How Do You Spell SOMETHING?

Pronunciation: [sˈʌmθɪŋ] (IPA)

The word "something" is spelled with the letters s-o-m-e-t-h-i-n-g. It is pronounced with the IPA transcription of /ˈsʌmθɪŋ/. The "s" sound at the beginning is followed by the "uh" sound in the stressed syllable "um". The "th" sound is spelled with the letters "t" and "h". The final syllable contains the "ih" sound and is spelled with "-ing". Overall, the spelling of "something" reflects its pronunciation and can help readers and spellers understand its sound structure.

SOMETHING Meaning and Definition

  1. Something is a pronoun used to refer to an unspecified or unidentified thing or object. It is a general term that encompasses the notion of a particular entity, item, or matter that is either unknown, not clearly defined, or not explicitly mentioned in conversation or text. By employing the term "something," individuals express a sense of vagueness, implying the existence of a specific item or concept without directly specifying what it is.

    The term "something" serves as a placeholder when individuals lack knowledge, understanding, or recollection of a particular thing or when they wish to leave it open-ended for further identification or clarification. It may be used to denote an indefinite number of items, ideas, or possibilities, as well as to describe a certain quality or characteristic. For instance, one might say, "I felt something brush against my arm," without providing a precise description of what that "something" actually was.

    Moreover, "something" is a versatile term that can be employed in various contexts, including everyday conversations, literary works, scientific discussions, or philosophical concepts. It allows individuals to communicate effectively despite uncertainties or a lack of specific information. Therefore, "something" is a fundamental part of language that aids in expressing abstract or elusive concepts, providing flexibility and inclusiveness when referring to an unspecified element, and enabling effective communication in both spoken and written discourse.

  2. • In some degree; somewhat.
    • In some degree.
    • A thing unknown or not specified; a portion more or less; a little.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Top Common Misspellings for SOMETHING *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SOMETHING

Etymology of SOMETHING

The word "something" originated from the Old English word "sum þing", where "sum" meant "a certain" or "one". "þing" meant "a thing" or "an object". Over time, the words combined to form "something", which is derived from the idea of "one thing" or "a certain thing". The term has remained relatively unchanged in its meaning and usage throughout the centuries.

Idioms with the word SOMETHING

  • put something over on The idiom "put something over on" means to deceive or trick someone, typically in a sly or manipulative manner, in order to gain an advantage or achieve something dishonestly. It implies successfully fooling or misleading someone to hide one's true intentions or actions.
  • get something off one's chest To "get something off one's chest" is an idiom that means to confess or disclose something that has been bothering or troubling one, often causing a sense of relief or emotional release. It involves expressing suppressed feelings, thoughts, or secrets in order to unburden oneself.
  • make hay (out) of something The idiom "make hay (out) of something" means to take advantage of a situation or exploit it to the fullest extent. It often implies making the most out of available opportunities in a timely manner, just as one would quickly gather and store hay during favorable weather conditions before it spoils.
  • live something down The idiom "live something down" means to overcome or make amends for an embarrassing or shameful event or action by proving oneself over time.
  • make something of The idiom "make something of" refers to the act of creating or achieving success or value from a particular situation, opportunity, or potential. It often involves turning an idea, talent, or circumstance into something meaningful, significant, or advantageous.
  • let something slide The idiom "let something slide" means to overlook, ignore, or neglect a certain matter or issue. It implies the act of choosing not to take action or address something that requires attention or correction.
  • something else The idiom "something else" refers to someone or something that is extremely remarkable, impressive, or extraordinary. It suggests that whatever is being described surpasses all expectations or is beyond comparison.
  • something to spare The idiom "something to spare" means having more than enough of something, usually in the context of time, money, or resources. It suggests that there is an abundance or surplus of the mentioned item, allowing for its use or allocation without any negative consequences or impact.
  • start something The idiom "start something" typically refers to initiating or instigating a situation, often with negative implications. It can imply causing trouble, instigating conflict, or creating a problematic situation.
  • get something out of one's system The idiom "get something out of one's system" means to release or eliminate something, typically a strong emotion, desire, or compulsion, by taking action or expressing it openly. It often implies that the person needs to act on or acknowledge a particular impulse or feeling in order to move on or find closure.
  • bring/get/keep something under control The idiom "bring/get/keep something under control" means to manage or regulate something effectively and prevent it from becoming chaotic or unmanageable. It implies maintaining order, stability, or restraint in a situation, behavior, or event.
  • take a long (cool/hard) look at something The idiom "take a long (cool/hard) look at something" means to carefully and thoroughly examine or evaluate something. It suggests the need for in-depth analysis or critical assessment of a situation, idea, or object. The specific adjectives used - cool or hard - can alter the connotation slightly. "Cool" implies a detached and objective evaluation, while "hard" implies a more rigorous and demanding scrutiny.
  • cop hold of something The idiom "cop hold of something" means to obtain or acquire something, often through determined effort or perseverance. It implies being able to successfully grab or seize an opportunity, object, or information.
  • drop/dump something in somebody’s lap The idiom "drop/dump something in somebody's lap" means to unexpectedly place a problem, responsibility, or burden onto someone without their prior knowledge or consent. It implies transferring a significant or challenging task to someone, often causing inconvenience or requiring immediate attention.
  • something drops/falls into somebody’s lap The idiom "something drops/falls into somebody’s lap" means that something unexpected or fortunate happens to someone without any effort on their part. It refers to a situation where something valuable or advantageous comes to a person effortlessly, as if it had fallen into their lap without them even seeking or trying for it.
  • as to something The idiom "as to something" is typically used to introduce or refer to a specific topic, issue, or matter that is being discussed or considered. It is often used to provide or seek information, understanding, or clarification about the subject at hand.
  • know/learn/find something to your cost To know/learn/find something to your cost means to gain knowledge or experience through personal losses, mistakes, or suffering. It implies that the understanding was obtained at the expense of a negative outcome or consequence.
  • in respect of something The idiom "in respect of something" means concerning or regarding a particular thing. It is often used to indicate that a statement or action is being addressed or discussed in relation to a specific matter or aspect.
  • with respect to something The idiom "with respect to something" is often used to indicate in relation to, concerning, or pertaining to a particular thing or topic. It signifies that a statement or discussion is directed specifically towards that subject matter and provides a frame of reference or context for further conversations or analysis.
  • rule/throw something out of court The idiom "rule/throw something out of court" refers to a legal decision made by a judge to exclude evidence or a claim from being considered or presented in a court of law. It suggests that the evidence or claim is deemed irrelevant, inadmissible, or lacking sufficient merit, and therefore cannot be used as evidence or included in the case.
  • beg leave to do something The idiom "beg leave to do something" means to politely ask for permission or approval to do a certain action or take a particular course of action.
  • something rears its (ugly) head The phrase "something rears its (ugly) head" is an idiom that means when a negative or problematic situation or issue suddenly appears or becomes noticeable. It implies that the situation is unwelcome or unwanted, hence the inclusion of "ugly" in some versions of the idiom.
