging or aligning various components or tasks to ensure everything is in proper order and ready for execution. Similar expressions include "get your house in order" or "get all your affairs in order."
  • claw your way back from The idiom "claw your way back from" means to make a relentless effort to regain something or recover from a difficult situation, often through strenuous struggle or hard work. It suggests overcoming obstacles, setbacks, or adversity through sheer determination and perseverance.
  • cock your ear The idiom "cock your ear" means to listen attentively or intently. It refers to the action of tilting or raising one's ear in order to better catch or focus on a specific sound or conversation.
  • take the law into your own hands The idiom "take the law into your own hands" means to take personal actions or seek revenge, without using proper legal channels or authorities. It implies acting as judge, jury, and executioner, often due to a perceived lack of justice or dissatisfaction with the legal system.
  • throw your weight behind The idiom "throw your weight behind" means to use one's influence, power, or support to fully endorse or promote something or someone. It implies using all available resources to ensure success or achieve a desired outcome.
  • Blow it out your ear! The idiom "Blow it out your ear!" is an impolite and vulgar expression used to dismiss or reject someone's ideas, suggestions, or opinions in a rude manner. It essentially means to disregard what the person is saying and suggests that they should stop talking or expressing themselves.
  • have your fingers in the till The idiom "have your fingers in the till" is used to describe someone who is illicitly taking money or embezzling funds from an organization or business in which they have responsibility or authority. It implies dishonesty and is often used to criticize or accuse someone of engaging in financial misconduct for personal gain.
  • give sb a piece of your mind The idiom "give someone a piece of your mind" means to express anger, frustration, or dissatisfaction with someone by speaking openly and without restraint. It implies that the person speaking will say exactly what they think, often in a direct and forceful manner.
  • have got somebody under your skin The idiom "have got somebody under your skin" means to feel deeply affected, bothered, or emotionally influenced by someone or their actions. It suggests that the person has a significant impact on your thoughts, feelings, or emotions, often to a point where it becomes difficult to ignore or let go of their influence.
  • lay your cards on the table The idiom "lay your cards on the table" means to be open and honest about your thoughts, intentions, or feelings, especially in a discussion or negotiation. It refers to revealing one's true position or information to others, without any concealment or deception. It implies transparency and a willingness to be straightforward and direct in communication.
  • scream your head off, at scream yourself hoarse/silly The idiom "scream your head off" refers to shouting or screaming loudly and intensely. It implies expressing strong emotions, often in a state of extreme excitement, anger, fear, or distress. Similarly, "scream yourself hoarse/silly" means to scream continuously until one loses their voice or becomes tired of shouting. These idioms emphasize the intensity and passion with which one yells.
  • try your luck The idiom "try your luck" means to make an attempt or take a chance at something, often referring to a situation where success is uncertain or dependent on chance.
  • with your nose in the air The idiom "with your nose in the air" refers to a behavior in which someone displays an air of superiority, arrogance, or haughtiness. It implies that the person holds themselves in high esteem and looks down upon others or dismisses them as inferior. This idiom suggests a condescending attitude or a sense of snobbishness.
  • get/pull your finger out The idiom "get/pull your finger out" means to start acting more efficiently, to stop being lazy or procrastinating, and to put more effort into completing a task or achieving a goal. It is an expression used to encourage someone to work harder or to increase their level of productivity.
  • your flesh and blood The idiom "your flesh and blood" refers to a person who is genetically related to you, typically a family member such as a child, parent, or sibling. It conveys the strong bond and deep connection shared by family members due to their shared bloodline.
  • keep you on your toes The idiom "keep you on your toes" means to keep someone alert, attentive, or cautious, often by constantly requiring them to respond quickly to changes or unexpected situations. It suggests that one needs to be mentally and physically agile in order to keep up with or anticipate potential challenges.
  • Who's your friend? The idiom "Who's your friend?" is typically used in a sarcastic or mocking manner to question or challenge someone about their association with a particular person or group. It implies doubt or suspicion about the character, intentions, or behavior of the person being referred to as a "friend."
  • give your right arm for something/to do something The idiomatic expression "give your right arm for something/to do something" means to be willing to sacrifice or trade something of great value or importance in order to obtain or achieve something desired. It implies an extreme level of desire or longing for the desired object or opportunity.
  • in your/its (infinite) wisdom The idiom "in your/its (infinite) wisdom" sarcastically refers to an ironic or mocking tone used to imply that someone or something has made a decision or taken an action that is foolish, inappropriate, or misguided despite suggesting otherwise. It highlights the irony of the supposedly superior intelligence or knowledge possessed by that person or thing.
  • has the cat got your tongue? The idiom "has the cat got your tongue?" is a humorous and rhetorical question often directed at someone who is unusually quiet or not speaking when expected to. It suggests that the person is unable or unwilling to speak up, similar to when a cat has seemingly taken away someone's ability to speak.
  • your conscience pricks you The idiom "your conscience pricks you" means that one's conscience is causing feelings of guilt, remorse, or inner conflict over a particular action or situation. It suggests that a person is experiencing moral discomfort or unease due to a perceived wrongdoing or violation of their values.
  • in the back of your mind The idiom "in the back of your mind" means to have a thought or idea that is present but not at the forefront of one's thoughts or consciousness. It refers to something that is not actively being considered or remembered, but is still a subtle presence in one's mind.
  • sink your teeth into sth The phrase "sink your teeth into something" is an idiomatic expression meaning to enthusiastically and wholeheartedly engage with or concentrate on a particular task, project, or activity. It suggests a deep involvement and dedication to something, often implying a sense of enjoyment or satisfaction in the process.
  • nail your colours to the mast To "nail your colours to the mast" means to firmly and openly declare one's beliefs, opinions, or allegiances, regardless of potential consequences or opposition. It originates from the naval tradition of raising flags (colours) on a ship's mast to indicate which side it was aligned with or to signal defiance. Therefore, this idiom suggests a willingness to stand up for one's convictions and make them known, even in the face of adversity.
  • push it, at push your luck The idiom "push it, or push your luck" means to take a risky action or go beyond what is sensible or acceptable, hoping for a favorable outcome, but potentially crossing a limit or jeopardizing one's current situation. It suggests pushing the boundaries of a situation, especially when there is already a level of uncertainty or risk involved.
  • your mother's, wife's, etc. apron strings The idiom "your mother's, wife's, etc. apron strings" refers to someone, typically a grown adult, who is excessively dependent on and controlled by their mother, wife, or another dominant female figure. The phrase suggests that the person lacks independence and is unable to make decisions or take actions without the guidance or approval of that person.
  • make your blood curdle The idiom "make your blood curdle" means to cause extreme fear, horror, or disgust, often to the point of feeling a chill or shudder. It describes something that is deeply unsettling or disturbing, capable of making one's blood run cold.
  • on your mind The idiom "on your mind" refers to the thoughts or concerns that are occupying a person's thoughts at a particular moment. It implies that something is preoccupying their mental space or attention and is often used to ask someone what they are thinking about or if they have something they would like to share.
  • your sea legs The idiom "your sea legs" refers to a person's ability to adjust or become comfortable with the motion of a ship or boat while at sea. It figuratively means being able to navigate and adapt to new or unfamiliar situations with ease and confidence.
  • knock your socks off The idiom "knock your socks off" means to completely astonish or impress someone, often by the extent or quality of something. It implies a significant impact or overwhelming surprise.
  • be your pride and joy The idiom "be your pride and joy" means to be someone or something that brings great pride, happiness, and satisfaction to a person. It refers to a person or object that is cherished, valued, and considered the source of immense joy and pride.
  • Keep your opinions to yourself! The idiom "Keep your opinions to yourself" means to refrain from expressing one's thoughts, judgments, or personal viewpoints on a matter. It suggests that it is better to remain quiet rather than sharing opinions that may be unwelcome, offensive, or unnecessary.
  • get your knickers in a twist The idiom "get your knickers in a twist" means to become excessively upset, worried, or agitated over a minor issue or inconvenience. It implies an overreaction or an unnecessary level of emotional distress in response to a situation that is not deserving of such a strong response.
  • keep your shirt on "Keep your shirt on" is an idiom that means to remain calm, patient, or composed in a situation, particularly when feeling frustrated, angry, or impatient. It advises someone to not overreact or lose control of their emotions and to maintain self-control and composure.
  • you pays your money and you takes your choice The idiom "you pays your money and you takes your choice" means that once you have made a decision or taken an action, you must accept the consequences or the outcome. It emphasizes that one must take full responsibility for their choices, regardless of whether they turn out favorable or unfavorable.
  • have your nose in a book, magazine, etc. The idiom "have your nose in a book, magazine, etc." refers to a person who is deeply engrossed in reading and is absorbed by the content of a book, magazine, or any other reading material. It implies that the individual is mentally preoccupied with what they are reading, often to the point of being oblivious to their surroundings.
  • see something out of the corner of your eye The idiom "see something out of the corner of your eye" refers to the act of noticing or glimpsing something without directly looking at it, often catching sight of it on the periphery of one's vision. It suggests a fleeting or peripheral awareness of something rather than a full, focused observation.
  • have kangaroos in your top paddock The idiom "have kangaroos in your top paddock" is an Australian slang that means someone is eccentric, crazy, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's thoughts or actions are peculiar or irrational, similar to the idea of having kangaroos (which are not usually found in a paddock) loose in the area intended for peaceful grazing.
  • stick in your gullet/throat The idiom "stick in your gullet/throat" refers to something that is difficult to accept or swallow, often referring to a statement, criticism, or situation that is hard to tolerate or digest emotionally. It implies that something is causing discomfort, annoyance, or offense, creating a feeling of being stuck or lodged in one's throat, similar to food being difficult to swallow.
  • pluck up (the) courage to do sth, at pluck up your courage The idiom "pluck up (the) courage to do sth" or "pluck up your courage" means to gather or summon the necessary bravery, determination, or confidence to do something that may be challenging, risky, or intimidating. It refers to the act of mustering the strength and resolve needed to overcome fear or hesitation in order to take action.
  • changed your mind? The expression "changed your mind" refers to the act of altering or revising one's opinion, decision, or viewpoint on a particular matter or course of action. It suggests a shift in perspective or a reversal of previously held beliefs or intentions.
  • scratch your head (over something) The idiom "scratch your head (over something)" means to be puzzled, perplexed, or uncertain about something, causing one to contemplate or think deeply in an attempt to understand or find a solution. It implies confusion or a lack of understanding, leading to a state of bewilderment.
  • quaking/shaking in your boots/shoes The idiom "quaking/shaking in your boots/shoes" means to feel extremely frightened or terrified. It refers to the physical sensation of trembling or shaking that can occur when someone is filled with fear or anxiety.
  • over your head The idiom "over your head" typically means that something is too difficult or complicated for someone to understand or comprehend. It refers to a situation or concept that surpasses an individual's level of knowledge or comprehension.
  • keep you on the edge of your seat The idiom "keep you on the edge of your seat" means to keep someone in a state of suspense, excitement, or anticipation, usually in reference to an event, story, or performance that is thrilling or captivating. It implies that something is so engaging or intense that it literally prevents one from relaxing or sitting comfortably, thus keeping them constantly focused and intrigued.
  • put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "put all your eggs in one basket" means to invest or rely entirely on a single option, venture, or opportunity, instead of diversifying or spreading resources or efforts. It warns against taking a high risk by depending solely on one possibility, as the potential for failure or loss is significant if that option fails.
  • you bet your bottom The idiom "you bet your bottom" means that someone is absolutely confident or certain about something. It emphasizes the certainty and conviction of the person making the statement.
  • rush your fences The idiom "rush your fences" can be defined as taking impulsive or hasty actions without fully considering the potential consequences or risks. It refers to behaving recklessly or making decisions without proper thought or planning.
  • your beauty sleep The idiom "your beauty sleep" refers to the restful sleep one gets, typically during nighttime, which is believed to enhance physical appearance and give a refreshed and youthful look. It suggests that sufficient sleep can contribute to maintaining or enhancing one's beauty.
  • put the roses back in your cheeks The idiom "put the roses back in your cheeks" is an expression used to describe a person whose face becomes rosy or flush with color, typically as a result of improved health or emotional well-being. It figuratively suggests that someone's complexion or overall vitality has returned, indicating their renewed energy, happiness, or improved physical condition.
  • need your head testing, at need your head examined/examining The idiom "need your head testing" (also known as "need your head examined" or "need your head examining") is a colloquial expression used to suggest that someone's thinking or judgement is questionable or irrational. It implies that the person's mental state is questionable or that they may be behaving strangely or illogically. The idiom is often used humorously or sarcastically to criticize someone's decisions, opinions, or actions.
  • have your knife into sb The idiom "have your knife into someone" means to have a strong and active dislike or animosity towards a particular person. It implies harboring a resentment or holding a grudge against someone, often resulting in constantly trying to harm or criticize them.
  • your good deed for the day The phrase "your good deed for the day" refers to an act of kindness or charitable action that a person performs as a moral or helpful contribution in their daily life. It implies that by performing this good deed, the person has fulfilled their obligation or responsibility to help others for that particular day.
  • shift (your) ground The idiom "shift (your) ground" means to change one's position, opinion, or stance on a particular topic or issue. It refers to altering one's viewpoint or argument in response to new information, evidence, or pressure.
  • weave your magic The idiom "weave your magic" means to use one's skills or abilities in a captivating or impressive manner, typically to accomplish or achieve something extraordinary or unexpected. It suggests the idea of performing something extraordinary, almost like performing a magical act.
  • It's your move The idiom "It's your move" is commonly used in the context of a game, particularly chess, to mean that it is someone's turn to make a decision or take action. It is often used metaphorically to imply that the responsibility or initiative lies with a particular person to take the next step or make a choice in a situation.
  • out of your mind/head The idiom "out of your mind/head" refers to someone being irrational, crazy, or behaving in a highly unusual or unreasonable manner. It implies that the person's thoughts or actions are disconnected from reality or logical thinking.
  • flap your gums "Flap your gums" is an informal idiom that means to talk excessively, often in a rambling or aimless manner, without saying anything of substance or importance. It implies that the person speaking is not being productive or providing valuable information.
  • nearly fall off your chair The idiom "nearly fall off your chair" is used to describe a situation or event that is extremely surprising, shocking, or hilarious, to the point where it elicits a strong physical reaction. It implies that the individual is so astonished that they are almost knocked out of their seat in astonishment or laughter.
  • off your guard The idiom "off your guard" means to be unprepared, not vigilant, or lacking caution and awareness. It refers to a state when someone is not expecting something to happen and thus becomes susceptible to being caught off balance or taken by surprise.
  • know/learn/find something to your cost The idiom "know/learn/find something to your cost" means to gain knowledge or experience through a costly mistake or negative consequences. It implies that one has suffered or incurred losses in order to acquire a valuable lesson or understanding.
  • born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family and has been fortunate enough to enjoy a life of luxury and abundance from a young age. It implies that the individual has been given numerous advantages and opportunities without having to work hard for them.
  • feel sick to your stomach The idiom "feel sick to your stomach" refers to experiencing intense physical discomfort, often characterized by nausea or a queasy sensation in the abdomen, usually caused by anxiety, fear, or extreme worry.
  • rack your brains The idiom "rack your brains" means to make a great effort to think or remember something, often when faced with a challenging problem or difficult situation.
  • be worth your/its weight in gold The idiom "be worth your/its weight in gold" means to be extremely valuable or precious. It suggests that someone or something has such high worth that they are comparable to the value of gold when measured by weight.
  • a roof over your head The idiom "a roof over your head" refers to having a place to live or having shelter. It implies having a safe and secure place to call home.
  • with your tongue in your cheek, at tongue in cheek The idiom "with your tongue in your cheek" or "tongue in cheek" is used to describe a statement that is made ironically or with a hidden meaning. It implies that the speaker is not being completely serious and intends for others to realize the humor or sarcasm behind their words. It often involves saying something that contradicts the literal truth or pretending to believe something that the speaker actually does not.
  • earn your spurs The idiom "earn your spurs" means to prove oneself or demonstrate one's abilities in order to gain recognition, respect, or a position of authority or accomplishment. It refers to the tradition in knighthood where spurs were awarded to knights as a symbol of their skills and achievements.
  • drag your heels/feet "Drag your heels/feet" is an idiom that refers to delaying or hesitating to take action or progress slowly and reluctantly. It signifies someone's resistance or unwillingness to move forward or make any meaningful effort towards a task or objective.
  • take to your heels The idiom "take to your heels" means to run away quickly or flee from a dangerous or threatening situation.
  • get the bit between your teeth To "get the bit between your teeth" is an idiomatic expression that means to become determined, enthusiastic, or motivated to accomplish something. It refers to the image of a horse biting down on a bit—a metal piece in its mouth—allowing the rider to have control and direct the horse's movements. In a figurative sense, the idiom suggests that a person has taken control, become eager, and is ready to pursue a goal or task with determination and persistence.
  • claw your way back from sth The idiom "claw your way back from something" means to overcome a difficult or challenging situation through persistent effort and determination. It refers to the process of fighting or struggling to regain one's position, success, or stability after experiencing a setback, failure, or loss.
  • find your way (to…) The idiom "find your way (to...)" generally means to locate or discover the path or route to a specific destination, either literally or metaphorically. It implies determining the right course or directions to reach a particular place or achieve a specific goal.
  • Hang on to your hat! The idiom "Hang on to your hat!" is an exclamation used to advise someone to be prepared for a surprising, chaotic, or intense situation. It suggests that the person should brace themselves or hold onto something (physically or metaphorically) to avoid being overwhelmed or thrown off balance by the forthcoming event or experience.
  • bring you/sth to your/its knees The idiom "bring you/bring something to your/its knees" means to cause someone or something to submit, surrender, or give in completely. It implies a situation where the individual or thing is overwhelmed, weakened, or defeated to an extreme degree.
  • do something with one hand behind your back The idiom "do something with one hand behind your back" means to accomplish a task or activity easily or effortlessly, implying that it requires little effort or skill. It suggests that the person performing the task is so adept or proficient that they can do it without utilizing their full capabilities or without facing any challenge.
  • have your bread buttered on both sides The idiom "have your bread buttered on both sides" means to have the best of both worlds or to enjoy the benefits of two conflicting or opposing things simultaneously. It refers to a situation where someone is able to gain advantages or benefits from two different sources or options at the same time. This idiom suggests that the person is in a fortunate position, as they have multiple options or resources available to them.
  • sing for your supper The idiom "sing for your supper" means to provide services or perform tasks in order to receive a reward or benefit. It implies having to work or prove oneself in some way before receiving compensation or a desired outcome.
  • be/get on your soapbox The idiom "be/get on your soapbox" refers to expressing one's opinions, ideas, or beliefs in a forceful, passionate, or self-righteous manner, typically in a public setting. It implies someone standing on a soapbox, a raised platform used by speakers in the past to make themselves more visible or heard by a crowd.
  • your ass The idiom "your ass" is an informal and slightly vulgar expression typically used to convey a strong emphasis or certainty in a statement. It is often used to express confidence, assertiveness, or defiance. However, the context and tone can heavily influence the meaning and can range from confrontational to playful banter.
  • at/in the back of your mind The idiom "at/in the back of your mind" refers to something that is not actively thought about or considered in the present moment, but is still present or remembered somewhere in your thoughts. It usually implies that this thought or idea is not the main focus, but rather a secondary or subconscious notion.
  • keep your/an eye on sth/sb The idiom "keep your/an eye on sth/sb" means to watch or closely monitor something or someone. It implies being vigilant or attentive to ensure nothing goes wrong or to prevent potential issues from occurring.
  • make your way (smw) The idiom "make your way" typically means to proceed or progress through a difficult or challenging situation or to navigate one's path towards a particular goal or destination. It implies taking deliberate and determined actions, overcoming obstacles, and persevering until one achieves the intended outcome or reaches their desired destination.
  • pack your bags The idiom "pack your bags" means to get ready to leave or prepare to depart for a trip or a new place. It refers to the act of putting one's belongings in a bag or suitcase in preparation for a journey or relocation.
  • turn your stomach The idiom "turn your stomach" means to cause intense disgust or revulsion. It refers to something that is so unpleasant or repulsive that it affects one's physical state, often leading to a feeling of nausea or sickness.
  • mind/watch your step The idiom "mind/watch your step" means to be cautious, careful, or watchful of one's actions or behavior. It warns someone to be attentive and aware in order to avoid potential dangers, mistakes, or pitfalls.
  • be (as) plain as a pikestaff, at be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as a pikestaff" or "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is extremely obvious or easily recognized. It is used to emphasize the clarity or evident nature of a situation, fact, or attribute, leaving no room for doubt or uncertainty.
  • put/throw your weight behind something The idiom "put/throw your weight behind something" means to fully support or endorse something with all your influence, power, or resources. It implies using one's authority, reputation, or position to ensure the success or achievement of a particular cause, idea, or project.
  • pit your wits against someone The idiom "pit your wits against someone" means to compete with or challenge someone intellectually, testing one's intelligence, knowledge, or problem-solving abilities against their opponent in order to prove superiority.
  • tied to your mother's/wife's apron strings The idiom "tied to your mother's/wife's apron strings" means being excessively dependent on or controlled by one's mother or wife. It implies a lack of independence or autonomy, often describing someone who cannot make decisions or take actions without the guidance or approval of their mother or spouse.
  • melt in your mouth The idiom "melt in your mouth" is used to describe food or candy that is exceptionally soft, tender, and delicious, often dissolving easily in one's mouth without much effort. It suggests that the taste and texture of the food are so satisfying that it almost feels as if it is melting as soon as it touches your tongue.
  • Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry. The idiom "Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry" suggests that while one should have faith and rely on a higher power for guidance and support, they should also be prepared and take practical measures to ensure their own safety and success. The phrase originated in the 17th century during the English Civil War and was often used to encourage soldiers to have faith in God whilst still being cautious and prepared during battles. The metaphorical "powder" refers to gunpowder, which, if kept dry, ensures that weapons will be functional and effective.
  • speak out of both sides of your mouth The idiom "speak out of both sides of your mouth" means to say contradictory or inconsistent things, often with the intention of deceiving or manipulating others. It refers to the act of talking from both ends of the mouth, leading to confusion or dishonesty in communication.
  • get your ass in gear The idiom "get your ass in gear" means to start working or moving quickly and efficiently, usually in response to someone being slow, unproductive, or lazy. It is an informal expression that is used to urge or motivate someone to get started or make progress.
  • get your hooks into sth/sb The idiom "get your hooks into sth/sb" refers to forcefully or strongly establishing a connection or influence over something or someone. It implies gaining a level of control, influence, or possession, often with the intention of manipulating or exploiting the situation or individual.
  • your heart skips/misses a beat The idiom "your heart skips/misses a beat" refers to feeling a sudden, intense emotion or surprise that causes a momentary pause or fluttering sensation in the chest. It is often used to describe a reaction of surprise, fear, excitement, or even attraction.
  • have your good, plus, etc. points The idiom "have your good, plus, etc. points" means to have valid arguments or favorable aspects related to a particular topic or situation. It refers to possessing strong points or advantages that support a position or argument.
  • sow your wild oats The idiom "sow your wild oats" refers to a period in a person's life, typically in their youth, when they engage in adventurous, reckless, and irresponsible behavior. It implies the need to indulge in various experiences, often of a sexual or hedonistic nature, before settling down or adopting a more responsible lifestyle.
  • lend me your ear The idiom "lend me your ear" means to attentively listen or give someone your full attention. It is usually used to request someone to listen to what you have to say, often implying that the speaker has something important, interesting, or significant to share.
  • have a/your finger on the button The idiom "have a/your finger on the button" refers to having direct control or influence over an important decision, action, or event. It implies being in a position of power and readiness to act or make a crucial decision when necessary. It can also suggest being knowledgeable or aware of the current state of affairs or being responsible for ensuring things go according to plan.
  • hold your tongue The idiom "hold your tongue" means to keep silent and refrain from speaking, especially when your words may cause trouble, offense, or disagreement. It implies controlling one's speech or staying quiet to avoid escalating a situation or making things worse.
  • have sth on your mind The idiom "have something on your mind" means to be preoccupied or constantly thinking about something. It implies that a person is concerned, bothered, or worried about a particular issue, problem, or situation, which occupies their thoughts and attention.
  • keep your pants on The idiom "keep your pants on" is an informal expression that means to remain calm, patient, or to refrain from getting overly excited or eager about something. It is often used to advise or remind someone to be patient and wait for an appropriate time or outcome.
  • dot your i’s and cross your t’s The idiom "dot your i's and cross your t's" means to pay careful attention to details, ensuring that everything is done correctly and completely. It emphasizes the importance of being meticulous and thorough in one's actions or work.
  • your heart out The idiom "your heart out" is used to describe someone doing something with great passion, skill, or enthusiasm, often surpassing others in the same activity. It implies that the person is doing their best or performing exceptionally well, sometimes outperforming or surpassing the abilities of others.
  • put your neck on the line The idiom "put your neck on the line" means to place oneself in a risky or vulnerable situation, usually by taking a bold or daring action. It involves taking a personal risk or making a significant commitment, often with the possibility of negative consequences or failure. It can be interpreted as going out on a limb or taking a stand for something, even at the expense of personal safety or reputation.
  • pin your faith/hopes on somebody/something The idiom "pin your faith/hopes on somebody/something" means to rely heavily or exclusively on a particular person or thing, often with high expectations or belief in their success or effectiveness. It indicates placing confidence, trust, or hopes in someone or something as the primary source of support or solution to a problem.
  • curl your lip The idiom "curl your lip" means to show disrespect or contempt by slightly raising one's upper lip, often accompanied by a sneer or a smirk. It is a facial expression that conveys disapproval, disdain, or arrogant superiority towards someone or something.
  • find it in your heart to do sth To "find it in your heart to do something" means to have the willingness or compassion to do something, usually an act of kindness, forgiveness, or understanding. It implies overcoming any initial reluctance or resistance and making a conscious decision to do the right thing or extend mercy.
  • have your share of sth The idiom "have your share of something" means to experience a fair or reasonable amount of a particular thing or situation, usually something negative or difficult. It suggests that one has had their portion or allotted share of something, whether it may be problems, challenges, or hardships.
  • put your head above the parapet The idiom "put your head above the parapet" means to take a risk or make yourself noticeable by expressing an opinion or taking a stand on a controversial or risky issue. It often suggests a willingness to face criticism, opposition, or potential negative consequences by speaking out or standing up for what one believes in.
  • I/you wouldn't wish sth on anyone/my/your worst enemy The idiom "I/you wouldn't wish something on anyone/my/your worst enemy" means that a particular experience or situation is so unpleasant or undesirable that one would not want even their greatest adversary to go through it. It emphasizes the severity or extreme nature of the undesired circumstance.
  • lose your life The idiom "lose your life" means to die or to suffer the consequence of death. It refers to the permanent termination of one's existence.
  • have had your fill The idiom "have had your fill" means to have consumed or experienced enough of something, typically referring to food, drink, or an activity. It implies a sense of satisfaction or completion.
  • put your hands up The idiom "put your hands up" typically means to raise one's hands, often as a gesture of surrender or compliance, especially in response to a command or in a potentially threatening situation. It can also be used metaphorically to imply giving up or surrendering in a non-literal sense.
  • know the ropes, at know your way around sth The idiom "know the ropes" or "know your way around something" means to be familiar with or knowledgeable about a particular task, job, or situation. It implies having experience, understanding, and competence in navigating through a specific area or field.
  • set your mind on something The idiom "set your mind on something" means to be determined and focused on achieving a specific goal or outcome. It implies having a strong commitment or resolution to pursue and accomplish something.
  • to your knowledge The idiom "to your knowledge" refers to the extent of one's understanding or awareness of a particular situation, event, or piece of information. It implies that the statement being made is based on the individual's current knowledge and may not necessarily encompass the entirety of the subject matter.
  • take to your bed The idiom "take to your bed" is typically used to describe someone's decision or need to remain in bed due to illness, fatigue, or emotional distress. It means to withdraw from daily activities and spend a significant amount of time resting or recuperating in bed.
  • pin back your ears The idiom "pin back your ears" means to listen attentively or closely, usually to someone speaking or providing important information. It suggests the act of focusing and paying careful attention to what is being said or instructed.
  • don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs The idiom "don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs" means that it is unnecessary or unwise to offer advice or give instructions to someone who is more experienced or knowledgeable in a particular subject or skill than you are. It implies that attempting to teach or advise someone who already knows more than you do is both redundant and disrespectful.
  • laugh on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh on the other side of your face" is used to describe a situation where someone who is initially happy or confident ends up feeling disappointed, embarrassed, or regretful. It suggests that a person's emotions or circumstances may change unexpectedly or dramatically, resulting in a reversal of fortune or sentiment.
  • beneath your dignity The idiom "beneath your dignity" refers to a situation or action that a person considers to be beneath their self-respect or personal standards. It implies that the person feels the task, behavior, or request is demeaning, not worthy of their status or character, and therefore, refusing to engage in it.
  • be on/off your guard The idiom "be on/off your guard" means to be alert and cautious (on your guard) or relaxed and less cautious (off your guard) in a particular situation. It refers to one's state of preparedness or vigilance in dealing with potential threats or dangers.
  • set your cap at someone The idiom "set your cap at someone" refers to the act of, typically a woman, developing a romantic interest or pursuing someone with the intent of attracting their attention and, ultimately, forming a romantic relationship with them. It implies a deliberate effort to capture someone's interest or affection.
  • rushed off your feet The idiom "rushed off your feet" means to be extremely busy, overwhelmed, or continuously occupied with tasks and responsibilities. It implies feeling rushed, unable to find time for relaxation or other activities due to being heavily burdened with work or obligations.
  • on your hands and knees The idiom "on your hands and knees" means being in a position where one is supporting the weight of their body with their hands and knees on the ground. It can also be used figuratively to describe a situation where someone is pleading or begging earnestly for something, often showing a sense of desperation or subservience.
  • your ears must be burning The idiom "your ears must be burning" is a phrase used to convey the notion that someone is speaking about you or referring to you in a conversation. It suggests that the person being spoken about should be aware or prepared to hear what is being said about them.
  • stick to your last The idiom "stick to your last" means to focus on and excel in a particular area of expertise or profession. It advises that one should stick to what they know best and not involve themselves in matters outside of their specific domain. It emphasizes dedication and specialization in one's chosen field. The phrase originates from the craft of shoemaking, where a "last" is a mold used to shape and form shoes.
  • pin your hopes on sth/sb The idiom "pin your hopes on something/somebody" means to place all of one's expectations or trust in a particular thing or person, hoping it will bring success or fulfillment. It implies relying heavily on that specific thing or person to achieve a desired outcome or goal.
  • get a/your foot in the door The idiom "get a/your foot in the door" refers to gaining initial or limited entry into a particular field, organization, or opportunity, usually with the intention of eventually achieving greater success or advancement. It means to establish a starting point or make an initial connection or contact that could potentially open up further opportunities or progress in the future.
  • stick your chin out The idiom "stick your chin out" means to show courage or determination, often in the face of danger or adversity. It implies being brave and not hesitating to confront challenges or take risks. It can also refer to being willing to stand up for one's beliefs, even if it means facing criticism or opposition.
  • weigh each word, at weigh your words The idiom "weigh each word" or "weigh your words" means to think carefully before speaking, considering the impact or consequences of every word chosen. It suggests being cautious and mindful of the language used in order to avoid offending or hurting others, as well as to ensure effective communication.
  • stick it/(something) up your arse! The idiom "stick it up your arse!" is an aggressive and vulgar expression used to convey extreme contempt, disregard, or hostility toward someone or something. It is a figurative way of telling someone to go away or dismisses their opinion or request in a disrespectful manner.
  • shut your gob, at shut your mouth/face The idiom "shut your gob" or "shut your mouth/face" is a colloquial expression used to tell someone to be quiet or stop speaking. It is a direct and informal way of asking someone to stop talking or to keep their opinion to themselves.
  • with your eyes closed/shut The idiom "with your eyes closed/shut" refers to being able to do something effortlessly, easily, or without any difficulty or hesitation. It implies that the person is so familiar or skillful in a particular task that they no longer need to pay close attention or give it their full concentration. They can perform the task reflexively or automatically, as if they were doing it without actually looking.
  • take the weight off your feet The idiom "take the weight off your feet" means to sit down or rest after standing or walking for a long time. It implies relieving physical tiredness or providing a moment of relaxation and relief from exertion.
  • true to your word The idiom "true to your word" means to consistently fulfill promises or commitments made, demonstrating reliability and integrity in keeping one's word.
  • dip your toe into something The idiom "dip your toe into something" means to try out or get a small taste of a new experience or venture before fully committing to it. It implies taking a cautious or hesitant approach to test the waters and gain initial experience or knowledge about something.
  • go/set about your work The idiom "go/set about your work" means to begin or start performing one's tasks, duties, or responsibilities in a diligent and focused manner. It implies taking action and getting started on the work at hand.
  • go your (or your own) gait To "go your (or your own) gait" means to proceed at one's own pace or way, without concern for others' expectations or judgments. It implies the idea of being independent, self-assured, and not conforming to societal norms or pressures. It suggests carrying oneself in a manner that is comfortable and true to oneself, regardless of what others may think or say.
  • with your eyes shut The idiom "with your eyes shut" means to do something very easily or instinctively, without any effort or conscious thought.
  • make your peace with sb The idiom "make your peace with someone" means to resolve conflicts, disagreements, or misunderstandings with that person and reconcile any differences. It refers to the act of coming to terms with someone, typically by setting aside animosity or resentment and finding a way to peacefully coexist or repair the relationship.
  • an albatross around your neck The idiom "an albatross around your neck" refers to a burdensome or troublesome problem or responsibility that one is stuck with or cannot seem to get rid of. It is derived from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," in which the protagonist wears the dead albatross around his neck as a punishment and reminder of his wrongdoing.
  • pull yourself up by your own bootstraps The idiom "pull yourself up by your own bootstraps" means to improve one's situation or achieve success through one's own efforts and resources without relying on external help or support. It implies acting independently and self-reliantly to overcome difficulties or obstacles. The phrase originated from the physical impossibility of lifting oneself off the ground by pulling on one's bootstraps, thereby highlighting the notion of achieving the seemingly impossible through sheer individual endeavor and determination.
  • cross your fingers The idiom "cross your fingers" means to make a gesture by placing one finger over another in the shape of a cross, typically to bring luck or to express a desire that a favorable outcome will occur. It is often used to express hope, optimism, or to wish for good luck in a particular situation or outcome.
  • your heart bleeds (for sb) The idiom "your heart bleeds (for someone)" is used figuratively to convey deep sympathy or sorrow for someone's suffering, misfortune, or difficult situation. It suggests that a person feels extreme empathy or compassion towards another person.
  • put/stick your oar in The idiom "put/stick your oar in" means to interfere in someone else's business or conversation without being asked or wanted, often offering unsolicited advice or opinions. It implies meddling or getting involved in a situation that does not concern you.
  • have your head (buried/stuck) in a book The idiom "have your head (buried/stuck) in a book" means to be fully engrossed in reading, often to the extent of being oblivious to one's surroundings or ignoring other activities or responsibilities.
  • jog your memory The idiom "jog your memory" means to do something that helps you remember or recall something that you have forgotten or cannot remember clearly.
  • Get your butt over here! The idiom "Get your butt over here!" is an informal expression used to command someone to come quickly or to get their attention. It signifies a sense of urgency or impatience in asking the person to be physically present or to take immediate action.
  • your sins will find you out The idiom "your sins will find you out" means that the truth or consequences of one's improper or immoral actions will eventually be revealed or discovered. It suggests that no matter how hard one tries to hide or conceal their wrongdoings, they will eventually be held accountable for their actions.
  • know on which side your bread is buttered The idiom "know on which side your bread is buttered" means to be aware of where one's interests or advantages lie, and to act accordingly in order to maintain those benefits or relationships. It suggests that one should consider the consequences of their actions or decisions and align themselves with the people, organizations, or opportunities that offer them the greatest advantages or benefits.
  • be fighting for your life The idiom "be fighting for your life" means to be engaged in an intense struggle or battle, often referring to a desperate effort to survive or overcome a dangerous situation. It conveys the idea of facing imminent threats or extreme adversity, requiring one to exert maximum effort and determination to stay alive or to prevail.
  • bob’s your uncle The idiom "bob's your uncle" is typically used to express that something will be easily accomplished or achieved. It is often used at the end of a set of instructions or to indicate the simplicity of a solution.
  • end your days/life The idiom "end your days/life" refers to the final period or moment of a person's existence, typically indicating their death or the culmination of their life's journey.
  • beyond your ken The idiom "beyond your ken" means something that is beyond your understanding, comprehension, or knowledge. It refers to a situation or concept that is outside the scope of what a person can comprehend or grasp.
  • get it out of your system The idiom "get it out of your system" means to do something that one feels the need or desire to do in order to satisfy themselves, often to resolve an intense urge or craving. It suggests that once the action or behavior is done, the person will no longer feel the strong need or desire. It can be used to describe the act of engaging in a certain behavior or action to alleviate pent-up emotions or urges.
  • have egg on your face The idiom "have egg on your face" means to feel embarrassed or be in a situation that exposes one's mistake or failure to others. It typically refers to a situation where someone's action or statement turns out to be wrong or foolish, causing them to look foolish or incompetent.
  • wash your dirty linen in public The idiom "wash your dirty linen in public" refers to the act of publicly revealing or discussing private, embarrassing, or confidential matters that should be kept within the confines of a home or organization. It metaphorically suggests airing one's personal issues or conflicts in a public or inappropriate manner, potentially inviting unwanted attention or judgment.
  • have a bee in your bonnet The idiom "have a bee in your bonnet" means to be preoccupied or obsessed with a particular idea or topic. It implies that someone has a fixed thought or concern that they cannot cease thinking about, similar to the way a bee buzzing in one's bonnet (hat) would constantly distract and occupy their attention.
  • beat your chest The idiom "beat your chest" refers to the act of proudly boasting or expressing one's own accomplishments, abilities, or superiority, often in an exaggerated or arrogant manner, to gain attention or assert dominance. The phrase is derived from the action of pounding on the chest, which is commonly associated with displaying power or confidence.
  • stick (or poke) your bib in The idiom "stick (or poke) your bib in" means to interfere or interrupt a conversation or situation that does not involve or concern you. It implies that someone is unnecessarily inserting themselves into a discussion or situation without being invited or having relevant information to contribute. It can also suggest that the person is being nosy or prying into other people's affairs.
  • bite your nails/fingernails The idiom "bite your nails/fingernails" refers to the act of nervously biting or chewing on one's nails, often due to anxiety, worry, or anticipation. It is a metaphorical expression used to depict a person's uneasiness or apprehension.
  • cover your ass The idiom "cover your ass" is informal and often used in a professional or bureaucratic context. It means to take precautions or actions to protect oneself from potential blame, criticism, or negative consequences of a situation. It involves avoiding or minimizing personal liability or responsibility by ensuring that all bases are covered and potential risks are mitigated.
  • be looking over your shoulder The idiom "be looking over your shoulder" means to be constantly worried, anxious, or apprehensive about potential dangers, threats, or negative consequences that might arise unexpectedly. It suggests a sense of caution and vigilance, as if one is expecting trouble or criticism to come from behind.
  • show your true colours The idiom "show your true colours" means to reveal one's real character, intentions, or beliefs, particularly when they differ from what was previously perceived or presented. It implies that someone's true nature or motives are finally exposed or made known.
  • (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "(as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is extremely obvious or evident, to the point where it cannot be overlooked or ignored. It implies that the subject in question is so clear and readily visible, just like one's nose is a prominent and unmistakable feature on their face.
  • say your piece The idiom "say your piece" means to express one's opinion, viewpoint, or thoughts on a particular matter freely and confidently, often in a forceful or assertive manner, regardless of whether or not it aligns with the prevailing opinion. It implies taking the opportunity to speak out and make a statement without restraint or holding back.
  • stick in your throat/craw The idiom "stick in your throat/craw" refers to something that is difficult to accept or swallow, often due to its disagreeable or objectionable nature. It can also denote an idea, comment, or action that feels uncomfortable or remains unresolved and bothersome, much like a piece of food stuck in one's throat. It implies a sense of being forced to tolerate or endure something that is emotionally or mentally unpleasant.
  • show/reveal your hand The idiom "show/reveal your hand" originated in card games, specifically poker, and it refers to the act of openly displaying the cards you are holding to your opponents. In a broader sense, the idiom means to disclose or make known your true intentions, plans, or abilities. It implies being transparent or honest about your capabilities, strategies, or motivations to gain an advantage or make a point in a situation.
  • You bet your boots! The idiom "You bet your boots!" is an affirmative response that means someone is extremely certain or confident about something. It is often used to express strong agreement or confirmation.
  • a frog in your throat The idiom "a frog in your throat" is used to describe the feeling of hoarseness or difficulty in speaking due to a temporary obstruction or irritation in the throat, often resulting in a croaky or raspy voice.
  • shut/close your ears to somebody/something The idiom "shut/close your ears to somebody/something" means to consciously ignore or disregard someone or something, typically by refusing to listen or pay attention to what they are saying or doing. It suggests actively blocking out unwanted information or opinions.
  • get your claws into sb The idiom "get your claws into someone" refers to aggressively and possessively establishing control or influence over someone, often in a manipulative or dominating manner. It implies a strong hold or grip on the person's emotions, actions, or decisions, similar to a predator using its claws to capture and control its prey.
  • be in one of your moods The idiom "be in one of your moods" refers to someone being in a particular state or disposition where their behavior and attitude are noticeably different from usual. It suggests that the person may be feeling moody, irritable, easily annoyed, or even unpredictable in their reactions.
  • (It's) none of your business! The idiom "(It's) none of your business!" is an abrupt and direct response to someone asking a question or involving themselves in a matter that is private, personal, or does not concern them. It conveys a sense of asserting boundaries and declining to provide information or involvement.
  • wash your hands of sth To "wash your hands of something" means to disassociate yourself from a situation or problem, indicating that you want nothing to do with it anymore, and are no longer willing to take responsibility or be involved. It implies that you are leaving the matter entirely to someone else or letting fate handle it.
  • penny for your thoughts The idiom "penny for your thoughts" is a rhetorical question or request that someone asks another person when they appear deep in thought or preoccupied. It is used to express curiosity or concern, suggesting that the person would like to know what the other person is thinking or feeling.
  • fire in your belly The idiom "fire in your belly" refers to a strong and intense passion, enthusiasm, or determination towards a particular goal or cause. It signifies a burning desire or drive within a person that motivates them to work hard and pursue their objectives relentlessly.
  • have your fingers/hand in the till The idiom "have your fingers/hand in the till" refers to someone who is stealing money or embezzling funds, usually from their employer or a company in which they have some financial responsibility. It implies that the person is engaged in dishonest or unauthorized financial activities for personal gain.
  • a dose (or taste) of your own medicine The idiom "a dose (or taste) of your own medicine" means to experience the same negative treatment, behavior, or situation that one has previously inflicted on others. It suggests that someone is being confronted with the consequences of their own actions or behavior, often as a form of justice or retribution.
  • your number is up The idiom "your number is up" is used to imply that someone's fate or time has come, often indicating that they are about to face a particularly significant or unfortunate event, especially their impending death or some form of failure or punishment.
  • throw your weight behind something The idiom "throw your weight behind something" means to support or promote something, usually by applying influence, power, or resources, in order to increase its chances of success. It signifies wholeheartedly and actively backing a particular cause, idea, or initiative.
  • do/try your utmost The idiom "do/try your utmost" means to make the greatest possible effort or to do everything one can to achieve a certain goal or perform a task to the best of their ability.
  • ahead of your time The idiom "ahead of your time" refers to someone or something that is innovative, progressive, or revolutionary for a particular period or context. It suggests that the person or idea is beyond the contemporary norms and is not fully appreciated or understood by their contemporaries, but rather their significance becomes recognized and appreciated in the future.
  • be off your head The idiom "be off your head" means to be crazy, insane, or mentally unstable. It refers to someone behaving in an irrational or nonsensical manner, often as a result of extreme emotions, intoxication, or other factors affecting their mental state.
  • get/have your ducks in a row The idiom "get/have your ducks in a row" means to be well-organized, prepared, and ready for something. It implies having all necessary tasks, details, or elements properly arranged and in order to ensure success or efficiency. It often refers to being fully prepared for a specific event, project, or situation.
  • get off your bike The idiom "get off your bike" typically means to stop being arrogant, condescending, or dismissive towards others and to start being more humble, considerate, or respectful. It implies that the person should abandon their haughty or superior attitude and adopt a more approachable or down-to-earth demeanor.
  • of your choice The idiom "of your choice" refers to the freedom or opportunity to select something according to personal preference or desire. It implies that one can choose whichever option they prefer among a given range of possibilities.
  • dig (deep) in/into your pocket(s), savings, etc. The idiom "dig (deep) in/into your pocket(s), savings, etc." means to spend or contribute money, usually a larger amount than expected or comfortably affordable. It suggests searching for and producing money from one's pockets or reserves, often in a situation where it is necessary or urgent to do so.
  • your hair stands on end The idiom "your hair stands on end" is used to describe an intense feeling of fear, horror, or extreme surprise that causes the hair on one's body, especially the neck or arms, to bristle or stand up straight. It signifies a strong and involuntary physical reaction to a shocking or terrifying situation.
  • earn/win your spurs To "earn/win your spurs" means to prove oneself worthy, skilled, or deserving of a position, title, or honor, typically through hard work, achievement, or demonstrated abilities. This idiom originated from the practice of knights receiving spurs as a symbol of their knighthood, and earning or winning one's spurs signified a recognition of their skills and accomplishments in battle. In a broader sense, it has come to refer to someone proving themselves in any field or endeavor.
  • raise your glass The idiom "raise your glass" means to make a toast or propose a toast during a gathering or celebration. It is a gesture of raising a drink as a symbol of respect, goodwill, or tribute to someone or something.
  • have eyes bigger than your stomach The idiom "have eyes bigger than your stomach" refers to a situation where someone takes more food or makes more commitments than they can actually handle or consume. It means being overly ambitious or greedy, without considering the practical limitations or consequences.
  • put/get something out of your mind The idiom "put/get something out of your mind" means to consciously choose to stop thinking or worrying about something. It refers to the act of intentionally clearing one's thoughts or dismissing a particular subject or concern from one's mind.
  • plough a lonely, your own, etc. furrow The idiom "plough a lonely, your own, etc. furrow" typically means to pursue one's own path, follow one's own ideas or principles, and work independently, even if it means doing so alone or without support from others. It implies that the person is resolute, determined, and unswayed by the opinions or actions of others, choosing to forge their own way.
  • keep your head The idiom "keep your head" means to remain calm and composed in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies maintaining control over one's emotions and thoughts, not panicking, and making rational decisions despite the circumstances.
  • a chip on your shoulder The idiom "a chip on your shoulder" refers to someone who has a persistent attitude of resentment or a ready inclination to take offense, usually due to a perceived or imagined grievance. It implies that the person is always expecting to be insulted or provoked, often leading to confrontation or aggression.
  • hide your light under a bushel The idiom "hide your light under a bushel" means to conceal or downplay one's abilities or accomplishments instead of showcasing them. It suggests that one should not be modest or underestimate their own talents, but rather let them shine and be noticed by others. The phrase often implies the importance of self-confidence and not being afraid to showcase one's abilities or achievements.
  • hang up your fiddle To "hang up your fiddle" is an idiom that means to retire or leave a position or occupation related to music or performing arts. It implies that someone is ending their career or stepping away from their musical endeavors.
  • retrace your steps The idiom "retrace your steps" means to go back along the same path or course one has previously taken, typically in order to find something lost or to reexamine a situation to find a mistake or error that was made. It can also refer to recalling or reviewing past actions or events in order to understand or remember something.
  • take your lumps The idiom "take your lumps" means to accept and endure any negative consequences, hardships, or punishment that one may face, without complaint or resistance. It refers to accepting the difficulties or challenges that come along and dealing with them, even if they are unpleasant or uncomfortable.
  • have your head screwed on The idiom "have your head screwed on" means to be sensible, rational, or practical in your thinking or decision-making. It suggests that someone has a good grasp on reality and is capable of making intelligent choices.
  • don’t put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "don’t put all your eggs in one basket" means not to invest all of one's resources or efforts in a single venture or endeavor, as it may lead to potential loss or failure. It advises against relying solely on one option or taking excessive risks, encouraging diversification and caution instead.
  • keep your own counsel The idiom "keep your own counsel" means to keep your thoughts, opinions, or plans to yourself and not share them with others. It suggests being discreet and not seeking advice or input from others, but relying solely on one's own judgment and decision-making.
  • make sth (all) your own The idiom "make something (all) your own" means to take possession or control of something and personalize it according to one's own preferences or style. It implies adding personal touches or making it unique to oneself.
  • the time of your life "The time of your life" is an idiom that refers to a period of extreme enjoyment, pleasure, or excitement. It represents a time when a person experiences unforgettable moments or experiences that they will remember fondly for the rest of their lives. This idiom typically implies a heightened sense of happiness, fulfillment, or joy during a specific period or event.
  • on your hands The idiom "on your hands" typically means that someone has a responsibility, task, or problem to deal with, often implying that it is time-consuming, burdensome, or difficult.
  • not know your arse from your elbow The idiom "not know your arse from your elbow" is an informal expression used to convey that someone is extremely ignorant, confused, or lacking basic knowledge about something. It implies that the person is unable to distinguish or understand even the most basic or obvious things.
  • be your epitaph The idiom "be your epitaph" refers to a phrase, expression, or statement that summarizes or encapsulates a person's life, achievements, or character. It represents how someone would like to be remembered.
  • make it your business to do sth The idiom "make it your business to do something" means taking it upon yourself to make a strong effort or take personal responsibility to accomplish a specific task or goal. It implies a sense of dedication, commitment, and prioritize working towards the mentioned objective.
  • wrap sb around/round your little finger The idiom "wrap someone around your little finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually through manipulation or charm. It suggests that the person being controlled is easily swayed and willing to do anything for the individual manipulating them.
  • not take your eyes off sb/sth The idiom "not take your eyes off someone/something" means to continuously watch or monitor someone or something without diverting your attention elsewhere. It implies paying close attention to ensure full awareness of someone's actions, movements, or the condition of something.
  • cool your heels The idiom "cool your heels" means to wait patiently, often when feeling restless or impatient. It implies taking a break or calming down in order to allow a situation to unfold or progress at its own pace.
  • put your money where your mouth is The idiom "put your money where your mouth is" means to support or prove one's words or opinions by taking action or making a financial commitment. It implies that if someone truly believes in something or claims to be capable of doing something, they should be willing to invest time, effort, or money to demonstrate their commitment.
  • see your way clear to do something The idiom "see your way clear to do something" means to be able to find a solution or reach a decision so that one can do something, especially when there are obstacles or difficulties involved. It implies gaining clarity and figuring out how to proceed in order to accomplish a particular task or action.
  • in your corner The idiom "in your corner" means to have someone's support, allegiance, or backing, especially during challenging times or situations. It implies that the person is figuratively positioned next to you, ready to provide assistance, encouragement, or protection when needed.
  • be at the end of your rope The idiom "be at the end of your rope" means to be in a situation where you are out of options, resources, or patience, and feel overwhelmed or unable to cope any longer. It indicates a sense of extreme frustration, hopelessness, or exhaustion.
  • get off your tail The idiom "get off your tail" means to stop being lazy or inactive and start taking action or making progress towards something. It is often used to encourage someone to be more motivated, proactive, or industrious.
  • fall on your feet The idiom "fall on your feet" means to quickly and easily recover from a difficult or challenging situation, usually through good fortune or inherent abilities. It implies that even in the face of adversity or uncertainty, one has the ability to land in a favorable position or find success.
  • have your business, sensible, etc. head on The idiom "have your business, sensible, etc. head on" means to approach a situation or task with a thoughtful and practical mindset. It implies being prepared, focused, and making rational decisions by putting aside distractions and personal biases. It suggests having a clear and logical state of mind to handle the matter at hand efficiently and responsibly.
  • get your tongue round/around sth The idiom "get your tongue round/around sth" means to be able to pronounce and articulate a word or phrase correctly, especially if it is challenging or unfamiliar. It refers to one's ability to form the sounds and syllables of a particular language or utterance with ease and proficiency. Example: "The pronunciation of that word is quite difficult, but with practice, I can eventually get my tongue round it."
  • sling your hook The idiom "sling your hook" is a British expression that means to leave or to go away. It is often used in a slightly dismissive or rude manner, suggesting that the person addressed is no longer wanted or welcome.
  • your heart sinks into your boots The idiom "your heart sinks into your boots" means to experience a sudden feeling of disappointment, sadness, or worry, often to such an extent that it feels as if your heart has dropped to the lowest point in your body, causing a heavy and deflated sensation.
  • you can't have your cake and eat it The idiom "you can't have your cake and eat it" means that one cannot have or enjoy the benefits of two conflicting things simultaneously. It implies that making a choice or decision often involves giving up or sacrificing something else.
  • get/take the bit between your teeth The idiom "get/take the bit between your teeth" refers to seizing control or taking charge of a situation with determination and enthusiasm, similar to how a horse takes control of its direction when it bites down on the bit in its mouth. It implies assertiveness, resoluteness, and a willingness to take action.
  • your spiritual home The idiom "your spiritual home" refers to a place or environment where one feels a deep sense of belonging, connection, and resonance on a spiritual or emotional level. It signifies a place where an individual finds solace, comfort, and a true reflection of their inner being, values, beliefs, or cultural roots. It may not necessarily be associated with a religious setting but rather denotes a space or community that offers a sense of purpose, alignment, and fulfillment.
  • You bet your sweet patoot! The idiom "You bet your sweet patoot!" is an expressive way of saying "absolutely" or "definitely." It emphasizes certainty and is often used in response to a statement or question when the speaker is extremely confident in their affirmation or agreement. The term "sweet patoot" is a playful and humorous variation of the word "butt" or "behind," adding a lighthearted and fun tone to the expression.
  • find your feet The idiom "find your feet" means to become comfortable and confident in a new situation or environment, usually after initially feeling uncertain or unfamiliar. It implies adapting, adjusting, and gaining a sense of stability or familiarity.
  • mend your ways The idiom "mend your ways" means to change one's behavior or habits for the better, especially after a period of behaving badly or making poor choices. It implies the need for self-improvement and reform.
  • your secret's safe with me The idiom "your secret's safe with me" means that one promises to keep the information shared with them confidential and not reveal it to anyone else. It assures the person that their secret will be kept secure and not disclosed to others.
  • be/take a weight off your mind The idiom "be/take a weight off your mind" means to feel relieved or have a sense of mental burden being lifted. It refers to a situation where someone feels a great deal of stress, worry, or responsibility, and then experiences a sense of relief or release from that burden.
  • chase your tail The idiom "chase your tail" typically means engaging in a futile or circular activity that does not lead to any productive outcome. It refers to the behavior of a dog chasing its own tail, which is an instinctive behavior but ultimately serves no purpose.
  • be dragging your feet To "be dragging your feet" means to delay or procrastinate in taking action, moving forward, or completing a task. It implies a lack of urgency, reluctance, or resistance towards accomplishing something. It often suggests a lack of enthusiasm or motivation.
  • show your teeth The idiom "show your teeth" typically means that someone is displaying aggression, assertiveness, or hostility, often as a way of asserting dominance or power. It is similar to the literal act of baring one's teeth, which in the animal kingdom can be a display of threat or warning. In a figurative sense, "showing your teeth" can imply showing a fierce or intimidating side of oneself in order to intimidate or deter others.
  • up/down your alley The idiom "up/down your alley" refers to something that is within someone's area of interest, expertise, or preference. It means that something is suitable or fitting for a specific individual.
  • feather in your cap The idiom "feather in your cap" refers to an achievement or accomplishment that brings pride, honor, or prestige to someone. It is often used to emphasize an individual's success and ability, as if they are collecting feathers in a cap to symbolize their accomplishments.
  • gather your wits The idiom "gather your wits" means to collect and compose oneself mentally, especially in a situation that is overwhelming, startling, or confused. It implies regaining calmness, clarity, and composure to be able to think or act effectively.
  • Can I take your order? The idiom "Can I take your order?" is a phrase commonly used by waiters or service staff in restaurants or cafes to ask customers what they would like to order from the menu.
  • put lead in your pencil The idiom "put lead in your pencil" is a slang expression commonly used to refer to the enhancement or restoration of one's sexual potency or energy. It implies an increase in a person's vigor, stamina, or libido.
  • pull a rabbit out of your hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of your hat" means to do or achieve something remarkable, unexpected, or impressive, often in a situation where it seemed impossible. It refers to a magician's act of producing a rabbit from an apparently empty hat, which astonishes and amazes the audience.
  • be in your element The idiom "be in your element" means to be in a situation or environment where one feels comfortable, relaxed, or able to excel. It refers to being in a state or place that aligns with one's skills, abilities, or natural inclination.
  • a spot of how's your father The idiom "a spot of how's your father" is a British slang term that is used euphemistically to refer to sexual activity or an illicit affair. It is a playful and somewhat humorous way to refer to romantic or sexual encounters without explicitly mentioning them.
  • have somebody in your corner To have somebody in your corner means to have someone who is supportive, loyal, and willing to help or defend you in difficult situations. They are on your side and will advocate for you and provide assistance when needed. This idiom often refers to having someone to rely on or trust during challenging times.
  • go out of your way The idiom "go out of your way" means to make an extra effort or take additional steps to help someone or accomplish something. It refers to going beyond what is required or expected, often involving inconvenience or additional time.
  • up to your ears The idiom "up to your ears" means to be extremely busy, overwhelmed, or deeply involved in something, often to the point of being unable to handle or cope with any more tasks or responsibilities. It implies being fully immersed or engrossed in a particular situation or burdened with numerous commitments.
  • fall into your lap The idiom "fall into your lap" refers to something unexpected or fortunate that comes to you effortlessly or without much effort on your part. It means to receive or obtain something valuable, such as an opportunity, success, or good luck, without actively seeking it or working hard for it. It implies that the desired outcome or benefit has been presented to you effortlessly or unexpectedly.
  • get your groove on The idiom "get your groove on" means to dance or move rhythmically and energetically, especially to music. It refers to getting into a good rhythm or finding your own unique style of dancing or moving to the music.
  • have a good head on your shoulders The idiom "have a good head on your shoulders" means to have good judgment, intelligence, and practical thinking abilities. It suggests that someone is wise, sensible, and capable of making sound decisions.
  • blow your own trumpet/horn The idiom "blow your own trumpet/horn" means to boast about one's own achievements or abilities, often in a proud or self-promoting manner. It refers to the act of praising oneself or seeking recognition for one's accomplishments.
  • with your eyes open The idiom "with your eyes open" means to be fully aware of the potential risks, consequences, or difficulties associated with a particular action or decision. It suggests being fully informed and prepared before engaging in something, often related to a serious or significant matter.
  • bored out of your mind The idiom "bored out of your mind" means to be extremely bored or lacking any interest or excitement in something. It implies an intense level of boredom where one feels their mind becoming idle or unengaged due to lack of stimulation or interest.
  • if I were in your shoes The idiom "if I were in your shoes" means to express empathy or understanding towards someone's situation or predicament by imagining oneself in their position and considering how one would act or feel in the same circumstances. It is often used to offer advice, provide support, or indicate an alternative course of action.
  • talk your way out of something/out of doing something The idiom "talk your way out of something/out of doing something" means to use persuasive or convincing words or arguments to avoid or escape a difficult or undesirable situation. It refers to verbally maneuvering in a way that results in avoiding a particular task, responsibility, or consequence.
  • make your presence felt The idiom "make your presence felt" means to assert oneself and make a noticeable impact or impression in a given situation or environment. It implies actively engaging and participating in a manner that leaves a lasting and influential effect on others.
  • be on your best behaviour The idiom "be on your best behavior" means to act or behave in a polite, appropriate, and well-mannered manner, typically in a formal or important situation, to demonstrate one's good character and avoid causing offense or trouble.
  • ring in your ears/head The idiom "ring in your ears/head" refers to a persistent sound or noise that is heard after a loud noise or an impactful event. It implies that a certain sound or experience continues to echo in one's mind even after the event has passed.
  • put/stick your head above the parapet To "put/stick your head above the parapet" is an idiom that means to take a bold or outspoken stand on an issue or to openly express an opinion, even though it may be unpopular or risky. It refers to the image of a soldier peering over the protective parapet wall in battle, leaving themselves exposed to danger.
  • have your wicked way with sb The idiom "have your wicked way with someone" typically means to exert power, control, or dominance over someone else, often in a sexually or manipulative manner, to fulfill one's desires or intentions without their consent. It denotes an act of taking advantage of someone for personal gain or pleasure.
  • know your way around sth The idiom "know your way around something" means to be familiar with a particular place, subject, task, or skill, and to have enough knowledge and experience to navigate or perform it confidently and skillfully. It implies a level of expertise and understanding in the mentioned area.
  • chase your (own) tail The idiom "chase your (own) tail" means to engage in futile or unproductive activities, often resulting in going in circles or failing to make any progress. It refers to the behavior of a dog chasing its own tail, which can be seen as an endless and pointless pursuit.
  • settle your stomach To "settle your stomach" is an idiomatic expression that means to calm or soothe the stomach and alleviate any discomfort or digestive issues. It refers to finding relief or a sense of well-being after experiencing indigestion, nausea, or an upset stomach.
  • here's mud in your eye! The idiom "here's mud in your eye" is an expression typically used when toasting or cheering during a celebratory occasion. It is a humorous and lighthearted way of wishing good luck or expressing good wishes to someone.
  • stand your ground The phrase "stand your ground" is an idiom that means to hold your position firmly and refuse to back down or yield, especially when facing opposition, criticism, or pressure. It implies maintaining one's beliefs, decisions, or rights in the face of challenges, even when it may be difficult or unpopular to do so.
  • with your last/dying breath The idiom "with your last/dying breath" means doing something or saying something intensely or passionately until the very end of your life or until you are physically unable to do so. It implies giving all of your energy, determination, or effort towards a cause or expressing a particular belief or sentiment until your final moments.
  • turn to ashes in your mouth The idiom "turn to ashes in your mouth" is used to describe a situation in which something that was initially anticipated or desired turns out to be extremely disappointing or bitter. It implies that the outcome or experience is disappointing, regretful, or unpleasant, leaving a feeling of disillusionment or dissatisfaction.
  • see your way to The idiom "see your way to" means to be willing to do, accept, or consider something, especially when it involves making a compromise or exerting effort. It implies being able to find a solution or overcome obstacles in order to achieve a particular outcome.
  • laugh/scream/shout etc. your head off The idiom "laugh/scream/shout etc. your head off" means to do something with an extreme or excessive intensity or to a great degree. Specifically, it refers to expressing laughter, screaming, shouting, or any other action so loudly, fiercely, or vigorously that it feels as if one's head might detach or be overwhelmed by the intensity of the activity. It implies an outburst of uncontrolled emotion or amusement.
  • take your hat off to The idiom "take your hat off to" means to show admiration, respect, or appreciation for someone or something. It implies acknowledging someone's achievements, skills, or qualities by metaphorically removing one's hat as a sign of respect.
  • on your honor The idiom "on your honor" refers to a request or expectation of someone to act honestly, truthfully, and with integrity, solely out of their own sense of personal responsibility, without any external accountability or supervision. It implies that the person is expected to behave in a trustworthy manner without any cheating, dishonesty, or deceit.
  • your mind goes blank The idiom "your mind goes blank" means that someone suddenly becomes unable to think clearly or recall information, often in a situation that requires them to remember or respond. It refers to a momentary loss of mental focus or memory.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it too" means that one cannot have or achieve two conflicting or mutually exclusive options or outcomes at the same time. It implies the need to make a choice or prioritize between two desirable but incompatible things.
  • beyond your wildest dreams The idiom "beyond your wildest dreams" means surpassing all expectations or even imagination, referring to something that is unexpectedly or excessively good or grand. It denotes a situation or outcome that is far more remarkable or extraordinary than anything one could have ever hoped or imagined.
  • I'll thank you to mind your own business The idiom "I'll thank you to mind your own business" is a polite way of telling someone to refrain from interfering in one's personal matters or affairs. It implies that the speaker prefers privacy and does not appreciate unsolicited advice or intrusion into their affairs.
  • set your heart on something The idiom "set your heart on something" means to have a strong desire or ambition for something; to be determined to achieve or obtain a specific goal or wish.
  • get your claws into The idiom "get your claws into" refers to someone exerting controlling or possessive behavior over someone or something, often with the intention of obtaining, controlling, or manipulating it for one's own benefit or advantage. It typically implies a strong and often negative influence or control that is difficult to escape or break free from. The idiom is often used metaphorically to describe someone who is trying to get a firm grasp or control over a person, a situation, or an opportunity.
  • the scales fall from your eyes The idiom "the scales fall from your eyes" means that someone has a sudden realization or understanding of something that was previously clouded or obscured. It implies that their perspective becomes clearer and they see the truth or reality of a situation.
  • do your bit The idiom "do your bit" means to contribute or do one's fair share or part in a particular task or effort, usually to help a cause or accomplish a common goal. It implies taking individual responsibility and making a sincere effort towards a shared objective.
  • miss your guess The idiom "miss your guess" means to be incorrect or mistaken in one's speculation or prediction about something. It implies that the person's assumption or guess is proven to be wrong.
  • give your eye teeth for The idiom "give your eye teeth for" means that someone desires or values something so greatly that they would be willing to exchange or sacrifice something extremely precious or valuable in return.
  • have all the cares of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have all the cares of the world on your shoulders" refers to someone feeling an overwhelming burden of responsibility or worry. It implies that the person is taking on more than their fair share of stress and concern, as if they are carrying the weight of the entire world on their shoulders.
  • in your element The idiom "in your element" refers to a situation or environment where someone is truly comfortable, confident, and at their best. It means being in a setting where a person's skills, abilities, or passions shine, allowing them to perform or behave effortlessly and naturally.
  • not put your finger on something The idiom "not put your finger on something" means being unable to identify or understand something precisely or accurately. It refers to the feeling of not being able to pinpoint or specify a particular issue, problem, or feeling.
  • follow your nose The idiom "follow your nose" means to proceed in a direction based on intuition or instinct, without any clear instructions or guidance. It suggests following one's natural senses or gut feeling to find the correct path or solution.
  • feast your eyes on sth The idiom "feast your eyes on something" means to look at or admire something with great delight or pleasure. It implies that the thing being observed is visually captivating or exceptionally pleasing to the senses, often offering a sense of satisfaction or enjoyment.
  • not hold your breath The idiom "not hold your breath" means to not expect something to happen or to not anticipate a particular outcome because it is unlikely or indefinite.
  • get/lay your hands on something To "get/lay your hands on something" means to locate, find, or acquire something, often something that is desired or difficult to obtain. It implies an eager or determined effort to obtain or possess the desired thing.
  • be/run in your blood The idiom "be/run in your blood" means that a certain characteristic or quality is inherent or deeply ingrained in a person's nature, often due to their family background or heritage. It implies that the trait or behavior is so deeply connected to the person's essence that it is an intrinsic part of who they are.
  • bless your pointy little head The phrase "bless your pointy little head" is a sarcastic idiom used to patronize or mock someone for their lack of understanding or intelligence about a particular topic or situation. It implies that the person's thoughts or ideas are naïve, simplistic, or misguided.
  • It will be your ass! The idiom "It will be your ass!" is a colloquial expression used to convey a strong warning or threat. It implies that the person being addressed will face severe consequences or punishment for their actions or behavior.
  • look as if butter wouldn't melt in your mouth The idiom "look as if butter wouldn't melt in your mouth" is used to describe someone who appears innocent or virtuous on the surface, often implying that they may be hiding their true nature or intentions. It suggests that the person's demeanor or appearance is deceiving, as if they would never do anything wrong or mischievous.
  • by the skin of your teeth The idiom "by the skin of your teeth" means to barely succeed or to narrowly escape a difficult or dangerous situation. It suggests that the individual's success or escape was very close or nearly didn't happen.
  • go, retreat, withdraw, etc. into your shell The idiom "go, retreat, withdraw, etc. into your shell" refers to a person's behavior of becoming introverted, aloof, or reserved, in order to protect themselves emotionally. It suggests that the person is avoiding social interaction or isolating themselves from others to feel safe or secure. Just like a turtle retreats into its shell for protection, this idiom implies that someone is closing themselves off emotionally or physically from the outside world.
  • lay down your life for sth The idiom "lay down your life for something" means to sacrifice oneself or to give up one's own life in order to protect or defend something or someone that is considered highly valuable, important, or deserving of such an extreme measure. It commonly implies a deep commitment, loyalty, or devotion to a cause, belief, or person, even to the extent of facing death.
  • go your (own) separate ways The idiom "go your (own) separate ways" means to end a relationship or partnership and choose different paths or pursue individual objectives independently. It indicates a decision to separate or part ways without any intention of continuing together.
  • off your hands "Off your hands" is an idiom that means to no longer be responsible for or burdened by someone or something. It suggests transferring the ownership, responsibility, or duty to someone else.
  • bare your soul (to somebody) The idiom "bare your soul (to somebody)" means to reveal or disclose one's most intimate thoughts, emotions, or secrets to someone else, usually in a deeply honest and vulnerable manner. It involves sharing one's innermost feelings and experiences, exposing oneself emotionally to another person.
  • have your head in the clouds The idiom "have your head in the clouds" means to be preoccupied, daydreaming, or not paying attention to the reality of the situation. It refers to someone who is detached from the present, lost in their thoughts or fantasies, and not focused on practical matters.
  • worth your/its weight in gold The idiom "worth your/its weight in gold" refers to something or someone that is extremely valuable or precious. The phrase indicates that the person or thing being referred to is worth a significant amount and is highly regarded, like gold, which is considered a valuable and precious metal.
  • keep your/both feet on the ground The idiom "keep your/both feet on the ground" means to remain practical, sensible, and realistic, especially in one's ambitions, goals, or expectations. It suggests staying grounded and not getting carried away or becoming extravagant or overly optimistic. It encourages a person to maintain a level-headed perspective and not lose touch with reality.
  • have your work cut out The idiom "have your work cut out" means that someone has a difficult or challenging task ahead of them that requires great effort and concentration.
  • lean on your oars The idiom "lean on your oars" means to rest or take a break from efforts or work, particularly after a strenuous or prolonged period of activity. It conveys the idea of temporarily pausing one's exertion and allowing oneself some respite before continuing forward.
  • sth up your sleeve The idiom "something up your sleeve" refers to having a secret plan, strategy, or surprise that is being kept hidden until the right moment. It is often used to describe someone who has a backup plan or a hidden advantage that can be used to gain an advantage or escape a difficult situation.
  • Go blow it out your ear! The idiom "Go blow it out your ear!" is an expression used to dismiss someone's suggestion, request, or opinion with contempt or disregard. It can be seen as a rude or sarcastic way of telling someone to go away or that their input is not valued.
  • up to your eyeballs The idiom "up to your eyeballs" means being deeply or excessively involved or overwhelmed by something. It refers to being completely immersed or overwhelmed with a particular situation, task, or responsibility.
  • have had your fill of somebody/something The idiom "have had your fill of somebody/something" means to have had enough or more than enough of someone or something. It suggests that a person has reached the point where they no longer desire or tolerate a particular person, activity, or thing.
  • put your hands together for someone The idiom "put your hands together for someone" means to applaud or show appreciation for someone, usually by clapping one's hands. It is often used as an expression to encourage an audience to show their recognition and support for a person's achievements, performance, or contribution.
  • have had more than your fair share of sth The idiom "have had more than your fair share of something" means to have had an excessive or disproportionate amount of something compared to what is considered reasonable or equitable. It implies that the person has had an abundance or an advantage in a particular situation, often to the detriment or unfairness to others involved.
  • meet your Waterloo The idiom "meet your Waterloo" is derived from the famous historical reference to the Battle of Waterloo, where Napoleon Bonaparte suffered a decisive defeat in 1815. This idiom is often used to describe a situation where someone faces a definitive and overwhelming defeat or failure. It implies encountering an insurmountable obstacle or being defeated by a formidable opponent or challenge.
  • set your heart/mind on something/on doing something The idiom "set your heart/mind on something/on doing something" means to have a strong desire or determination to achieve a particular goal or attain something. It implies being highly motivated and focused on accomplishing a specific objective despite any challenges or obstacles that may arise.
  • get your breath back The idiom "get your breath back" means to regain one's normal breathing rhythm after exertion or exhaustion, allowing oneself to recover and resume normal activities or conversation.
  • get your dander up The idiom "get your dander up" means to become angry, agitated, or worked up about something. It refers to a state of being riled up or provoked.
  • with a flea in your ear The idiom "with a flea in your ear" refers to being reprimanded, scolded, or humiliated by someone in a sharp or forceful manner. It implies being reproached or receiving a severe admonition that leaves a lasting impression.
  • trail your coat The idiom "trail your coat" means deliberately provoking or challenging someone, often in an attempt to start a confrontation or argument. It is derived from the act of purposely dragging one's coat along the ground, hoping someone will step on it and respond aggressively.
  • don't count your chickens The idiom "don't count your chickens" means to not rely on or anticipate a favorable outcome until it is certain or has actually happened. It suggests that one should avoid making assumptions or becoming overly confident about the future before the desired outcome is achieved or confirmed.
  • carry the weight of the world on your shoulders The idiom "carry the weight of the world on your shoulders" means to feel an immense burden or responsibility, usually due to excessive worries or pressures. It describes someone who feels overwhelmed with the problems or concerns of others and takes them on as their own, leading to emotional strain or exhaustion.
  • keep your eyes open The idiom "keep your eyes open" means to remain watchful, attentive, or alert to your surroundings or any potential danger or opportunity. It suggests being observant and not missing any important details or information.
  • money burns a hole in your pocket The idiom "money burns a hole in your pocket" means that someone has a strong urge or compulsion to spend money quickly after acquiring it. They find it difficult to hold onto money and feel an overwhelming desire to spend it as soon as possible.
  • call your own The idiom "call your own" means to possess or claim something as your own, generally referring to personal property, accomplishment, or achievement. It implies a sense of pride or ownership.
  • on your own head be it The idiom "on your own head be it" is a phrase used to assign full responsibility and accountability to someone for the consequences or outcomes of their actions or decisions. It implies that the individual will bear the blame or suffer the negative consequences resulting from their own choices or behavior.
  • show your paces The idiom "show your paces" typically means to demonstrate one's abilities, skills, or talents. It can be used to describe someone showing their proficiency or expertise in a particular area, often in a competitive or evaluative context.
  • have/lack the courage of your convictions The idiom "have/lack the courage of your convictions" refers to the level of bravery or confidence one has in standing up for their beliefs, principles, or opinions. When someone "has the courage of their convictions," it means they possess the strength and determination to support and defend what they believe is right, even in the face of opposition or criticism. On the other hand, if someone "lacks the courage of their convictions," it implies a lack of boldness or confidence to stand up for their beliefs, often resulting in compromise or inaction.
  • with your tail between your legs The idiom "with your tail between your legs" means to feel or appear ashamed, defeated, or humiliated, often due to a failure or a negative outcome. It originates from the behavior of a submissive or defeated animal, such as a dog, who would tuck its tail between its legs when feeling scared or defeated.
  • split your sides The idiom "split your sides" means to laugh extremely hard, to the point where it feels as though your sides (the area around your ribs) might literally split or burst from laughter.