  • under (the) cover of something The idiom "under (the) cover of something" typically means to do something secretly or with hidden motives while using something else as a front or pretext. It implies that the action being taken is concealed or disguised by the presence of another activity or situation.
  • let something go The idiom "let something go" means to release or relinquish control or attachment to something, to stop holding onto a grudge, or to stop worrying or obsessing over a particular issue or problem. It implies the act of moving on and not allowing something to bother or affect oneself anymore.
  • ride the crest of something To "ride the crest of something" means to be at the peak or highest point of success or popularity in a particular field or endeavor. It suggests being in a favorable position and enjoying the benefits or advantages that come with it. This idiom often refers to someone or something that is currently experiencing a period of great achievements, recognition, or influence.
  • put a crimp in/on something The idiom "put a crimp in/on something" means to obstruct, hinder, or disrupt something, typically causing an inconvenience or setback.
  • burn something to a cinder/crisp The idiom "burn something to a cinder/crisp" means to completely burn or char something, typically to the point of being blackened or extremely overcooked. It suggests that whatever was being cooked or heated is ruined or destroyed beyond use or edibility.
  • give/allow free/full rein to something The idiom "give/allow free/full rein to something" means to give someone or something complete freedom or permission to act as they wish or pursue their interests without any restrictions or limitations. It implies granting unrestricted or unchecked control or liberty to a person or idea.
  • a far cry from something The idiom "a far cry from something" means that something is very different or distant from another thing, often indicating a significant or notable difference.
  • cast/shed/throw light on something To cast/shed/throw light on something means to provide clarification, understanding, or insight into a particular subject or situation. It implies bringing forth information or knowledge that unveils or illuminates previously unknown or unclear aspects.
  • in the light of something The idiom "in the light of something" means considering or taking into account a specific piece of information, event, or factor when evaluating a situation or making a decision. It refers to examining a situation with the new knowledge or perspective gained from the mentioned information or event.
  • in light of something The expression "in light of something" means considering or taking into account a specific event, circumstance, or piece of information. It suggests that the mentioned factor has influenced or affected the way one thinks, perceives, or interprets a situation.
  • set light to something The idiom "set light to something" means to ignite or start a fire in something intentionally. It can also figuratively refer to initiating a conflict, controversy, or a series of events with potentially negative consequences.
  • be light on something The idiom "be light on something" typically means to have a small or insufficient amount of something, or to lack abundance or excess of it. It can refer to a limited quantity, scarcity, or a lack of intensity or quality in regards to a particular thing.
  • make light of something The idiom "make light of something" means to treat or consider something as unimportant or trivial, often by minimizing its significance or seriousness. It refers to downplaying or trivializing a situation, concern, or issue.
  • make light work of something The idiom "make light work of something" means to complete a task easily or efficiently without much effort or difficulty. It implies that the task was accomplished quickly and effortlessly.
  • draw a line under something The idiom "draw a line under something" means to put an end to or conclude a certain event, situation, or issue. It suggests that one should stop dwelling on or discussing a past occurrence and move forward by mentally marking it as finished or resolved.
  • in line for something The idiom "in line for something" refers to being next in order to receive or attain something, typically based on a predetermined or expected sequence of events or circumstances. It implies being in a favorable position or having a high likelihood of gaining a particular opportunity, benefit, or outcome.
  • in line with something The idiom "in line with something" means to be consistent, compatible, or in agreement with a particular principle, guideline, standard, or expectation. It suggests being in accordance with a specific course of action, objective, or overall direction.
  • give something a rest The idiom "give something a rest" means to stop or take a break from doing or discussing something. It suggests that a particular activity or topic has been repeated or emphasized too much and it is time to put it aside temporarily.
  • lay/put something to rest The idiom "lay/put something to rest" means to settle or resolve a problem or issue, usually by providing conclusive evidence or finding a conclusive solution. It suggests putting an end to any doubts, uncertainties, or lingering concerns about a particular matter.
  • keep something dark The idiom "keep something dark" means to keep something secretive or hidden from others. It implies not sharing information or keeping certain facts or intentions concealed.
  • kick something into the long grass/into touch The idiom "kick something into the long grass/into touch" refers to intentionally delaying or avoiding dealing with a problem or issue, usually by directing it to someone else or disregarding it altogether. It comes from the sport of rugby, where players often kick the ball away from their opponent to gain time or get rid of it. Similarly, when applied figuratively, it means to push away or get rid of a matter to avoid addressing it promptly or completely.
  • the long arm of something The idiom "the long arm of something" refers to the extensive reach or influence that a person or organization has over a situation or events, often implying their ability to exert control or enforce their authority over a wide area. It suggests that the influence or power can extend far beyond what is initially expected or perceived.
  • long on something The idiomatic expression "long on something" refers to someone having a large or excessive quantity or amount of something, typically a particular quality, attribute, skill, or resource. It implies that the person possesses an abundance or surplus of that specific thing.
  • let something ride The idiom "let something ride" means to allow a situation to continue without intervention or to refrain from taking immediate action. It implies not interfering or making changes even when there may be risks or uncertainties involved.
  • ride a/the wave of something The idiom "ride a/the wave of something" means to take advantage of a favorable or successful situation or trend and experience its benefits. It refers to being carried along metaphorically on a wave, similar to how a surfer rides the crest of a wave in water.
  • give your right arm for something/to do something The idiom "give your right arm for something/to do something" means to be willing to sacrifice or give up something extremely valuable or important in order to obtain or achieve the desired thing or opportunity. It conveys a strong desire, indicating that the person is ready to go to great lengths or make significant sacrifices to attain their objective.
  • let loose something The idiom "let loose something" means to release or set free something, whether it be physical or metaphorical. It implies allowing something or someone to be unleashed or permitted to operate with little or no restraint. It often indicates a sudden or forceful action of freeing or unleashing something that was previously held back or controlled.
  • let something rip The idiom "let something rip" means to allow or enable something to proceed quickly and forcefully, often involving a sudden burst of energy or action. It can also refer to letting loose or expressing something freely and without inhibition.
  • tear/rip the heart out of something The idiom "tear/rip the heart out of something" is used to describe an action that severely damages or removes the most essential or vital element of a situation, event, or thing. It signifies the act of extracting or eliminating what gives something its life, energy, or meaning, leaving it greatly diminished or destroyed.
  • give rise to something The idiom "give rise to something" means to be the cause or origin of something, typically an idea, a problem, an action, or a certain situation. It implies that a particular thing or event happens as a result of another factor or circumstance.
  • do something at your own risk The idiom "do something at your own risk" means that a person is being warned or cautioned that they are taking full responsibility for any potential negative consequences or dangers that may arise from their actions. It suggests that the person should proceed with caution as they are venturing into something uncertain or potentially risky, and any adverse outcomes or harm will be solely their responsibility.
  • the dead hand of something The idiom "the dead hand of something" refers to the lingering, restrictive, or oppressive influence of someone or something from the past, often hindering progress, growth, or change. It implies a heavy, lifeless, and stifling impact that can slow down or impede an organization, relationship, or situation.
  • (just) for the love of something The idiom "(just) for the love of something" is used to express that someone does or is willing to do something solely because they have a deep passion, enjoyment, or affection for it. It emphasizes that the motivation behind the action is purely out of love and not influenced by external factors such as money or personal gain.
  • sink to something The idiom "sink to something" means to stoop or lower oneself to a certain level or behavior that is considered undesirable, unethical, or immoral. It implies a decrease in moral standards, values, or dignity by engaging in actions or behaviors that are beneath one's usual character or principles.
  • give somebody/get/have the run of something The idiom "give somebody/get/have the run of something" means to allow someone to have unrestricted access or control over a place or thing. It implies giving someone the freedom to move around, use, or explore something without any limitations or restrictions.
  • make, etc. a dent in something The idiom "make a dent in something" means to have a significant impact or make noticeable progress in achieving a goal or task. It refers to making considerable headway or causing a meaningful change in a particular situation.
  • make as if to do something The phrase "make as if to do something" means to give the appearance or gesture of preparing or intending to do a specific action, without actually following through with it. It is a way of pretending to engage in an action or giving the impression of starting to do something, often with an underlying intention of deception or trickery.
  • make something good The idiom "make something good" typically refers to the act of improving or turning something into a positive outcome. It suggests changing an unfavorable situation or making a negative experience more favorable or beneficial.
  • take something with a pinch of salt The idiom "take something with a pinch of salt" means to not fully believe or accept something without questioning or doubting its accuracy or truthfulness. It suggests being skeptical or cautious about the information or statement being presented.
  • not be able to do something to save your life The idiom "not be able to do something to save your life" means that someone is completely incapable or incompetent in performing a specific task or activity, even in a life-threatening situation. It emphasizes the extreme difficulty or lack of skill someone possesses in a particular area, suggesting a complete inability to succeed or accomplish the task under any circumstances.
  • there’s something, not much, etc. to be said for something/doing something The idiom "there’s something, not much, etc. to be said for something/doing something" means that there are certain advantages, merits, or positive aspects associated with a specific thing or action, although these may be limited or outweighed by other factors. It is often used to acknowledge the existence of certain benefits or valid points regarding a topic or action without fully endorsing it or considering it as the most favorable option.
  • dip a toe in/into something The idiom "dip a toe in/into something" means to cautiously or tentatively try something new or unfamiliar. It refers to taking a small, initial step or getting a brief experience of something without fully committing or going all in. It implies a sense of hesitancy or of testing the waters before taking further action.
  • wipe something off the map The idiom "wipe something off the map" means to completely destroy or erase something, often referring to a place or location. It implies the total annihilation or elimination of a specific entity or area, usually by force or devastating means.
  • set the seal on something The idiom "set the seal on something" means to finalize or complete something, often in a decisive or authoritative manner, by adding the final important element or action. It symbolizes the act of officially approving or confirming a matter, making it legally binding or effectively finished.
  • sow the seeds of something The idiom "sow the seeds of something" means to initiate or begin the process of creating or developing something, especially when it refers to ideas, influences, or circumstances that will lead to a particular outcome or result in the future. It derives from the agricultural practice of sowing seeds, where planting seeds is the first step towards growing crops.
  • be sold on something The idiom "be sold on something" means to be convinced or persuaded to believe in or support something. It refers to being fully convinced or completely won over by a particular idea, concept, product, or argument.
  • make sense of something The idiom "make sense of something" means understanding or comprehending something that is confusing or unclear. It refers to the act of finding logical or rational meaning or order in a situation, information, or concept.
  • be/have done with something The idiom "be/have done with something" means to finish or complete something, to be done with or free from a particular situation, task, or person. It implies a desire to put an end to or move on from something.
  • get/knock/lick something into shape The idiom "get/knock/lick something into shape" means to improve or put something in order or in a desirable condition through effort, discipline, or hard work. It implies taking action to fix or refine something that is not functioning properly or is in a disorderly state.
  • give shape to something The idiom "give shape to something" means to bring an idea or concept into a tangible or concrete form, to develop or form something. It implies transforming an abstract notion or plan into a more recognizable or definite structure.
  • (more than) your fair share of something The idiom "(more than) your fair share of something" refers to receiving or having a larger amount or portion of something than is considered equitable or reasonable in a given situation. It implies that the person has obtained an excessive or unjust advantage or burden compared to others involved.
  • bend your mind/efforts to something The idiom "bend your mind/efforts to something" means to apply or concentrate one's mental or physical energy specifically towards a particular task, goal, or objective. It emphasizes the act of focusing and exerting one's efforts towards achieving a specific outcome.
  • something boggles the mind The idiom "something boggles the mind" is used to describe situations or things that are difficult to comprehend or understand fully. It implies that the idea or concept is so extraordinary, bizarre, or incomprehensible that it challenges one's mental capacity or exceeds what one can grasp.
  • close your mind to something The idiom "close your mind to something" means to refuse to consider or be open to new information, ideas, or opinions about a particular subject. It implies being unwilling to accept or explore alternative perspectives, often due to a strong bias or preconceived notions.
  • open your/somebody’s mind to something To "open your/somebody's mind to something" means to broaden someone's perspective or understanding, often by introducing them to new ideas, experiences, or viewpoints. It encourages a person to be receptive to unfamiliar concepts and be willing to consider alternative perspectives, thereby expanding their knowledge and challenging their preconceived notions. This idiom emphasizes the importance of being open-minded and willing to explore different viewpoints or possibilities.
  • push something to the back of your mind The idiom "push something to the back of your mind" means to deliberately try to forget about or ignore something. It refers to the act of mentally placing a thought, concern, or issue aside and purposely not giving it too much attention or consideration.
  • put/set/turn your mind to something The idiom "put/set/turn your mind to something" means to focus or direct your thoughts, attention, or mental energy towards a particular task, problem, or goal. It suggests channeling one's cognitive efforts and concentration towards accomplishing or understanding something specific.
  • set your mind on something The idiom "set your mind on something" means to have a strong determination or focus on achieving a particular goal or desire. It implies that someone is committed and resolute in their thoughts and intentions regarding a specific matter.
  • put/get something out of your mind The idiom "put/get something out of your mind" means to deliberately stop thinking or worrying about a particular subject or issue. It implies a conscious effort to mentally let go or dismiss thoughts and concerns related to something.
  • take your mind off something The idiom "take your mind off something" means to divert one's attention or focus away from a particular problem, worry, or difficult situation in order to provide temporary relief or distraction.
  • I wouldn’t mind something/doing something The idiom "I wouldn't mind something/doing something" means to express that something is acceptable or agreeable, or that one has no objection to it. It indicates a lack of strong feeling or preference, and suggests a willingness or openness towards a particular action or situation.
  • be down to something The idiom "be down to something" means to have only that particular thing or option remaining or available, often implying a limited or final choice. It suggests that one has eliminated all other possibilities and is now left with a single alternative.