  • have another string/more strings to your bow The idiom "have another string/more strings to your bow" means to have additional skills, abilities, or options in addition to the ones already possessed. It reflects the idea of a bow and arrow, where having multiple strings allows for more opportunities to hit the target.
  • gnash your teeth The idiom "gnash your teeth" refers to the act of grinding or clenching one's teeth, often as a response to frustration, anger, or bitterness. It implies an intense feeling of displeasure, discontent, or resentment.
  • bring a lump to your throat The idiom "bring a lump to your throat" refers to a situation or an emotion that causes someone to feel a tightening or constriction in their throat, often leading to a feeling of sadness, sentimentality, or intense emotion. This phrase typically denotes an overwhelming or touching experience that evokes strong feelings, often resulting in needing to swallow hard or fight back tears.
  • with (your) guns blazing The idiom "with (your) guns blazing" means to confront a situation or engage in activity with a fierce, aggressive, or determined attitude. It often refers to facing challenges or conflicts head-on, without hesitation or fear, and displaying courage and vigor in pursuing one's goals or objectives.
  • do your level best The idiom "do your level best" means to put forth maximum effort or to give one's utmost to achieve a goal or complete a task. It implies giving it your best shot or doing everything within your capabilities to accomplish something.
  • a gleam in your eye The idiom "a gleam in your eye" refers to a hopeful or ambitious idea or goal that a person is contemplating or considering. It suggests a sense of anticipation or excitement about an idea that has not yet been fully realized or pursued.
  • do something by the skin of your teeth The idiom "do something by the skin of your teeth" means to narrowly succeed in accomplishing or achieving something just barely and with great difficulty or narrow margin of victory.
  • by the sweat of your brow The idiom "by the sweat of your brow" means to accomplish something through hard work and physical labor. It implies that success or achievement is attained through intense effort and exertion.
  • shoot your wad The idiom "shoot your wad" is a colloquial expression that means to expend or use up all of one's resources, energy, or efforts in a single action or endeavor, often recklessly or prematurely. It originates from the imagery of shooting all the ammunition in a firearm in one shot, leaving oneself with no more options or chances. This idiom is often used to caution against hasty or impulsive decision-making, suggesting that one should conserve resources for future opportunities.
  • keep your ear to the ground The idiom "keep your ear to the ground" means to stay alert and attentive to what is happening or about to happen, typically in a particular situation or context. It refers to paying close attention and being aware of the latest information, trends, or developments in order to react or adapt effectively.
  • at your elbow The idiom "at your elbow" typically means to be within close reach or proximity to someone, usually for assistance or support. It implies that the person or object is readily available, right beside you, or easily accessible.
  • get your head around something The idiom "get your head around something" means to understand or comprehend something, especially when it is complex, difficult, or unfamiliar. It refers to the act of mentally processing and absorbing information or concepts that may initially be confusing or challenging.
  • get/have your end away The idiom "get/have your end away" is a colloquial expression that typically refers to engaging in sexual activity or having sexual intercourse. It is commonly used in informal or humorous contexts.
  • call your shot The idiom "call your shot" refers to the act of confidently predicting or stating in advance the outcome or action one intends to take before it actually happens. The phrase originates from baseball and is often associated with players confidently pointing to a specific spot in the field where they intend to hit the ball before swinging. By calling their shot, individuals demonstrate their self-assuredness and ability to fulfill the desired outcome.
  • work your way around/round to sth The idiom "work your way around/round to sth" means gradually approaching or addressing a particular topic, issue, or task. It implies taking a circuitous or indirect route to reach a desired conclusion or understanding. It can also refer to persuading or convincing oneself or others about something over time.
  • bat your eyelashes/eyes The idiom "bat your eyelashes/eyes" is used to describe someone who is flirting or trying to be charming by fluttering their eyelashes rapidly. It typically conveys the idea of coquetry or playfully trying to manipulate or attract someone's attention or favor.
  • a figment of your imagination The idiom "a figment of your imagination" means something that someone imagines or thinks they see or perceive, but which does not actually exist in reality. It refers to something that is entirely fictional or imaginary and has no basis in truth or fact.
  • on your feet The idiom "on your feet" means being physically or mentally prepared, alert, and ready to take action or face a challenge. It often refers to being in a position of stability or getting back to a state of self-sufficiency after a setback or difficult situation.
  • be back on your feet The idiom "be back on your feet" means to recover from a setback or difficult situation and return to a normal or stable condition, especially in terms of health, emotions, or financial status. It implies regaining one's physical or emotional strength, stability, or independence after facing challenges or adversity.
  • burn your fingers The idiom "burn your fingers" refers to getting involved in a situation that brings negative consequences or results in a loss or failure. It implies that one has experienced harm, damage, or loss due to their own actions or involvement.
  • take sb under your wing The idiom "take someone under your wing" means to provide guidance, protection, or support to someone, especially when they are in need or facing challenges. It refers to the act of assuming responsibility for someone's welfare or acting as a mentor or guardian figure.
  • lose your nerve The idiom "lose your nerve" means to suddenly become fearful, hesitant, or lacking in courage or confidence in a particular situation. It refers to a person's ability to handle pressure, take risks or make assertive decisions being weakened or diminished.
  • out of your mind The idiom "out of your mind" refers to someone being irrational, crazy, or acting in a way that is not logical or reasonable. It implies a state of mind that is beyond normal or sensible thinking.
  • to your dying day The idiom "to your dying day" means to do or hold onto something until the very end of one's life or until the last moment possible. It implies unwavering commitment or belief that lasts until death.
  • thread your way through, between, etc. sth The idiom "thread your way through, between, etc. something" means to navigate carefully and skillfully through a crowded or difficult situation, finding a path or route that allows progress. It implies maneuvering through obstacles or challenges with caution and precision, similar to threading a needle.
  • be (down) on your uppers The idiom "be (down) on your uppers" means to be in a state of extreme poverty or financial hardship. It describes a situation where someone has little to no money or resources. It implies that they are struggling to make ends meet and may be facing difficult circumstances due to lack of financial stability.
  • drag your/its heels The idiom "drag your/its heels" means to delay or procrastinate, to act slowly or reluctantly in completing a task or making a decision. It refers to the resistance of moving forward or taking action, as if someone or something is intentionally slowing down progress.
  • buck your ideas up The idiom "buck your ideas up" means to improve one's performance, behavior, or attitude; to make an effort to do better or to become more focused and motivated.
  • wear sth on your sleeve To wear something on your sleeve means to openly and proudly display or express your emotions, beliefs, or interests. It refers to someone who is not afraid to show their true feelings or personality to others, without concealing their thoughts or sentiments. It implies being transparent and genuine in conveying one's emotions or opinions without hesitation.
  • a man/woman after your own heart The idiom "a man/woman after your own heart" is used to describe someone who shares similar interests, values, or qualities with another person. It suggests that the individual being referred to is highly likeable and pleases the person speaking or thinking about them.
  • take your eye off the ball The idiom "take your eye off the ball" means to become distracted or lose focus on the most important aspect of a situation. It refers to a momentary lapse in attention, where one fails to closely monitor or pay attention to a specific task or objective. This can often lead to mistakes, missed opportunities, or a failure to achieve desired outcomes.
  • bite your lip The idiom "bite your lip" means to force oneself to remain silent or stop oneself from saying something, typically when feeling annoyed, angry, or upset. It refers to the act of physically biting down on one's own lip to suppress an emotional or impulsive response.
  • put your heads together The idiom "put your heads together" means to collaborate or work together as a team to solve a problem or come up with a solution. It implies combining knowledge, ideas, or efforts in a collective and cooperative manner to achieve a common goal.
  • in your hour of need The idiom "in your hour of need" means during a time of great difficulty, when you are facing a crisis or are in desperate need of help or support. It refers to a situation where someone requires assistance, typically in times of personal or emotional distress. It implies the expectation of others being available to provide aid or comfort during their most challenging moments.
  • your meat and two veg The idiom "your meat and two veg" refers to a traditional or typical meal consisting of a piece of meat accompanied by two different cooked vegetables. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something basic, essential, or unexciting. In some contexts, it can refer to male genitalia, using euphemistic language, but this usage is relatively rare and considered informal or vulgar.
  • strengthen your hand The idiom "strengthen your hand" means to improve one's position, power, or influence in a particular situation. It refers to taking actions or measures that increase one's capabilities, resources, or authority to achieve a desired outcome or negotiate more effectively. It is often used in contexts where one needs to enhance their position in order to overcome obstacles, gain leverage, or achieve success.
  • break your neck The idiom "break your neck" means taking extreme risks or exerting maximum effort to achieve something. It implies going to great lengths or pushing oneself to the limit, often for success or accomplishment in a particular endeavor.
  • are your ears burning? The idiom "are your ears burning?" is a rhetorical question used to inquire whether someone is aware that others have been talking about them in their absence. It suggests that the person's ears might feel hot or tingly due to the attention and discussion focused on them.
  • with one hand behind your back The idiom "with one hand behind your back" is a phrase used to convey that someone is able to easily accomplish a task or achieve a goal, even if they face some difficulty or handicap. It implies that the person is so skilled or proficient in a particular area that they can perform the task effortlessly, as if it requires minimal effort or with one less advantage.
  • don't put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "don't put all your eggs in one basket" means that one should not rely solely on a single approach or option, as it can result in a significant loss if that option fails. It advises against risking everything on one thing and suggests diversifying or spreading out one's resources, efforts, or investments to minimize potential losses.
  • caught with your pants down The idiom "caught with your pants down" refers to a situation where someone is unexpectedly or embarrassingly exposed or unprepared. It typically implies being caught off guard or unaware of a particular situation, often leading to embarrassment or disadvantage. The idiom’s origin is related to the literal act of being caught with one's pants down, which symbolizes vulnerability or unguardedness.
  • keep your head above water The idiom "keep your head above water" means to manage or survive a difficult situation, often of a financial or emotional nature, by just meeting the basic requirements or staying afloat. It implies struggling to cope with and maintain stability amidst challenging circumstances.
  • feel (it) in your bones (that…) The idiom "feel (it) in your bones (that…)" means to have a strong instinctive or intuitive feeling about something. It refers to an intense and deeply rooted sensation or belief that cannot be easily explained or proven.
  • speak your mind The idiom "speak your mind" means expressing one's thoughts, opinions, or feelings openly and honestly, without hesitation or reservation. It implies being straightforward and unfiltered in conveying one's viewpoint on a particular matter.
  • cash in your chips The idiom "cash in your chips" refers to a situation where a person decides to give up or retire from a particular endeavor, usually to reap the benefits or rewards they have gained until that point. It originated from the practice in casinos, where poker players would exchange their poker chips for cash when leaving the game.
  • lay/put your cards on the table The idiom "lay/put your cards on the table" means to be open and honest about your intentions, opinions, or information, especially in order to resolve a problem or reach an agreement. It refers to the act of revealing your true position or revealing all the relevant facts in a discussion or negotiation, just like a card player shows their hand on a table in a game.
  • (out from) under your nose, at (from) under your nose The idiom "(out from) under your nose" or "at (from) under your nose" can be defined as something that is happening or being done very close to you without you noticing or being aware of it. It implies that something is right in front of you, but you are oblivious to its presence or actions. It often refers to situations where someone overlooks or fails to perceive something that is obvious or within their immediate surroundings.
  • know your onions, at know your stuff The idiom "know your onions" or "know your stuff" means to have a thorough knowledge, expertise, or understanding of a particular subject or skill. It refers to being well-informed and knowledgeable in a specific area. This idiom is often used to indicate someone's competence or proficiency in a particular field.
  • put your foot down The idiom "put your foot down" means to assert oneself firmly and take a strong stance on something, usually by refusing to accept or tolerate a certain situation or behavior any longer. It signifies the act of making a definitive decision or taking action to express one's disapproval or to establish control in a particular situation.
  • be conspicuous by your absence The idiomatic expression "be conspicuous by your absence" means that someone or something is noticeably missing or absent from a particular situation, event, or place. It implies that the absence is so significant or unexpected that it draws attention and is easily noticeable.
  • get something off your chest The idiom "get something off your chest" means to openly and honestly discuss or express something that has been bothering, burdening, or preoccupying one's thoughts or emotions. It refers to the act of sharing one's feelings, opinions, or concerns in order to find relief, closure, or resolution.
  • find your tongue The idiom "find your tongue" means to regain the ability to speak or to overcome a temporary loss of words due to surprise, shock, or shyness. It refers to someone who has been unable to express themselves verbally but has now found the words to communicate.
  • too big for your britches, at too big for your boots The idiom "too big for your britches" (or "too big for your boots" in some regions) is used to describe someone who is behaving in an arrogant, conceited, or superior manner, especially when they do not possess the skills, abilities, or accomplishments to justify such an attitude. It suggests that the person's inflated self-importance exceeds their actual status or competence.
  • of your own making The idiom "of your own making" refers to something that is the result or consequence of one's own actions, decisions, or behavior. It implies that the situation, problem, or outcome is entirely due to the choices and actions of the person involved.
  • Get your ass over here! The idiom "Get your ass over here!" is an expression used to forcefully or urgently demand someone's presence or immediate arrival. It is usually employed when the speaker is angry, frustrated, or in a hurry to have someone come closer or join them. The phrase "ass" is a vulgar slang term for buttocks, indicating the speaker's intensity or urgency in demanding the person's presence.
  • pluck up your courage The idiom "pluck up your courage" refers to gathering or summoning one's bravery or boldness in order to face a difficult or challenging situation. It means to muster the strength or confidence to confront one's fears or take a risk.
  • your mind is a blank/goes blank The idiom "your mind is a blank/goes blank" refers to a situation where someone is unable to think clearly or cannot recall something important. It implies a temporary loss of memory or inability to concentrate, often resulting in a state of confusion or lack of ideas.
  • get sth out of your system The idiom "get something out of your system" means to engage in or satisfy a particular desire, urge, or emotion in order to alleviate its intensity or to allow oneself to move on from it. It refers to the idea of removing or purging something from one's mind or body to gain a sense of closure or relief.
  • move/shift your arse! The idiom "move/shift your arse!" is an informal and somewhat rude way of telling someone to hurry up or move quickly. It is often used to express impatience or frustration when someone is perceived as being slow or lazy.
  • have your eye on sth To have your eye on something means to be interested in it or to be considering it as a potential choice. It implies that you are observing or paying attention to that thing with a desire or intention to acquire or achieve it. It can refer to a physical object that you want to possess or a goal or opportunity that you are pursuing.
  • lose your shirt The definition of the idiom "lose your shirt" is to lose a substantial amount of money or assets, often in a risky investment or venture.
  • have somebody’s blood on your hands The idiom "have somebody's blood on your hands" means to have caused someone's death or be responsible for someone's killing, either directly or indirectly. It implies guilt or culpability for the harm inflicted upon another person.
  • know your place The idiom "know your place" refers to the notion of understanding and accepting one's position or role in a hierarchical or social structure. It implies that one should not overstep boundaries, challenge authority, or assert oneself in a way that goes against the established order of things. Knowing one's place often suggests a level of submission or deference to those in positions of power or authority.
  • in a world of your own The idiom "in a world of your own" refers to someone who is deeply engrossed in their own thoughts, daydreaming, or disconnected from their surroundings. It suggests that the person is mentally or emotionally detached from the present moment and lost in their own thoughts or imagination.
  • drop your bundle The idiom "drop your bundle" means to lose control emotionally, become overly anxious, or panic in a challenging or stressful situation. It refers to someone's inability to handle pressure or keep composure, typically resulting in a breakdown or inability to function effectively.
  • more than your job's worth The idiom "more than your job's worth" means that something is not worth the risk or consequences associated with doing it, often implying that it would lead to negative repercussions or loss. It suggests that the potential repercussions outweigh any potential benefits or gains one might achieve.
  • not believe your eyes/ears The idiom "not believe your eyes/ears" refers to a state of disbelief or astonishment upon witnessing or hearing something that seems so incredible or unexpected that one questions its validity or reality. It suggests the idea of being skeptical or finding it difficult to accept what one is seeing or hearing as true.
  • off your chump The idiom "off your chump" is an informal and slightly dated expression that means someone is behaving in a foolish, irrational, or nonsensical manner. It implies that the person's actions or words are unreasonable or lacking in common sense.
  • Burn not your house to fright the mouse away The idiom "Burn not your house to fright the mouse away" means that one should not use excessive or harmful methods to solve a minor or inconsequential problem. It advises against taking drastic measures or causing unnecessary harm to oneself or others in order to address a small inconvenience.
  • as fast as your legs can carry you The idiom "as fast as your legs can carry you" means to run or move as quickly as possible using your own physical ability, usually to escape danger or to reach a destination urgently.
  • hitch your wagon to somebody/something The idiom "hitch your wagon to somebody/something" means to attach or align oneself with someone or something that is powerful, successful, or influential. It suggests relying on or forming a partnership with someone or something for mutual benefit or advancement. It can also imply putting one's fate or success in the hands of someone or something more capable.
  • claw your way (smw) The idiom "claw your way" means to exert great effort, often while facing obstacles or challenges, in order to achieve or accomplish something. It implies a struggle or a determined and tenacious approach in pursuing a goal.
  • be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind" refers to experiencing extreme levels of a particular emotion or state. It emphasizes being completely overwhelmed, excessively affected, or intensely absorbed in a specific feeling or circumstance. The term "out of your mind" indicates the extent to which one is consumed by that state and implies a temporary loss of rational thinking or control due to the intensity of the emotion or situation being described.
  • your bag The idiom "your bag" is an informal phrase used to describe something that a person is particularly interested in or knowledgeable about, or something they enjoy doing or prefer. It can also refer to something that is within a person's skill set or area of expertise. It is often used to ask or assert whether a particular topic or activity aligns with someone's interests or abilities.
  • with egg on your face The idiom "with egg on your face" is used to describe a situation where someone feels embarrassed, humiliated, or foolish due to their own mistake, failure, or public humiliation. It suggests the image of having literal egg on one's face as a sign of a blunder or a humiliating experience.
  • off your rocker The phrase "off your rocker" is an idiom used to describe someone who is crazy, irrational, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's behavior or thinking is not rational or in line with societal norms.
  • mind your Ps and Qs The idiom "mind your Ps and Qs" means to be cautious or mindful of one's behavior, words, or manners. It is often used as a reminder to be on one's best behavior and to exercise caution in how one conducts themselves. The origin of the phrase is uncertain, but it is believed to have originated in the 17th century. The "Ps" refers to pints and the "Qs" to quarts, which may have been used as a reminder to pay attention to the amount of alcohol consumed in pubs. However, this explanation is speculative and has other possible origins as well.
  • hang your hat The idiom "hang your hat" means to find a place where you feel comfortable, settled, or at home. It refers to the act of physically hanging one's hat on a hook or stand after entering a location, symbolizing a sense of resting, staying, or making oneself at ease in a particular place.
  • you can bet your bottom dollar, at you can bet your life The idiom "you can bet your bottom dollar" or "you can bet your life" is a phrase that expresses absolute certainty or confidence in something. It implies that one is willing to bet everything they have, even their last dollar or their life, on the certainty of the statement or situation being discussed.
  • lose your marbles The idiom "lose your marbles" means to become mentally unbalanced, irrational, or crazy.
  • put (your) money on sb/sth The idiom "put (your) money on sb/sth" means to predict or bet on someone or something as being likely to succeed or win. It expresses confidence or belief in a particular person or thing.
  • not see beyond/past the end of your nose The idiom "not see beyond/past the end of your nose" means to be shortsighted or unaware of what is happening or might happen beyond one's immediate surroundings or perspective. It refers to a limited vision or understanding that fails to consider broader possibilities or consequences.
  • make a rod for your own back The idiom "make a rod for your own back" means that someone is creating difficulties or problems for themselves, often by their own actions or decisions, which will ultimately lead to negative consequences or additional hardships in the future. It suggests that someone is behaving in a way that will result in unfavorable outcomes or self-inflicted troubles.
  • stick to your ribs The idiom "stick to your ribs" means that the food or drink being referred to is heavy or substantial, providing a feeling of satisfaction and nourishment.
  • be up your alley, at be up your street The idiom "be up your alley, be up your street" is used to express that something is suited to someone's interests or preferences. It suggests that something is in line with someone's capabilities or inclinations.
  • not pass your lips The idiom "not pass your lips" means to not speak or mention something. It refers to withholding or keeping information to oneself and not expressing it verbally.
  • overplay your hand The idiom "overplay your hand" means to push one's advantage too far or to overestimate one's abilities or influence in a particular situation, resulting in a negative outcome or loss of advantage. It suggests that someone has become overly confident or arrogant, leading them to make a mistake or take actions that go beyond what is reasonable or achievable.
  • keep your nose clean To "keep your nose clean" means to behave well, stay out of trouble, and avoid any involvement in illegal or suspicious activities. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining a good reputation by staying away from anything that may lead to negative consequences or trouble.
  • be banging/hitting your head against a brick wall The idiom "to be banging/hitting your head against a brick wall" means to be persistently trying to achieve something or solve a problem, but encountering constant obstacles or opposition that make progress difficult or impossible. It implies a frustrating and futile effort, as if one's actions are ineffective and unproductive.
  • get/put your own house in order The idiom "get/put your own house in order" means to focus on resolving one's own problems, improving one's own situation or addressing one's own responsibilities before attempting to interfere, criticize, or offer advice to others. It implies the importance of self-reflection, self-improvement, and taking care of one's own affairs.
  • have/be left with egg on/all over your face The idiom "have/be left with egg on/all over your face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated by a mistake or failure that becomes evident to others. It refers to the feeling of shame or humiliation one experiences when their actions or words backfire on them, causing them to look foolish or incompetent.
  • not mince (your) words The idiom "not mince (your) words" means to speak bluntly and directly without euphemism or polite language, expressing one's thoughts or opinions in a straightforward and honest manner. It entails being frank and not sugarcoating or softening the message to avoid offense or confrontation.
  • have the courage of your/its convictions The idiom "have the courage of your/its convictions" means to have confidence and determination in what one believes or advocates, even when facing opposition or challenges. It refers to the ability to stay true to one's principles and beliefs, regardless of any doubts or criticisms. It suggests being steadfast and resolute in defending one's opinions and taking action accordingly.
  • have stars in your eyes The idiom "have stars in your eyes" means to be idealistic, romantic, or overly optimistic, often to the point of being naïve or unrealistic. It refers to a state of being captivated by dreams or fantasies, which might lead to a reduced ability to perceive or evaluate reality accurately.
  • have had your chips The idiom "have had your chips" means to have reached a point of no return, where one has experienced a failure or a loss that cannot be undone or recovered. It often implies that someone has exhausted all their chances or opportunities and is left with no further options or hope for success. Originating from the game of poker, "chips" represent a player's stake or money, so the idiom suggests that all the resources have been used up and there is no possibility of a favorable outcome.
  • be your last resort The idiom "be your last resort" refers to a situation where all other options or alternatives have been exhausted and one is left with no choice but to resort to a particular action or solution. It signifies that this action is the final or ultimate option, usually taken in desperate circumstances when all else has failed.
  • be rubbing your hands The idiom "be rubbing your hands" means to be eagerly anticipating or excited about something, typically due to a potential advantage, gain, or success. It implies a sense of satisfaction and anticipation, as if one is metaphorically rubbing their hands together in excitement or anticipation.
  • be talking out of your arse The idiom "be talking out of your arse" is an informal and usually crude way of saying that someone is speaking nonsense, making baseless claims, or exaggerating without any factual basis or logical reasoning. It suggests that the person is not speaking truthfully or sensibly and is making things up.
  • the answer to your prayers The definition of the idiom "the answer to your prayers" is a solution or outcome that is exactly what someone has been hoping or praying for, generally implying that it comes at an opportune time or in a fortunate manner.
  • throw your weight behind sb/sth The idiom "throw your weight behind someone/something" means to support or use one's influence, power, or resources to back someone or something. It implies giving strong support and actively working towards the success or promotion of a person or cause.
  • be talking through your hat The idiom "be talking through your hat" means to speak nonsense or make unfounded claims without having proper knowledge or understanding about a particular topic. It implies that someone is speaking without any basis or evidence, often exaggerating or fabricating information.
  • I'll thank you to keep your opinions to yourself. The idiom "I'll thank you to keep your opinions to yourself" is used to politely request or demand that someone refrain from expressing their thoughts or viewpoints. It implies that the speaker does not value or want to hear the opinions being offered.
  • have your feet on the ground The idiom "have your feet on the ground" means to be practical, realistic, and level-headed in thinking and behavior. It suggests that a person is sensible, down-to-earth, and firmly rooted in reality, as opposed to being overly dreamy, idealistic, or disconnected from practical considerations.
  • loosen your grip The idiom "loosen your grip" means to relax control or lessen one's firm hold on something, whether it be a physical object or a situation. It often suggests allowing more freedom or flexibility, and letting go of excessive control or rigidity.
  • couldn't act/argue/fight your way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't act/argue/fight your way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally inept or lacking skill in a particular area. It implies that the person is so incompetent that they would struggle to perform even the most basic tasks, such as escaping from a paper bag, acting convincingly, making a compelling argument, or engaging in a physical altercation.
  • the fullness of your heart "The fullness of your heart" is an idiom that refers to a feeling of great love, joy, or contentment that one experiences deeply within oneself. It signifies an overwhelming emotional state where one's heart is so brimming with positive emotions that it cannot be contained. It suggests a sense of completeness and fulfillment in one's emotional state.
  • too big for your britches The idiom "too big for your britches" refers to someone who is arrogant, overconfident, or assuming a level of importance or skill that is unwarranted. It implies that the person's ego has surpassed their actual abilities or status, making them seem conceited or boastful.
  • cast your net wider The idiom "cast your net wider" means to extend one's search or options beyond what is initially considered or explored. It suggests expanding the range of possibilities or opportunities to increase chances of success or finding what is desired.
  • use your head for more than a hatrack The idiom "use your head for more than a hatrack" means to encourage someone to think or use their intellect and common sense rather than solely relying on their head as a place to hang a hat. It implies that someone should employ their intelligence and mental capacities for problem solving, decision making, or being resourceful.
  • take your mind off something The idiom "take your mind off something" means to divert or distract one's thoughts or attention from a particular subject or problem, typically in order to find relief or temporary respite from it. It refers to engaging in activities or focusing on other matters in order to temporarily stop thinking about something that is causing worry, stress, or anxiety.
  • tip your hat The idiom "tip your hat" means to show respect or honor to someone, usually by nodding or physically lifting the brim of one's hat as a gesture of greeting or acknowledgment. It can also indicate admiration or gratitude towards someone.
  • open your mouth The idiom "open your mouth" means to speak or express oneself freely and without hesitation. It suggests being honest, assertive, and vocal about one's thoughts, opinions, or feelings.
  • it's your own lookout The idiom "it's your own lookout" means that you are responsible for the consequences, outcomes, or risks associated with your actions or decisions. It implies that the individual should be aware of the possible negative outcomes but it is no one else's responsibility to prevent or warn you about them.
  • feast your eyes The idiom "feast your eyes" means to enjoy or delight in looking at something, usually something visually appealing or impressive. It implies taking pleasure in observing or admiring something with great satisfaction.
  • save your (own) skin/hide/neck The idiom "save your (own) skin/hide/neck" means to take actions or make decisions in order to protect oneself or avoid harm or trouble, often disregarding others or acting out of self-interest. It implies prioritizing one's own welfare or survival above everything else.
  • knit your brow(s) The idiom "knit your brow(s)" refers to the act of furrowing or contracting one's forehead muscles, usually as a sign of confusion, deep concentration, or concern. It is an expression often used to describe a person's facial expression when they are thinking hard or trying to understand something.
  • worth your salt The idiom "worth your salt" refers to someone who is competent, skilled, or deserving of respect and admiration. It originates from ancient times when salt was a valuable commodity, and being worth one's salt meant being worth the price or value of the salt one was paid as wages.
  • be off your food The idiom "be off your food" means to have a decreased or complete loss of appetite. It is often used to describe a temporary condition where someone is not interested in or not able to eat.
  • raise your eyebrows To "raise your eyebrows" is an idiom that means to express surprise, disbelief, or disapproval about something. It involves lifting one's eyebrows, often accompanied by widening the eyes, to show astonishment or skepticism.
  • set your heart on sth/doing sth The idiom "set your heart on sth/doing sth" means to have a strong and determined desire or goal to do or obtain something. It implies a deep emotional attachment or determination towards achieving a particular objective.
  • have your/its moments The idiom "have your/its moments" refers to something or someone that displays occasional bouts of excellence, brilliance, or exceptional performance, but is not consistently outstanding or exceptional all the time. It implies that there are instances or periods when the subject is highly impressive or commendable, but it may be followed by mediocrity or average performance.
  • put in your two penn’orth The idiom "put in your two penn'orth" or "put in your two cents" means to contribute or give your opinion on a matter, even if it may not hold significant value or importance. It implies expressing one's viewpoint, regardless of its worth or impact on a conversation or decision-making process.
  • cut your teeth on something The idiom "cut your teeth on something" means to gain initial experience or proficiency in a particular skill or field through practice or learning from actual practical situations. It often refers to the process of acquiring expertise or knowledge by starting with simpler or basic tasks before moving on to more complex ones.
  • put your two cents (worth) in "Put your two cents (worth) in" is an idiomatic phrase that means to offer one's opinion or viewpoint on a particular matter, usually unsolicited or without being asked. It refers to sharing one's thoughts or advice, often with the implication that the person's opinion may not be highly valued or may be unnecessary.
  • contemplate your navel The idiom "contemplate your navel" refers to someone being overly self-absorbed or excessively focused on one's own thoughts, feelings, or experiences. It suggests a state of introspection or self-centeredness to the point of being disconnected from the world around them.
  • raise your eyebrows (or an eyebrow) The idiom "raise your eyebrows (or an eyebrow)" means to show surprise, disbelief, or skepticism about something. It refers to the action of lifting one or both eyebrows as a physical expression of doubt, astonishment, or uncertainty.
  • in your hands The idiom "in your hands" typically means that someone or something is under your control, responsibility, or influence. It implies that the outcome or fate of that person or thing depends solely on your actions or decisions.
  • give someone a piece of your mind The idiom "give someone a piece of your mind" means to express one's anger or dissatisfaction with someone, usually by speaking one's thoughts honestly and forcefully.
  • not have a… bone in your body The idiom "not have a... bone in your body" typically means that a person lacks a particular trait or characteristic to an extreme degree. It implies that the person completely lacks the mentioned quality, suggesting that it is not a part of their nature or personality. The phrase is commonly used to express the complete absence or opposite of a specific attribute.
  • add (or put in) your twopenn'orth The idiom "add (or put in) your twopenn'orth" means to offer your opinion or contribute your thoughts on a particular topic or issue, often in a discussion or debate. It suggests that you are sharing your viewpoint or giving input, even if it may not be valued as highly as others' opinions. "Twopenn'orth" is a colloquial abbreviation of "twopenny worth," which refers to a small or insignificant contribution.
  • hold your (own) ground, at hold your own The idiom "hold your (own) ground" or "hold your own" means to maintain one's position, assertion, or stance confidently in the face of opposition, criticism, or pressure. It implies standing firm and not yielding or compromising in one's beliefs, principles, or opinions.
  • feel in your bones The idiom "feel in your bones" means to have a strong intuitive feeling or deep conviction about something, often based on instinct or past experiences. It implies a certainty or strong belief that is rooted in one's innermost self, often beyond logical or rational explanation.
  • be your own master/mistress The idiom "be your own master/mistress" refers to the act of being independent and in control of one's own actions, decisions, and destiny. It implies that an individual is not bound by the authority or influence of others and can make their own choices and take responsibility for their own life.
  • hit your stride The idiom "hit your stride" refers to reaching a period of optimal performance or efficiency, where one becomes comfortable, confident, and successful in their actions or endeavors. It describes a state where everything is working smoothly and effortlessly, and someone is performing at their best.
  • be able to do something in your sleep The idiom "be able to do something in your sleep" means to possess such proficiency or expertise in a particular task or skill that it can be performed effortlessly and without conscious effort. It suggests that the ability to perform the action is so ingrained that it could be done instinctively, even during a state of unconsciousness.
  • go through your paces The idiom "go through your paces" typically means to perform a series of actions or tasks in a practiced and rehearsed manner, often in order to demonstrate one's abilities or skills. It implies following a set routine or demonstrating proficiency, usually under observation or evaluation by others.
  • floor it, at put your foot down The idiom "floor it" or "put your foot down" refers to the act of accelerating or driving quickly. It suggests pushing the gas pedal all the way to the floor in order to increase speed or go at maximum acceleration.
  • give your eyeteeth for sth The idiom "give your eyeteeth for something" means to desire or be willing to sacrifice or trade something very valuable or precious in order to obtain or achieve something else. It typically emphasizes the intensity or desperation of one's desire or longing for a particular thing or goal. The phrase "give your eyeteeth" implies a willingness to part with one's own body parts (the eyeteeth being valuable and important teeth) as a metaphor for extreme desire or sacrifice.
  • have another/more than one string to your bow The idiom "have another/more than one string to your bow" means to have multiple skills, abilities, or options in addition to the main one. It refers to being versatile or having alternative choices or fallbacks in various situations or endeavors. Just as a bow with multiple strings can produce different sounds or pitches, having another string to your bow means having an additional resource or ability to rely on when needed.
  • be light on your feet The idiom "be light on your feet" means to be nimble, quick, or agile in one's movements or actions. It refers to someone who is physically or mentally quick, responsive, and able to adapt easily. It often suggests a sense of gracefulness and ease in performing tasks or handling situations.
  • dig your heels/toes in The idiom "dig your heels/toes in" means to refuse to change your opinion, decision, or stance on something, and to demonstrate stubbornness and resistance to pressure or persuasion. It implies firmly sticking to your position and being unwilling to compromise or give in.
  • keep your ears/eyes open (for something) The idiom "keep your ears/eyes open (for something)" means to remain attentive and aware in order to be alert to any relevant information, opportunities, or changes that may occur. It suggests staying vigilant and not missing out on important or notable things.
  • the bane of your life The idiom "the bane of your life" refers to something or someone that causes constant difficulties, troubles, or frustration, having a negative and often impactful influence on one's existence or quality of life. It describes a persistent source of annoyance or an ongoing problem that one finds extremely troublesome and wishes to eliminate.
  • be of your own making The idiom "be of your own making" means that a particular situation or problem is entirely one's own fault or responsibility. It suggests that the individual has caused this situation through their own actions, choices, or decisions and therefore has to face the consequences or take ownership of it.
  • bust your ass/balls The idiom "bust your ass/balls" is a slang expression that means to put in a great deal of effort, work extremely hard, or exert oneself to the maximum. It implies going above and beyond what is expected to achieve a goal or complete a task, often indicating a significant level of physical or mental exertion.
  • fold your arms The idiom "fold your arms" means to cross one's arms over the chest, typically in a defensive or closed-off manner, indicating feelings of resistance, skepticism, defiance, or disapproval.
  • your road to Damascus The idiom "your road to Damascus" refers to a life-changing event or experience that dramatically alters a person's beliefs, values, or perspective, typically leading to a significant transformation in their life. It originates from the biblical story of the Apostle Paul, who had a transformative experience while traveling on the road to Damascus, leading to his conversion to Christianity.
  • have sb in your corner The idiom "have someone in your corner" refers to having someone who supports, defends, or is on one's side. It means to have someone in a position to provide assistance, advocacy, or guidance during challenging situations. This person is typically loyal, dependable, and willing to help.
  • leave sth in your wake The idiom "leave sth in your wake" refers to the act of causing or leaving behind a significant impact or consequence as a result of one's actions or presence. It implies that someone or something has created a lasting influence or effect that is noticeable or significant even after they have moved on or completed a particular task.
  • your (or the) last gasp The idiom "your (or the) last gasp" refers to the final or ultimate effort made in a particular situation, often characterized by desperation, exhaustion, or impending defeat. It signifies the final chance to achieve something or the final moments of existence.
  • your knees are knocking The idiom "your knees are knocking" is an expression used to describe someone who is extremely scared or frightened. The phrase implies that the person's fear is so intense that their knees are physically shaking or trembling.
  • skeleton in the/your cupboard/closet The idiom "skeleton in the/your cupboard/closet" refers to a shameful or embarrassing secret from one's past that one tries to hide from others. It signifies a hidden aspect of a person's life that, if revealed, could potentially damage their reputation or relationships.
  • put your foot in your mouth The idiom "put your foot in your mouth" means to say something inappropriate, awkward, or offensive without intending to, usually resulting in embarrassment or causing offense to oneself or others.
  • Shove/Stick sth up your arse! The idiom "Shove/Stick something up your arse!" is an offensive and vulgar way to express extreme disregard or contempt towards someone or something. It is typically used to tell someone to disregard or ignore a request or suggestion, emphasizing complete dismissal.
  • come to your senses The idiom "come to your senses" means to regain rationality, clear thinking, or to become aware of the truth after a period of being confused, deluded, or making poor decisions. It refers to the act of becoming sensible or reasonable again, often by abandoning irrational thoughts or behavior.
  • keep a cool head, at keep your head "Keep a cool head" or "keep your head" means to remain calm and composed in a challenging or difficult situation. It suggests maintaining a clear and rational mindset instead of becoming overwhelmed, panicked, or behaving impulsively.
  • get/put your head down The idiom "get/put your head down" is used when someone is advised or encouraged to focus on a task or work diligently without getting distracted. It means to concentrate on the work at hand, ignore distractions, and apply oneself with dedication.
  • swallow your words The idiom "swallow your words" means to refrain from expressing one's opinion or retract a statement due to embarrassment, fear, being proven wrong, or acknowledging a mistake. It refers to the act of retracting or suppressing one's own words or opinions.
  • have it away (on your toes) The idiomatic expression "have it away (on your toes)" is primarily used in British English and has various interpretations. It can be defined as: 1. To quickly and discreetly escape or flee from a particular situation, often involving wrongdoing or evading consequences. Example: "When they realized the police were on their way, the thieves had it away on their toes." 2. To steal or take something without permission, particularly in a swift and crafty manner. Example: "The pickpocket expertly had it away on his toes with the victim's wallet." 3. To engage in a secret romantic or sexual rendezvous, usually implying an illicit affair. Example: "She was meeting her lover in a hotel room
  • not a bone in your body The idiom "not a bone in your body" is used to describe someone who lacks a specific attribute, quality, or characteristic. It suggests that the person is completely devoid of a particular trait or behavior.
  • live out your dreams/fantasies The idiom "live out your dreams/fantasies" means to fulfill or experience one's deepest desires, aspirations, or unrealistic imaginations in real life. It refers to actively pursuing and enjoying the things one has always dreamt of or fantasized about, often involving achieving personal goals or engaging in activities one finds immensely satisfying or pleasurable.
  • know your onions The idiom "know your onions" means to have expertise, knowledge, or understanding about a particular subject or situation. It implies possessing a deep understanding or familiarity with the topic at hand.
  • a man, woman, etc. after your own heart The idiom "a man, woman, etc. after your own heart" refers to someone who shares the same beliefs, values, interests, or qualities as oneself. It implies that the person is similar in nature and closely aligned with one's own preferences or character.
  • a plum in your mouth The idiom "a plum in your mouth" refers to someone speaking in an overly exaggerated, formal, or posh manner. It implies that the person is trying to sound more sophisticated or high-class than they actually are.
  • shake the dust off your feet To "shake the dust off your feet" is an idiom derived from a biblical phrase, specifically Luke 10:11. It means to leave a place or situation, often morally or spiritually, and let go of any negative experiences, baggage, or associations. It signifies moving on, breaking ties, and not allowing past hardships or negativity to affect one's present or future.
  • hang up your boots The idiom "hang up your boots" means to retire or cease one's involvement in a particular activity, often referring to retiring from a career or quitting a job. It originated from the world of sports, specifically football (soccer), where players hang up their boots when they retire from playing professionally. The phrase implies the act of permanently giving up or ending one's involvement in a certain pursuit or profession.
  • get your hands dirty The idiom "get your hands dirty" means to engage in or involve oneself in activities that are difficult, challenging, or potentially unpleasant. It often implies being willing to do hard work, including tasks that others might find undesirable or scrupulous. It can also suggest being actively involved in practical or hands-on tasks rather than just directing or observing from a distance.
  • time is on your side The idiom "time is on your side" means that, in a particular situation, there is no immediate need to rush or make hasty decisions because time is available to wait, think, and act patiently or advantageously. It implies that the passing of time will work in your favor, allowing for a more favorable outcome or giving you a better position in the future.
  • get, pull, etc. your finger out The idiom "get, pull, etc. your finger out" is an informal expression that means to start taking action or stop procrastinating and become more productive. It is often used to encourage someone to complete a task or make progress on something they have been putting off.
  • have a roof over your head The idiom "have a roof over your head" means to have a place to live, usually referring to having a stable and secure housing situation. It emphasizes the basic necessity of having shelter or a dwelling.
  • shake your head The idiom "shake your head" refers to the act of moving one's head from side to side in a lateral motion, typically to express disbelief, disagreement, or disapproval. It signifies a non-verbal gesture that often conveys a negative response or a lack of understanding.
  • on your honour The idiom "on your honour" means to do something based on one's own integrity, honesty, and sense of responsibility, without the need for supervision or formal control. It implies that the person is trusted to act with integrity and fulfill their obligations without any external constraints or monitoring.
  • can't hold your drink The idiom "can't hold your drink" refers to someone who becomes easily intoxicated after consuming alcohol, often showing signs of losing control, behaving recklessly, or becoming overly emotional.
  • have an ace/a trick up your sleeve The idiom "have an ace up your sleeve" or "have a trick up your sleeve" means to have a secret plan or resource that could be used to gain an advantage or achieve success in a situation, often when others are unaware of it. It implies that someone is holding back something advantageous or unexpected, ready to be revealed at the appropriate moment.
  • fire in your/the belly The idiom "fire in your/the belly" refers to having a strong determination, enthusiasm, or passion for something. It suggests a burning desire and an intense motivation to achieve a certain goal or pursue an aspiration.
  • live by your wits The idiom "live by your wits" means to rely on one's intelligence, resourcefulness, and cleverness in order to survive or succeed, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It implies that one must rely on their quick thinking and problem-solving abilities rather than relying on external help or resources.
  • with one hand tied behind your back The idiom "with one hand tied behind your back" refers to doing something easily or effortlessly, despite facing challenges or limitations. It implies that even with a significant disadvantage, one can still achieve a task with minimal effort or difficulty.
  • wait your turn The idiom "wait your turn" means to patiently wait for one's rightful opportunity or chance, usually in a sequential or orderly manner, instead of trying to go ahead of others. It implies the importance of respecting and adhering to a fair and established order of precedence or queue.
  • be a shadow/ghost of your former self The idiom "be a shadow/ghost of your former self" suggests that someone or something has undergone a significant decline, becoming weakened, diminished, or less impressive compared to their previous state or condition. It implies that a person or thing has lost their previous vitality, energy, ability, or positive qualities, often due to hardship, illness, aging, or other challenging circumstances.
  • have/keep your ear to the ground The idiom "have/keep your ear to the ground" means to be attentive and stay informed about the current situation or any relevant information. It implies being vigilant and aware of any developments, changes, or rumors that may impact a particular situation or the environment. This phrase often suggests the importance of being well-connected and informed in order to make better-informed decisions.
  • get your own way "Get your own way" is an idiom that means to successfully or persuasively achieve what you desire or prefer, often disregarding the opinions, wishes, or objections of others. It implies having a strong will or determination to achieve a desired outcome, regardless of the circumstances or other people's inputs.
  • lose your/its grip The idiom "lose your/its grip" means to lose control or influence over a situation, task, project, or a person. It implies an inability to maintain control or a declining effectiveness in managing a particular situation or entity.
  • fight your own battles The idiom "fight your own battles" means to independently face and resolve one's own problems or conflicts without seeking or expecting help from others. It encourages self-reliance and taking personal responsibility for addressing issues or challenges.
  • Don't waste your time The idiom "Don't waste your time" means to avoid spending or using your time on something that is not productive, beneficial, or worthwhile. It suggests focusing on more important or valuable activities instead of engaging in activities that offer little or no value.
  • Keep your mouth shut (about someone or something). The idiom "Keep your mouth shut (about someone or something)" means to refrain from speaking or revealing information about someone or something. It suggests remaining silent or keeping a secret to avoid causing trouble, harming someone's reputation, or sharing confidential details.
  • get your end away The idiom "get your end away" is a crude British slang phrase that refers to engaging in sexual activity or having sexual intercourse.
  • feast your eyes on sb/sth The idiom "feast your eyes on sb/sth" means to look at someone or something with great pleasure, admiration, or enjoyment because of their beauty, attractiveness, or interest. It suggests indulging in the visual experience and taking in every detail, as if savoring a delightful feast.
  • your elders and betters The idiom "your elders and betters" refers to those who are older and superior to you in terms of authority, social status, or experience. It usually implies showing respect and obedience towards individuals who possess more knowledge, wisdom, or higher positions in society.
  • your lord and master The idiom "your lord and master" typically refers to someone who has complete control or authority over another person, often used humorously or sarcastically to emphasize someone's dominance or superiority in a particular situation. It can be used to depict someone as being in total command, with the other person being subservient or obedient.
  • shoot your load The idiom "shoot your load" is a vulgar expression that refers to expending or using up the entirety of one's energy, resources, or efforts in a particular endeavor, often in a short amount of time. It can imply someone exhausting themselves physically, mentally, or emotionally in a concentrated effort, much like someone expending their entire ammunition supply in a single burst. It can also carry a sexual connotation, which adds an additional layer of explicitness to the idiom.
  • (from) under your nose The idiom "(from) under your nose" means something that is happening or existing very close to you without you noticing or realizing it. It refers to situations or things that are within your immediate surroundings, but you are oblivious to their presence or importance.
  • get/have your way The idiom "get/have your way" means to successfully achieve what you want or to obtain the desired outcome, especially when facing opposition or resistance from others. It suggests that an individual is able to persuade others or manipulate the situation to their advantage.
  • lose your bearings The idiom "lose your bearings" means to become disoriented or confused, usually in a physical or mental sense, often resulting in a loss of direction or understanding of one's surroundings. It refers to a situation where someone becomes unsure or unable to determine their current position or situation or unable to make sense of the circumstances they find themselves in.
  • on your own account The idiom "on your own account" means doing something for yourself, often in pursuit of your own interests or preferences, without being influenced or motivated by others. It implies acting independently or taking responsibility for one's own actions or decisions.
  • get your teeth into sth The idiom "get your teeth into something" means to become fully engaged or involved in a task or activity, typically something challenging or complex. It implies a determination to thoroughly understand, tackle, or accomplish the given task. It conveys a sense of focus and determination to give the task one's full attention and effort.
  • be rubbing your hands with glee The idiom "be rubbing your hands with glee" refers to a person being extremely pleased, excited, or anticipating something eagerly. It implies a sense of satisfaction or delight, often used to describe someone who is eagerly anticipating a favorable outcome or taking pleasure in another person's misfortune. The action of "rubbing hands" signifies a display of satisfaction or excitement.
  • shoot your mouth off (about something) The idiom "shoot your mouth off (about something)" means to speak in an arrogant, reckless, or indiscreet manner without considering the potential consequences or impact of one's words. It refers to speaking impulsively or boastfully about a particular subject, often leading to negative repercussions or a loss of credibility.
  • turn over/spin in your grave, at turn in your grave The idiom "turn over/spin in your grave" refers to a situation in which someone's actions or statements go against their deeply held beliefs, principles, or values, causing them extreme disbelief, outrage, or disappointment. It implies that if the person were alive, they would be so profoundly disturbed by the current circumstances that their corpse would move or rotate within the grave in response.
  • come out of your shell The idiom "come out of your shell" refers to encouraging someone to break out of their shyness or introverted nature, and to become more sociable and outgoing. It signifies encouraging someone to be less reserved and more open to engaging with others.
  • close your mind to something The idiom "close your mind to something" means to refuse to consider or be open to new ideas, opinions, or possibilities. It implies a rigid or fixed mindset that is unreceptive to alternative perspectives or information.
  • flip (your lid) The idiom "flip (your lid)" is used to describe a sudden and extreme outburst of anger or frustration, often resulting in a loss of control. It implies the idea of someone becoming so overwhelmed with emotion that they figuratively lose their sanity or composure, as if an imaginary lid on their mind has been forcefully flipped open.
  • long as your arm The idiom "long as your arm" is used to describe something that is exceptionally long or extensive. It refers to a list, task, or any other series of items that is seemingly endless or extremely time-consuming.
  • your best bib and tucker The idiom "your best bib and tucker" refers to someone dressing in their finest or most formal attire, usually for a special occasion or event. It implies that the person is well-dressed and presenting themselves in their most elegant or impressive clothing.
  • under your belt The idiom "under your belt" means to have acquired or accomplished something and have it as an experience or achievement.
  • harden your heart The idiom "harden your heart" means to become emotionally distant, unfeeling, or unsympathetic towards someone or a situation. It implies a deliberate act of strengthening one's emotional barriers to protect oneself from emotional pain or vulnerability.
  • have/keep your fingers crossed The idiom "have/keep your fingers crossed" means to hope for good luck or success in a particular situation. It often implies that the outcome is uncertain or there is a need for some sort of positive outcome. People often physically cross their fingers as a superstitious gesture while saying or thinking this phrase.
  • do your stuff The idiom "do your stuff" means to perform or carry out one's skills, talents, or abilities in a confident and effective manner. It implies that the person has demonstrated competence or expertise in a particular area and is now being encouraged or asked to showcase their abilities.
  • have sb in the palm of your hand The idiom "have sb in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone. It suggests that the person is completely submissive or obedient to the one who has them in their palm, as if they were holding them in their hand.
  • by your leave The idiom "by your leave" is a phrase used to request permission or to politely ask someone if it is alright to do something. It is used when seeking approval before doing or saying something that may affect or inconvenience the person being addressed.
  • Anything new down your way? The idiom "Anything new down your way?" is a conversational question used to inquire if there have been any recent developments, happenings, or news in the area where the listener is located. It is often used as a friendly and informal way to initiate conversation and stay updated on what's been going on in someone's vicinity.
  • lose your heart to sb The idiom "lose your heart to someone" means to fall deeply in love or become emotionally attached to someone. It implies a strong and intense emotional connection or passion towards a particular person.
  • muster your forces The idiom "muster your forces" means to gather and assemble the resources, strength, or individuals needed for a particular purpose or task. It often refers to organizing and preparing a group of people or materials to face a challenge, confront an enemy, or achieve a common goal.
  • a shadow of your former self The idiom "a shadow of your former self" refers to someone who is noticeably changed, usually for the worse, from how they used to be. It suggests a significant decline in physical or mental well-being, vitality, or overall appearance. It implies a lack of the qualities or characteristics that defined the person's previous self.
  • your idea of sth The phrase "your idea of something" is typically used to express disagreement or disbelief in someone's perception or understanding of a particular concept, action, or situation. It implies that the person's understanding or interpretation differs significantly from what is considered reasonable, acceptable, or accurate by others. It often highlights a difference in perspective, taste, or opinion.
  • don't let the door hit your ass on the way out The idiom "don't let the door hit your ass on the way out" is a humorous and informal expression used to convey a strong desire for someone to leave quickly and without causing any further disruption or inconvenience. It implies that the speaker has a low opinion or no interest in the person staying any longer, and that they should make a swift exit without causing any additional trouble.
  • close your eyes to The idiom "close your eyes to" means to ignore or deliberately not acknowledge something. It refers to the act of intentionally avoiding or overlooking a certain situation, problem, or truth, often out of fear, discomfort, or denial.
  • put your best foot forward The idiom "put your best foot forward" means to make the best possible impression or to present oneself in the most favorable or positive way. It can refer to showcasing one's abilities, skills, or qualities in a particular situation, such as a job interview, a meeting, or a social gathering, in order to maximize the chance of success or to leave a lasting positive impression on others.
  • be laughing your head off The idiom "be laughing your head off" is used to describe a situation where someone is laughing uncontrollably or very loud, often to the point where it appears as if their head might come off. It emphasizes great amusement or finding something extremely funny.
  • do your business The idiom "do your business" typically means to attend to personal needs or responsibilities, often referring to tasks or activities that are necessary or important. It is usually used in a more informal or humorous context.
  • a millstone around/round your neck The idiom "a millstone around/round your neck" refers to a heavy burden or constant problem that one must carry or deal with, often hindering progress or causing significant difficulties. It alludes to the literal millstone, a heavy stone wheel used to grind grain, which would be extremely difficult and burdensome to carry around one's neck.
  • turn away from sth, at turn your back on sth The idiom "turn away from something" or "turn your back on something" means to intentionally reject, abandon, or distance oneself from a person, situation, or idea. It can also imply a refusal to acknowledge or confront a particular issue or problem. The idiom typically emphasizes a deliberate act of turning away or disengaging, often in a metaphorical sense rather than a literal physical action.
  • past your/its prime The idiom "past your/its prime" refers to something or someone that has reached the peak of their best condition or performance and is now on a decline, no longer as successful, useful, or influential as they once were. It implies that the person, thing, or organization's best years are behind them, and they are no longer as capable or effective as they used to be.
  • put your foot in your mouth, at put .your foot in it The idiom "put your foot in your mouth" or "put your foot in it" refers to a situation where someone unintentionally says or does something inappropriate, embarrassing, or offensive, often resulting in negative consequences or awkwardness. It implies making a social blunder by saying the wrong thing at the wrong time, usually due to speaking hastily or without thinking.
  • flex your muscle The idiom "flex your muscle" means to demonstrate or assert one's power, strength, or influence, usually in a showy or boastful manner. It can refer to physical strength or metaphorically to one's authority, capabilities, or control in a particular situation or domain.
  • have your doubts The idiom "have your doubts" refers to having uncertainty or skepticism about something, questioning its credibility, validity, or likelihood of success. It indicates a lack of complete trust or confidence in a particular matter or belief.
  • You bet your life! "You bet your life!" is an idiomatic expression used to affirm something with strong conviction or absolute certainty. It is often used to convey complete confidence and certainty in a statement. It suggests that one is so convinced of the truth or accuracy of the statement that they are willing to stake their life on it.
  • in your face The idiom "in your face" is typically used to describe a confrontational or aggressive behavior, action, or attitude by someone towards another person. It usually implies a display of dominance, arrogance, or provocation in a very direct and deliberate manner, often intended to intimidate or humiliate the other person.
  • before your very eyes The idiom "before your very eyes" means something that happens or takes place in front of someone, in a way that is noticeable or easily seen. It implies that the event or transformation is happening right in front of the person, usually in an unexpectedly quick or surprising manner.
  • Here's your hat, what's your hurry? The idiom "Here's your hat, what's your hurry?" is a playful or sarcastic way of telling someone to leave or hurry up. It implies that the person is no longer welcome or is taking too long to leave a particular place or situation.
  • have the ball at your feet The idiom "have the ball at your feet" means to be in a position of control, power, or advantage, often in a competitive or leadership context. It implies that the person has complete freedom to make important decisions and take actions. It comes from the game of soccer, where having the ball at your feet allows you to directly influence the outcome of the game.
  • have a chip on your shoulder (about something) The idiom "have a chip on your shoulder (about something)" means to be harboring a persistent and easily provoked sense of resentment or a grudge about a particular issue or topic. It typically involves perceiving oneself as being at a disadvantage and feeling a need to prove one's worth or superiority to others in that area. This phrase often implies a readiness to confront or become defensive when confronted about the topic, resulting in a confrontational or detached attitude.
  • be frightened/nervous/scared of your own shadow The idiom "be frightened/nervous/scared of your own shadow" is used to describe someone who is excessively fearful or easily frightened. It implies that the person is so timid or anxious that even the slightest thing can make them feel scared or overwhelmed. This phrase typically indicates a state of constant unease or apprehension.
  • know which side your bread is buttered (on) The idiom "know which side your bread is buttered (on)" means to be aware of where your best interests lie and to act in a way that keeps those interests protected or prioritized. It implies understanding the benefits or advantages one has in a particular situation or relationship and acting accordingly.
  • till/to/until your dying day The idiom "till/to/until your dying day" means for the entirety of one's life or until the moment of death. It implies a strong commitment, belief, or sentiment that will last until the very end.
  • take your cue from sth/sb The idiom "take your cue from something/someone" means to take guidance, inspiration, or direction from a particular source or person. It suggests that one should observe and imitate the actions or behavior of the referenced source or individual as a guide for their own actions or decisions.
  • know which side your bread is buttered The idiom "know which side your bread is buttered" means being aware of where one's best interests lie or recognizing the person or thing that helps in improving one's situation. It implies understanding who or what provides advantage or benefits and acting accordingly to maintain a favorable relationship or position.
  • make your voice heard The idiom "make your voice heard" means actively expressing your opinions, concerns, or ideas in order to have an impact and ensure that you are not ignored or disregarded in a conversation, debate, or decision-making process. It emphasizes the importance of speaking up and asserting yourself in order to make sure your viewpoint is acknowledged and considered.
  • take your cue from sb/sth The idiom "take your cue from someone/something" means to observe or pay attention to someone or something in order to understand how to behave or what to do in a particular situation. It suggests that one should follow the example or guidance of the person or thing being referred to.
  • be your own man/woman The idiom "be your own man/woman" means to be independent, self-reliant, and decisive in your actions and decisions; to not be influenced or controlled by others. It suggests taking responsibility for one's own life choices and refusing to conform to societal expectations or norms.
  • be/work to your advantage The expression "be/work to your advantage" means to use a particular situation, circumstance, or characteristic in a way that brings benefits, advantages, or positive outcomes. It refers to making the most out of something to achieve personal or professional goals.
  • do your nut The idiom "do your nut" is a colloquial expression that means to become extremely angry, frustrated, or agitated. It conveys a state of intense emotional outburst or a loss of control due to a particular situation or someone's actions.
  • beat your brains out The idiom "beat your brains out" means to work or think very hard or to make an intense, diligent effort to accomplish a task or solve a problem. It suggests putting in a significant amount of mental or physical effort while striving for a desired outcome.
  • have both feet on the ground, at have/keep your feet on the ground The idiom "have both feet on the ground" or "have/keep your feet on the ground" means to be practical, realistic, and down-to-earth in your thinking or approach to life. It suggests having a balanced perspective, being sensible, and not getting caught up in unrealistic dreams or ideas. It implies being aware of the reality of a situation and making decisions based on practicality rather than idealism.
  • be a load/weight off your mind When people say "be a load/weight off your mind," they are referring to a situation or circumstance that causes them stress, worry, or mental burden. Once that situation is resolved, they feel a sense of relief and release from the anxiety it brought. It is often used to describe the feeling of being freed from a heavy mental burden or a source of anxiety.
  • lighten your load The idiom "lighten your load" means to reduce or alleviate the amount of responsibilities, tasks, or burdens that someone is carrying or dealing with, in order to experience a sense of relief or make their situation easier to manage.
  • find/meet your match (in somebody) The idiom "find/meet your match (in somebody)" means to encounter or come across someone who is equally clever, strong, skilled, or formidable, often resulting in a challenging or competitive situation. It implies that the person being referred to has finally met someone who can match or surpass their abilities or qualities.
  • your jaw drops The idiom "your jaw drops" refers to a state of surprise, shock, or astonishment when one's mouth opens involuntarily and their jaw physically drops due to a sudden and unexpected event or revelation. It signifies being rendered speechless or in awe of something unexpected or extraordinary.
  • mind/watch your language The idiom "mind/watch your language" is an expression used to advise or remind someone to be careful about the words they use or the manner in which they speak. It is typically used when someone is using offensive or inappropriate language or expressing their thoughts in an impolite or vulgar manner.
  • be up to your ears/eyeballs/eyes in sth When someone says they are "up to their ears/eyeballs/eyes in something," it means they are fully occupied or overwhelmed by a particular task, activity, or situation. It implies being deeply engrossed or excessively involved in something to the point of having no time or capacity for other matters.
  • make your way The idiom "make your way" means to progress or move forward in a determined or deliberate manner, often in the face of obstacles or challenges. It implies taking personal initiative and using resourcefulness to reach a destination or achieve a goal.
  • the fruit of your loins The idiom "the fruit of your loins" refers to one's offspring or children. It symbolizes the biological or familial connection between a person and their descendants. It emphasizes the idea that children are the result or product of one's reproductive capabilities or actions.
  • keep your fingers crossed The idiom "keep your fingers crossed" means to hope for good luck or success in a particular situation. It is an expression of optimism or a way to show support for someone. It is often accompanied by the action of crossing one's fingers, which is believed to bring good luck.
  • get your own back (on sb) The idiom "get your own back" or "get your own back on someone" means to take revenge or seek retaliation on someone who has previously wronged or harmed you. It refers to the act of reciprocating the damage or harm inflicted upon oneself.
  • have/keep your feet on the ground The idiom "have/keep your feet on the ground" means to remain grounded and level-headed in thinking or behavior, to avoid being overly idealistic or disconnected from reality. It implies staying practical, realistic, and not getting carried away by impractical ideas or fantasies.
  • thorn in your flesh/side The idiom "thorn in your flesh/side" refers to a persistent problem, annoyance, or person that causes ongoing frustration or difficulty. It implies that the issue is constant, unpleasant, and hard to ignore, similar to having a thorn stuck in your skin.
  • can't see further than the end of your nose The idiom "can't see further than the end of your nose" means someone is lacking foresight or the ability to consider long-term consequences or possibilities. It implies that the person is only focused on immediate concerns or is short-sighted in their thinking.
  • First catch your hare The idiom "First catch your hare" means that before you can achieve or obtain something desired or expected, you must first take the necessary initial steps or make necessary preparations. It emphasizes the importance of careful planning and action to achieve a desired outcome.
  • be up to your eyes in something The idiom "be up to your eyes in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task, activity, or problem. It suggests being deeply involved or immersed in a situation or having an excessive amount of work or responsibilities.
  • have your head up your arse The idiom "have your head up your arse" conveys that someone is being oblivious, ignorant, or foolishly unaware of their surroundings or circumstances. It suggests that the person is not being attentive or discerning, often to the point of disregarding obvious information or making poor decisions.
  • throw your money about/around The idiom "throw your money about/around" refers to a person who spends money carelessly or extravagantly, often in an ostentatious or showy manner, without regard for the value or consequences of their spending. It suggests a lack of consideration or restraint in the way money is used.
  • die with your boots on The idiom "die with your boots on" means to die while actively engaged in or participating in something you are passionate about or devoted to. It implies that you continue working or pursuing your interests until the end, rather than retiring or giving up. It often refers to someone who loves their work or activities so much that they wish to remain involved until their death, rather than stepping away or quitting.
  • fill your boots The idiom "fill your boots" means to indulge or take full advantage of a particular opportunity or situation without any restraint. It suggests that one should make the most of something, typically with enthusiasm or eagerness.
  • keep/hold your cards close to your chest The idiom "keep/hold your cards close to your chest" means to keep your thoughts, intentions, or plans secret and not reveal them to others. It originates from the game of poker, where players keep their cards hidden and close to their chest to avoid giving away their strategies or the strength of their hand. In a broader sense, it is used to describe a cautious or secretive approach where one carefully guards and protects valuable information or plans.
  • under your breath The idiom "under your breath" refers to speaking quietly or murmuring in a low tone that is difficult for others to hear.
  • you can bet your life/your bottom dollar The idiom "you can bet your life/your bottom dollar" means to be extremely confident or certain about something, as if one was willing to wager their life or last bit of money on it.
  • have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders Having the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders is an idiom that means to feel an immense amount of pressure, responsibility, or concern that weighs heavily on a person's mind or emotions. It suggests that someone feels deeply burdened by the problems and worries of the world, often resulting in a sense of overwhelming distress or fatigue.
  • pick on sm your own size The idiom "pick on someone your own size" means to confront or challenge someone who is equal in strength, ability, or power, rather than targeting someone who is weaker or less capable. It is often used in the context of advising individuals to choose fair and equal opponents in order to avoid taking advantage or being excessively aggressive.
  • bang for your buck The idiom "bang for your buck" means getting value or benefits worth the money spent. It refers to getting the most or highest quality for the price paid, emphasizing the idea of maximizing the value or impact of what you receive in return for your investment.
  • get your hooks into sb/sth The idiom "get your hooks into someone/something" means to gain control or influence over someone or something, often in a manipulative or forceful way. It implies that the person or thing referenced has been caught or trapped by the power or influence of another entity.
  • have a chip on your shoulder The idiom "have a chip on your shoulder" refers to an attitude or stance of being easily offended or harboring a grudge or resentment, often resulting in an aggressive or defensive behavior. It implies someone who is confrontational or seeking confrontation due to underlying feelings of grievance or past negative experiences.
  • be cutting your own throat The idiom "be cutting your own throat" means to take an action or make a decision that will intentionally harm oneself or undermine one's own best interests. It implies acting in a self-destructive or counterproductive manner.
  • I beg your pardon, at pardon (me) The idiom "I beg your pardon, at pardon (me)" is a polite phrase used to apologize or ask for forgiveness for a mistake, an inadvertent act, or a misunderstanding. It is often employed when someone realizes they have said or done something inappropriate or offensive and wish to rectify the situation by expressing remorse.
  • your blue-eyed boy The idiom "your blue-eyed boy" refers to an individual who is highly favored, trusted, or held in high regard by someone else, often a superior or influential figure. It implies distinct favoritism and partiality towards that person, suggesting that they are given preferential treatment or are the recipient of exceptional trust and support.
  • break your balls The idiom "break your balls" is an informal expression that means to deliberately or excessively push, pressure, or harass someone, typically in a demanding, challenging, or aggressive manner. It is often used in a figurative sense to describe someone's persistent or intense efforts to make someone else feel stressed, frustrated, or overwhelmed.
  • blow your stack The idiom "blow your stack" means to lose one's temper or become very angry and explode with anger or frustration.
  • win/earn your spurs The idiom "win/earn your spurs" originates from the tradition in medieval knighthood where a knight-in-training would receive spurs as a symbol of his knighthood. It refers to proving oneself and gaining recognition through skill, accomplishment, or hard work to achieve a position of honor or authority. In a broader sense, the idiom is used to describe the act of earning one's qualifications, credentials, or respect in a particular field or endeavor.
  • send shudders/a shudder down your spine The idiom "send shudders/a shudder down your spine" means to cause a feeling of fear, unease, or intense discomfort. It refers to a physical sensation likened to a trembling or shivering down one's back, usually triggered by something frightening, shocking, or eerie.
  • marry beneath your station The idiom "marry beneath your station" means to marry someone of lower social status, education, or financial standing than one's own. It implies that the person is choosing a partner who is considered to be socially inferior or of a lower rank or position in society.
  • shove/stick sth up your ass! The idiom "shove/stick something up your ass" is an offensive and vulgar expression used to convey a strong feeling of disregard, anger, or contempt towards someone or something. It suggests forcefully and disrespectfully telling someone to take something and place it in their rectum as a form of dismissal or insult. It is important to note that this idiom is highly disrespectful and should be used with caution, if at all.
  • have, etc. a lump in your throat The idiom "have a lump in your throat" is used to describe the feeling of tightness, heaviness, or a knot-like sensation in the throat due to strong emotions, usually sadness, grief, or sentimentality. It refers to an overwhelming feeling that makes it difficult to speak or swallow, often accompanied by tears or sadness. It symbolizes the presence of an emotional blockage in the throat area.
  • cross your path The idiom "cross your path" means to encounter or come across someone or something unexpectedly, often in a way that causes inconvenience or conflict. It implies an unexpected intersection or meeting that can have potential implications on one's plans or situation.
  • pour your heart out The idiom "pour your heart out" means to express one's deepest and most sincere emotions, thoughts, or feelings freely and openly, often to someone who is willing to listen and provide support or understanding.
  • cast your eyes on something The idiom "cast your eyes on something" means to look at or observe something, often with a sense of admiration, curiosity, or astonishment. It suggests a deliberate act of focusing one's gaze on a particular object, person, or scene.
  • shake your booty The idiom "shake your booty" is a colloquial expression that encourages someone to dance or move their hips in an energetic and rhythmic manner. It implies letting loose, having fun, and engaging in lively dancing or movement.
  • in your glad rags The idiom "in your glad rags" means to be dressed in one's finest or most fashionable clothing, typically for a special occasion or event. It suggests being dressed up and looking one's best.
  • your own woman The idiom "your own woman" typically refers to a person, specifically a woman, who is independent, self-reliant, and does not conform to societal expectations or the influence of others. It implies that the individual is not easily swayed or controlled by external pressures and is confident in making decisions for herself.
  • keep your friends close and your enemies closer The idiom "keep your friends close and your enemies closer" means that it's important to closely monitor and be aware of the actions and intentions of those who might be your enemies or adversaries. By maintaining a close relationship with them, you can gain valuable insight into their plans and strategies, making it easier to counteract or anticipate their actions.
  • win/gain your spurs The idiom "win/gain your spurs" refers to earning recognition, respect, or a position of authority through skill, experience, or achieving a noteworthy accomplishment. It can often refer to proving one's worth, particularly in a specific field or occupation. The phrase originated from the practice of knighthood, where knights would earn their spurs as a symbol of their achievements and skill in battle.
  • fall flat (on your face) The idiom "fall flat (on your face)" means to fail or be unsuccessful, often in a very obvious or embarrassing manner. It emphasizes a complete lack of achievement or accomplishment, sometimes resulting in humiliation or disappointment.
  • put in your two cents’ worth The idiom "put in your two cents’ worth" means to offer or contribute one's opinion or viewpoint on a topic or issue, usually in a conversation or discussion. It suggests that the speaker is providing their input or perspective, regardless of its value or importance.
  • put something out of your head The idiom "put something out of your head" means to stop thinking or worrying about something or to dismiss a thought, idea, or concern from your mind. It implies deliberately ignoring or consciously refusing to dwell on a particular matter.
  • be written all over your face The idiom "be written all over your face" means that someone's true emotions or thoughts are very evident and can be easily seen or understood by their facial expressions or body language. It implies that the person's face reveals their feelings or reactions without them having to say anything explicitly.
  • have your tubes tied The idiom "have your tubes tied" refers to a surgical procedure called tubal ligation in which a woman's fallopian tubes are permanently or temporarily blocked or severed as a form of sterilization, effectively preventing pregnancy. This idiom is often used colloquially to imply that someone has chosen to undergo this surgery to permanently prevent the possibility of having children.
  • out of/from the corner of your eye The idiom "out of/from the corner of your eye" means to see or notice something indirectly or peripherally, without focusing on it directly. It refers to the act of glimpsing or observing something without giving it full attention or openly looking at it.
  • Shut your face/gob/mouth/trap! The idiom "Shut your face/gob/mouth/trap!" is an informal and impolite way of telling someone to stop talking or to be quiet. It is a colloquial expression used to express frustration, annoyance, or to indicate that the person's words are unwelcome or irritating.
  • sob your heart out The idiom "sob your heart out" a figurative expression that means to cry intensely and express one's deep emotions or grief openly and without reserve.
  • pull your/its punches The idiom "pull your/its punches" means to deliberately lessen or weaken the force, impact, or intensity of something, typically a criticism, remark, action, or physical blow, in order to spare or show mercy to someone or something. It can also refer to restraining or holding back from fully expressing one's thoughts, emotions, or abilities.
  • keep/leave your options open The idiom "keep/leave your options open" means to not commit to one particular course of action, but instead, choose to remain flexible and have several possible choices or alternatives available. It suggests avoiding making a final decision or commitment in order to maintain flexibility and adaptability in the future.
  • hide your head in the sand The idiom "hide your head in the sand" means to ignore or avoid a problem or unpleasant situation, pretending that it does not exist or will simply go away. The phrase originates from the popular belief that ostriches bury their heads in the sand when they are afraid, even though this is not actually true.
  • dig your heels in The idiom "dig your heels in" means to firmly resist or refuse to change one's stance, opinion, or decision, usually in the face of opposition or pressure. It implies stubbornness and determination to stand one's ground.
  • (your) (daily) bread The term "(your) (daily) bread" is an idiom that refers to one's basic needs or sustenance, typically in relation to food. It represents the fundamental necessities of life and serves as a metaphor for all that is essential for survival and well-being.
  • send a chill down your spine The idiom "send a chill down your spine" is an expression used to describe a feeling of fear, unease, or discomfort that is so intense that it creates a shivering sensation down one's back. It implies that something has shocked or horrified a person, causing a physical and visceral reaction.
  • leave your/its mark on sb/sth The idiom "leave your/its mark on sb/sth" means to have a lasting or significant impact or influence on someone or something. It implies making a noticeable or memorable impression that will be remembered or recognized in the future.
  • sb is at your disposal The idiom "sb is at your disposal" means that someone is willing and available to assist or help you in any way that you need. They are offering their services, resources, or time for your benefit. It implies that the person is there to cater to your needs and is ready to fulfill any requests or requirements you may have.
  • to the best of your knowledge/belief The idiom "to the best of your knowledge/belief" means that someone is providing information or making a statement based on the extent of their understanding or belief at the present moment. It implies that the person may not have all the facts or complete certainty, but they are sharing their knowledge or beliefs as accurately as they can.
  • can't do something to save your life The idiom "can't do something to save your life" means that a person is completely unable to do a particular task or activity, even when their life depends on it. It emphasizes extreme incompetence or ineptitude in performing a specific skill or action.
  • put your heart and soul into sth The idiom "put your heart and soul into something" means to give a task, endeavor, or pursuit one's utmost effort, dedication, and enthusiasm. It suggests investing one's whole being, emotions, and energy into completing or achieving something, often associated with passion and wholehearted commitment.
  • ply your trade The idiom "ply your trade" means to engage in or practice a specific profession, occupation, or craft. It refers to the act of actively working, dealing, or operating in one's chosen field or industry.
  • your finger on the pulse (of sth) The idiom "your finger on the pulse (of something)" means being well-informed, knowledgeable, or aware of the current trends, developments, or state of a particular subject, issue, or situation. It implies having a good understanding and staying updated on relevant information.
  • not see beyond your nose The idiom "not see beyond your nose" means to be unable or unwilling to look at or consider anything beyond one's immediate surroundings, thoughts, interests, or concerns. It implies a limited perspective or lack of foresight, where a person fails to consider the bigger picture or long-term consequences of their actions.
  • (flat) on your back The idiom "(flat) on your back" refers to the physical position of lying horizontally on one's back, usually implying a state of being incapacitated or unable to move due to exhaustion, illness, injury, or defeat. It can also metaphorically mean being overwhelmed or defeated by a difficult situation or setback.
  • roll up your sleeves The idiom "roll up your sleeves" means to prepare or get ready to work hard and put in effort to accomplish a task. It suggests a willingness to engage in labor-intensive work or face challenges without hesitation.
  • swallow your pride The idiom "swallow your pride" means to suppress one's ego or put aside feelings of pride in order to do or accept something that one considers humiliating, degrading, or beneath oneself. It suggests the action of accepting a situation or admitting a mistake even though it may be difficult or uncomfortable due to one's pride or stubbornness.
  • get your marching orders The idiom "get your marching orders" refers to receiving instructions or commands from someone in a position of authority, typically in reference to tasks or duties that need to be accomplished. It implies being given clear and definitive directives or orders that are to be followed. The phrase originates from military terminology, where soldiers are given orders to move or take action.
  • screw up your courage The idiom "screw up your courage" means to gather or summon one's bravery or determination, usually in order to do something difficult, intimidating, or fearful. It implies overcoming hesitation, fear, or doubt and mustering the necessary courage to face a challenging situation or take a bold action.