  • be/go down with something The idiom "be/go down with something" typically means to become or suddenly fall ill with a specific illness or disease. It implies that the person is experiencing symptoms and is unable to carry out their usual activities due to being unwell.
  • down to the last, smallest, final, etc. something The idiom "down to the last, smallest, final, etc. something" usually means that there is nothing left other than that particular thing or that it is the only remaining option. It signifies that everything else has been exhausted or utilized.
  • have/get something down The idiom "have/get something down" typically means to acquire or master a skill, task, or knowledge through practice, repetition, or learning it sufficiently to confidently perform or understand it. It can also refer to recording or writing something in a detailed or accurate manner.
  • take the shine off something The idiom "take the shine off something" means to diminish or reduce the positive qualities, excitement, or appeal of something. It implies dampening the enthusiasm or spoiling the experience of something that was originally regarded as impressive or exceptional.
  • draw the line (between something and something) The idiom "draw the line (between something and something)" refers to establishing a clear boundary or limit between two things or concepts. It implies setting a point at which one separates or distinguishes between different ideas, actions, or situations.
  • little/nothing short of something The idiom "little/nothing short of something" is used to emphasize that something or someone is extremely close to a particular quality or state, often implying that it is almost equal to that quality or state. It suggests that there is very little difference or distance between the actual thing and the mentioned quality or state.
  • short of (doing) something The idiom "short of (doing) something" means to be close to doing or achieving something but falling just shy of completing or attaining it. It refers to being almost at a desired goal or action, but not fully reaching it.
  • drive something home (to somebody) The idiom "drive something home (to somebody)" means to make someone understand something very clearly and forcefully. It refers to emphasizing a point or message in a way that leaves no room for doubt.
  • (have) something, nothing, etc. to show for something The idiom "(have) something, nothing, etc. to show for something" means to have proof, evidence, or tangible results of a particular action, effort, or experience. It suggests that there should be a visible or concrete outcome or reward after investing time, energy, or resources into something. The phrase can also be used to highlight a lack of results or achievements after significant efforts.
  • give something a miss To "give something a miss" means to intentionally avoid or choose not to participate in something. It refers to the act of consciously deciding not to do or be a part of a particular activity, event, or task.
  • drum something into somebody’s head The idiom "drum something into somebody’s head" means to repeatedly and forcefully teach or instill a particular idea, concept, or information into someone's mind so that they remember or understand it thoroughly. It implies persistent repetition or emphasis on a subject in order for it to become ingrained in the person's thinking.
  • close/shut the door on something The idiom "close/shut the door on something" typically means to end or eliminate the possibility of a certain outcome or opportunity. It refers to consciously avoiding or disregarding a particular option or path, making it unlikely or impossible to pursue it further.
  • shut/close your ears to something The idiom "shut/close your ears to something" means to deliberately ignore or refuse to listen to something, often to avoid hearing or considering a certain topic, criticism, or information. It refers to intentionally blocking out or disregarding a particular message or sound.
  • shut/close your eyes to something The idiom "shut/close your eyes to something" means to intentionally ignore or overlook something, typically an unfavorable or unpleasant situation or truth. It implies avoiding acknowledging or addressing a particular issue or action, often out of convenience, denial, or refusal to confront the truth.
  • err on the side of something The idiom "err on the side of something" means to choose or act in favor of a particular option or course of action when unsure or facing a dilemma. It refers to taking a cautious approach, leaning towards being excessively careful or conservative, rather than taking a risk or being too reckless. It implies prioritizing safety, prudence, or avoiding potential negative consequences by opting for the safer or more responsible choice.
  • be/do something for your sins The idiom "be/do something for your sins" means to take responsibility or face the consequences for previous wrongdoings or mistakes that have been made. It suggests that a person must make amends or experience hardship as a result of their past actions.
  • be sunk in something The idiom "be sunk in something" means to be deeply engrossed or heavily involved in a particular activity or situation, often to the point of being absorbed or consumed by it. It implies a state of complete immersion or preoccupation with something, often to the exclusion of other matters or responsibilities.
  • go easy on/with something The idiom "go easy on/with something" means to treat or use something with moderation, restraint, or gentleness. It often implies being cautious, lenient, or less demanding in a particular situation, action, or behavior.
  • take the edge off something The idiom "take the edge off something" means to diminish the intensity, severity, or unpleasantness of something. It is often used to describe actions that help to alleviate stress, anxiety, or discomfort.
  • bring/put something into effect The idiom "bring/put something into effect" means to make something happen or implement it. It refers to taking action to ensure that a plan, idea, or policy is carried out and becomes a reality.
  • be able to do something in your sleep The idiom "be able to do something in your sleep" means being extremely skilled or proficient at a particular task or activity, to the point that one can do it effortlessly and without conscious effort or concentration. It implies that the person has mastered the task to such a degree that they could accomplish it even while sleeping.
  • not lose sleep/lose no sleep over something The idiom "not lose sleep/lose no sleep over something" means to not worry or be concerned about a particular thing. It implies that one is unaffected by or indifferent to the issue at hand, and it does not cause any distress or insomnia.
  • put something to sleep The idiom "put something to sleep" typically means to cause something to end or finish, often in a gentle or peaceful manner. It can refer to stopping or concluding a process, activity, or discussion. It may also imply ending the existence or relevance of something, metaphorically putting it into a state of rest or inactivity.
  • let slip something The idiom "let slip something" generally means to reveal or unintentionally reveal something, often unintentionally or carelessly. It implies disclosing information or a secret that was meant to be kept hidden or confidential.
  • let something slip (through your fingers) To "let something slip (through your fingers)" means to negligently or carelessly lose the opportunity to achieve or obtain something valuable or desirable. It refers to mistakenly failing to seize a chance or advantage that was within your reach.
  • be at the end of something The idiom "be at the end of something" means to have reached or come to the final stage or point of something. It typically implies that there are no further options or possibilities and that the situation has come to a conclusion or resolution.
  • no end of something The idiom "no end of something" means a large or indefinite amount or quantity of something. It implies that there is a significant or seemingly endless supply or number of the referred thing or action.
  • a/the something to end all sths The idiom "a/the something to end all sth" is used to refer to something that is considered the best, most extreme or ultimate example of its kind. It suggests that the thing being described is so exceptional that it surpasses all others and sets a new standard or benchmark.
  • somewhere around, between, etc. something The idiom "somewhere around, between, etc. something" is used to indicate an approximate or vague location or amount. It suggests that something is not exact or precise, but rather in the general vicinity or range of a particular point or value.
  • a sort of something The idiom "a sort of something" is used to describe or qualify something or someone in a vague or uncertain manner. It indicates that the thing being referred to possesses some characteristics or qualities that resemble or are similar to the named thing, but it is not a perfect or exact match. It implies a degree of approximation or ambivalence in describing or categorizing something.
  • in spite of something The idiom "in spite of something" means to do or achieve something despite facing obstacles, challenges, or unfavorable circumstances. It implies overcoming adversity or resistance and proceeding forward with determination and persistence.