  • kick up your heels The idiom "kick up your heels" is an expression that means to engage in carefree or exuberant behavior, often involving dancing, celebrating, or enjoying oneself without any restraint or inhibition. It implies having a lively and uninhibited time for fun and relaxation.
  • get/have your day in court The idiom "get/have your day in court" typically refers to the opportunity for someone to present their case or argument in a court of law, where they can be heard, supported by evidence or witnesses, and have a fair chance to defend themselves or seek justice. It implies the right to a formal legal proceeding where a judge or jury will hear both sides and reach a verdict. Overall, it symbolizes the fundamental principle of due process and the chance to have one's voice heard in a legal setting.
  • Mind your own beeswax. The idiom "Mind your own beeswax" is a playful and humorous way of telling someone to mind their own business or to not interfere in someone else's affairs.
  • have a method to your madness, at have method in your madness The idiom "have a method to your madness" or "have method in your madness" means to have a hidden purpose or strategy behind one's seemingly chaotic or unconventional actions. It suggests that even though someone's approach may appear irrational or disorderly, there is actually a logical and thoughtful reasoning behind their behavior.
  • twist someone around your little finger The idiom "twist someone around your little finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually through manipulation or charm. It suggests that the person being manipulated is easily swayed or influenced by the person doing the twisting, as if they were easily directed by the movement of a finger.
  • take your hat off to someone The idiom "take your hat off to someone" is used to express admiration, respect, or praise for someone's achievements, qualities, or actions. It implies acknowledging and giving credit to someone for their success or excellence. It is often used to show admiration or recognition for someone's accomplishments.
  • hang up your hat The idiom "hang up your hat" means to retire or stop working, usually used in relation to one's career or job. It indicates the act of ending or leaving a particular profession or occupation.
  • throw your weight about The idiom "throw your weight about" means to assert one's authority or influence in a forceful or bullying manner, often by using one's position of power to intimidate or control others.
  • be off your chump The idiom "be off your chump" means to behave in a foolish or irrational manner. It implies that someone is acting in a way that is considered odd, nonsensical, or irrational, often due to being mentally unstable or lacking common sense.
  • by your fingertips The idiom "by your fingertips" means to be in a situation where success or failure is extremely close and can be achieved or lost with just a small effort or deciding action. It refers to having control or influence over a situation that is within reach but requires extra effort or careful handling to grasp or retain.
  • up to your armpits The idiom "up to your armpits" refers to being heavily involved or deeply immersed in a particular situation or activity. It suggests being overwhelmed or completely engrossed in something, to the point of being fully committed or surrounded by it.
  • against your will The idiom "against your will" refers to doing something or being forced to do something unwillingly or without desire. It implies that one's actions or participation are done reluctantly or in opposition to their personal preferences or intentions.
  • crawl/go/retreat/retire into your shell The idiom "crawl/go/retreat/retire into your shell" means to withdraw or isolate oneself from others, usually due to feelings of shyness, introversion, or a desire for privacy. It refers to the behavior of a turtle or a snail that retreats into its protective shell when feeling threatened or overwhelmed.
  • in your glory The idiom "in your glory" refers to a state of utmost contentment, satisfaction, or pride that someone experiences when they are at their best or when they are being admired or recognized for their achievements or qualities. It implies a feeling of personal triumph or a moment of great success.
  • turn your back on somebody/something The idiom "turn your back on somebody/something" means to abandon, reject, or disregard someone or something. It refers to a situation in which you intentionally choose to ignore or disassociate yourself from a person or a particular matter.
  • turn something to your advantage The idiom "turn something to your advantage" means to utilize or manipulate a situation, circumstance, or resource in a way that benefits oneself or achieves a favorable outcome. It implies the ability to make the best of a given situation or use it to gain an advantage.
  • get (or receive) your just deserts The idiom "get (or receive) your just deserts" means to receive punishment or a reward that is fair and appropriate for one's actions or behavior. It implies that someone is getting what they rightfully deserve, whether positive or negative consequences. It is often used when someone's actions lead to an outcome that is seen as fitting or deserved.
  • lay down your life To "lay down one's life" means to sacrifice or give up one's life for a cause or another person. It often implies heroic selflessness and a willingness to die in the pursuit of a greater good or in the protection of others.
  • let something slip (through your fingers) The idiom "let something slip (through your fingers)" means to unintentionally lose, miss, or fail to take advantage of an opportunity or valuable thing. It implies that someone had a chance to grasp or retain something, but due to carelessness, oversight, or negligence, they allowed it to escape or go to waste.
  • to your heart's content The idiom "to your heart's content" means doing something as much as one desires or until one feels fully satisfied or fulfilled. It implies indulging or engaging in an activity without any limits or restrictions.
  • shiver (up and) down your spine The idiom "shiver (up and) down your spine" refers to a physical reaction to fear, excitement, or cold, often described as a tingling or shivering sensation felt along the length of one's spine. It implies a strong emotional response that can range from a thrilling or exhilarating feeling to a chilling sense of dread or discomfort.
  • get your breath (again/back) The idiom "get your breath (again/back)" refers to the act of taking a moment to recover physically or emotionally after exerting oneself or experiencing a challenging situation. It implies that a person needs a break or a moment of respite to regain composure, strength, or energy.
  • with your eyes shut/closed The idiom "with your eyes shut/closed" refers to doing something very easily or effortlessly, as if it requires little or no effort or thought. It suggests that a task or activity is so familiar or simple that it can be accomplished without needing to concentrate or pay much attention.
  • on your mark, get set, go, at on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your mark, get set, go" is a phrase often used to start a race or competition. It signifies the beginning of a contest or activity that requires participants to be prepared and then commence without any delay. It is often heard before races or competitive events, indicating that competitors should assume their starting positions, prepare themselves for the imminent start, and then begin the activity as soon as the signal is given. The phrase is typically spoken in a sequential manner to build anticipation and allow participants to mentally and physically prepare before the "go" signal is given.
  • You bet your sweet patootie! The idiom "You bet your sweet patootie!" is a colloquial expression used to convey strong affirmation or agreement with something. It is a lighthearted and emphatic way of saying "absolutely" or "without a doubt." It is often used to show enthusiasm or certainty in response to a statement or question.
  • get it off your chest The idiom "get it off your chest" means to express or vent strong feelings or emotions that have been weighing one down in order to feel relieved or unburdened. It refers to the act of sharing or discussing one's thoughts, concerns, or grievances to someone else, typically through open communication or conversation.
  • come into (or to) your kingdom The idiom "come into (or to) your kingdom" refers to the moment when someone attains power, authority, or control over a certain domain or situation, typically after a period of struggle, preparation, or waiting. It implies the attainment of a position of strength, influence, or dominion.
  • keep your options open The idiom "keep your options open" means to refrain from making a final decision or commitment, to maintain freedom and flexibility in choices or opportunities, and to avoid closing off possibilities. It suggests that one should not limit themselves to a single option but instead consider different alternatives before settling on a particular course of action.
  • take your courage in both hands The idiom "take your courage in both hands" means to summon and gather one's bravery or confidence in order to face a difficult or challenging situation, often with determination and resolve. It suggests that one must grip tightly onto their courage and overcome any fear or hesitation in order to tackle the task or obstacle at hand.
  • under your own steam The idiom "under your own steam" refers to doing something independently or without assistance, relying solely on your own abilities or resources. It implies that the task or action is accomplished through one's individual effort and without the need for external support or guidance.
  • sign your own death warrant The idiom "sign your own death warrant" refers to an action or decision taken by someone that will ultimately result in their own downfall, ruin, or demise. It implies that the person is unknowingly or willingly engaging in self-destructive behavior that will lead to severe consequences or a catastrophic outcome.
  • calm your tits The idiom "calm your tits" is an informal and somewhat vulgar expression, often used to tell someone to relax, calm down, or stop being overly emotional or agitated. The phrase originates from a slang term for breasts, so it's meant to convey a need for someone to bring their emotions or level of excitement under control.
  • lose your rag The idiom "lose your rag" means to become extremely angry, lose control of one's temper, or have an outburst of anger.
  • piss/shit your pants The idiom "piss/shit your pants" is a colorful and informal expression used to describe an extreme reaction of fear, shock, or surprise. It means to be so frightened or shocked that one loses control of their bodily functions and unintentionally urinates or defecates in their pants. This idiom is figurative and not meant to be taken literally.
  • get your act together The idiom "get your act together" means to organize, improve one's performance, or become more focused and efficient in one's actions or behavior. It implies the need for someone to make positive changes and be more responsible or competent in their endeavors.
  • your eyes pop out of your head The idiom "your eyes pop out of your head" is a figurative expression used to describe someone's intense shock, surprise, or astonishment at what they are seeing or hearing. It implies that the person's eyes widen dramatically and seem to bulge out of their sockets due to the overwhelming nature of the situation.
  • feel your way The idiom "feel your way" means to proceed cautiously or without proper knowledge, relying on intuition or trial and error to navigate a situation or solve a problem. It suggests the idea of exploring uncertain territory by tactfully testing different approaches or hypotheses until a solution or understanding is reached.
  • not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have a penny to your name" means to be completely broke or without any money at all. It implies that a person does not possess even the smallest amount of currency.
  • lose your head The idiom "lose your head" means to panic, become overwhelmed, or act impulsively in a situation due to fear, stress, or anger, often resulting in making foolish decisions or losing self-control.
  • flex your/its muscles "Flex your/its muscles" means to demonstrate or show off one's power, strength, influence, or abilities, usually in a confident or assertive manner. It often implies displaying one's abilities or resources to intimidate or assert dominance over others.
  • be run/rushed off your feet The idiom "be run/rushed off your feet" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities. It implies that a person is constantly on the move, occupied, or working nonstop.
  • lie your way into/out of something The idiom "lie your way into/out of something" refers to the act of using deceit or falsehoods to gain entrance or exit from a certain situation or circumstance. It implies deliberately providing misleading or untruthful information to achieve a desired outcome, often at the expense of honesty and integrity. This phrase typically implies that someone is trying to manipulate a situation by fabricating information or making false statements.
  • You pays your money The idiom "You pays your money" is often used to convey the idea that after making a payment or investment, one must accept the circumstances or outcome, even if it is not desirable or favorable. It implies that once you have committed your financial resources, you have little control over the result and must accept whatever the consequence may be.
  • keep/hold/play your cards close to your chest The idiom "keep/hold/play your cards close to your chest" means to keep one's plans, thoughts, or intentions secret; to not reveal or disclose crucial information or strategies to others. It suggests being cautious and guarded in sharing information, much like a poker player who keeps their cards hidden close to their chest so that opponents cannot see them.
  • (all) by/on your lonesome The idiom "(all) by/on your lonesome" means to do something alone, without any company or assistance from others. It implies being solitary or isolated in a given situation or task.
  • by/with your leave The idiom "by/with your leave" is an expression used to ask for permission or agreement from someone before taking a specific action or making a decision. It is a polite way of seeking approval or consent.
  • melt in the/your mouth The idiom "melt in the/your mouth" is typically used to describe food or a food item that is exceptionally tender, soft, and delicious. When something "melts in the/your mouth," it suggests that the food easily and pleasantly dissolves or disintegrates as soon as it touches your tongue due to its exquisite texture or flavor. The expression often implies a sense of indulgence or enjoyment associated with the sensory experience of eating something truly delectable.
  • lose your heart To "lose your heart" is an idiom that refers to falling deeply in love, typically with someone or something. It suggests that the person has become emotionally invested and feels strongly attached or infatuated.
  • your luck's in! The idiom "your luck's in!" means that someone's luck is favorably or unexpectedly turning in their favor. It implies that a fortunate or advantageous event has occurred, often unexpectedly, bringing good fortune or success to the person.
  • keep a civil tongue in your head The idiom "keep a civil tongue in your head" means to speak politely and avoid using offensive or disrespectful language. It is an expression that reminds someone to exercise restraint and maintain a civilized way of speaking. It emphasizes the importance of using respectful and considerate language when engaging in conversation or expressing opinions.
  • have/keep (all) your wits about you The idiom "have/keep (all) your wits about you" means to stay alert, focused, and mentally prepared in order to face challenges or difficult situations. It implies being quick to think, make decisions, and react appropriately in order to avoid any potential dangers or pitfalls.
  • hold your peace The idiom "hold your peace" means to remain silent or refrain from expressing one's opinion, especially in a specific situation or during a particular discussion. It typically implies keeping quiet or not speaking up, often used in contexts where a person is expected to voice objections or concerns but chooses not to do so.
  • your brains out The idiom "your brains out" typically means to think very deeply and intensely, often to the point of mental exhaustion or overthinking. It implies the act of focusing all intellectual effort on a particular subject or problem.
  • hoist with your own petard "Hoist with your own petard" is an idiom that means to be harmed or defeated by one's own actions or plans. The phrase originates from Shakespeare's play "Hamlet," where a petard is a small explosive device used to breach walls. Therefore, being "hoist with your own petard" implies being blown up or caught in the very trap that one created for others.
  • prick up your ears The idiom "prick up your ears" means to suddenly become attentive or listen very carefully to something, often due to hearing an interesting or important piece of information or a sudden noise.
  • get your kit off The idiom "get your kit off" is a slang phrase commonly used in British English, generally meaning to undress or remove one's clothing. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous context. The word "kit" refers to one's outfit or clothing in this phrase.
  • be up to your eyes in sth The idiom "be up to your eyes in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task, activity, or responsibility. It conveys the idea of being fully engaged or deeply involved in something to the point of having no or very little spare time or capacity for anything else.
  • feel it in your bones The idiom "feel it in your bones" means to have a strong intuition or inner sense about something, often characterized by a deep and unexplainable feeling or premonition. It suggests a strong conviction or certitude that transcends rational explanation and is based on an instinctive or deeply-rooted understanding.
  • get your finger out "Get your finger out" is an idiomatic expression usually used in a colloquial or informal context. It typically means to start taking action, to stop procrastinating, or to hurry up and finish a task or complete something that has been delayed or neglected. It conveys a sense of urgency, impatience, or frustration.
  • shoot your cuffs To "shoot your cuffs" is an idiom that originated from the act of adjusting one's shirt cuffs. It refers to the action of rolling up or adjusting the cuffs of one's sleeves, typically in a confident or stylish manner. It often symbolizes a moment of self-assurance or readiness, as if preparing oneself for an important or challenging task.
  • have your hands full The idiom "have your hands full" means to be very busy or occupied with a difficult task or situation, often implying that one is overloaded with responsibilities or problems.
  • keep/hold your end up The idiom "keep/hold your end up" means to fulfill or carry out one's responsibilities or obligations in a particular situation or interaction, especially when working in a team or partnership. It suggests being reliable, competent, and actively contributing to the shared task or goal.
  • in over your head The idiom "in over your head" means to be involved in a situation or task that is too difficult or beyond one's capabilities or understanding. It implies that the person is overwhelmed or outmatched by the circumstances they are in, typically due to lack of experience, knowledge, or skills.
  • have had its/your day The idiom "have had its/your day" is used to convey that something or someone is no longer as successful, popular, or influential as they once were. It implies that the time of glory or relevance has passed and that the subject is no longer significant or capable of achieving the same level of success or impact as before.
  • turn your nose up The idiom "turn your nose up" means to show disdain, arrogance, or superiority toward something or someone, usually by physically or metaphorically raising one's nose upwards. It suggests a dismissive or snobbish attitude.
  • meet your maker The idiom "meet your maker" refers to the act of dying or encountering death. It implies meeting or facing one's creator or God after death.
  • more power to you!, at more power to your elbow! The idiom "more power to you!" or "more power to your elbow!" is an expression used to encourage or commend someone for their actions, decisions, or achievements. It conveys a sense of admiration, support, and encouragement towards the person being addressed. It can be seen as a way of saying "keep up the good work" or "I fully support and applaud what you're doing."
  • die on your feet To "die on your feet" is an idiom that means to face death or adversity courageously, standing up for one's beliefs and principles until the very end. It implies refusing to give up or surrender, even in the face of overwhelming challenges or imminent danger. It signifies a determination to maintain dignity and integrity until the last moment, rather than succumbing or capitulating.
  • at your earliest convenience The idiom "at your earliest convenience" is used to politely request someone to do something as soon as possible or whenever it is most convenient for them. It implies that there is no urgency or immediate deadline, but a suggestion to accomplish the task at the earliest opportunity.
  • feast your eyes on The idiom "feast your eyes on" means to enjoy looking at or admiring something intensely, especially something visually appealing or breathtaking.
  • above your head The idiom "above your head" means something that is too difficult or complex to understand or grasp. It refers to a concept or information that is beyond one's level of comprehension.
  • have sb/sth hanging round your neck The idiom "have sb/sth hanging round your neck" typically means to be burdened or constantly troubled by someone or something. It suggests a persistent and bothersome presence, often causing difficulties or hindrances.
  • scream, shout, etc. your head off The idiom "scream, shout, etc. your head off" means to express one's emotions, usually anger, excitement, or joy, by screaming, shouting, or making a lot of noise. It suggests that someone is expressing themselves in an exaggerated or intense manner.
  • wash your dirty laundry/linen in public The idiom "wash your dirty laundry/linen in public" means to discuss private or embarrassing matters in public, typically revealing personal or sensitive information that should remain private. It implies a lack of discretion and an inappropriate display of personal problems or conflicts.
  • fall/land on your feet The idiom "fall/land on your feet" means to quickly and successfully recover from a difficult or challenging situation, typically by finding a solution or adapting well to changing circumstances. It implies the ability to bounce back or come out of a disappointment or setback with resilience and positivity.
  • hang out your shingle The idiom "hang out your shingle" means to open a new business or start working independently. It derives from the practice of lawyers in the past who would literally hang a shingle or sign outside their office to signify their presence and availability for legal services. Thus, the phrase has come to symbolize the act of starting one's own practice or business.
  • get your feet under the table The idiom "get your feet under the table" means to become comfortable and familiar in a new or unfamiliar environment, especially when one is able to establish oneself in a position of power or influence. It signifies a sense of settling in and finding stability within a certain place or situation.
  • set your face against something The idiom "set your face against something" means to strongly oppose or disapprove of something. It implies taking a firm or determined stance against a particular action, idea, or behavior.
  • put on your thinking cap The idiom "put on your thinking cap" means to engage in deep thought or problem-solving, often implying the need for creativity or mental focus. It is a way of encouraging someone to think more deeply or to come up with innovative ideas or solutions to a problem.
  • a millstone around your neck The idiom "a millstone around your neck" refers to a heavy burden or responsibility that someone is carrying, usually symbolic of something that is causing them significant difficulty, hindrance, or ongoing trouble. It implies a sense of being weighed down or constrained by this burden, similar to the way a heavy millstone around the neck of a person would impede their movement or cause them distress.
  • dry your eyes The idiom "dry your eyes" means to stop crying or to cease feeling sad or upset about something. It is often used as an encouragement or a way to console someone who is experiencing sadness or emotional distress.
  • none of your business! The idiom "none of your business!" is a straightforward and often blunt response that implies the person being addressed has no right to inquire or be involved in a certain matter. It is commonly used to assert privacy or to indicate that the information or situation in question is personal and not open for discussion.
  • not soil your hands The definition of the idiom "not soil your hands" is to avoid involvement or participation in something that is morally wrong, unethical, or distasteful. It means to maintain one's innocence, integrity, or cleanliness by refraining from engaging in harmful, dirty, or dishonorable activities.
  • keep your distance The idiom "keep your distance" means to maintain a certain physical or emotional space between oneself and someone or something else, typically to avoid conflict, maintain privacy, or protect oneself. It implies the need to stay at a safe distance or not become too involved in a particular situation or relationship.
  • put your finger on something The idiom "put your finger on something" means to identify or understand something precisely or accurately, often referring to an intangible concept, issue, or feeling. It refers to the ability to pinpoint or articulate a specific problem, cause, or solution in a situation.
  • get your kicks The idiom "get your kicks" is defined as seeking excitement, pleasure, or satisfaction from a particular activity or experience. It is often used to imply a sense of personal enjoyment or fulfillment derived from engaging in something. The phrase originally gained popularity through the lyrics of the song "Route 66" by Bobby Troup, where it referred to the joy of traveling and exploring.
  • have something on your side The idiom "have something on your side" means to possess an advantage or favorable condition that supports or helps you in a particular situation. It refers to having a factor or element that works in your favor, giving you an upper hand or a greater likelihood of success.
  • throw your weight about/around The idiom "throw your weight about/around" means to assert one's authority, influence, or power in a way that is typically seen as arrogant, aggressive, or overbearing. It involves using one's position or physical strength to intimidate or dominate others.
  • tip your hand The idiom "tip your hand" means to reveal or divulge your intentions, plans, or secrets, usually unintentionally or prematurely. It originates from card games, where "tipping your hand" refers to accidentally showing your cards to other players, thus giving away valuable information about your strategy or hand strength. In broader usage, this expression is often used to caution against disclosing too much information or compromising a position of advantage.
  • change/mend your ways The idiom "change/mend your ways" means to alter one's behavior or habits for the better, typically implying that the current behavior is unacceptable or problematic. It suggests embracing a different approach or attitude to improve oneself or to conform to societal norms or expectations.
  • have something at your feet The idiom "have something at your feet" means to possess or have complete control or mastery over something or someone. It implies that something is easily or readily available for an individual, allowing them to have dominance or influence in a particular situation.
  • rest your case The idiom "rest your case" is a phrase used in a legal context to indicate that one has presented all the evidence or arguments necessary to support their case and that no further evidence or arguments are required. It means that the person believes they have sufficiently proven their point and there is no need for additional discussion or debate.
  • cry into your beer The idiom "cry into your beer" refers to feeling discouraged, disappointed, or sad about a particular situation or an unfulfilled desire while consuming alcoholic beverages, typically beer. It implies that someone may be seeking solace or consolation in alcohol and is expressing their grievances or frustrations about their circumstances.
  • have your finger on the trigger The idiom "have your finger on the trigger" is used to describe someone who is ready or prepared to take immediate action or make a decision, especially in a decisive or critical situation. It suggests that the person is in a position to take control or initiate an action at any moment.
  • harden your heart against somebody/something The idiom "harden your heart against somebody/something" means to intentionally close oneself emotionally and refuse to feel sympathy, empathy, or compassion towards a particular person or situation. It refers to intentionally becoming emotionally detached and unresponsive to someone or something, typically as a means of self-protection or defense.
  • lose your cool The idiom "lose your cool" means to become angry, frustrated, or agitated in a situation where one would normally remain calm and composed.
  • stew (in your own juice) The idiom "stew (in your own juice)" refers to the act of being left alone to deal with the consequences of one's actions or decisions. It means to be left in a difficult or uncomfortable situation without any external assistance or support. It often implies experiencing frustration, regret, or distress as a result of one's own choices or mistakes, without anyone providing comfort or help.
  • get a/your second wind The idiom "get a/your second wind" means to suddenly find a renewed burst of energy or vigor after feeling tired or lethargic. It refers to pushing through a period of fatigue to continue with renewed strength and vigor.
  • keep/play your cards close to your chest The idiom "keep/play your cards close to your chest" means to keep one's thoughts, intentions, or plans secret or undisclosed, especially in a situation that involves strategy, competition, or negotiation. It originates from card games like poker, where players typically hold their cards close to their chest in order to avoid revealing their hand to opponents. By using this idiom, it suggests being cautious and not revealing too much information.
  • with your head in the clouds The idiom "with your head in the clouds" means to be inattentive, impractical, or daydreaming instead of being focused or grounded in reality. It describes someone who is not fully present or aware of their surroundings, often lost in their thoughts or fantasies.
  • clear your desk The idiom "clear your desk" generally means to remove all items and clutter from your workspace, usually in preparation for a new task, project, or a thorough cleaning. It symbolizes starting with a clean slate and organizing oneself for increased productivity and efficiency.
  • get off your arse The idiom "get off your arse" means to stop being lazy or inactive, and to start taking action or making an effort towards a particular task or goal. It is a straightforward and sometimes forceful way of encouraging someone to stop procrastinating or being unproductive.
  • to within an inch of your life The idiom "to within an inch of your life" refers to a severe beating or punishment that is administered with great intensity or brutality, almost to the point of causing death. It implies a severe physical assault or injury that leaves the person barely alive. Figuratively, it can also refer to exhaustive or intense efforts made to accomplish something or thoroughly transform a situation.
  • get caught/found with your hand in the cookie jar The idiom "get caught/found with your hand in the cookie jar" refers to being discovered or caught while engaging in an activity that is considered deceitful, dishonest, or inappropriate. It implies being caught in the act of doing something wrong, similar to a child sneaking cookies from a jar without permission and being caught in the act.
  • good to hear your voice The idiom "good to hear your voice" is an expression used to convey pleasure or joy upon hearing someone's voice. It signifies delight in connecting with someone and implies a sense of comfort, familiarity, or relief associated with their presence or communication.
  • make your blood run cold The idiom "make your blood run cold" is used to describe something that is extremely frightening or chilling, causing a sudden and intense feeling of fear, horror, or dread. It suggests that whatever it is, it has a disturbing and unsettling effect on the person, often causing a physical reaction such as shivering or a sudden drop in body temperature.
  • get your teeth into something The idiom "get your teeth into something" means to become fully engaged or involved in a task or activity, often showing enthusiasm and determination. It implies sinking one's metaphorical teeth into something, like a dog would with a bone, in order to grasp it firmly and work at it with dedication. It can suggest immersing oneself into a project or endeavor, giving it full attention and concentration.
  • work your way up/to the top The idiom "work your way up/to the top" refers to the process of advancing or progressing through a hierarchical system or structure, typically within a professional or social context. It means starting from a lower position, level, or rank and gradually achieving higher or more influential positions through hard work, dedication, and perseverance. Working your way up or to the top often involves gaining experience, acquiring new skills, proving oneself, and taking on increasing levels of responsibility or authority.
  • up to your eyes in The idiom "up to your eyes in" means deeply or heavily involved in something, overwhelmed or extremely busy with a task or situation. It implies being fully committed or completely immersed in a particular activity or responsibility to the point of being overwhelmed.
  • be run off your feet To be run off your feet means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities, often to the point of feeling overwhelmed or exhausted.
  • keep your feet on the ground To "keep your feet on the ground" means to remain practical, realistic, and down-to-earth rather than being overly idealistic or dreaming excessively. It suggests staying grounded and focusing on the present reality rather than getting carried away with imaginative or unachievable ideas.
  • jump/leap out of your skin The idiom "jump/leap out of your skin" means to have a strong and sudden physical reaction to something surprising or shocking. It refers to being extremely startled or scared to the point where one's body feels like it is physically reacting by jumping or moving involuntarily.
  • Have it your way The idiom "Have it your way" means allowing someone to have things done or arranged according to their preferences or desires, even if it differs from the usual or standard way. It implies granting someone the freedom to choose or control a situation to suit their own needs or wishes.
  • not count your chickens The idiom "not count your chickens" means to not make plans or anticipate success before it actually occurs. It cautions against being overly confident or assuming desired outcomes without concrete evidence or guarantees. It suggests the importance of being cautious and realistic instead of being too optimistic about future events or situations.
  • be wringing your hands The idiom "be wringing your hands" means to be anxious, worried, or distressed about something. It often implies a sense of helplessness or despair, as one might physically wring their hands when feeling overwhelmed or uncertain.
  • be off your nut The idiom "be off your nut" generally means to be crazy, mentally unstable, or acting in a bizarre or irrational manner. It implies that someone's thoughts or actions are not within the bounds of normal behavior or reason.
  • be scratching your head The idiom "be scratching your head" means to be confused, puzzled, or uncertain about something, often leading to the action of literally scratching one's head as a physical manifestation of mental confusion.
  • look your age The idiom "look your age" means to appear or behave in a manner that is appropriate for someone of one's own age. It suggests that a person's appearance or actions should align with their chronological age, implying that they should not try to appear younger or older than they actually are.
  • bet your bottom dollar/your life The idiom "bet your bottom dollar/your life" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something, to guarantee something without any doubt or hesitation, often implying a high level of confidence or assurance of the outcome. It suggests that someone is so confident in a particular outcome that they are willing to wager their last dollar or risk their life on it.
  • fall off your perch The idiom "fall off your perch" refers to someone who is in a position of authority or power losing their position or influence abruptly or unexpectedly. It alludes to a bird falling off its perch, representing a sudden decline or downfall.
  • be/get too big for your boots The idiom "be/get too big for your boots" means to have an inflated sense of one's own importance, ability, or authority. It refers to someone who is overly confident, arrogant, or behaves in a way that exceeds their actual capabilities or position.
  • cut your coat according to your cloth The idiom "cut your coat according to your cloth" means to live within one's means and to adjust one's expenses or goals to match the resources or circumstances available. It suggests that one should not exceed their financial or material limitations and should be mindful of their capabilities before embarking on something beyond their means. In essence, it advises individuals to be practical, realistic, and to make wise choices based on their current situation.
  • have your head screwed on (the right way) The idiom "have your head screwed on (the right way)" means to be sensible, rational, and well-organized in one's thinking or decision-making. It implies having good judgment, being level-headed, and thinking in a logical and practical manner.
  • spread your net The idiom "spread your net" means to expand your options or opportunities by casting a wide range of possibilities or resources in order to increase your chances of success or achievement. It implies being open-minded, flexible, and proactive in exploring different avenues in order to maximize potential outcomes.
  • be/do something for your sins The idiom "be/do something for your sins" means to suffer consequences or penance for one's past wrongdoings or misdeeds. It implies that one is facing or enduring a difficult or unpleasant situation as a form of retribution or punishment.
  • zip your lip The idiom "zip your lip" means to be quiet or to stop talking. It is often used as an informal and direct way to tell someone to be silent or to keep a secret.
  • make your blood freeze The idiom "make your blood freeze" refers to something that is so terrifying, shocking, or horrifying that it causes a sudden intense feeling of fear or panic. It implies a sensation that makes one's blood feel as if it is turning cold or stopping momentarily, due to the extreme fright or horror experienced.
  • save your own skin/hide The idiom "save your own skin/hide" means to prioritize one's own safety or interests above others, especially in a difficult or dangerous situation. It suggests that someone is primarily concerned with protecting themselves rather than helping or considering others.
  • at your best The idiom "at your best" refers to performing or behaving in a way that showcases one's highest level of ability, skills, and characteristics. It commonly indicates an individual's optimal state where their performance, behavior, or appearance is exemplary and surpasses their usual standards. It implies being in peak condition or demonstrating one's greatest qualities and capabilities.
  • your mind’s eye The idiom "your mind's eye" refers to the ability to visualize or imagine something in one's mind. It's the inner eye or mental vision that allows a person to mentally picture or recall sights, images, or memories.
  • keep your hand in The idiom "keep your hand in" means to continue practicing or staying involved in a particular activity or skill in order to maintain proficiency or knowledge. It implies the importance of regularly engaging in an activity to avoid losing the skills or competence associated with it.
  • earn your crust To "earn your crust" is an idiomatic expression that means to work hard and earn a living or earn money to support oneself or one's family. It typically refers to the effort and dedication required to make a living, especially through a job or occupation.
  • Make your mind up The idiom "Make your mind up" means to make a decision or come to a conclusion about something. It suggests that a person should choose or decide on something after considering the options or factors involved.
  • take sth in stride, at take sth in your stride To "take something in stride" or "take something in your stride" means to handle or deal with a difficulty or setback calmly and confidently, without being overly affected by it. It refers to the ability to face challenges with ease, not allowing them to disrupt one's progress or composure.
  • burn your bridges The idiom "burn your bridges" refers to intentionally severing or destroying your connections, relationships, or opportunities, usually in a way that makes it impossible or very difficult to go back or undo the action. It implies a complete commitment to moving forward and not having the option to retreat or return to a previous state or situation.
  • prove/show your mettle The idiom "prove/show your mettle" means to demonstrate one's ability, competence, or courage in a challenging or difficult situation. It refers to the act of showcasing one's true capabilities or character under demanding circumstances, often to gain respect or recognition from others. This idiom is often used in contexts where individuals are expected to overcome obstacles or perform exceptionally to prove their worth.
  • dot the/your i's and cross the/your t's The idiom "dot the i's and cross the t's" means to pay attention to small details and ensure that everything is correct and in order before completing a task or making a decision. It refers to thoroughly and meticulously finishing a task by taking care of every minor detail and adhering to proper procedures.
  • earn your keep The idiom "earn your keep" refers to the concept of working or contributing in a way that justifies or merits the support, benefits, or resources one receives. It implies actively participating and fulfilling one's responsibilities or obligations in exchange for the privileges or provisions provided.
  • clean up your act The idiom "clean up your act" means to improve one's behavior or performance, usually when it has been lacking or considered inadequate. It implies the need for a person to make positive changes, often by eliminating bad habits, irresponsible actions, or unprofessional behavior to become more responsible, organized, or reliable.
  • raise your hat to someone The idiom "raise your hat to someone" means to acknowledge and show respect or admiration for someone's achievements or actions. It is typically used to express praise, admiration, or appreciation for someone's qualities or accomplishments. The phrase originates from the act of raising one's hat as a gesture of respect or greeting.
  • stick in your craw The idiom "stick in your craw" means that something is deeply or persistently annoying, irritating, or causing resentment. It refers to a feeling of discomfort or unease caused by an action, statement, or situation that is difficult to swallow or accept. It implies that the particular issue or topic is stubbornly bothersome and hard to get rid of, much like an obstruction in one's throat.
  • try your hand at sth The idiom "try your hand at something" means to attempt or give something a try, usually something new or unfamiliar, in order to see if one is capable of doing it or to test one's skills.
  • give somebody your word The idiom "give somebody your word" means to make a serious and sincere promise to someone. It implies giving a personal assurance or guarantee that you will fulfill a certain commitment or keep a specific agreement.
  • get/find/take your bearings The idiom "get/find/take your bearings" refers to the act of determining one's position or finding one's way, either physically or metaphorically, in a given situation or context. It implies the need to gain a clear understanding of the current circumstances or one's location in order to make informed decisions or navigate effectively.
  • your own flesh and blood The idiom "your own flesh and blood" refers to a close family member, usually a child or a parent, who is connected to you by blood ties. It emphasizes the strong bond and sense of loyalty that exists within a family, highlighting the deep emotional connection and understanding that typically exists between relatives.
  • the tools of the/your trade The idiom "the tools of the/your trade" refers to the specific skills, equipment, or materials that are necessary for a particular job or profession. It signifies the essential items or knowledge needed to perform tasks or work effectively in a specific field or industry.
  • hold/put your hands up The idiom "hold/put your hands up" refers to raising one's hands in the air, typically as a gesture of surrender or compliance when confronted by someone with authority or a weapon. It is often used in situations where individuals are being threatened or stopped by law enforcement, security personnel, or criminals who are demanding compliance or submission.
  • fly by the seat of your pants The idiom "fly by the seat of your pants" means to act or make decisions in a spontaneous or instinctive manner, without a specific plan or adequate preparation. It implies relying on one's intuition, improvisation, or guesswork rather than following a prescribed course of action.
  • have somebody eating out of your hand The idiom "have somebody eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone to the extent that they are willing to do anything you ask or desire. It suggests that the person is obedient, submissive, or easily manipulated.
  • come into your own The idiom "come into your own" means to reach a stage where one's skills, talents, or personal qualities are fully recognized and appreciated, leading to a sense of fulfillment or success. It refers to the moment when someone truly begins to shine or excel in a particular area.
  • bang your head against a brick wall The idiom "bang your head against a brick wall" means to persistently try to achieve something or solve a problem with little or no success. It implies repeatedly attempting a futile or frustrating task despite the lack of progress or any possibility of success. This idiom suggests a sense of futility, exasperation, and wasted effort.
  • quicken your/the pulse The idiom "quicken your/the pulse" means to cause excitement, anticipation, or nervousness that increases one's heartbeat rate. It refers to a situation or event that elicits an intense emotional or physical response, often related to fear, anxiety, or exhilaration.
  • close your eyes to sth The idiom "close your eyes to something" means to ignore or intentionally not acknowledge a particular issue, situation, or problem. It implies deliberately avoiding or refusing to see or deal with something, usually because it is uncomfortable, unpleasant, or inconvenient. It suggests a conscious decision to turn a blind eye to something rather than confront or address it.
  • nearly/almost fall off your chair The idiom "nearly/almost fall off your chair" means to be extremely surprised or shocked by something. It implies such a profound astonishment that it feels as if one's reaction might cause them to lose their balance and fall off a chair.
  • ring in your ears The idiom "ring in your ears" refers to a persistent or lingering sound or sensation that one experiences, particularly after being exposed to a loud noise or a shocking event. It describes the perception of a continuous, often high-pitched noise in one's ears even when there is no external source to account for it. This idiom can also be used metaphorically to indicate a haunting memory or impression that remains in one's mind long after an event has occurred.
  • thumb your nose at sth/sb To "thumb your nose at something/somebody" means to openly and defiantly show contempt, disrespect, or disregard for someone or something. It involves deliberately and boldly disregarding rules, standards, or authority figures, often with a sense of mockery or disdain. It can also imply an act of rebelliousness or defiance against societal norms or expectations.
  • stick/put your tongue out The idiom "stick/put your tongue out" refers to the action of protruding one's tongue out of the mouth, typically to express a mocking, cheeky, or taunting gesture towards someone or something. It is often used to convey playful teasing or childish behavior.
  • put/lay your cards on the table To "put/lay your cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent about your thoughts, intentions, or expectations in a situation. It refers to revealing all relevant information or sharing your true position or plans without hiding anything. It often implies a desire for sincerity and clear communication in order to avoid misunderstandings or deceit.
  • cover your back The idiom "cover your back" means to take actions or precautions to protect oneself from potential harm, blame, or negative consequences. It refers to being vigilant, cautious, and proactive in safeguarding one's interests and avoiding any possible difficulties or liabilities.
  • get your claws into somebody The idiom "get your claws into somebody" means to exert control or influence over someone, often in a manipulative or possessive manner. It implies grabbing onto or gaining a strong hold over another person, typically for personal gain or to maintain power over them.