  • be spotted with something The idiom "be spotted with something" means to be seen or observed in the company or possession of something, often something undesirable or disreputable, which may potentially bring criticism or judgment. It implies being associated with or linked to something that could tarnish one's reputation or credibility.
  • be up to your eyes in something The idiom "be up to your eyes in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task or situation. It suggests being deeply involved or engrossed to the point where it becomes challenging to manage or find time for other things.
  • cast/run an eye/your eyes over something The idiom "cast/run an eye/your eyes over something" means to look briefly or quickly at something. It implies a casual and cursory examination, typically without going into depth or analyzing the details.
  • be up to your eyeballs in something The idiom "be up to your eyeballs in something" means to be extremely busy or deeply involved in a particular situation or task to the extent that it becomes overwhelming or all-consuming. It signifies being completely engrossed or overwhelmed by something, typically work, responsibilities, problems, or a large amount of work.
  • set the stage for something The idiom "set the stage for something" means to create the conditions or circumstances that make it likely for a certain event or situation to happen. It generally implies that certain actions or preparations are being made in order to lay a foundation for a particular outcome or development.
  • do something till you are blue in the face The idiom "do something till you are blue in the face" refers to continuously or persistently doing something in a futile or excessive manner, to the point of exhaustion or frustration, without achieving the desired outcome or result. It implies that no matter how much effort or time is expended, the outcome will not change.
  • face to face with something The idiom "face to face with something" means to directly encounter or confront a specific situation, experience, or challenge. It implies being in close proximity to a problem or circumstance, typically requiring immediate attention or action.
  • fly in the face of something The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to directly oppose or contradict something, often in a bold or defiant manner. It refers to going against established beliefs, rules, traditions, or expectations, regardless of the potential consequences or disapproval faced.
  • in the face of something The idiom "in the face of something" typically means to confront or deal with a difficult situation or challenge directly and boldly, without backing down or being deterred. It suggests a resolute determination to confront and overcome obstacles.
  • put a brave face on something The idiom "put a brave face on something" means to pretend to be brave, composed, or unaffected by a situation, even though one may be feeling anxious, upset, or scared. It refers to the act of concealing one's true emotions in order to maintain a positive or strong appearance.
  • go to the stake over/for something The idiom "go to the stake over/for something" means that someone is willing to make great sacrifices or endure extreme consequences to defend or support a particular belief, opinion, or cause. It originated from the historical practice of burning individuals at the stake as a form of punishment, often for heresy or holding unconventional beliefs.
  • carry/take something too far The idiom "carry/take something too far" means to exaggerate, overdo, or overextend a particular action, behavior, or concept beyond the acceptable or reasonable limit. It implies going beyond what is deemed appropriate or necessary, often resulting in negative consequences or outcomes.
  • far be it from me to do something (but…) The idiom "far be it from me to do something (but…)" is used when you want to express an opinion or suggestion but want to make it clear that you do not intend to impose your view on others or claim authority on the subject. It is often followed by a statement that contradicts or opposes the initial disclaimer.
  • bet the farm/ranch on something The idiom "bet the farm/ranch on something" means to risk everything or put all of one's resources, assets, or livelihood at stake on a particular outcome or decision. It implies making a significant and often all-or-nothing wager or commitment.
  • hold fast to something The idiom "hold fast to something" means to cling tightly or firmly to a belief, principle, or value, even when faced with challenges, difficulties, or temptations to abandon it. It signifies perseverance, determination, and unwavering commitment to a particular idea or course of action.
  • poke/stick your nose into something The idiom "poke/stick your nose into something" means to intrude or interfere in someone else's business or affairs without being asked or invited. It implies that the person is being nosy or excessively curious about matters that do not concern them.
  • (feel) honour-bound to do something The idiom "(feel) honour-bound to do something" means feeling a strong moral or ethical obligation to carry out a certain action. It implies that one is compelled to act in a particular way due to a sense of duty, integrity, or personal code of honor.
  • put stock in something The idiom "put stock in something" means to have confidence or belief in something, to trust or rely on it. It refers to considering something as valuable, reliable, or worthy of trust.
  • get something straight The idiom "get something straight" means to clarify or resolve a misunderstanding or confusion about something. It suggests the act of making sure an issue or information is understood correctly and accurately.
  • take something in your stride To "take something in your stride" means to handle or deal with a difficult or challenging situation calmly and without being overly affected or troubled by it. It refers to having a composed and unruffled attitude in the face of obstacles or setbacks.
  • take something in stride The idiom "take something in stride" means to handle or deal with a problem, challenge, or disappointment calmly and without becoming overly upset or surprised. It implies the ability to maintain composure and continue on without letting the situation affect one's emotions or progress.
  • strike a blow for/against/at something The idiom "strike a blow for/against/at something" means to actively and forcefully support or oppose a specific cause, idea, or action. It suggests taking action to make a significant impact or create change in favor or against something. This can be done through specific actions, protests, or campaigns aimed at achieving a desired goal or result.
  • find it in your heart/yourself to do something The idiom "find it in your heart/yourself to do something" means to make a conscious effort to muster the compassion, forgiveness, or generosity needed to take a particular action or show kindness towards someone, especially when it may be difficult or unpleasant. It implies encouraging someone to dig deep within their emotions or conscience to find the ability to do something.
  • get something down to a fine art The idiom "get something down to a fine art" means to become exceptionally skillful, efficient, or proficient at doing something through extensive practice or experience. It suggests mastering a particular task or activity to such a degree that it is executed with precision and ease, often surpassing others in proficiency.
  • pluck something out of the air To "pluck something out of the air" means to come up with an idea or answer spontaneously, without any prior thought or preparation. It refers to the act of making something up on the spot or offering a solution without a factual basis.
  • you, etc. can stuff something The idiom "you, etc. can stuff something" is an informal and sometimes slightly impolite expression. It means that the person being addressed believes that a particular suggestion, idea, or request is unacceptable or unreasonable and that they strongly reject it. It indicates a refusal or dismissal of the subject matter.
  • all of something The idiom "all of something" means the entirety or complete amount of a particular thing or idea. It emphasizes the full scope or extent of whatever is being described.
  • set foot in/on something The idiom "set foot in/on something" means to enter or visit a place. It implies physically stepping into a location or territory, often emphasizing that it is the first time doing so.
  • answer to the name of something The idiom "answer to the name of something" means to acknowledge or respond to being called or referred to by a specific name or title. It suggests that the person, object, or entity being talked about is recognized or identified by a particular name.
  • bang goes something The idiom "bang goes something" is used to express that something has failed or been ruined. It implies a sudden and abrupt end or a significant setback in a certain situation or plan.
  • lay something bare To "lay something bare" means to reveal or expose something completely, often referring to secrets, truths, or hidden aspects of a situation or person. It implies removing any cover, disguise, or ambiguity surrounding the subject and bringing it into the open or making it evident for all to see and understand.
  • something is what it is The idiom "something is what it is" means accepting or recognizing the reality or true nature of a situation, without trying to change, manipulate, or overanalyze it. It emphasizes the need to acknowledge and accept things as they are, without attempting to alter or distort them.
  • do, mean, etc. something for the best The idiom "do, mean, etc. something for the best" means to carry out an action or make a decision with the intention of achieving the most positive outcome or result, even if it may be difficult or have potential drawbacks in the short term. It involves making a choice based on long-term benefits, despite any immediate challenges or sacrifices involved.
  • have/get the best of something The idiom "have/get the best of something" means to gain an advantage or be successful in a particular situation or competition. It suggests that someone or something has achieved a desirable outcome or has surpassed others in a given context.
  • the best/better part of something The idiom "the best/better part of something" refers to the majority or most significant portion of a whole. It suggests that a substantial amount or the most valuable aspect of something has been experienced or consumed.
  • make a (big) thing of/about something To "make a (big) thing of/about something" means to excessively emphasize, exaggerate, or give unnecessary attention or importance to something that may not truly warrant it. It implies making a situation more significant or significant than it really is, often leading to unnecessary drama or fuss.
  • lift the lid on something The idiom "lift the lid on something" means to reveal or expose information or secrets that have been previously hidden or undisclosed. It refers to uncovering the truth or bringing something hidden into the open.
  • take/blow the lid off something The idiom "take/blow the lid off something" means to reveal a secret, expose hidden information, or uncover the truth about a situation, especially when it involves scandals, cover-ups, or previously unknown facts.
  • make a bolt for something The idiom "make a bolt for something" means to make a sudden and quick dash or escape towards a particular destination or goal. It often implies a sense of urgency or desperation in reaching the desired objective.
  • cut, pare, etc. something to the bone The idiom "cut, pare, etc. something to the bone" means to reduce or minimize something, especially expenses or resources, to the absolute minimum or bare essentials. It implies making significant and often drastic cuts or reductions that go beyond what may be considered necessary or reasonable.
  • close the book on something The idiom "close the book on something" means to bring a conclusion or finality to a particular situation or event, usually implying that it can no longer be changed or altered. It refers to accepting and moving on from a situation, making a decision or judgment, or putting an end to something definitively.
  • be born to be/do something The idiomatic phrase "be born to be/do something" refers to a belief or expression indicating that someone possesses a natural or innate talent, ability, or inclination towards a particular activity, profession, or skill.
  • be bound up in something To be bound up in something means to be extremely focused or preoccupied with a particular activity, task, or situation. It implies being fully engrossed or invested in something to the point of being unable to think about or dedicate time and attention to anything else.
  • bound up with something The idiom "bound up with something" means to be closely or inseparably connected or intertwined with something. It refers to a situation where two or more things are deeply linked and cannot be easily separated or untangled from each other.
  • get a charge out of something The idiom "get a charge out of something" means to derive great enjoyment, excitement, or amusement from something. It implies finding something extremely pleasurable or entertaining, often resulting in a strong emotional response.
  • hold/keep something in check The idiom "hold/keep something in check" means to control, limit, or restrain something, often to prevent it from becoming excessive, overwhelming, or uncontrollable. It implies taking necessary measures to manage or regulate a situation or behavior.
  • get something off your chest To "get something off your chest" means to reveal or confess something that has been bothering or weighing you down. It refers to expressing or sharing a secret, concern, or emotion in order to relieve the burden it has been causing.
  • take something on the chin The idiom "take something on the chin" means to accept and face difficulties, criticism, or adversity without complaint or showing any signs of being affected. It implies dealing with setbacks or challenges bravely and uncomplainingly.
  • the armpit of something The idiom "the armpit of something" is used to describe a place or situation that is considered to be extremely unpleasant, undesirable, or of very low quality within a broader context. It suggests that the place or situation is comparable to the armpit—an unflattering depiction of a body part that is generally associated with sweat, odor, or unpleasantness.
  • break the back of something "Break the back of something" is an idiomatic expression that means to complete the most difficult or crucial part of a task or project, leading to a significant advancement or progress towards its completion. It implies overcoming the most challenging obstacles or reaching a crucial milestone.
  • on the back of something The idiom "on the back of something" typically means as a result or consequence of something. It refers to riding or relying on the success, advantage, or support of a particular situation, event, or person.
  • put your back into something The idiom "put your back into something" means to exert a significant amount of effort or energy into accomplishing a task or goal. It implies applying physical or mental strength to ensure success.
  • back of something The idiom "back of something" typically refers to the rear or reverse side of an object or location. It implies a position that is furthest from the front or main area. It can also mean having a comprehensive knowledge or deep understanding of something.
  • make a clean breast of something The idiom "make a clean breast of something" means to confess or admit to one's wrongdoings, secrets, or misdeeds openly and honestly, without withholding any information or hiding any details. It implies a sense of relieving oneself from guilt or burden by openly acknowledging and sharing the truth.
  • paint something with a broad brush The idiom "paint something with a broad brush" means to make generalizations or assumptions about a particular subject or group of people without considering individual differences or specific details. It refers to oversimplifying a complex matter, often by using broad and sweeping statements.
  • nip something in the bud The idiom "nip something in the bud" means to stop or prevent a problem or undesirable situation from developing into something more serious or harmful by taking immediate action. It is often used to imply dealing with an issue at its early stages before it can grow or escalate.
  • be the butt of something The idiom "be the butt of something" refers to being the target or object of jokes, ridicule, criticism, or some form of negative attention. It means to be the focus of others' amusement or mockery.
  • call something into play The idiom "call something into play" means to use or bring something into action or use it as a strategy or resource in a particular situation. It refers to the act of utilizing a skill, method, asset, or factor that is relevant or advantageous in a given context or circumstance.
  • make capital (out) of something The idiom "make capital (out) of something" means to take advantage of a situation or circumstance in order to gain a personal benefit or advantage, often by exploiting it for one's own interests or to attract attention or publicity. It refers to using something as a means to achieve personal gain or further one's agenda.
  • sweep something under the rug To "sweep something under the rug" means to hide, conceal, or ignore a problem or issue instead of dealing with it openly or honestly. It refers to the act of physically sweeping dirt or debris under a rug to make the surface appear clean, but the problem still exists, potentially causing further complications if left unaddressed. Metaphorically, the phrase implies an attempt to cover up or avoid addressing an inconvenient or embarrassing situation.
  • in case of something The idiom "in case of something" refers to making preparations or taking precautions for a possible event or situation that may occur in the future. It implies being prepared or having a plan of action if the specified thing happens.
  • lay claim to something The idiom "lay claim to something" means to assert or establish one's right or ownership over something, often in a possessive or assertive manner. It refers to making a formal or informal declaration of ownership or control over a particular thing or territory.
  • clear the way (for something/for something to happen) The idiom "clear the way (for something/for something to happen)" means to remove any obstacles or hindrances in order to allow something to proceed or occur smoothly. It is often used to describe the act of making space or eliminating barriers to facilitate the progress or achievement of a specific goal or event.