  • thank your lucky stars The idiom "thank your lucky stars" means to feel extremely grateful and fortunate for a particular situation or outcome. It suggests acknowledging and appreciating the good fortune that has come one's way.
  • break your back The idiom "break your back" is often used metaphorically to describe putting in a lot of effort or working extremely hard to accomplish a task or goal. It implies going beyond one's normal capabilities or pushing oneself to the limit in order to achieve success.
  • in your own words The idiom "in your own words" means to express or explain something using one's own vocabulary and personal understanding instead of directly quoting or using someone else's wording. It emphasizes the importance of individual interpretation and expression.
  • have sth hanging over your head The idiom "have something hanging over your head" means to have a looming or unresolved issue or responsibility that causes stress, anxiety, or a sense of impending consequence. It refers to a lingering burden or worry that has not yet been resolved or resolved satisfactorily.
  • paddle your own canoe The idiom "paddle your own canoe" means to be self-reliant, independent, and responsible for one's own actions and decisions. It refers to taking control of one's own life, pursuing personal goals without relying on others, and being self-sufficient in navigating one's own way through various challenges and obstacles.
  • weigh your words The idiom "weigh your words" means to carefully consider and choose the words one is going to say, taking into account their potential impact, consequences, or how they may be interpreted by others. It emphasizes the importance of speaking thoughtfully and with caution to avoid misunderstandings, offense, or unnecessary conflict.
  • before your eyes The idiom "before your eyes" means that something is happening or occurring right in front of you, often unexpectedly or in a very noticeable manner. It implies that the event or situation is unmistakable and easily observed.
  • your last gasp The idiom "your last gasp" typically refers to the final moments or the end of a person's life or a particular situation. It suggests the final effort, attempt, or breath someone takes before their ultimate demise or the conclusion of something.
  • put/lay your head/neck on the block The idiom "put/lay your head/neck on the block" means to knowingly expose oneself to a great risk or danger, usually by taking responsibility for something or making a bold decision. It often indicates that a person is willing to face the consequences, even if they are severe or unfavorable.
  • hold your breath The idiom "hold your breath" means to wait expectantly or anxiously for something to happen, often implying that the outcome is uncertain or unlikely to occur. It suggests that one should not have high hopes or should not rely on something happening.
  • have somebody in the palm of your hand The idiom "have somebody in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often used to describe a situation where someone is easily manipulated or influenced by another person. It suggests that the person being referred to is highly submissive and obedient, similar to a puppet in the hand of its puppeteer.
  • go your own way The idiom "go your own way" means to act independently, making decisions and pursuing a course of action that is different from what is expected or commonly followed. It suggests doing things in your own unique manner, regardless of others' opinions or societal norms.
  • pissed out of your head/mind/skull The idiom "pissed out of your head/mind/skull" is a colloquial expression that refers to being extremely intoxicated or drunk. It implies that the person's level of drunkenness is so excessive that it affects their cognitive abilities and judgment.
  • off your face The idiom "off your face" is a colloquial expression that refers to being extremely intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. It implies being in a state where one's senses and mental faculties are significantly impaired due to excessive consumption of alcohol or drugs.
  • shut your face! The idiom "shut your face!" is an informal, impolite way of telling someone to be quiet or stop talking. It is a more forceful and less polite alternative to "shut up" or "be quiet."
  • your lips are sealed The idiom "your lips are sealed" means to keep information confidential or to promise not to reveal a secret. It implies a commitment to silence or discretion.
  • bet your bottom dollar The idiom "bet your bottom dollar" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something, often used to express a strong belief or assurance that a particular outcome or statement will happen or be true. It implies a high level of confidence and conviction in the wager being made.
  • throw up your hands/arms in despair, horror, etc. The idiom "throw up your hands/arms in despair, horror, etc." refers to an expression of extreme frustration, helplessness, shock, or disbelief in response to a difficult, overwhelming, or unpleasant situation. It implies a gesture of giving up, surrendering, or expressing a lack of control over the circumstances.
  • outstay/overstay your welcome The idiom "outstay/overstay your welcome" means to continue staying in a place or prolonging a visit beyond the point where it becomes inconvenient, unwelcome, or no longer appreciated by the host or the people around. It suggests that one has overstayed their hospitality and should leave.
  • on the tip of your tongue The idiom "on the tip of your tongue" refers to a situation when you are unable to recall or remember something momentarily, but it feels very close or easy to retrieve from your memory. It can be used when you have the sensation that the information you are trying to remember is about to be recalled, but you just can't quite retrieve it or find the right words.
  • grind your teeth The idiom "grind your teeth" refers to a situation where someone is experiencing anger, frustration, or irritation, often in a suppressed manner. It signifies clenching or grinding one's teeth together due to a difficult or unpleasant circumstance. It suggests that a person is enduring a challenging situation without expressing their negative emotions openly.
  • button your lip The idiom "button your lip" means to be silent or stop talking, often in a forceful or stern manner. It implies that a person should close their lips as if fastening a button to prevent any further speech. It is commonly used as a command to someone who is talking too much or sharing information that should be kept confidential.
  • vote with your feet "Vote with your feet" is an idiomatic expression that means to express one's dissatisfaction, disagreement, or protest by physically leaving a place, situation, or organization. It refers to the act of showing disapproval or disagreement by choosing not to participate or be associated with something anymore.
  • take your pick The idiom "take your pick" means to have a wide range of things or options to choose from, allowing someone to select whatever they prefer or find most suitable.
  • have your heart in The idiom "have your heart in" typically refers to being deeply committed, passionate, or fully focused on something. It signifies having a strong emotional attachment or dedication to a particular activity, goal, or person.
  • fling up your hands The idiom "fling up your hands" means to express shock, disbelief, or frustration by quickly and dramatically raising both hands in the air. It is often used to convey a feeling of giving up or being overwhelmed by a situation.
  • cudgel your brain To "cudgel your brain" means to think hard or ponder deeply in order to come up with a solution to a problem or to understand something complex. It refers to the act of using one's brain like a cudgel or a heavy club, implying that one is exerting great mental effort or forcefully challenging their mind to figure out or remember something.
  • come out of (or retreat into) your shell The idiom "come out of (or retreat into) your shell" means to either start being more sociable, outgoing, and confident, or to become more reserved, withdrawn, and shy. The expression is often used when talking about someone's behavior changing from being introverted or shy to becoming more extroverted or vice versa.
  • put sth out of your mind The idiom "put something out of your mind" means to intentionally or consciously forget about something or stop thinking about it. It refers to the act of consciously dismissing or disregarding a thought, worry, or concern, often in an effort to avoid dwelling on it or to maintain focus on something else.
  • hard on your heels The idiom "hard on your heels" means to closely follow someone or something, often implying a pursuit or the ability to catch up quickly. It suggests that the person or thing being followed is being closely monitored or chased.
  • show your face The idiom "show your face" means to make an appearance or be present at a particular place or event, often implying that the person has been absent or avoiding it. It suggests a challenge or expectation for someone to physically show up and be seen.
  • a skeleton in the/your cupboard The idiom "a skeleton in the/your cupboard" refers to a shameful or embarrassing secret that someone wants to keep hidden or that someone else knows about. It implies that there is a past event or a piece of information which, if revealed, could damage someone's reputation or cause embarrassment. The phrase often suggests the fear or discomfort associated with having a hidden secret.
  • draw yourself up/rise to your full height To "draw yourself up" or "rise to your full height" means to straighten your posture, stand tall, and project confidence. This idiom is often used in a figurative sense to describe someone who is asserting their authority, asserting their rights, or reacting with dignity and pride. It suggests a physical and metaphorical act of standing up tall and showing strength, self-assuredness, and determination.
  • run your eye over sth The idiom "run your eye over something" means to quickly scan or glance at something, often to get a general sense or overview of it without examining it in great detail.
  • draw in your horns The idiom "draw in your horns" means to become less aggressive, outspoken, or assertive in order to avoid conflict or confrontation. It often implies the act of restraining oneself and adopting a more cautious or submissive approach.
  • your eyes glued to something The phrase "your eyes glued to something" is an idiom that means to be fixated, completely absorbed, or intensely focused on something or someone. It implies being unable to take one's eyes off a particular object or situation due to sheer fascination, interest, or curiosity.
  • on your knees The idiom "on your knees" means to be in a position of extreme weakness, vulnerability, or submission, usually referring to a person who is desperate, helpless, or begging for mercy or forgiveness. It can also refer to a person who is pleading or praying fervently for something.
  • your pound of flesh The idiom "your pound of flesh" refers to the insistence on exacting or demanding what one feels is owed to them, even if it causes harm or detriment to another person. It originates from William Shakespeare's play "The Merchant of Venice," where the character Shylock demands a literal pound of flesh as a repayment for a debt. The idiom now represents an unyielding pursuit of what one believes they deserve, often at the expense of someone else.
  • have had your day The idiom "have had your day" means that someone or something has already had their time of success, influence, or importance and is no longer relevant or significant. It indicates that the peak or prime period has passed, and the person or thing is now in decline or losing relevance.
  • have the courage of your convictions The idiom "have the courage of your convictions" means to be brave and confident in standing up for one's beliefs, even in the face of opposition or criticism. It implies having the strength of character to act upon and defend one's principles, no matter how challenging or unpopular they may be.
  • on your hobbyhorse The idiom "on your hobbyhorse" means to enthusiastically and repeatedly talk about or engage in a particular topic or interest, often to the annoyance or boredom of others. It refers to someone who has a fixed idea or favorite subject and frequently brings it up in conversations or activities.
  • be out of your brain The idiom "be out of your brain" typically means to be in a state of extreme confusion, disorientation, or irrationality. It suggests that someone's thoughts or actions are not rational or logical.
  • go back on your word The idiom "go back on your word" means to break a promise or fail to keep a commitment that was previously made. It suggests a lack of trustworthiness or reliability, as someone is not honoring their word or reneging on their previous agreement.
  • afraid of your own shadow The idiom "afraid of your own shadow" refers to someone who is overly timid, cautious, or easily frightened, often to the point of feeling threatened by trivial or imaginary things or situations. It implies that the person is excessively fearful or paranoid, even in the absence of any real danger.
  • know sth like the back of your hand The idiom "know something like the back of your hand" means to be extremely familiar with or have a thorough understanding of something. It implies that you have complete knowledge of a particular thing, just like knowing all the details on the back of your hand.
  • by your own account The idiom "by your own account" refers to a situation where someone is describing an event or situation based on their own personal perspective or understanding. It implies that the information being presented is according to their own testimony or narrative.
  • hang up your fiddle when you come home The idiom "hang up your fiddle when you come home" means to put aside or stop pursuing a particular activity or interest upon returning to one's residence or personal life. It suggests the idea of separating work or hobbies from personal responsibilities, encouraging individuals to prioritize their personal life and relationships over their professional or extracurricular pursuits.
  • take your life in your hands The idiom "take your life in your hands" means to willingly and knowingly put oneself in a dangerous or risky situation where one's well-being or life is at stake. It often implies taking personal responsibility for the outcome of such actions, disregarding potential risks or consequences.
  • get your mind round sth The idiom "get your mind round something" means to fully understand or comprehend something. It refers to the process of mentally processing and comprehending a concept, idea, or problem. It suggests actively engaging with the subject matter until it becomes clear and understandable.
  • send shivers down your spine The idiom "send shivers down your spine" is used to describe a feeling of intense fear, anticipation, or nervousness that causes an involuntary physical reaction, typically resulting in a shivering or tingling sensation down one's back. It signifies a deeply unsettling or chilling experience that can evoke a strong emotional response.
  • find your own level The idiom "find your own level" means to become comfortable or compatible in a particular situation or social group that suits one's abilities, interests, or characteristics. It refers to discovering where one fits or belongs, often in terms of skill, knowledge, or personality.
  • Zip (up) your lip! The idiom "Zip (up) your lip!" is a command or request for someone to stop talking or remain silent. It is an informal way of telling someone to refrain from speaking or to keep their words to themselves.
  • earn your stripes The idiom "earn your stripes" means to gain experience, respect, or credibility in a particular field or occupation through hard work, achievement, or demonstrated competence. It originates from the military practice of awarding stripes on a uniform to indicate rank or level of authority.
  • split your sides (laughing) The idiom "split your sides (laughing)" refers to an extreme outburst of laughter, so intense and prolonged that it feels as if one's sides are about to burst or split due to excessive amusement or hilarity.
  • shoot your mouth off The idiom "shoot your mouth off" means to speak impulsively, boastfully, or without considering the consequences. It refers to saying something without thinking about the potential negative outcomes or repercussions that it may have.
  • would give your eye teeth The idiom "would give your eye teeth" is an expression that signifies an extreme desire or willingness to sacrifice something valuable or precious in order to obtain or achieve a particular goal or desire. It implies that someone is willing to give up something highly important, even something as valuable as their own eye teeth, which are the canine teeth in the upper jaw, in exchange for the desired outcome.
  • out of your league The idiom "out of your league" refers to someone or something that is considered to be beyond one's ability, skill, or social standing. It suggests that the person or object is of higher quality, attractiveness, or status, making them unreachable or unattainable for the individual in question. It implies a sense of inferiority or inadequacy in comparison to what is desired or sought after.
  • take the wind out of your sails The idiom "take the wind out of your sails" means to deflate or diminish someone's confidence, energy, or excitement by delivering news or information that undermines their enthusiasm or expectations. It implies taking away the driving force or momentum behind a person's actions or plans.
  • spill your guts The idiom "spill your guts" means to reveal or confess one's deepest and most personal thoughts, feelings, or secrets, often in a candid or unreserved manner. It implies sharing information or emotions that were previously kept hidden or secret.
  • go your own (sweet) way The idiom "go your own (sweet) way" means to choose your own path or make decisions independently, without seeking or adhering to the opinions, suggestions, or instructions of others. It implies a sense of self-reliance, individuality, and autonomy in decision-making. The addition of "sweet" emphasizes that following one's own path can be pleasant, satisfactory, or fulfilling.
  • drag/pull yourself up by your bootstraps The idiom "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" or "pull yourself up by your own bootstraps" means to achieve success or improve one's circumstances through one's own efforts and determination, especially without any external help or support. It implies a self-reliant and determined attitude towards overcoming challenges or difficulties.
  • how's your father The idiom "how's your father" is a British slang phrase that refers euphemistically to sexual activity, often used humorously or teasingly in a flirtatious or playful manner. It can also be used to refer to secretive or illicit affairs.
  • explode in your face The idiom "explode in your face" refers to a situation where something goes wrong unexpectedly or disastrously, often resulting in negative consequences for the person involved. It implies that a plan, situation, or expectation has failed or backfired dramatically.
  • pull in your horns The idiom "pull in your horns" means to moderate or restrain one's behavior, especially if it is aggressive, confrontational, or excessive. It suggests the act of retracting or pulling back one's metaphorical horns, which symbolize aggressiveness or assertiveness. It implies the need to treat a situation with more caution, reserve, or humility.
  • don't worry your pretty little head The idiom "don't worry your pretty little head" is typically used in a dismissive or condescending manner to tell someone, usually a woman, not to concern herself with a particular issue or problem. It implies that the person being addressed is not capable of understanding or handling the situation and should leave it to someone else.
  • have enough on your plate The idiom "have enough on your plate" means to already have a sufficient or overwhelming amount of tasks, responsibilities, or problems to deal with. It implies that a person's schedule or workload is already full and there is no capacity to handle additional or unnecessary things.
  • hold your head high To "hold your head high" means to be confident and proud of oneself, despite facing difficulties or criticism. It suggests maintaining self-esteem and not allowing negative experiences or opinions to affect one's self-worth.
  • (I'm) delighted to make your acquaintance. The idiom "(I'm) delighted to make your acquaintance" is an expression used to convey extreme pleasure or happiness upon meeting someone for the first time or establishing a new acquaintance. It expresses genuine excitement or enthusiasm about the introduction.
  • put your finger in the dyke The idiom "put your finger in the dyke" refers to a situation where one temporarily solves or tries to prevent a bigger problem by addressing a smaller issue. It originates from the Dutch folk tale of a young boy who saved his village from flooding by sticking his finger in a hole in a dyke (a barrier used to prevent water from flowing into low-lying areas). The expression is often used metaphorically to describe one's attempt to manage or control a problem before it escalates or worsens.
  • lick your chops The idiom "lick your chops" means to be eagerly anticipating or looking forward to something with great excitement or anticipation. It is often used to describe a feeling of eager anticipation or satisfaction before a desirable event or opportunity. The phrase is derived from the literal action of licking one's lips in anticipation or satisfaction, particularly after a mouth-watering meal or when offered something appealing.
  • the light of your life "The light of your life" is an idiom used to describe someone who brings immense joy, happiness, and meaning to another person's life. This person is typically someone who is cherished and loved deeply, often making one's life brighter and better simply by being present.
  • in your mind's eye In your mind's eye is an idiom used to describe the ability to visualize something or recall a memory mentally, without physically seeing it with one's eyes. It refers to the imaginative and introspective capacity of the mind to create or recreate images, concepts, or experiences internally.
  • mind your own business The idiom "mind your own business" is a phrase used to politely tell someone to stay out of another person's affairs or to refrain from interfering in their personal matters. It implies that it is important for individuals to focus on their own concerns instead of meddling in the affairs of others.
  • Don’t get your bowels in an uproar! The idiom "Don’t get your bowels in an uproar!" is a playful and humorous way of telling someone not to become excessively upset or angry over a trivial or insignificant matter. It suggests that the person should not overreact or allow their emotions to become uncontrollable. The phrase uses the metaphor of the bowels, which refers to the intestines or digestive system, to add a comical and exaggerated element to the advice. Overall, it is a lighthearted reminder to remain calm and not make a big fuss about something inconsequential.
  • scratch your head The idiom "scratch your head" refers to a behavior or response characterized by confusion, puzzlement, or uncertainty about a situation or problem. It implies the act of physically scratching or rubbing one's head in an attempt to find a solution or understand something difficult.
  • like, love, etc. the sound of your own voice The idiom "like, love, etc. the sound of your own voice" refers to someone who enjoys or takes great pleasure in hearing themselves talk or speak. It implies that the person has a tendency to speak excessively, often without considering or valuing the opinions, thoughts, or input of others. This expression is typically used to describe individuals who are self-centered, egotistical, or excessively self-assured when it comes to expressing their own ideas or viewpoints.
  • not take your eyes off somebody/something The idiom "not take your eyes off somebody/something" means to keep constant attention or watchfulness on someone or something, often due to suspicion, curiosity, or wariness. It implies being intensely focused on observing the person or thing without diverting attention, as if afraid of missing something important or fearing potential harm.
  • have sth burning a hole in your pocket The idiom "have something burning a hole in your pocket" means having money or something that you are eager to spend or use. It implies a sense of urgency or restlessness to use or spend the item.
  • feast your eyes (on somebody/something) The idiom "feast your eyes (on somebody/something)" means to look at someone or something with great pleasure or admiration. It implies a deep appreciation or enjoyment of what is being seen, often describing something visually appealing or impressive.
  • try your luck (at something) The idiom "try your luck (at something)" means to attempt or make an effort in order to see if one will be successful or fortunate in a particular endeavor, often involving an element of chance or uncertainty.
  • hustle your butt The phrase "hustle your butt" is an informal idiom that means to work or move quickly and energetically, often under pressure or in a competitive scenario. It implies putting in extra effort, being proactive, and doing whatever is necessary to achieve a goal or succeed. It can also indicate a sense of urgency and determination to accomplish tasks efficiently.
  • dig/dip into your pocket The idiom "dig/dip into your pocket" is used to describe the action of spending one's own money or resources for a specific purpose or to contribute financially towards something. It implies the act of reaching into one's pocket to access money or resources and using them willingly.
  • hold your horses The idiom "hold your horses" means to be patient or to slow down. It is often used to advise someone to wait or to be careful before taking action.
  • in fear of your life The idiom "in fear of your life" refers to a situation where someone experiences extreme and genuine fear for their safety and survival. It implies that the person feels threatened and believes that their life is at imminent risk or danger.
  • None of your lip! The idiom "None of your lip!" is a phrase used to tell someone not to speak in a disrespectful or impudent manner. It is typically used to firmly and forcefully demand politeness or to reprimand someone for being rude or talking back.
  • Get your head out of the clouds! The idiom "Get your head out of the clouds!" means to stop daydreaming or fantasizing and focus on reality. It is often said to someone who appears to be excessively dreaming or not paying attention to practical matters.
  • your mind is on sth The idiom "your mind is on something" refers to a situation where a person is preoccupied or constantly thinking about a specific topic, idea, or concern. It implies that their thoughts are completely focused on that particular matter, often resulting in distractions from other tasks or conversations.
  • be up your street The idiom "be up your street" means that something is suitable or well-suited to your interests or preferences. It refers to something that you would be interested in or have knowledge about, making it a good fit for you.
  • all power to your elbow The idiom "all power to your elbow" is an encouraging phrase used to express support and encouragement to someone in their endeavors or tasks. It signifies the idea of giving someone extra strength, energy, or capability as they work towards achieving their goals.
  • get your arse in gear The idiom "get your arse in gear" is a phrase commonly used in informal speech, particularly in British English. It means to urge someone to start working, take action, or make an effort in order to achieve a desired outcome. It can be understood as a command or a strong encouragement to cease procrastination and begin working diligently towards a particular goal or task.
  • take your cue from somebody/something The idiom "take your cue from somebody/something" means to observe or follow someone's behavior, actions, or decision as a guide or an example in a particular situation. It implies that one should use the actions or indications from another person or a situation as a signal to know how to act or proceed.
  • a list as long as your arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" means having or referring to a very long list. It implies that the list is extensive, containing numerous items or tasks.
  • be your best bet The idiom "be your best bet" means that something or someone is the most likely or favorable option or choice in a particular situation. It implies that choosing that particular option or person will likely yield the best outcome or result.
  • earn your corn To "earn your corn" is an idiom that means to prove one's worth or merit through hard work, competence, or skill. It implies the idea of justifying one's position or salary by demonstrating the ability to deliver results and contribute effectively. In essence, it refers to achieving success and deserving the rewards or benefits associated with a particular job, role, or responsibility.
  • be up to your neck in sth The idiom "be up to your neck in something" means to be deeply immersed or heavily involved in a particular situation or problem to the point where it becomes overwhelming or difficult to manage. It implies being occupied or inundated with a significant amount of work, responsibilities, or troubles, often resulting in a sense of being overwhelmed or burdened.
  • feel your age The idiom "feel your age" means to acknowledge or recognize one's own age and the physical or emotional limitations associated with it. It implies a sense of self-awareness and acceptance of the natural aging process.
  • dear to your heart The idiom "dear to your heart" means something or someone that is beloved, cherished, or of great significance to you personally. It refers to anything that holds a special place in your affections or is deeply meaningful to you.
  • get your fill (of sth) The idiom "get your fill (of sth)" means to have as much of something as one desires or to satisfy one's cravings or needs completely. It implies the idea of indulging in or experiencing something to the maximum extent possible.
  • don't hold your breath 1 The phrase "don't hold your breath" is an idiomatic expression used to advise someone not to expect something to happen or not to anticipate something occurring anytime soon. It implies that the desired outcome is highly unlikely or improbable, and one should not wait in eager anticipation for it.
  • Act your age! The idiom "Act your age!" is an admonition or expression used to indicate that a person's behavior or actions are inappropriate or immature for their current age or stage of development. It serves as a reminder for someone to behave more maturely or responsibly.
  • get your hands on someone The idiom "get your hands on someone" means to physically confront, apprehend, or lay hold of someone, often with the intention of inflicting harm or punishment. It suggests a desire to take control or exert dominance over someone through physical means.
  • Shove up your arse! "Shove up your arse!" is an offensive and vulgar idiom used to express extreme disapproval, frustration, or contempt towards someone or their actions. It is a strong and crude way of telling someone that their ideas, opinions, or requests are unwelcome or deemed foolish. It suggests forcefully rejecting or disregarding what the person is offering.
  • your heart isn't in something The idiom "your heart isn't in something" is used to describe a situation or activity in which someone is not fully engaged, committed, or enthusiastic. It suggests that the person lacks genuine passion, interest, or motivation for what they are doing. Their emotions, desires, and dedication are not fully invested or reflected in their actions or attitude towards the task at hand.
  • not believe your luck The idiom "not believe your luck" means to express disbelief or astonishment at a favorable or fortunate event or situation that has occurred. It signifies being pleasantly surprised or incredulous about something positive happening to oneself.
  • go about your business The idiom "go about your business" means to continue doing what you were doing or to continue with your usual activities in a calm and methodical manner, without being distracted or affected by external factors. It implies minding one's own affairs and not interfering with others.
  • shut your gob The idiom "shut your gob" means to command someone to be quiet or stop talking. It can be considered a slang or informal expression used to encourage someone to cease speaking or to indicate annoyance with their incessant chatter.
  • a run for your money The idiom "a run for your money" generally means to face a significant challenge or competition that puts one's abilities, skills, or resources to the test. It implies that even in a difficult situation, one is determined to give their best effort and prove their worth.
  • on your/its knees The idiom "on your/its knees" typically refers to a situation where someone or something is in a state of extreme weakness, vulnerability, or defeat. It suggests that the person or thing is struggling and lacks the ability or strength to recover or resist further challenges or difficulties.
  • slip through your fingers The idiom "slip through your fingers" means to lose or miss out on an opportunity or chance, often due to a lack of attention, care, or understanding. It refers to a situation where something valuable or significant figuratively slips away or escapes one's grasp, leaving them with a feeling of regret or disappointment.
  • have passed your sell-by date The idiom "have passed your sell-by date" refers to a person, thing, or idea that is considered outdated, no longer relevant, or past its prime. It implies that the individual or concept is no longer useful, effective, or valuable, similar to expired goods that are no longer fit for sale or consumption.
  • hoist by your own petard The idiom "hoist by your own petard" means to be harmed or thwarted by one's own plan or actions. It refers to a situation where someone's own schemes, strategies, or actions backfire on them, causing them to suffer the consequences. The word "petard" refers to a small explosive device used in warfare, and "hoist" means to be lifted or thrown upwards forcefully. Therefore, being "hoist by your own petard" implies being blown up or damaged by your own explosive device, metaphorically representing the consequences of one's own actions turning against them.
  • (your) every move The idiom "(your) every move" refers to an intense level of scrutiny or surveillance, implying that someone is closely observing and being aware of all of your actions, decisions, or behavior. It suggests that there is constant attention or monitoring of your activities.
  • bury your head in the sand The idiom "bury your head in the sand" means to ignore or refuse to acknowledge a problem, danger, or unpleasant truth, often out of fear, denial, or wishful thinking. It implies avoiding facing difficult or uncomfortable situations instead of addressing them.
  • get your lines/wires crossed The idiom "get your lines/wires crossed" means to become confused or mistaken, typically due to a miscommunication or misunderstanding. It implies a situation where information or instructions are misunderstood or mixed up. It can also refer to a situation where multiple people are talking or sending messages at the same time, leading to confusion.
  • beat your breast The idiom "beat your breast" is a figurative expression that means to show extreme remorse, guilt, or sorrow publicly, often accompanied by a physical gesture of hitting one's chest with one's fist. It originates from biblical references where individuals would strike their chests as a sign of deep repentance or grief.
  • turn your back on sb The idiom "turn your back on sb" means to reject, abandon, or disregard someone or something. It implies intentionally refusing to support, help, or acknowledge someone, often indicating a loss of trust or a deliberate act of distancing oneself.
  • throw your hat in the ring The idiom "throw your hat in the ring" means to actively compete for a position, opportunity, or challenge, by declaring one's interest or willingness to participate. It originates from the act of throwing one's hat into an actual ring to signify their desire to engage in a boxing match, a common practice in the past.
  • cut your cloth The idiom "cut your cloth" means to be mindful of your limitations and to adjust your actions or plans to accommodate those limitations. It originates from the practice of tailoring, where cloth is cut according to available measurements and resources, symbolizing the need to work within one's means.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it (too). The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it (too)" means that you cannot have or enjoy two conflicting things or options at the same time. It refers to the impossibility of retaining something while consuming or using it simultaneously. It implies that choices often require trade-offs and compromises.
  • Hitch your wagon to a star. The idiom "Hitch your wagon to a star" means to set high aspirations or goals for oneself and align one's efforts and ambitions with those who are successful or influential. It encourages individuals to aim for greatness and seek opportunities that will lead them towards their desired achievements.
  • have your heart in your mouth The idiom "have your heart in your mouth" means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or afraid, causing one to feel their heart pounding or racing in their mouth. It refers to a situation that fills someone with intense anticipation or fear, often related to an impending and uncertain outcome.
  • Do you kiss your momma with that mouth? The idiom "Do you kiss your momma with that mouth?" is a rhetorical question used to express disapproval or shock at someone's use of vulgar, offensive, or disrespectful language. It implies that a person's speech is so inappropriate that it might even be offensive to their own mother.
  • lead with your chin The idiom "lead with your chin" means to act or speak in a way that deliberately invites or provokes criticism, attack, or trouble. It refers to being overly confrontational, indiscreet, or taking a risk without considering the potential consequences.
  • live beyond/within your means The idiom "live beyond/within your means" refers to the financial behavior of an individual or a household. When one lives beyond their means, it signifies that their expenses exceed their income or financial resources, leading to debt or unsustainable financial habits. Conversely, living within one's means implies that they spend only what they can afford with their income, avoiding excessive debt and maintaining financial stability.
  • a load/weight off your mind The idiom "a load/weight off your mind" is used to express a feeling of relief or a sense of release from a worry or problem that has been resolved. It implies a feeling of mental or emotional burden being lifted or removed, bringing about a sense of ease, peace, or freedom.
  • shut your mouth/trap/face/gob! The idiom "shut your mouth/trap/face/gob!" is an informal expression that refers to telling someone to stop talking or being silent. It is often used as a command or an impolite way of asking someone to be quiet.
  • sit on your arse The idiom "sit on your arse" typically means to be inactive, lazy, or unproductive; to avoid doing anything or taking action. It implies sitting or lounging around without engaging in any meaningful or useful activity.
  • get your brain in gear The idiom "get your brain in gear" means to start thinking clearly, intelligently, or to engage one's mental faculties in order to focus or solve a problem. It signifies the need to be more attentive, alert, or proactive in one's thinking or decision-making process.
  • have your back to the wall The idiom "have your back to the wall" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation with limited options or resources, leaving one vulnerable and in a position where they must defend themselves or face a potential threat. It signifies being trapped or having no escape route, and often implies the need to fight back or find a solution quickly.
  • put your feet up The idiom "put your feet up" means to relax and rest, often by sitting down with your feet elevated. It implies taking a break from work or responsibilities and engaging in leisurely activities.
  • your goods and chattels The idiom "your goods and chattels" refers to all of one's personal possessions, belongings, or property. It includes movable possessions such as furniture, appliances, clothing, and other items that are not considered real estate or immovable assets. It typically encompasses everything a person owns that can be moved or transferred, except for land, buildings, or permanent structures.
  • be out of your league The idiom "be out of your league" means that someone or something is considered to be superior, beyond one's abilities, or not within one's social or romantic range. It suggests that the person or thing in question is too difficult, advanced, or beyond one's reach to compete or interact with successfully.
  • have sth on your side The idiom "have something on your side" means to possess or enjoy an advantage or support in a given situation. It refers to having a particular factor or resource that aids in achieving a desired outcome or helps in negotiations, decision-making, or resolving conflicts. Having something on your side implies having a favorable condition, circumstance, or advantage that increases the likelihood of success.
  • to go, retreat, etc. into your shell The idiom "to go, retreat, etc. into your shell" means to withdraw or become introverted and avoid interaction with others. It refers to the behavior of a turtle or a hermit crab retreating into its protective shell as a defense mechanism.
  • lay down your arms The idiom "lay down your arms" means to surrender or agree to stop fighting or engaging in conflict. It originates from the act of soldiers physically placing their weapons onto the ground, indicating their intention to cease hostilities. Figuratively, it suggests a willingness to abandon aggression or discord in favor of peace, compromise, or reconciliation.
  • take your cue from someone The idiom "take your cue from someone" means to observe and follow someone's actions or behavior as guidance for one's own actions or decisions. It implies relying on someone's lead or example to determine how to proceed in a particular situation.
  • lower your guard The idiom "lower your guard" means to relax or become less cautious and vigilant, often in a defensive or protective sense. It refers to the act of becoming less wary or less defensive, making oneself more vulnerable or open to potential harm or danger.
  • do your own thing The definition of the idiom "do your own thing" is to behave or act in a way that is true to oneself without being influenced or constrained by others' expectations or opinions. It implies a sense of independence, individuality, and following one's own desires or interests.
  • the best/happiest days of your life The idiom "the best/happiest days of your life" refers to a period in a person's life where they experience the most joy, contentment, and overall enjoyment. It typically refers to a specific portion of one's childhood or youth that is considered to be carefree, enjoyable, and memorable. It suggests that those particular days or years are regarded as the peak of happiness and that subsequent periods may not live up to the same level of fondness and satisfaction.
  • pay your dues The idiom "pay your dues" means to work hard, put in the necessary effort or experience difficulties in order to achieve success, recognition, or advancement in a particular field or endeavor. It suggests that one must endure challenging or unfavorable circumstances, persevere, and accumulate experience or skills to reach a desired position or goal.
  • learn a/your lesson The idiom "learn a/your lesson" means to gain knowledge and understanding from a negative experience or mistake, often resulting in a change of behavior or actions to avoid repeating the same error in the future. It implies that the individual has received a valuable teaching or insight that will influence their future decisions or behavior.
  • music to your ears The idiom "music to your ears" means to hear something that brings great joy or pleasure, something that one finds extremely gratifying or comforting.
  • snap your fingers The idiom "snap your fingers" means to produce a sharp sound by pressing the thumb and middle finger together and quickly releasing them. In a figurative sense, it refers to performing a small action or making a request, often indicating a desire for something to happen immediately or effortlessly.
  • as fast as your legs would carry you The idiom "as fast as your legs would carry you" means to run or move as quickly as one possibly can. It implies giving maximum effort in order to move swiftly, often in situations where there is urgency or a need for escape.
  • laugh your head off The idiom "laugh your head off" means to laugh hysterically or uncontrollably, usually to the point of bursting into loud or excessive laughter. It suggests intense amusement or finding something extremely funny.
  • be on your honour The idiom "be on your honour" means to be expected to act with integrity, honesty, and a strong sense of moral responsibility, often in a situation where formal rules or supervision may not be present. It implies being trusted to do the right thing and uphold one's principles without external enforcement.
  • pin your ears back, at pin back your ears The idiom "pin your ears back" or "pin back your ears" is an expression used to imply that someone should listen carefully or pay close attention to what is being said or instructed. It suggests actively engaging and focusing on the information being given.
  • have/put your head on the block To have/put your head on the block means to put yourself in a position of great risk or danger, typically by making a bold or risky decision or undertaking a task that could result in negative consequences or harm. It implies taking personal accountability or responsibility for the outcome, even if it turns out badly.
  • know something like the back of your hand The idiom "know something like the back of your hand" means to be extremely familiar with something. It implies that you have thorough knowledge or understanding of a particular subject or situation, just like how you know the back of your hand very well.
  • (that's) your hard luck The idiom "(that's) your hard luck" is a phrase used to express sympathy or indifference towards someone's misfortune or bad luck. It implies that the person's unfortunate situation is solely their own responsibility or fault, and the speaker is uninvolved or unsympathetic towards it.
  • cut your own throat The idiom "cut your own throat" means to do something that ultimately harms oneself or puts oneself at a disadvantage. It refers to engaging in actions or making decisions that are self-destructive or detrimental to one's own interests or well-being.
  • take your breath away The idiom "take your breath away" means to cause a person to be amazed, astonished, or overwhelmed by something's beauty, power, or intensity. It refers to a sudden and intense emotional or physical reaction that momentarily leaves a person breathless.
  • see your way to doing something The idiom "see your way to doing something" means to be willing or able to do something, usually with some difficulty or hesitation. It suggests considering or finding a way to accomplish a task or fulfill a request, even if it may not be convenient or easy.
  • keep your mouth shut The idiom "keep your mouth shut" means to remain silent or to refrain from speaking, especially in a situation where it is advisable or crucial not to reveal information or opinions.
  • be out on your ear To be out on your ear means to be dismissed or fired from a job abruptly and unceremoniously, often due to poor performance or misconduct. It implies a sudden and unexpected termination with no opportunity for negotiation or further employment.
  • not your line of country The idiom "not your line of country" means that something is not within an individual's area of expertise, interest, or range of experience. It suggests that the person is unfamiliar with or has little knowledge about a particular subject or topic. It can also imply that someone is not suited for or comfortable in a specific situation or environment.
  • not have two pennies to rub together, at not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have two pennies to rub together" means that someone is extremely poor or financially destitute, lacking even a small amount of money. Similarly, the phrase "not have a penny to your name" implies that someone has absolutely no money or financial resources. Both expressions emphasize the severe poverty or lack of wealth experienced by an individual.
  • hedge your bets The idiom "hedge your bets" means to reduce the risk or potential loss by adopting multiple or alternative options or actions simultaneously. It refers to the practice of diversifying investments or strategies to ensure some level of success or protection. It can also imply a cautious approach to decision-making by avoiding committing fully to a single possibility.
  • what's your game? The idiom "what's your game?" refers to questioning someone's intentions or ulterior motive behind their actions or words. It suggests skepticism or suspicion towards someone's behavior, motives, or hidden agenda.
  • Keep your mouth shut (about sm or sth). The phrase "Keep your mouth shut" is an idiom that means to remain silent or refrain from speaking about a specific subject or information. It implies the importance of not divulging confidential or sensitive details, opinions, or gossip.
  • wing your/its way The idiom "wing your/its way" means to move or be sent swiftly and effortlessly through the air, as if flying with wings. It implies a rapid and smooth movement, often used when describing the delivery or transportation of something.