  • pour/throw cold water on something The idiom "pour/throw cold water on something" means to discourage or undermine enthusiasm, excitement, or hope for an idea, plan, or proposition. It refers to the act of extinguishing the fervor or dampening the enthusiasm associated with a particular thing, making it less appealing or feasible.
  • pale beside/next to something The idiom "pale beside/next to something" means to appear less significant or impressive in comparison to something else. It suggests that the contrast between the two things is so significant that the first thing seems weak, insignificant, or unimportant in comparison.
  • go over/through something with a fine-tooth/fine-toothed comb The idiom "go over/through something with a fine-tooth/fine-toothed comb" means to examine something very carefully and thoroughly, paying close attention to every detail. It implies a meticulous and comprehensive analysis or inspection of a particular subject or object.
  • do something to death The idiom "do something to death" means to repeat or perform an action excessively or excessively discuss a topic, making it monotonous, boring, or tiresome.
  • flog something to death The idiom "flog something to death" means to continue discussing, promoting, or emphasizing something excessively, to the point of becoming tiresome, repetitive, or no longer effective.
  • I defy you/anyone to do something The idiom "I defy you/anyone to do something" is a statement challenging or daring someone to accomplish a difficult task or achieve a specific outcome. It implies that the task is so challenging or impossible that it is unlikely for anyone to succeed.
  • eighty-six something The idiom "eighty-six something" refers to the act of getting rid of or excluding something or someone. It means to cancel, reject, remove, or eliminate.
  • far cry from something The idiom "far cry from something" means that something is significantly different or distant from another thing in terms of quality, state, or expectation. It implies that they are not comparable or similar.
  • abide by something The idiom "abide by something" means to obey or follow a rule, law, or agreement. It implies accepting or respecting a certain standard or requirement and acting in accordance with it.
  • able to cut something The idiom "able to cut something" typically refers to someone's ability to handle or deal with a difficult or challenging situation effectively and successfully. It implies having the necessary skills, expertise, or resilience to overcome obstacles or accomplish a task without difficulty.
  • above (doing) something The idiom "above (doing) something" means to be unwilling or to consider oneself too important or superior to engage in a particular activity or behavior. It signifies a sense of being too elevated or holding oneself in higher regard than others.
  • absorb something in(to) something The idiom "absorb something in(to) something" means to fully engage or immerse oneself in a particular activity, task, or environment. It refers to the act of giving one's full attention or focus to something, often with great interest or concentration. It implies a deep absorption or assimilation of information, knowledge, or experiences.
  • absorb something with something The idiom "absorb something with something" typically means to take in or soak up a substance or information by using or utilizing a certain tool or method. It is often used metaphorically to describe the process of comprehending or understanding something deeply or completely.
  • accept something as something To "accept something as something" means to acknowledge, take, or perceive something in a particular way or with a specific understanding. It implies that one has come to terms with a situation, idea, or fact, and has decided to treat it or view it from a specific perspective.
  • accord with something The idiom "accord with something" means to be in agreement or harmony with something, or to match or be consistent with it. It implies that two or more things are compatible or congruent with each other.
  • be across something The idiom "be across something" means to have a thorough understanding or knowledge of something. It implies being well-informed, acquainted, or familiar with a particular topic, subject, or situation. It can also suggest being able to deal with or manage something competently.
  • come across with something The idiom "come across with something" means to provide or deliver something, especially in a timely manner or as expected. It often implies fulfilling a promise, obligation, or expectation by giving or sharing something.
  • act (up)on something The idiom "act (up)on something" means to take action or make a decision based on something, such as information, advice, or instructions. It implies that one is responding to or following through with a given situation or guidance.
  • act something out The idiom "act something out" means to physically demonstrate or perform a situation, story, or event, often using gestures, expressions, and body movements, rather than just describing it verbally. It can be used as a way to portray a narrative, resolve conflicts, or communicate ideas effectively.
  • adapt something for something The idiom "adapt something for something" means to modify or adjust something in order to make it suitable or appropriate for a specific purpose or situation. It involves altering or customizing a particular thing to better fit the needs or requirements of a specific situation, audience, or context.
  • adapt something from something The idiom "adapt something from something" means taking ideas, concepts, or elements from one source and modifying, adjusting, or reworking them to fit a different context or purpose. It involves making necessary changes to suit a specific situation while drawing inspiration or utilizing existing material.
  • adapt something to something The idiom "adapt something to something" means to modify or adjust something, such as a concept, idea, or object, to fit or suit a particular situation, purpose, or requirement. It involves making necessary changes or alterations to accommodate a different context or need.
  • adapt to something The idiom "adapt to something" means to adjust, modify, or change oneself or one's behavior in order to cope with or accommodate to new or different circumstances or conditions. It refers to the ability to acclimatize and make necessary changes in response to a particular situation, environment, or challenge.
  • add something into something The idiom "add (something) into (something)" means inserting or including something additional or extra into an already existing situation, object, or concept, usually to enhance or improve it. It implies the action of introducing an element that was previously absent or lacking in order to modify or supplement the current state.
  • add (something) to something The idiom "add (something) to something" is typically used to describe the act of including or introducing a specific element or factor to a situation, group, concept, or discussion, in order to enhance or improve it. This can be both a literal and figurative expression, where "something" can refer to an actual object, idea, perspective, opinion, contribution, or any other relevant aspect.
  • add something up The idiom "add something up" means to calculate or tally a series of numbers or facts in order to reach a total or a conclusion. It can also be used figuratively to imply analyzing or evaluating a situation or information to understand its meaning or significance.
  • adhere to something The idiom "adhere to something" means to stick firmly or closely to a rule, principle, belief, or guideline. It implies a strict adherence without deviation or compromise, indicating a strong commitment or loyalty to a particular idea or standard.
  • admit something into something The idiom "admit something into something" typically means allowing or accepting something into a specific place, organization, or group. It implies granting admission or entry to a specific object, idea, information, or person into a specific context or situation.
  • admit to something The idiom "admit to something" means to acknowledge or confess to something, especially something that may be unflattering, embarrassing, or difficult to admit.
  • adopt something as something The idiom "adopt something as something" means to officially accept, embrace, or take on something new as a characteristic, belief, practice, or identity. It refers to the act of consciously choosing and assuming a particular thing or idea as one's own.
  • the golden age of something The idiom "the golden age of something" refers to a period of time in the past that is considered to be the pinnacle or peak of achievement, success, or excellence in a particular field or area. It implies that during this specific era, everything was thriving and at its best.
  • agree to something The idiom "agree to something" means to accept or give consent to a proposal, idea, plan, or arrangement. It implies reaching a mutual understanding or consensus with others on a particular matter.
  • agree with something The idiom "agree with something" refers to the act of expressing one's concurrence or approval with a particular idea, belief, suggestion, or viewpoint. It implies a shared understanding and alignment of opinions or a willingness to accept and support a given concept.
  • aim for something The idiom "aim for something" means to set a specific goal or target to work towards or achieve. It implies directing one's efforts, focus, or intentions towards attaining a particular objective or desired outcome.