  • line your (own) pockets The idiom "line your (own) pockets" means to acquire wealth or personal gain, often through unethical or selfish means, especially by taking advantage of a position of power or influence.
  • do your head in The idiom "do your head in" is typically used to express a feeling of frustration, confusion, or irritation caused by something or someone. It implies that something is mentally taxing or overwhelming, and often refers to a situation or problem that is difficult to understand, resolve, or deal with.
  • drive your message/point home The idiom "drive your message/point home" means to emphasize or reinforce one's message or point of view in a clear and powerful manner, often with the intention of ensuring that it is fully understood, acknowledged, or accepted by others. It involves using compelling arguments, persuasive techniques, or vivid examples to make a lasting impact on the audience.
  • what's your poison?, at name your poison The idiomatic expression "What's your poison?" or "Name your poison" is a playful way to ask someone what type of alcoholic drink they prefer. It is often used in a casual or social setting when offering someone a drink and wanting to know their beverage preference. The phrase acknowledges that alcohol can be seen as both enjoyable and potentially detrimental to one's health, hence the use of the word "poison."
  • get your comeuppance The idiom "get your comeuppance" means to receive the consequences or punishment that one deserves for their actions or behavior. It implies that someone has received their just deserts or has been held accountable for their wrongdoings.
  • be a weight off your shoulders To say that something is a weight off your shoulders means that it is a relief or a burden removed, usually referring to a problem, worry, or responsibility that has been resolved or taken care of. It symbolizes the feeling of being freed from a heavy load or the weight of a difficult situation, providing a sense of release, ease, or liberation.
  • nearly jump out of your skin The idiom "nearly jump out of your skin" is typically used to describe a situation where someone is extremely startled, frightened, or surprised. It implies that the person's reaction is so intense that it feels as if their body is physically jumping or leaping out of their own skin.
  • sweat your guts out, at sweat blood The idiom "sweat your guts out" is an expression used to convey the idea of working extremely hard, exerting great effort, or going to great lengths to achieve something. It implies complete dedication, perseverance, and determination. On the other hand, the idiom "sweat blood" has a similar meaning and is commonly used as a hyperbolic expression to describe extreme distress, anxiety, or mental strain endured during a challenging or stressful situation. It implies the feeling of putting every ounce of effort and energy into something, to the point where it feels like physically sweating blood. Both idioms emphasize the idea of going to extraordinary lengths, physically or mentally, to accomplish a goal or overcome a difficult situation.
  • on/about your person The idiom "on/about your person" refers to something that is in your possession or physically carried with you. It typically refers to items that are kept on your body, such as in your pockets, wallet, or bag.
  • put hairs on your chest The idiom "put hairs on your chest" is a humorous expression that typically refers to food or drinks that are considered strong, potent, or robust. It implies that consuming such substances will make the person stronger or more resilient, as if growing chest hair is a symbol of masculinity or toughness.
  • do your dash The idiom "do your dash" generally means to make a strong and determined effort to complete a task or achieve a goal. It implies putting in one's maximum effort, often with a sense of urgency or speed.
  • you have made your bed and must lie in it The idiom "you have made your bed and must lie in it" means that one must accept the consequences of their actions or decisions, even if they are undesirable or unpleasant. It suggests that once a choice has been made, one is responsible for the outcome and must face the circumstances without complaint or regret.
  • breathe down your neck The idiom "breathe down your neck" means to monitor or observe someone closely and persistently, creating a sense of unease or pressure. It often implies that someone is watching your every move or constantly checking on your progress, which can make you feel uncomfortable or anxious.
  • the world is your oyster The idiom "the world is your oyster" means that you have the freedom and opportunity to do or achieve anything you desire. It suggests that the world is full of possibilities and you have the ability to take advantage of them.
  • make your flesh creep The idiom "make your flesh creep" means to cause someone to feel a strong sensation of fear, disgust, or unease.
  • have bats in your belfry The idiom "have bats in your belfry" means to be crazy, eccentric, or mentally unstable. It refers to someone who has peculiar or erratic behavior, as if there are bats (symbolizing madness) in the belfry (the top of a bell tower in a church).
  • fold your hands The idiom "fold your hands" typically means to place one's hands together, usually resting on one's lap, with the palms and fingers touching or intertwined. This action signifies being calm, patient, or contemplative, often associated with waiting quietly or being at peace.
  • would turn in your grave The idiom "would turn in your grave" is used to describe a hypothetical situation where someone who has passed away would be deeply disturbed, shocked, or outraged by something that is happening in the present. It implies that the event or action being described goes against the deceased person's beliefs, values, or expectations to such an extent that they would be figuratively spinning in their grave.
  • up to your/its old tricks The idiom "up to your/its old tricks" refers to someone or something returning to their familiar, usual, or previously known behavior, often negative or deceptive. It implies that the person or thing has resumed engaging in actions or habits that they are typically associated with, especially when they were previously believed to have changed or improved.
  • lose your temper The idiom "lose your temper" means to become angry or lose control of one's emotions, often resulting in outbursts or irrational behavior.
  • up to your ears in The idiom "up to your ears in" means being overwhelmed or deeply involved in a particular situation or task, to the point of being fully occupied or saturated. It implies a high level of involvement or connection, often in a negative or challenging sense.
  • have had your fill of something The idiom "have had your fill of something" means to have experienced, consumed, or dealt with something to the point of satisfaction or satisfaction. It suggests that one has had enough of something and does not desire or need any more.
  • to your bootstraps The idiom "to your bootstraps" means to achieve success or improve one's situation solely by their own efforts and without any external assistance. It implies a determination to work hard and overcome obstacles without relying on others for support or resources.
  • stick in your gizzard The idiom "stick in your gizzard" refers to something that deeply bothers or irritates someone. It originates from the gizzard, which is part of a bird's digestive system, known for grinding food. If something sticks in your gizzard, it means it lingers uncomfortably, causing annoyance or unease.
  • your glad rags The idiom "your glad rags" refers to one's finest or most stylish clothing that is typically worn on special or celebratory occasions. It implies dressing up in fancy or elegant attire.
  • What's your poison? The idiom "What's your poison?" is typically used as a lighthearted or humorous way to ask someone what kind of alcoholic drink they prefer or would like to order. The phrase is often used in a social setting, such as a bar or when offering someone a drink at a gathering.
  • be hoist/hoisted by/with your own petard The idiom "be hoist/hoisted by/with your own petard" means to have a plan or scheme backfire, resulting in the downfall or harm of the person who devised it. It refers to when someone's own actions or intentions lead to their own failure or embarrassment. The term "petard" refers to a small explosive device used in medieval warfare to breach gates or walls, and being hoisted by it signifies being blown up or hurt by one's own weapon.
  • You pays your money and you takes your chance The idiom "You pays your money and you takes your chance" means that once you have made a decision or taken a risk, you must accept the outcome, whether it is positive or negative. It emphasizes that taking a chance or making a choice involves a degree of uncertainty or risk, and one must be prepared to face the consequences.
  • pull/haul yourself up by the/your (own) bootstraps The idiom "pull/haul yourself up by the/your (own) bootstraps" means to improve one's own situation or achieve success through one's own efforts and resources, without relying on external assistance or support. It implies the idea of self-reliance, resilience, and the ability to overcome challenges independently. The phrase is often used to emphasize personal responsibility and perseverance in difficult circumstances.
  • find your voice, at find your tongue The idiom "find your voice, find your tongue" means to gain confidence or the ability to express oneself effectively, especially in a situation where one's opinions or feelings may have been suppressed or ignored. It implies discovering one's own unique perspective or point of view, and finding the courage to communicate it openly and assertively.
  • keep your powder dry The idiom "keep your powder dry" means to be cautious, prepared, and ready for any possible situation or opportunity that may arise. It often implies the need to withhold one's resources, such as strength, knowledge, or abilities, until the most advantageous moment to utilize them. Originally, the phrase referred to gunpowder being kept dry to ensure it would ignite properly when needed in battle. In a broader sense, it suggests the importance of being patient, keeping one's options open, and avoiding unnecessary risks.
  • lose your cherry The idiom "lose your cherry" is a slang expression that is often used to refer to someone losing their virginity. It signifies the first experience of engaging in sexual intercourse.
  • in your birthday suit The idiom "in your birthday suit" refers to someone being completely naked, without any clothes on. It means being in the state of being born, similar to how someone is when they enter the world.
  • be out of your tree The idiom "be out of your tree" means to be crazy, irrational, or mentally unstable. It suggests a state of mind that is detached from reality or exhibiting unusual behavior.
  • keep your head down The idiom "keep your head down" means to avoid drawing attention to oneself, to stay out of trouble or danger, or to focus on one's work or tasks without getting involved in unnecessary conflicts or distractions. It suggests maintaining a low profile or being cautious in order to stay safe or remain undisturbed.
  • spill your guts (to somebody) The idiom "spill your guts (to somebody)" means to reveal or confess deeply personal, private, or secret information to someone, often in an emotional or unreserved manner. It implies sharing thoughts, feelings, or details honestly and openly.
  • have an ace up your sleeve The idiom "have an ace up your sleeve" means to have a hidden advantage or secret plan that can be used to gain an advantage over others, especially in a competitive situation. It refers to the act of keeping a valuable card (an ace) hidden in the sleeve during a card game to increase one's chances of winning.
  • have your guts for garters The idiom "have your guts for garters" is an expression used to convey extreme anger or a threat of punishment towards someone. The phrase suggests that a person is so furious that they would metaphorically rip out someone's internal organs (guts) and use them as garters, which are elastic bands worn around the legs to hold up socks or stockings. It is an exaggerated way of expressing intense anger or the desire to seek revenge.
  • teach your grandmother to suck eggs The idiom "teach your grandmother to suck eggs" means to offer unsolicited advice or instruction to someone who is more knowledgeable or experienced in that particular subject or skill than the person giving the advice. It implies that the advice or instruction is unnecessary and patronizing.
  • get/sink your teeth into sth The idiom "get/sink your teeth into something" means to become fully engaged or involved in a task or activity. It expresses the idea of dedicating one's time and energy to understanding, learning, or tackling something with enthusiasm and determination.
  • keep (or play) your cards close to your chest (or vest) The idiom "keep (or play) your cards close to your chest (or vest)" means to keep one's thoughts, intentions, or plans secret and not reveal them to others. It refers to the way a poker player holds their cards close to their chest or vest to prevent others from seeing them and thus gaining an advantage. This idiom is often used to advise someone to be cautious and not disclose important information too early or to maintain a strategic position in various situations.
  • take your leave The idiom "take your leave" means to depart or say goodbye, especially in a polite or formal manner. It is used when someone is ready to leave a place or end a conversation or social gathering. It implies a respectful gesture of ending the interaction.
  • cling on/hang on by your fingernails The idiom "cling on/hang on by your fingernails" means to desperately hold onto something or to cling onto a situation or position with great effort and determination, even when there are strong difficulties or challenges present. It suggests a precarious and tenuous grip or hold on something.
  • kick your heels To "kick your heels" is an idiom that means to be left waiting or inactive, usually due to someone else's delay or inefficiency. It refers to the act of tapping one's heels impatiently while waiting for something to happen or for someone to arrive.
  • more/a bigger etc. bang for your buck The idiom "more/a bigger etc. bang for your buck" means getting more value or benefit in return for the money or resources one invests or spends. It suggests maximizing the outcome or return on investment.
  • feel your oats "Feel your oats" is an idiomatic expression that means to display a high level of confidence, energy, or assertiveness, often associated with a sense of youthful vitality or newfound power. It is usually used when describing someone who is acting boldly or with a self-assured demeanor.
  • stand on your dignity The idiom "stand on your dignity" means to behave in a way that upholds and defends one's self-respect and integrity, even in difficult or challenging situations. It refers to refusing to compromise one's principles or allow others to demean or disrespect oneself.
  • out of your hands The idiom "out of your hands" means that a situation or decision is no longer under your control or influence. It implies that you are unable to change or direct the outcome, and that it is now in the hands of someone else or outside forces.
  • a spring in your step The idiom "a spring in your step" means to have an energetic and lively manner of walking or moving, often indicating a person's happiness, confidence, or enthusiasm. It suggests a light and bouncy stride, typically associated with a positive attitude or a sense of well-being.
  • cast your mind back The idiom "cast your mind back" means to remember or recall something from the past by actively focusing your thoughts or memories on that particular time or event.
  • your John Hancock The idiom "your John Hancock" refers to a person's signature or the act of signing one's name, typically in reference to an important or official document. It originates from the American founding father John Hancock, who famously signed the United States Declaration of Independence with a bold and prominent signature. Therefore, "your John Hancock" implies someone's personal signature.
  • of your own free will The idiom "of your own free will" means to do something willingly, voluntarily, and without any external pressure or coercion. It implies that the decision or action is a result of one's own choice, without any influence from others.
  • fight your corner The idiom "fight your corner" means to defend oneself or one's position vigorously and assertively, especially in a confrontation or argument. It refers to standing up for oneself, maintaining one's beliefs, and ensuring one's interests are protected in a challenging situation.
  • hold/keep/play your cards close to your chest The idiom "hold/keep/play your cards close to your chest" means to keep your plans, intentions, or thoughts secret, and not reveal them to others. It suggests being cautious and strategic, not exposing too much information or vulnerability. This phrase is derived from the practice of playing card games, where players hold their cards close to their chests to prevent opponents from seeing them and gaining an advantage.
  • Put up your dukes! The idiom "Put up your dukes!" means to prepare for a physical fight or confrontation. It is an expression encouraging someone to get ready to defend themselves by raising their fists, mimicking the stance of a boxer. It can be used figuratively to signify a readiness to stand up for oneself or engage in a difficult situation.
  • bury/hide your head in the sand The idiom "bury/hide your head in the sand" refers to the act of willfully ignoring or avoiding a difficult or unpleasant situation, usually due to fear, discomfort, or a desire to remain ignorant. It is often used in a figurative sense to describe someone who refuses to acknowledge or confront problems, challenges, or criticisms. Just as an ostrich supposedly buries its head in the sand to avoid danger or threats, this idiom portrays someone who chooses to remain oblivious or in denial.
  • cross your mind The idiom "cross your mind" means to briefly think of or consider something, even if it may not receive much attention or be the main focus of your thoughts.
  • have your nose in a book The idiom "have your nose in a book" means to be deeply engrossed in reading, to be completely absorbed or immersed in a book, often to the point of being unaware of or disengaged from one's surroundings.
  • put/set your house in order The idiom "put/set your house in order" means to organize or improve one's personal or professional affairs, resolve any outstanding issues or problems, and establish a state of readiness or stability. It is often used as advice to someone who needs to address their own responsibilities or priorities.
  • close your mind The idiom "close your mind" refers to the act of refusing to consider new ideas, possibilities, or perspectives. It describes a closed-off or narrow-minded mentality where one is unwilling to entertain different viewpoints or explore alternative options.
  • be worth your while The idiom "be worth your while" means that something is valuable or beneficial enough to justify one's time, effort, or investment. It implies that the outcome or rewards gained are significant enough to make the endeavor worthwhile.
  • put your finger on sth To put your finger on something is an idiom that means to identify or point out the exact nature or cause of a problem, issue, or feeling. It refers to the act of understanding or explaining something precisely, often by recognizing or specifying the key element or detail involved.
  • throw in your lot with somebody The idiom "throw in your lot with somebody" means to join or associate yourself closely with someone, typically in a shared enterprise or cause, often implying a commitment to support and share the same fortunes or fate as that person.
  • get your fingers burnt The idiom "get your fingers burnt" means to suffer negative consequences or get into trouble as a result of taking a risky or ill-advised action.
  • cannot see further than (the end of) your nose The idiom "cannot see further than (the end of) your nose" refers to someone who lacks perspective, foresight, or fails to consider anything beyond their immediate circumstances or limited viewpoint. It suggests a limited ability to understand the potential consequences or long-term consequences of one's actions.
  • tear/tug at your heartstrings The idiom "tear/tug at your heartstrings" refers to something that evokes strong emotions or a deep sense of sympathy or empathy. It describes a situation, story, music, or any form of expression that resonates deeply with one's emotions, often causing feelings of sadness, compassion, or nostalgia. It implies that the subject matter is so touching that it figuratively pulls or tugs at the strings of one's heart, eliciting a heartfelt response.
  • have made your bed and have to lie on it The idiom "have made your bed and have to lie on it" means that one must accept the consequences or face the outcomes of their actions, decisions, or choices, especially when they have made a mistake or taken a difficult path. It implies that once a decision is made or a situation is created, it cannot be easily undone or escaped from, and one must accept responsibility for the circumstances they find themselves in.
  • be out of your element The idiom "be out of your element" means to be in a situation or environment that is unfamiliar or uncomfortable to someone, causing them to feel unsure, unskilled, or out of place.
  • your neck of the woods The idiom "your neck of the woods" refers to a particular region, neighborhood, or area where someone lives or is familiar with. It is often used to inquire about or refer to someone's specific location or surroundings.
  • hold your peace/tongue The idiom "hold your peace/tongue" means to remain silent or refrain from speaking, especially when it is one's inclination or duty to speak up or voice an opinion or concern. It often refers to a situation where one has the opportunity to object or raise an issue but chooses to keep quiet. This idiom is often used in legal contexts, such as during a wedding ceremony or a court hearing, when individuals are asked if they have any objections or testimony to offer.
  • stick (something)/it up your arse The idiom "stick (something)/it up your arse" is an offensive and vulgar expression used to tell someone that you don't care about their opinion or request. It implies that you have no interest in considering or accommodating their wishes and suggests that they should place their idea or request somewhere uncomfortable. It is important to note that this is a highly impolite phrase not suitable for formal or polite conversations.
  • set your face against The idiom "set your face against" means to disapprove strongly, oppose or take a firm stance against someone or something. It implies having a determined and stern facial expression which mirrors the resolute opposition.
  • raise your hand to/against sb The idiom "raise your hand to/against someone" means to physically harm or attack someone, often by using violence or force. It implies a confrontation or aggressive action taken towards another person.
  • die in your bed The idiom "die in your bed" means to have a natural and peaceful death, typically occurring at an old age and in a comfortable or familiar setting, such as one's own bed. It emphasizes the desire to avoid a sudden or untimely death, wishing for a peaceful and expected end.
  • drop your aitches The idiom "drop your aitches" means to pronounce words without pronouncing the initial "h" sound. It refers to a dialect or accent where the speaker consistently omits the "h" sound at the beginning of words. This idiom is commonly used in British English.
  • be hoist(ed) with/by your own petard "Be hoist(ed) with/by your own petard" is an idiom that means to be undone or harmed by one's own actions or plans. The word "petard" refers to a small explosive device used in medieval warfare to breach gates and walls. Thus, the idiom implies that a person's own scheme or machinations backfire and cause harm to themselves instead.
  • don't cut off your nose to spite your face The idiom "don't cut off your nose to spite your face" means to take a self-destructive action or make a hasty decision out of anger, with the intention of hurting someone else, but ultimately causing more harm to oneself. It implies that one should not harm themselves just to seek revenge or teach a lesson to others, as it will only bring negative consequences or unintended harm.
  • more bang for your buck(s) The idiom "more bang for your buck(s)" means getting the maximum value or benefit from something you spend money on or invest in. It implies receiving a greater return, quality, or quantity in relation to the amount of money or effort expended.
  • your best/strongest/trump card The idiom "your best/strongest/trump card" refers to a person's or an entity's most powerful or effective strategic move or advantage that can be used to gain an advantage or win a situation. A trump card is often associated with a resource, skill, or advantage that surpasses or outshines others, resembling the highest-ranking card in certain card games.
  • be in over your head The idiom "be in over your head" means to find oneself in a situation that is too challenging or difficult to handle or manage effectively. It signifies being overwhelmed or out of one's depth in a particular task, responsibility, or problem, often implying a lack of knowledge, resources, or experience to handle the situation successfully.
  • keep your end up The idiom "keep your end up" means to fulfill one's responsibilities or to stay determined and not give up despite difficulties or challenges. It refers to maintaining one's part or share of a job, task, or duty, thereby contributing to the overall success or completion of a goal or project.
  • be (like) a millstone around/round your neck The idiom "be (like) a millstone around/round your neck" refers to a burden or heavy responsibility that causes difficulties or hinders progress. It implies being tied to something troublesome or oppressive that prevents one from moving forward or achieving goals. The imagery comes from a millstone, a large, heavy stone used for grinding grain, which would drag a person down in water if attached around their neck.
  • in your heart of hearts The idiom "in your heart of hearts" means in the deepest part of your true feelings or innermost thoughts. It refers to someone's true and sincere beliefs or desires that they may not openly express or acknowledge.
  • count your chickens before they're hatched The idiom "count your chickens before they're hatched" means to make plans or anticipate success before it is certain or guaranteed. It warns people against prematurely expecting positive outcomes or assuming that something will happen in the future, as there is always a chance of unforeseen circumstances or failure.
  • on your bike! The idiom "on your bike!" is an informal expression commonly used to tell someone to go away or leave. It can be used dismissively or to express annoyance or disbelief towards someone's actions or words.
  • blow your top The idiom "blow your top" means to become extremely angry, lose one's temper, or have an outburst of rage or frustration.
  • Don't worry your head about it The idiom "Don't worry your head about it" means not to concern oneself or become anxious about something. It is a gentle way of telling someone not to waste their mental energy on a particular matter or issue.
  • in your cups The idiom "in your cups" refers to being intoxicated or drunk, often associated with excessive consumption of alcohol.
  • have ants in your pants The idiom "have ants in your pants" means to be restless, fidgety, or unable to sit still due to excitement, nervousness, or impatience. It implies a feeling of extreme restlessness and an inability to remain calm or settled in one place.
  • leave your mark To "leave your mark" means to make a lasting impact or impression on something or someone. It refers to leaving a significant and memorable influence or contribution that will be remembered or recognized even after you are no longer present.
  • wet your pants The idiom "wet your pants" is a colloquial expression generally used to indicate extreme fear, excitement, or laughter. It metaphorically implies the loss of control over one's bodily functions due to an overwhelming emotional response.
  • Not on your nelly! The idiom "Not on your nelly!" is a slang expression used to strongly reject or refuse a suggestion or proposal. It essentially means that there is absolutely no chance or possibility of agreeing or participating in something.
  • not rest on your laurels The idiom "not rest on your laurels" means to not become complacent or satisfied with past success or achievements. It implies the need to continue working hard and striving for further accomplishments rather than becoming lazy or resting on one's previous accolades.
  • never let the sun go down on your anger The idiom "never let the sun go down on your anger" means that you should always try to resolve conflicts or disagreements before the end of the day. It signifies the importance of resolving issues promptly, rather than holding onto anger and allowing it to linger and potentially escalate.
  • stir your blood, at stir the blood The idiom "stir your blood" or "stir the blood" refers to something that excites or arouses strong emotions, particularly passion, enthusiasm, or a sense of adventure. It often describes an experience or event that evokes a deep and powerful reaction, causing one's blood to figuratively "stir" or become invigorated.
  • up to your elbows in The idiom "up to your elbows in" means to be very busy or deeply involved in a task or situation. It implies that someone is fully occupied or overwhelmed by their current responsibilities or duties.
  • with all your heart/your whole heart The idiom "with all your heart/your whole heart" means to do something with complete and sincere devotion, enthusiasm, or commitment. It implies giving one's maximum effort or showing deep affection, belief, or desire towards a person, task, or purpose.
  • close to your heart The idiom "close to your heart" refers to something that is deeply meaningful, important, or cherished to someone. It typically describes a person's strong emotional connection or personal attachment to someone or something.
  • come/get (down) off your high horse The idiom "come/get (down) off your high horse" means to stop behaving in a proud, arrogant, or superior manner and to become more humble, approachable, or down-to-earth. It suggests that the person needs to let go of their condescending attitude and connect with others on a more equal level.
  • smack your lips The idiom "smack your lips" refers to the act of making a sound with one's lips, often associated with relishing or savoring something pleasurable, like food or an anticipated experience. It can also indicate expressing satisfaction or excitement about something upcoming.
  • put your head on the block The idiom "put your head on the block" means to take a significant risk or make a bold statement or prediction, often in a situation where one's reputation or credibility is at stake. It originates from the imagery of beheading, where placing one's head on a block signifies a vulnerable position where the potential outcome can be severe.
  • with your bare hands The idiom "with your bare hands" means to perform a task or achieve something using only one's natural abilities, physical strength, or skills, without the aid of any tools or assistance. It implies doing something manually or without the use of any external resources.
  • it's your funeral The idiom "it's your funeral" is typically used to warn or caution someone about the consequences they may face as a result of their own choices or actions. It implies that the person is responsible for what happens to them and that they will have to suffer the negative outcomes or deal with the repercussions. It often implies a sense of detachment from the speaker, implying that they do not have or want any responsibility for the potential negative consequences.
  • not on your life! The phrase "not on your life!" is an idiomatic expression used to vehemently reject or deny a proposal, request, or suggestion with absolute certainty. It indicates a strong refusal or conviction that something will not happen or be accepted under any circumstances.
  • shake in your shoes The idiom "shake in your shoes" refers to a state of extreme fear or anxiety that causes someone's body or limbs to tremble or shake uncontrollably. It implies being so terrified or intimidated that one's fear becomes physically visible through the trembling of their feet or legs inside their shoes.
  • be quaking in your boots The idiom "be quaking in your boots" means to be extremely frightened, anxious, or nervous about something, often to the point of shaking or trembling. It suggests a high level of fear or apprehension in anticipation of a particular event, situation, or outcome.
  • lose your grip The idiom "lose your grip" means to lose control or to become unable to handle a situation effectively. It refers to a person losing their composure, power, or influence over something or someone.
  • be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat The idiom "be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat" means to assume or act in the manner of a specific professional role or expertise, even if one does not belong to that profession. It implies temporarily adopting the knowledge, skills, or behavior associated with a particular occupation to address a specific situation or assist others effectively.
  • show your hand The idiom "show your hand" means to reveal or make known your true motives, intentions, capabilities, or plans usually in a strategic or competitive situation. It originated from the game of poker, where players would have to show their cards (hand) to determine the winner. Figuratively, it suggests being transparent, honest, or open about one's position or objectives.
  • line your (own)/somebody’s pockets The idiom "line your (own)/somebody’s pockets" means to make money, often through dishonest or corrupt means, in order to benefit oneself or someone else financially. It implies exploiting a situation or position of power for personal gain, usually in a selfish or unethical manner.
  • give your head a shake The idiom "give your head a shake" means to rethink or reassess a situation, to become more realistic or sensible about something, or to overcome confusion or disbelief. It is often used when someone's thoughts or actions are considered illogical, foolish, or out of touch with reality.
  • get your head round something The idiom "get your head round something" means to understand or comprehend something difficult or complex, typically after a period of confusion or struggle. It implies the mental process of finally grasping an idea, concept, or situation.
  • need your head examined The idiom "need your head examined" is usually used as a sarcastic or humorous remark to express disbelief or amusement at someone's irrational or illogical behavior. It implies that the person in question is acting in a foolish or senseless manner, suggesting that they should see a doctor or psychiatrist for a mental evaluation.
  • with every fibre of your being The idiom "with every fibre of your being" means to do something with utmost intensity, determination, and commitment. It suggests that someone is fully engaged and giving their entire physical or emotional energy to accomplish or experience something.
  • a burr under (or in) your saddle The idiom "a burr under (or in) your saddle" refers to a persistent annoyance or irritation that keeps bothering someone. It originated from the practice of placing a small burr or thorn under a horse's saddle, which would cause discomfort and agitation to the animal, making it restless and difficult to ride. The idiom is used metaphorically to describe a situation or issue that continually bothers and frustrates an individual.
  • get into your stride The idiom "get into your stride" means to reach a comfortable pace or rhythm in an activity or task, usually after an initial period of adjustment or difficulty. It implies that one has found their flow, gained confidence, and is performing at their best.
  • get your money's worth The idiom "get your money's worth" means to receive the full value or benefit from something that one has paid for or invested in. It implies that the person has obtained the maximum value, enjoyment, or benefit from the amount of money they have spent.
  • set your heart on The idiom "set your heart on" means to be fully determined or very intent on achieving or obtaining a particular goal, desire, or outcome. It signifies a strong dedication or commitment towards achieving something.
  • to your bones The idiom "to your bones" means to the very core or essence of something, deeply and profoundly. It implies that something has affected a person or situation on a fundamental level, leaving a lasting impact.
  • cast your net wide/wider The idiom "cast your net wide/wider" means to expand or broaden one's options or opportunities in order to increase the chances of success or finding what one is looking for. It is often used to encourage people to consider a wider range of possibilities or to explore various alternatives rather than limiting themselves to a narrow selection or specific approach.
  • make your mind up, at make up your mind The idiom "make your mind up" or "make up your mind" means to reach a decision or make a choice about something. It implies the act of resolving uncertainty or indecisiveness by selecting a specific option or course of action.
  • Wash your mouth out! The idiom "Wash your mouth out!" is an expression used to scold someone for saying something rude, disrespectful, vulgar, or inappropriate. It typically implies that the person's words were offensive or distasteful, and suggests that they should clean their mouth as a way to figuratively cleanse themselves of the offending speech.
  • your guts out The idiom "your guts out" typically refers to doing something with great intensity, effort, or enthusiasm until one is physically or emotionally exhausted. It implies putting all of one's energy and passion into a particular task or activity.
  • none of your beeswax The idiom "none of your beeswax" is a playful and informal way of telling someone that a particular matter or topic does not concern them and they should not ask or interfere. It is often used to politely and lightheartedly decline disclosing personal or private information.
  • if I were in your place The idiom "if I were in your place" typically means to imagine oneself in someone else's situation or circumstances, expressing empathy or understanding towards the other person's predicament. It often implies offering advice, perspective, or support based on how one would react or handle the situation if they were in the same position.
  • on your beam ends The idiom "on your beam ends" typically refers to a situation where someone is in extreme difficulty, distress, or financial hardship. It originates from sailing terminology, where being "on your beam ends" means that a ship is severely heeled over to one side due to strong wind or storm, making it vulnerable and on the brink of capsizing. In a figurative sense, it conveys a state of being overwhelmed, struggling, or facing imminent collapse.
  • warm the cockles of your heart The idiom "warm the cockles of your heart" refers to something that makes you feel deeply happy, joyful, or contented, often in a sentimental or touching way. It signifies a feeling of emotional warmth and satisfaction that brings comfort and delight.
  • throw your voice The idiom "throw your voice" refers to the act of creating the illusion that your voice is coming from a different location or source than your actual position. It is often associated with ventriloquism, where a performer is able to make it seem like the voice is originating from a puppet or other object. However, in a broader sense, it can also describe the ability to deceive or mislead others about the source or origin of one's words or ideas.
  • in your stocking(ed) feet The idiom "in your stocking(ed) feet" refers to being barefoot or wearing only stockings without shoes. It means to be in a relaxed, comfortable, or informal state, often suggesting a sense of being at home or at ease. It can also imply a feeling of vulnerability or naturalness without any pretense.
  • make your bow The idiom "make your bow" typically refers to taking a final bow or exit after completing a performance, speech, or any notable endeavor, symbolizing a conclusion or the end of a particular phase. It is often used to describe the act of wrapping up or bidding farewell after putting on a show or proving oneself.
  • (not) in your right mind The idiom "(not) in your right mind" refers to someone who is (not) thinking or behaving rationally or reasonably. It suggests that the person is not using their sound judgment or is acting irrational or crazy.
  • putty in your hands The idiom "putty in your hands" means that someone has complete control or influence over another person, making them easily manipulated or obedient.
  • have enough, a lot, etc. on your plate The idiom "have enough, a lot, etc. on your plate" means that someone is very busy, overwhelmed, or burdened with a lot of tasks, responsibilities, or problems to deal with. It implies that they have a full schedule and are struggling to manage everything simultaneously.
  • in your salad days The idiom "in your salad days" refers to a period of youth, innocence, or inexperience, usually referring to one's younger years or early stages of life.
  • wet your whistle The idiom "wet your whistle" generally refers to having a drink, usually an alcoholic beverage, to quench one's thirst or refresh oneself. It is often used colloquially to indicate the need or desire for a drink, as well as to encourage someone to have a drink for enjoyment or refreshment.
  • give something your best shot The idiom "give something your best shot" means to give one's maximum effort, attempt, or performance in order to achieve the best possible outcome in a particular situation or task.
  • put in/stick in your two penn'orth The idiom "put in/stick in your two penn'orth" means to offer one's opinion or contribute to a conversation or discussion, even if it may not be particularly valuable or necessary. It refers to expressing one's thoughts or ideas, regardless of whether they are requested or useful. The phrase is derived from the British currency system, where a pennyworth represents a small or insignificant amount, implying a modest or unimportant contribution.
  • not pull any/your punches The idiom "not pull any/your punches" means to speak, act, or behave in a direct and honest manner, without holding back or minimizing one's words or actions. It suggests being straightforward, forceful, and not refraining from expressing the full intensity or seriousness of a situation or opinion.
  • have something coming out of your ears The idiom "have something coming out of your ears" means to have an excessive or overwhelming amount of something. It suggests that one possesses such a large quantity of something that it cannot be contained and is seemingly overflowing.
  • shut your eyes to sth To "shut your eyes to sth" means to intentionally ignore or disregard something, usually a problem or an unpleasant truth. It implies turning a blind eye and choosing not to acknowledge or confront the issue.
  • you've made your bed and now you must lie in it The idiom "you've made your bed and now you must lie in it" means that one must accept the consequences of their actions or decisions, even if they are negative or unpleasant. It implies that once a choice has been made, it cannot be undone, and the person must face the resulting circumstances, whether they are desirable or not.
  • put your head in the lion's mouth The idiom "put your head in the lion's mouth" means to willingly or knowingly subject oneself to a dangerous or risky situation. It refers to taking bold or daring action without considering the potential consequences or perils involved.
  • your eyes are bigger than your stomach The idiom "your eyes are bigger than your stomach" means that someone has taken or desired more food, items, or activities than they are actually able to handle or consume. It refers to a situation where someone's ambitions or desires exceed their actual capabilities or capacity.
  • put your shoulder to the wheel The idiom "put your shoulder to the wheel" means to work hard and expend great effort in order to achieve a goal or accomplish a task. It implies giving your full dedication and support to something, often through physical labor or intense effort.
  • smarten up your act The idiom "smarten up your act" means to improve one's behavior or performance, particularly by becoming more sophisticated, professional, or organized. It suggests making adjustments or enhancements to enhance one's appearance, skills, or overall approach towards a specific task or situation.
  • be/get on your high horse The idiom "be/get on your high horse" means to act in a self-righteous or arrogant manner, often by criticizing or scolding others. It suggests that someone is behaving as if they are morally superior or better than others.
  • use your loaf The idiom "use your loaf" means to use one's intelligence, common sense, or reasoning abilities to solve a problem or make a wise decision. It is derived from the rhyming slang phrase "loaf of bread" which refers to "head," implying that one should use their brain.
  • your heart goes out to sb The idiom "your heart goes out to someone" means to feel strong empathy, sympathy, or compassion towards someone who is experiencing a difficult or distressing situation. It implies a sincere emotional connection and a sincere desire to support or console the person.
  • pull yourself up by your bootstraps The idiom "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" means to improve one's situation or achieve success through one's own efforts or resources, particularly when faced with challenging circumstances or a lack of external support. It suggests taking independent action and demonstrating self-reliance to overcome obstacles and make progress. The phrase originated from the notion of lifting oneself off the ground by pulling on the straps attached to one's boots, which is physically impossible, making it a metaphor for an extraordinary feat of self-improvement.
  • give someone the rough side of your tongue The idiom "give someone the rough side of your tongue" means to harshly scold or criticize someone in a stern or forceful manner. It implies expressing one's anger, frustration, or disapproval towards someone's actions or behavior in a blunt and direct manner.
  • spread your wings The idiom "spread your wings" means to explore new possibilities, gain independence, or take on new challenges and experiences. It is often used to encourage someone to step out of their comfort zone and embrace opportunities for growth and self-discovery.
  • get on your bike The idiom "get on your bike" typically means to take action, make an effort, or start working towards a goal. It suggests that one should proceed with determination and self-reliance, often in response to a challenging situation or when facing a difficulty. It implies taking personal responsibility and initiative rather than relying on someone else for assistance or relying on luck.
  • get your arse in gear, at get off your arse The idiom "get your arse in gear" (also known as "get off your arse") is an informal expression used to urge someone to start doing something or to act more quickly and with more effort. It typically implies that the person is being lazy, unproductive, or dragging their feet on a task or responsibility. The idiom emphasizes the need for action and implies that the individual should stop procrastinating and begin working or making progress.
  • keep your eyes open for sb/sth The idiom "keep your eyes open for sb/sth" means to remain vigilant or watchful for someone or something. It suggests paying close attention and being ready to notice and react to the person or thing being sought after or expected.
  • be out of your mind with worry, etc. The idiom "be out of your mind with worry, etc." means to be extremely or excessively anxious, concerned, or consumed by a particular emotion or situation to the point of losing control of rational thoughts or actions. It suggests a heightened state of mental distress or preoccupation.
  • the rough edge of your tongue The idiom "the rough edge of your tongue" refers to speaking in a harsh, sharp, or critical manner. It implies that someone is being rude, disrespectful, or using offensive language while communicating with others.
  • bust your chops The idiom "bust your chops" is typically used to mean to tease, criticize, or give someone a hard time in a playful or joking manner. It can also refer to the act of exerting a lot of effort or working extremely hard to achieve something.
  • mend your fences The idiom "mend your fences" means to repair or strengthen relationships, especially after a disagreement or conflict. It implies taking efforts to reconcile with someone and to resolve any misunderstandings or issues that may have arisen.
  • (right) up your street The idiom "(right) up your street" means that something is well-suited or perfectly suited to a person's interests, abilities, or preferences. It suggests that the person will find something enjoyable, appealing, or convenient because it matches their specific tastes or skills. It is often used when referring to an opportunity or situation that is a good fit for someone.
  • hold your own The idiom "hold your own" means to maintain one's position, status, or competency in a given situation, particularly when faced with challenging circumstances or competition. It implies the ability to remain strong, confident, and competent without needing assistance or support from others.
  • bust your ass The idiom "bust your ass" means to work extremely hard, put in a lot of effort, or exert oneself to the maximum extent in order to achieve or complete something. It implies going to great lengths or making great sacrifices to accomplish a task or goal.
  • in the palm of your hand The idiom "in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone or something, often with little effort or resistance. It implies that the person or situation is easily within one's grasp or under one's power.
  • burn your boats/bridges The idiom "burn your boats/bridges" means to eliminate all possibilities of retreat or escape, typically used to describe a situation where one commits fully to a particular course of action. It refers to the historical practice of burning the boats or bridges that connected an army to the mainland, making it impossible for them to retreat and forcing them to fight with complete determination.
  • shovel sth down, at shovel sth into your mouth The idiom "shovel something down" or "shovel something into your mouth" refers to the act of eating hastily or quickly, usually using a large spoon or utensil like a shovel. It implies eating in a rushed and voracious manner, often without savoring the food or paying attention to the taste. This phrase is typically used to emphasize someone's lack of table etiquette or their eagerness to consume large amounts of food without taking the time to enjoy it.
  • after your own heart The idiom "after your own heart" means to have similar interests, values, or qualities as oneself. It suggests that someone or something is ideal or perfectly suited to one's own preferences or character.
  • your guess is as good as mine The idiom "your guess is as good as mine" means that the person saying it does not have any more knowledge or information about a particular topic than the person they are speaking to. It implies that both individuals are equally uncertain or clueless about a certain matter.
  • throw (your) money/cash around The idiom "throw (your) money/cash around" refers to someone spending or giving away money freely and without thought or concern. It suggests a display of wealth or generosity by being extravagant with financial resources.
  • bend your elbow The idiom "bend your elbow" is a colloquial expression that means to drink alcohol, specifically referring to lifting a glass or a bottle to one's mouth in order to consume a beverage.
  • set you back on your heels The idiom "set you back on your heels" refers to surprising or shocking someone, causing them to be momentarily stunned or taken aback. It implies catching someone off guard, causing a reaction that makes them lose their balance or composure temporarily.
  • the fullness of your (or the) heart The idiom "the fullness of your (or the) heart" refers to the state or condition of having strong and unrestricted emotions, typically positive ones such as joy, love, or gratitude. It implies that one's heart is filled to capacity with feelings or emotions, often evoking a sense of overwhelming happiness or contentment.
  • for your information The idiom "for your information" is used to inform someone or provide them with a piece of information that they may not be aware of, often with the intention of clarifying or correcting their understanding of a subject.
  • pay your last respects, at pay your respects To pay your last respects or pay your respects is an idiom referring to the act of showing respect or honoring someone who has died. It typically involves attending their funeral or memorial service, and expressing condolences and sympathy to the family and loved ones of the deceased.
  • play your cards close to the vest The idiom "play your cards close to the vest" refers to the act of keeping one's thoughts, intentions, or plans secret and not revealing them to others. It originated from the game of poker, where players typically hold their cards close to their vest or body to avoid showing them to opponents and revealing their strategies or the strength of their hand. In a broader sense, the idiom suggests being cautious and secretive about sharing information or being guarded in one's actions.
  • have/keep something up your sleeve The idiom "have/keep something up your sleeve" means to possess a secret plan, strategy, or hidden advantage that can be used at a later time when needed. It alludes to a magician who hides objects or tricks up their sleeve to surprise or impress others.
  • play out of your skin The idiom "play out of your skin" means to perform at an extraordinary or exceptional level, surpassing one's usual abilities or expectations, especially in sports or competitive situations. It implies putting in maximum effort and delivering an outstanding performance.
  • on your high horse The idiom "on your high horse" refers to someone who is behaving arrogantly, pompously, or condescendingly. It implies that the person is acting superior or self-righteous, often looking down on others or asserting their own opinions and beliefs forcefully.
  • hang out/up your shingle The idiom "hang out/up your shingle" means to start or establish one's own business or practice, typically by advertising or displaying a sign, often indicating one's profession or occupation. It originated from the practice of lawyers and doctors traditionally displaying their professional signs, known as "shingles," outside their offices to attract clients.
  • for your good The definition of the idiom "for your good" typically means doing something with the intention of benefiting or helping someone, even if it might not be desired or acknowledged by the person in question at the time. It implies that the action or decision is made in their best interest, despite any immediate discomfort or disagreement.
  • wear your heart on your sleeve The idiom "wear your heart on your sleeve" means to openly and unabashedly display or show one's emotions, feelings, or vulnerabilities for others to see. It refers to someone who is transparent and does not hide their emotions or thoughts, making their innermost sentiments easily visible to others.
  • raise your hackles The idiom "raise your hackles" means to cause someone to become angry, defensive, or irritated, typically due to a perceived threat or provocation. It refers to the physiological response of a dog when its hair stands on end, particularly along the neck and back, as a reaction to a perceived danger or fear. In the context of human behavior, it signifies someone becoming tense, agitated, or provoked by a particular statement, action, or situation.
  • pick up your marbles (and go home/leave) The idiom "pick up your marbles (and go home/leave)" refers to someone who decides to withdraw from a situation or abandon a project, usually out of frustration or disappointment. It implies that the person is taking their resources or contributions away, leaving others to deal with the consequences or challenges on their own.
  • cool your jets! The idiom "cool your jets!" means to calm down, relax, or to reduce one's excitement, impatience, or anger in a given situation. It is often used as an exclamation to tell someone to take it easy or to slow down.
  • bet your boots The idiom "bet your boots" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something. It implies a strong belief in the success or accuracy of a situation or statement. It can also suggest that someone is willing to wager everything they have on the outcome being true or favorable.
  • Do not wash your dirty linen in public. The idiom "Do not wash your dirty linen in public" means that one should not discuss or expose personal or private problems, conflicts, or issues in public or in front of others. It advises against airing one's dirty laundry or sharing intimate or embarrassing details in a public setting. It suggests maintaining discretion and dealing with personal matters privately.
  • burn a hole in your pocket The idiom "burn a hole in your pocket" means to have money that is so tempting or difficult to resist spending that it feels as if it is continuously "burning" or urging you to spend it impulsively.
  • be speaking/talking out of both sides of your mouth The idiom "be speaking/talking out of both sides of your mouth" means to say contradictory or inconsistent things, often with a deceptive or insincere intention. It implies dishonesty or double-dealing, where the person's words do not align with their true intentions or beliefs.
  • in terror of your life The idiom "in terror of your life" typically refers to a state of extreme fear or panic, often experienced when someone believes their life is in immediate danger. It suggests being frightened to the point of feeling an imminent threat to one's own survival or well-being, causing intense terror or dread.
  • take sth in your stride To "take something in your stride" means to handle or deal with a difficult or challenging situation in a calm and relaxed manner, without being overly affected by it or allowing it to disrupt your composure. It implies the ability to face obstacles or setbacks with ease and maintain a positive attitude.
  • get your eye in The idiom "get your eye in" means to adjust or familiarize oneself with something, especially a sport or activity, by practicing or focusing on it until one's perception and judgment improve. It refers to improving one's ability to see or judge things accurately.
  • on your conscience The idiom "on your conscience" refers to a feeling of guilt or responsibility for something that one has done or failed to do. It signifies carrying a sense of moral obligation or remorse for one's actions or decisions.
  • a flea in your ear The idiom "a flea in your ear" refers to receiving an unexpected or unwelcome criticism, advice, or rebuke from someone, often in a forceful or persistent manner. It implies being bothered or irritated by someone's words or opinions.
  • have the time of your life The idiom "have the time of your life" refers to having an exceptionally enjoyable and memorable experience, typically involving a great deal of fun, excitement, or happiness. It implies that one is thoroughly enjoying a particular moment or event, creating lasting memories.
  • delighted to make your acquaintance The idiom "delighted to make your acquaintance" is a polite and formal way of expressing one's happiness or pleasure in meeting someone for the first time.
  • stew in your own juice/juices The idiom "stew in your own juice/juices" means to suffer the consequences of one's actions or thoughts, often in a state of self-inflicted frustration or discomfort, without seeking or receiving external assistance or sympathy. It implies that the individual is left to handle the repercussions of their behavior or decisions alone.
  • your name is mud The idiom "your name is mud" refers to a situation where someone's reputation or social standing is severely tarnished or damaged. It implies that the person is widely disliked, discredited, or considered untrustworthy.
  • be born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to the idea of being born into a wealthy or privileged family. It implies that someone has been provided with plentiful resources and opportunities from birth, usually without having to work or struggle for them.
  • curl your hair The idiom "curl your hair" is used to describe something that is extremely shocking, frightening, or exciting. It suggests that the experience is intense enough to make one's hair literally curl due to surprise or fear.
  • cry/sob your heart out The idiom "cry/sob your heart out" means to cry intensely and without restraint in order to express or release deep emotions or grief. It suggests shedding tears freely and until one feels emotionally relieved or exhausted.
  • if I was/were in your place The idiom "if I was/were in your place" is used to express empathy or understanding towards someone's situation, indicating that if the speaker was experiencing the same circumstances, they would likely react or behave similarly. It implies putting oneself in someone else's position to better comprehend their feelings, choices, or actions.
  • have a lot/enough on your plate The idiom "have a lot/enough on your plate" means to have a significant amount of things to deal with or responsibilities to attend to. It implies being busy or overloaded with tasks or obligations. The phrase originates from the image of a plate being filled with too much food, signifying that one has more than they can handle.
  • your wish is my command The idiom "your wish is my command" is a figurative way of expressing wholehearted willingness to fulfill someone's request or desire immediately and without hesitation. It indicates complete obedience or devotion to the person making the wish, implying that their desires have full control or authority over the speaker.
  • turn your back The idiom "turn your back" generally means to ignore or neglect something or someone intentionally, usually resulting in a negative consequence or outcome. It implies a deliberate act of distancing oneself emotionally or physically, often with a dismissive or uncaring attitude.
  • leave you to your own devices The idiom "leave you to your own devices" means to leave someone alone and allow them to figure things out or solve a problem independently without any assistance or interference.
  • pit your wits against sb/sth The idiom "pit your wits against someone/something" means to engage in a competition or challenge against someone or something, relying on your intelligence, knowledge, or skills. It suggests a test of mental abilities or strategies in order to succeed or outsmart the opponent.
  • fancy your chances The idiom "fancy your chances" means to believe or feel confident about one's ability or likelihood of succeeding in a particular situation or endeavor. It implies having a positive or optimistic outlook regarding the outcome.
  • your best bet The idiom "your best bet" is used to indicate the most advisable or logical course of action in a particular situation. It implies that the suggested choice or option is likely to yield the greatest chance of success or the desired outcome.
  • make your toes curl The idiom "make your toes curl" is used to describe something that is extremely embarrassing, cringe-worthy, or unsettling, to the point where it elicits a physical reaction, causing the curling or scrunching up of one's toes.
  • put your hands together The idiom "put your hands together" commonly refers to the act of bringing the palms of your hands together and clapping to show appreciation, approval, or applause for someone or something.
  • catch your breath The idiom "catch your breath" means to take a moment to rest, recover, or regain composure after physical exertion or a hectic situation. It refers to pausing or slowing down to take a deep breath or regain one's normal breathing rhythm before continuing an activity or handling a challenging situation.
  • cook your goose The idiom "cook your goose" typically means to ruin someone's plans, bring about their demise, or cause them significant trouble or harm.
  • need (to have) your head examined To say that someone "needs (to have) their head examined" is an idiomatic expression used to suggest that the person has done or said something foolish or irrational. It implies that their mental state or judgment may be questionable or flawed, and they might benefit from undergoing a psychological evaluation or examination. This idiom is often used in a humorous or sarcastic manner to convey disbelief or astonishment at someone's words or actions.
  • keep your hair on The idiom "keep your hair on" means to remain calm and composed in a situation, especially when one is feeling frustrated, agitated, or angry.
  • be your own man (or woman or person) The idiom "be your own man (or woman or person)" refers to the concept of being independent, self-reliant, and self-sufficient. It is about taking ownership of one's decisions, actions, and beliefs, rather than being overly influenced by others or conforming to societal expectations. It encourages individuals to think for themselves, follow their own moral compass, and not be swayed or controlled by external influences.
  • can do something standing on your head The idiom "can do something standing on your head" means that a person can easily or effortlessly complete a task or accomplish something, even without using much effort or skill. It implies that the task is incredibly simple or not challenging at all for the person.
  • be putty in your hands The idiom "be putty in your hands" means to be completely under someone's control or influence, easily manipulated or influenced by someone else's words or actions. It suggests that the person being referred to is highly susceptible to another person's persuasion or charm.
  • hold/stand your ground The idiom "hold/stand your ground" means to maintain one's position or stance despite opposition or pressure to yield or retreat. It refers to the act of standing firm and not being easily swayed or intimidated.
  • a feather in your cap The idiom "a feather in your cap" means achieving or accomplishing something noteworthy or commendable. It refers to a personal achievement or success that adds to a person's reputation or self-esteem, often used to indicate pride or honor.
  • stick to your knitting The idiom "stick to your knitting" means to focus on or concentrate on one's own areas of expertise or core responsibilities. It urges individuals or organizations to stay within their expertise and not venture into unfamiliar or unrelated territories. Similar to the idea of "staying in your lane," it emphasizes the importance of staying focused and not getting distracted by other activities or pursuing areas outside of one's expertise.
  • at your peril The idiom "at your peril" means taking a risk or engaging in something with potentially serious consequences or harm. It implies that by proceeding or ignoring a warning or caution, one is jeopardizing their well-being or safety.
  • take leave of your senses The idiom "take leave of your senses" means to act in a way that is irrational, illogical, or crazy. It refers to a sudden loss of reason or sanity, often temporary, resulting in irrational behavior or decisions.
  • in your bones The idiom "in your bones" refers to having a deep, intuitive understanding or knowledge of something, often attributed to a strong feeling or experience that is deeply ingrained or inherent. It suggests a profound internalized conviction or perception that goes beyond mere intellectual or rational comprehension.
  • get your knife into somebody To "get your knife into somebody" is an idiom that means to criticize, attack, or show intense hostility towards someone, often with the intention of causing harm or ruining their reputation. It implies that the person using this idiom harbors strong negative feelings or ill will towards the individual they are targeting.
  • get your claws into someone The idiom "get your claws into someone" refers to exerting control or influence over someone, often in a manipulative or possessive manner. It implies hooking or grasping onto someone figuratively, like claws digging into flesh, to gain power, exploit, or control them.
  • on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your marks, get set, go!" is a phrase commonly used in racing or competitive situations, particularly in track events. It is used to signal the start of a race or competition, with participants being instructed to assume their starting positions ("on your marks"), prepare themselves ("get set"), and then begin the activity ("go"). Figuratively, the idiom is used to indicate the beginning or initiation of any undertaking or event, often emphasizing the need for readiness and prompt action.
  • pack your bag The idiom "pack your bag" means to prepare for or get ready to leave a place or situation, typically in a hurry or under certain circumstances. It implies the need to gather necessary belongings or make necessary arrangements before departing.
  • without a by your leave The idiom "without a by your leave" is used to describe a situation in which someone acts or behaves in a manner that is impolite or disrespectful, without seeking permission or giving proper notice beforehand. It implies that the person acted without considering others' feelings or without showing the proper courtesy or respect that would be expected in the given situation.
  • your pride and joy The idiom "your pride and joy" typically refers to something or someone that someone feels immense pride and pleasure in and considers to be their most treasured possession or accomplishment. It highlights a strong emotional attachment and a sense of personal significance.
  • out of the goodness of your heart The idiom "out of the goodness of your heart" refers to doing something kind, generous, or selfless without expecting anything in return. It suggests performing an action driven solely by compassionate motives or pure goodwill.
  • have your finger on the pulse The idiom "have your finger on the pulse" means to be fully aware of current trends, events, or developments in a specific field or situation. It refers to having a deep understanding and knowledge about what is happening, allowing one to stay informed and make informed decisions.
  • put your hand in your pocket The idiom "put your hand in your pocket" refers to willingly giving or contributing money or resources, usually for a charitable or helpful cause. It signifies a generous or selfless act of offering financial assistance or support.
  • keep your eyes peeled/skinned The idiom "keep your eyes peeled/skinned" means to be vigilant, observant, or watchful, often used when asking someone to be on the lookout for something specific or to pay close attention to one's surroundings.
  • lose your way The idiom "lose your way" means to become confused, disoriented, or uncertain about your direction or purpose, both in a literal or figurative sense. It implies losing one's sense of direction or losing sight of one's goals, resulting in a lack of clarity or purpose in one's actions or decisions.
  • on your mark, get set, go The idiom "on your mark, get set, go" is a phrase often used to give the signal or command to start a race or competition. It represents the sequence of actions that take place before initiating a physical or competitive activity. The phrase is a way to prepare participants mentally and physically for the upcoming challenge, with "on your mark" indicating the initial position, "get set" signifying the readiness or preparation, and "go" indicating the start of the event.
  • afraid of (or frightened of) your own shadow The idiom "afraid of (or frightened of) your own shadow" means to be excessively or irrationally fearful or easily scared. It implies a constant state of being overly cautious, anxious, or timid, even in situations where there is no real danger or threat present.
  • land on your feet The idiom "land on your feet" means to quickly and successfully recover from a difficult or challenging situation. It refers to the ability to adapt, find a solution, or achieve success despite adversity or setbacks.
  • to your fingertips The idiom "to your fingertips" means to possess comprehensive knowledge, skill, or mastery of something. It refers to having a thorough understanding or complete control over a particular subject or task.
  • make a/your mark (on sth) The idiom "make a/your mark (on sth)" means to achieve a significant or lasting impact or impression on something, often referring to leaving one's influence or distinctiveness on a particular aspect, situation, or endeavor. It signifies making a noticeable and notable contribution, leaving a memorable legacy, or establishing oneself in a particular field or context.
  • Keep your pecker up! The idiom "keep your pecker up!" is a colloquial expression that means to maintain a positive attitude or to stay cheerful and optimistic in the face of difficulties or challenging situations. It is often used to encourage someone to remain resilient, hopeful, and confident.
  • take the weight off your feet/legs The idiom "take the weight off your feet/legs" means to rest or relieve yourself from standing or walking for a while, typically by sitting down or finding a place to rest. It implies seeking relief or respite from physical exertion or tiredness.
  • get/lay/put your hands on sth The idiom "get/lay/put your hands on sth" means to obtain or find something, usually something that is not easily accessible or readily available. It implies a sense of determination or effort to acquire a particular item or information.
  • Watch your mouth! The idiom "Watch your mouth!" is a warning or admonition to someone to be careful or more respectful about what they say. It is usually used when someone has spoken inappropriately, rudely, or without thinking, telling them to be mindful of their words and avoid offensive language or disrespectful remarks.
  • be at your wits’ end The idiom "be at your wits' end" means to be extremely frustrated, puzzled, or unable to think of a solution or way forward in a challenging or difficult situation. It implies a state of mental or emotional exhaustion, where all options or resources have been exhausted and no solution is apparent.
  • to the best of your belief/knowledge The idiom "to the best of your belief/knowledge" refers to a situation where you provide information or make a statement based on your understanding or beliefs, acknowledging that you may not have all the facts or complete certainty. It implies that you are being honest and giving the most accurate answer or account you can, given the information available to you.
  • Keep your shop and your shop will keep you. The idiom "Keep your shop and your shop will keep you." typically means that if you take care of your business or work diligently, it will provide you with sustenance and financial stability. In other words, if you devote attention and efforts to your occupation, it will reward you with success and prosperity.
  • take a load off your feet The idiom "take a load off your feet" means to sit down and rest, particularly when one has been standing or walking for a long time. It implies taking a break or finding relief from physical exertion or fatigue.
  • mind your back The idiom "mind your back" means to be cautious, vigilant, or careful of potential dangers or threats that may arise behind you. It is often used as a warning to someone to be aware of their surroundings and not become complacent or vulnerable.
  • put (all) your cards on the table The idiom "put (all) your cards on the table" means to openly and honestly reveal all the information, intentions, or secrets that one possesses. It suggests being transparent and forthright in a situation, not holding back anything important or relevant. It commonly refers to being completely candid during discussions, negotiations, or confrontations.
  • have your back to/against the wall The idiom "have your back to/against the wall" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation with limited options or support. It usually refers to being under pressure or facing a crisis where one feels trapped or cornered, as if they have no way out or are at a great disadvantage.
  • be on, show, prove, etc. your mettle The idiom "be on, show, prove, etc. your mettle" means to demonstrate one's strength, courage, abilities, or true character especially when faced with challenges or difficult situations. It implies showing one's resilience and capability to handle demanding circumstances or tasks, often in order to gain recognition or respect from others.
  • set your teeth on edge The idiom "set your teeth on edge" means to cause a feeling of extreme irritation, discomfort, or a shiver down your spine. It is often used to describe something unpleasant that provokes an intense physical or emotional reaction.
  • make your hair curl The idiom "make your hair curl" is used to describe something shocking, shocking, or horrifying. It implies that the situation or information is so alarming that it figuratively causes one's hair to stand on end or curl.
  • bless your heart, at bless you The idiom "bless your heart" is often used as a polite, nuanced way to express sympathy, condescension, or even a veiled insult, particularly in Southern American English. It can be interpreted in different ways depending on the context and tone of the speaker. In some cases, it may be an expression of genuine kindness or empathy, while in others, it might imply pity, amusement, or the acknowledgment of someone's perceived naïveté or foolishness. "Bless you" is another common phrase used to express goodwill or to offer encouragement, often in response to someone's actions, remarks, or situations.
  • chance your arm "Chance your arm" is an idiom that means to take a risk or attempt something even if the chances of success are uncertain or slim. It often implies a willingness to try one's luck or make an effort, even when facing potential failure or rejection.
  • be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of your face" is used to convey the idea that someone will eventually be disappointed or experience a reversal of fortune after initially feeling joy or satisfaction. It suggests that the initial joy or laughter will ultimately be replaced by a different, often undesirable, feeling or outcome.
  • close your mind to The idiom "close your mind to" means to refuse to consider or entertain new ideas, perspectives, or possibilities. It refers to a mental state where a person deliberately shuts themselves off from accepting or understanding alternative viewpoints.
  • make your flesh crawl/creep The idiom "make your flesh crawl/creep" means to cause an intense feeling of disgust, fear, or aversion, usually due to something unsettling, eerie, or repulsive. It refers to a sensation that can cause physical or emotional discomfort, making one's skin "crawl" or "creep" with unease.
  • You bet your (sweet) life! The idiom "You bet your (sweet) life!" is a strong affirmation or response meaning "absolutely" or "without a doubt." It signifies complete certainty or confidence in the statement or action being discussed. The addition of "sweet" in some versions of the idiom adds emphasis or intensifies the certainty being expressed.
  • of your own accord The idiom "of your own accord" means to do something willingly or voluntarily, without being prompted or forced by others.
  • you kiss your momma with that mouth? The idiom "you kiss your momma with that mouth?" is a rhetorical question used to express disapproval or shock at someone's use of crude or offensive language. It implies that the person's words are inappropriate and disrespectful, suggesting that they should not speak in such a manner, even to their own mother.
  • have time on your side, at time is on sb's side The idiom "have time on your side" or "time is on someone's side" means that someone has enough time available to achieve or accomplish something successfully. It suggests that there is no immediate rush or deadline, allowing one to take advantage of the passage of time to achieve their desired outcome or goal.
  • get your feet on the ground "Get your feet on the ground" is an idiom that means to face reality or to stop having unrealistic or impractical ideas or expectations. It suggests the need to be sensible, practical, and down-to-earth.
  • turn something to advantage (or to your advantage) The idiom "turn something to advantage (or to your advantage)" means to use a particular situation, circumstance, or resource in a way that benefits or favors you. It refers to the act of making the best or most advantageous use of something for your own gain or benefit.
  • tug at/touch your forelock The idiom "tug at/touch your forelock" refers to a submissive or deferential gesture of respect or obedience, typically towards a person of higher social status or authority. It originates from the act of touching or tugging at the front lower part of one's hat or cap, known as the forelock. This gesture is performed as a sign of acknowledgement or subservience.
  • twist sb around/round your little finger The idiom "twist sb around/round your little finger" is used to describe the act of having complete control or influence over someone, often by manipulating them or convincingly persuading them to do what you want. It implies the ability to effortlessly manipulate and dominate someone, as if twisting them around your little finger.
  • buck up your ideas The idiom "buck up your ideas" means to start behaving or performing better, often used as a firm or commanding statement to encourage someone to be more focused, diligent, or efficient. It implies urging someone to improve their actions, attitudes, or efforts in order to achieve better results.
  • air your dirty laundry in public The idiom "air your dirty laundry in public" means to discuss or reveal personal or private matters, especially those that are embarrassing or shameful, in a public or open setting. It refers to openly exposing or disclosing personal problems, conflicts, or secrets that are typically better kept private.
  • at your convenience The idiom "at your convenience" means that something can be done or should be done at a time that is most convenient for the person it is being addressed to. It implies that there is no rush or urgency, and the action or task can be done when it is most convenient or suitable for them.
  • have your eye on somebody The idiom "have your eye on somebody" means to be attracted to or interested in someone romantically or to have a specific person in mind as a potential partner. It implies that one is observing or paying special attention to that person, possibly with an intention to pursue a relationship.
  • without a by your leave; without so much as a by your leave The idiom "without a by your leave; without so much as a by your leave" means without asking for permission or without giving any notice or explanation. It is used to describe someone's action of doing something without any regard for others or without any polite or courteous gesture.
  • slog your guts out The idiom "slog your guts out" is an informal expression that means to work very hard or make considerable effort to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies going to great lengths, exerting oneself physically or mentally, and pushing through challenges or difficulties without giving up. The phrase emphasizes the intensity and dedication required in one's efforts.
  • dirty your hands The idiom "dirty your hands" means to become involved in or to actively participate in morally or ethically questionable actions, often compromising one's principles or integrity in the process.
  • do your homework The idiom "do your homework" means to complete the necessary preparation or research required for a particular task or situation. It implies putting in the effort to acquire knowledge or gather information beforehand in order to be well-prepared and informed. It can be used in various contexts, such as studying for an exam, conducting research for a project, or thoroughly researching a topic before engaging in a discussion or making a decision.
  • with your own fair hand(s) The idiom "with your own fair hand(s)" typically refers to doing something oneself, usually implying that the action requires personal involvement, effort, or attention to detail. It emphasizes the physical participation or manual labor undertaken by the person in question, emphasizing their personal touch or craftsmanship.
  • not (be able to) take your eyes off somebody/something The idiom "not (be able to) take your eyes off somebody/something" means being fully captivated or unable to stop watching or looking at someone or something due to their attractiveness, charm, or compelling nature. It implies a strong sense of fascination or being completely engrossed in what is being observed.
  • pipe your eye The idiom "pipe your eye" means to cry or shed tears. It is often used to indicate that someone is or should be showing emotion, especially grief or sadness.
  • vent your spleen The idiom "vent your spleen" means to express or release one's anger, frustration, or negative emotions, often by complaining, criticizing, or ranting about someone or something. It refers to letting out one's pent-up emotions, similar to how the ancient belief held that the spleen was responsible for producing anger or melancholy.
  • save your bacon The idiom "save your bacon" means to avoid or escape a difficult or dangerous situation, usually through clever thinking, quick action, or a stroke of luck. It is often used when a person manages to protect themselves or someone else from harm or trouble.
  • on your tod The idiom "on your tod" means to be alone or to do something by yourself without any company or assistance.
  • bluff your way The idiom "bluff your way" refers to persuading or deceiving others into believing that one possesses more knowledge, skill, or confidence than one actually does. It involves using confidence, bravado, or cleverness to navigate through a situation, even if lacking the necessary qualifications or abilities.
  • do sth off your own bat The idiom "do something off your own bat" means to take an action or initiative without being instructed, advised, or influenced by others. It suggests that the individual is doing something independently and according to their own judgment or choice.
  • have your name in lights The idiom "have your name in lights" means to achieve fame and recognition, especially in the entertainment industry. It refers to someone's name being prominently displayed on a marquee or billboard, typically as a symbol of success and public acknowledgement.
  • blow/toot your own horn The idiom "blow/toot your own horn" means to brag, boast, or promote oneself and one's accomplishments. It refers to someone showing off or publicly proclaiming their own achievements, skills, or talents.
  • go to your head The idiom "go to your head" means that success, praise, or attention has made someone arrogant, conceited, or inflated their ego. It refers to the tendency of certain individuals to let success or flattery have a negative impact on their behavior or attitude.
  • get on your soapbox The idiom "get on your soapbox" means to passionately express one's opinion or make a speech, especially in a public setting, often with an air of self-righteousness or without considering opposing perspectives. This phrase originates from the act of physically standing on a soapbox, which was commonly used by public speakers to elevate their stance and be better heard by a crowd.
  • be frightened (or scared) out of your wits The idiom "be frightened (or scared) out of your wits" means to be extremely scared or terrified to the point of losing one's ability to think or reason clearly. It implies experiencing a sudden and intense fear that paralyzes or overwhelms a person.
  • move your ass The idiom "move your ass" is an informal and sometimes offensive expression that means to hurry up, move quickly, or act promptly. It is often used in situations where urgency or a sense of impatience is desired.
  • have your heart in the right place The idiom "have your heart in the right place" means to have good intentions or to be kind-hearted, even if one's actions may not always result in positive outcomes. It implies that despite any mistakes or shortcomings, the person genuinely means well and has a sincere desire to do the right thing.
  • burn your fingers, at get/have your fingers burned The idiom "burn your fingers" or "get/have your fingers burned" is an expression meaning to experience negative consequences or suffer from a bad outcome as a result of one's actions or decisions. It implies encountering trouble, loss, or harm that could have been avoided with more caution or consideration.
  • feather your nest The idiom "feather your nest" means to accumulate wealth or resources for personal comfort and security, typically through cunning or selfish means. It refers to the act of enhancing one's own living conditions or financial situation without considering others.
  • keep your eyes peeled/skinned (for somebody/something) The idiom "keep your eyes peeled/skinned (for somebody/something)" means to stay vigilant, alert, and watchful for a particular person or thing. It suggests the need to pay close attention and be actively aware in order to spot or notice something important or anticipated.
  • be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" means that something is very obvious, clear, and easily noticeable, just like one's own nose on their face. It is used to indicate that there is no need for explanation or further discussion, as the information or situation is self-evident.
  • pay your respects (to somebody) The idiom "pay your respects (to somebody)" means to show courtesy, admiration, or acknowledgment towards someone, typically by visiting them or acknowledging their achievements, usually in a formal or ceremonial manner. It often implies expressing condolences or showing respect towards someone who has passed away.
  • watch your step The idiom "watch your step" means to be cautious and careful about one's actions or decisions, usually in order to avoid making a mistake, causing harm, or getting into a difficult or dangerous situation. It implies the need to be attentive and mindful of potential risks or traps.
  • at your wit's end The idiom "at your wit's end" means to be extremely frustrated, perplexed, or at a loss about what to do in a given situation. It is used to express a state of being mentally or emotionally exhausted due to a problem or difficulty that seems unsolvable.
  • be shouting your head off The idiom "be shouting your head off" means to shout or scream extremely loudly or vigorously. It implies a high level of volume, intensity, and persistence in expressing one's emotions or opinions.
  • a viper in your bosom The idiom "a viper in your bosom" refers to someone who pretends to be a friend or ally but is secretly harmful or treacherous. It suggests that the person you trust and hold close to you can unexpectedly harm or betray you, just like a venomous snake hiding in your clothing could bite and cause harm.
  • keep your eye on the ball The idiom "keep your eye on the ball" means to stay focused and attentive to a particular task or goal, disregarding distractions or diversions. It originated from sports, particularly ball-oriented games like baseball or tennis, where one must continuously watch the ball in order to perform well. Metaphorically, it encourages individuals to maintain concentration and not be easily distracted, ensuring they are aware of the main objective or priority.
  • draw/pull in your horns The idiom "draw/pull in your horns" means to become more cautious, reserved, or less assertive in order to avoid conflict or confrontation. It refers to the action of retracting or withdrawing one's horns, like a defensive mechanism used by certain animals. This idiom suggests that one should become less aggressive or defensive in order to maintain peace or avoid worsened situations.
  • put your house in order The idiom "put your house in order" means to organize, prioritize, or resolve one's personal or professional matters. It refers to taking control, making necessary adjustments, or addressing problems in one's life in order to achieve stability and success.
  • too big for your boots The idiom "too big for your boots" refers to someone who has an exaggerated sense of their own importance or abilities, often overestimating their skills or status. It implies that the person is arrogant, self-important, and behaves in a way that exceeds their actual capabilities or position.
  • keep your . . . The phrase "keep your . . ." typically refers to maintaining control over or preserving something, often involving one's emotions, actions, or personal belongings. It is often used as a piece of advice or a warning to stay cautious and careful in certain situations.
  • get your arse into gear The idiom "get your arse into gear" means to start taking action or making an effort to accomplish something. It is a colloquial expression that is commonly used to urge someone to work harder, be more productive, or get moving on a task or goal.
  • in your own good time The idiom "in your own good time" means to do something at one's own preferred pace or in one's own timing, without feeling rushed or pressured by external factors or expectations. It suggests that it is better to take the necessary time to complete a task or make a decision in a way that suits one's capabilities or comfort level. It emphasizes the importance of personal autonomy and avoiding unnecessary stress or anxiety.
  • go about your work The idiom "go about your work" means to engage in one's tasks, duties, or responsibilities in a diligent and focused manner. It implies taking action and actively proceeding with the necessary actions to complete one's work or assigned tasks.
  • rub your hands The idiom "rub your hands" refers to expressing satisfaction, anticipation, or excitement about something that is about to happen. It often implies a sense of joy or anticipation for a favorable outcome or benefit.
  • be dead on your feet The idiom "be dead on your feet" means to be extremely exhausted, worn out, or fatigued to the point of being unable to continue functioning effectively. It implies a complete lack of energy or stamina due to physical or mental exertion.
  • with your eyes (wide) open The idiom "with your eyes (wide) open" means to be fully aware of the risks, consequences, or realities of a situation before making a decision or taking action. It implies being well-informed, attentive, and consciously making choices after considering all relevant information or potential outcomes.
  • work your socks off The idiom "work your socks off" means to work extremely hard or diligently at something. It implies giving maximum effort and dedication to accomplish a task or goal.
  • see your way (clear) to doing something/to do something The idiom "see your way (clear) to doing something/to do something" means to be willing or able to do something, despite possible difficulties or objections. It implies being able to find a solution or overcome obstacles in order to accomplish a certain task or fulfill a request.
  • get/lay your hands on somebody The idiom "get/lay your hands on somebody" means to physically harm or catch hold of someone. It implies aggression or intent to physically confront or deal with someone.
  • press home your advantage The idiom "press home your advantage" means to take full advantage of a situation or an opportunity, typically in a competitive context, by continuing to assert or exploit one's strengths, advantages, or successes in order to secure further gains or achieve a definitive victory.
  • stand on your own (two) feet The idiom "stand on your own (two) feet" means to be self-sufficient and independent, capable of taking care of oneself without relying on others for support. It implies being able to handle responsibilities, make decisions, and survive or succeed without assistance.
  • have your moments The expression "have your moments" is an idiomatic phrase that refers to someone or something that intermittently shows signs of excellence, talent, or success, despite being inconsistent or imperfect most of the time. It acknowledges that although the subject may not consistently perform at a high level, there are occasional instances when they exhibit skill, charm, intelligence, or other desirable qualities.
  • be on your guard The idiom "be on your guard" means to be cautious, alert, and watchful in order to anticipate and protect oneself from possible dangers, threats, or deceptive situations. It implies being vigilant and ready to respond to any potential risks or hazards.
  • cut your losses The idiom "cut your losses" means to abandon a failing situation or venture in order to prevent further losses or damage. It involves accepting and minimizing the losses incurred rather than continuing to invest time, effort, or resources with little chance of success or improvement.
  • could do sth in your sleep The idiom "could do something in your sleep" means that someone is extremely proficient or skilled at a particular task to the point where they can accomplish it effortlessly and without much thought. It suggests a high level of expertise or familiarity with the task, to the extent that it can be completed unconsciously or with minimal effort, akin to performing it while asleep.
  • Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. The idiom "Hoist your sail when the wind is fair" means to take advantage of favorable circumstances or opportunities when they arise, rather than waiting for the perfect conditions which may never come. It emphasizes the importance of seizing the moment and acting promptly when conditions are in your favor.
  • feather your own nest The idiom "feather your own nest" means to selfishly and opportunistically work towards enriching oneself, often by taking advantage of a particular situation or exploiting others for personal gain. It implies the act of accumulating wealth, power, or advantages for oneself, often without considering the wellbeing or fairness towards others.
  • the bottom falls out of your world The idiom "the bottom falls out of your world" means experiencing a sudden and drastic loss, failure, or disappointment that completely shatters one's previous sense of security, happiness, or stability. It implies a complete and devastating collapse of one's expectations or reality.
  • do something at your own pace The idiom "do something at your own pace" means to perform a task or activity at a speed or tempo that is comfortable and suitable for oneself, without feeling rushed or pressured by external factors. It suggests taking one's time, prioritizing personal comfort and ability over external expectations or imposed deadlines.
  • what did your last slave die of The idiom "what did your last slave die of?" is an expression used to dismiss or mock complaints, criticisms, or demands made by someone. It suggests that the speaker has no sympathy for the individual's concerns and implies that they should not be complaining as if they have endured great hardship. The phrase often highlights a lack of empathy or a refusal to en