  • aim to do something The idiom "aim to do something" means to have a specific goal or objective in mind and to strive to accomplish it. It implies setting a target or purpose and working towards achieving it.
  • pluck something from the air The idiom "pluck something from the air" means to come up with an idea, solution, or answer spontaneously or without any basis or evidence. It refers to making something up or improvising without much thought or preparation.
  • air something out To "air something out" means to allow fresh air to circulate and remove musty or stagnant smells. It can also refer to addressing and resolving problems or grievances openly and honestly in order to bring about a sense of renewal or clarity.
  • an ocean of something The idiom "an ocean of something" is used to describe a very large or abundant quantity or amount of something, often emphasizing its vastness or overwhelming nature. It portrays the idea of having a tremendous quantity or an overwhelming expanse of a particular thing.
  • cast an eye on something The idiom "cast an eye on something" typically means to take a quick look or glance at something. It implies a brief observation or assessment of the subject or object in question.
  • keep an ear out (for something or someone) The idiom "keep an ear out (for something or someone)" means to pay close attention or be vigilant in listening or watchful for any signs, information, or alerts about something or someone. It suggests being alert and attentive in order to detect and respond to any relevant or important updates or changes.
  • keep an eye peeled (for something or someone) The idiom "keep an eye peeled (for something or someone)" means to remain watchful and vigilant, often with focused attention, for any occurrence, object, or person that is important or might be easily missed. It suggests maintaining a state of alertness and being observant in order to notice or be aware of something.
  • make an issue of/out of something The idiom "make an issue of/out of something" means to exaggerate or focus on a particular matter, often unnecessarily or excessively, typically in order to cause conflict, express dissatisfaction, or create a controversy or disagreement. It refers to blowing a situation out of proportion or making a big deal out of something that may not warrant significant attention or concern.
  • not lose any sleep over something The idiom "not lose any sleep over something" means to not be worried or concerned about a particular issue or situation. It implies that the issue is of little importance or does not cause any personal distress or anxiety, to the extent that it does not disrupt one's sleep or peace of mind.
  • run something up The idiom "run something up" means to accumulate or produce a large amount of something, especially a debt, bill, or expense, often quickly or unexpectedly. It can also refer to creating or making something, such as a flag or clothes, through sewing or stitching.
  • keep something up The idiom "keep something up" means to continue doing something, especially to maintain a certain level or frequency. It can refer to the continuation of an action, behavior, or effort without interruption or decline.
  • append something (on)to something The idiom "append something (on)to something" means to add or attach something to the end or beginning of something else, usually in a formal or systematic manner. It implies the act of joining or extending one thing with another to create a larger, more comprehensive whole.
  • be (really) something The idiom "be (really) something" is used to describe someone or something as being outstanding, remarkable, impressive, or extraordinary. It implies that the person or thing mentioned possesses exceptional qualities, skills, or abilities that sets them apart from others. It is often used to express astonishment or admiration.
  • be a (fully) paid-up member of something The idiom "be a (fully) paid-up member of something" refers to someone who is a complete and committed member of a particular group, organization, or cause. It suggests that the person actively supports and is dedicated to the principles, goals, or values associated with that group or organization. It often implies that the person has gone above and beyond the minimum requirements and has a strong allegiance to the group.
  • arise from something The idiom "arise from something" means to originate or result from a particular situation, event, or condition. It refers to a circumstance or issue that has developed as a consequence of another circumstance or issue.
  • welcome something with open arms The idiom "welcome something with open arms" means to greet or accept something or someone eagerly and warmly, showing enthusiasm and a positive attitude.
  • as per something The idiom "as per something" is used to indicate that something is being done in accordance with a particular standard, instruction, or directive. It indicates that the actions or details mentioned are in exact accordance with the specified requirement or expectation.
  • ask for something (bad or dire) The idiom "ask for something (bad or dire)" means to engage in actions or behave in a way that increases the likelihood of experiencing negative consequences or undesirable outcomes. It implies that by inviting or provoking trouble, danger, or misfortune, one is essentially requesting or inviting such unfavorable outcomes.
  • aspire to something The idiom "aspire to something" means to have a strong desire or ambition to achieve a particular goal or to become something in life. It implies a sense of longing and motivation to work towards that desired outcome.
  • bust ass to do something The idiom "bust ass to do something" means to work very hard, putting in a great deal of effort and exertion, to achieve a specific task or goal. It implies giving maximum dedication and pushing oneself to the limit to accomplish something.
  • bust one’s ass to do something The idiom "bust one's ass to do something" means to work extremely hard, putting in a lot of effort and dedication in order to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies going above and beyond, often exceeding the expectations or demands placed on oneself.
  • assent to something The idiom "assent to something" means to agree or give approval to a proposal, idea, action, or decision. It indicates the act of expressing one's agreement or acceptance of a particular notion or plan.
  • assist in something The idiom "assist in something" means to help or support in a particular task, activity, or process. It implies offering aid or contributing efforts towards a desired outcome or objective.
  • assist (someone) at something The idiom "assist (someone) at something" means to help or support someone in a particular task, activity, or event. It implies providing aid, guidance, or cooperation to ensure the successful completion or achievement of the specified endeavor.
  • a fair crack at something The idiom "a fair crack at something" means to be given a reasonable and equal opportunity or chance to do or achieve something. It emphasizes the importance of fairness and equality in giving someone a fair chance without any bias or disadvantage.
  • at odds with something The idiom "at odds with something" means to be in conflict, disagreement, or opposition with something. It refers to a situation where there is a disagreement or inconsistency between one's beliefs, opinions, or actions and something or someone else.
  • be in at something The idiom "be in at something" means to be present or involved in a particular activity or event. It implies that someone is actively participating or participating from the beginning.
  • at the rear of something The definition of the idiom "at the rear of something" refers to being located behind or at the back of something. It indicates a position that is opposite or away from the front or leading part of an object, place, or group.
  • attach to something The idiom "attach to something" refers to the act of connecting or bonding emotionally or mentally with something or someone. It indicates a strong affinity or fondness for a particular object, idea, person, or group.
  • attract (someone or something) to (someone or something else) The idiom "attract (someone or something) to (someone or something else)" means to draw someone or something towards another person or thing. It suggests a magnetic or compelling force that pulls someone or something towards a specific target or location.
  • awake(n) from something The idiom "awake(n) from something" means to become aware or conscious after being in a state of unawareness or lack of knowledge. It refers to the act of recognizing or realizing a particular situation, fact, or truth after previously being unaware or ignorant of it.
  • awake(n) to something The idiomatic phrase "awake(n) to something" means to become aware or conscious of something, often something important, significant, or previously unnoticed. It implies a realization or recognition of a particular fact, idea, situation, or truth.
  • back-order something The idiom "back-order something" refers to the act of ordering a product or item that is currently out of stock or unavailable, with the understanding that the item will be delivered or made available at a later date once it is restocked by the seller or manufacturer.
  • back something up The idiom "back something up" typically means to provide evidence or support for a claim or statement, often through the use of facts, examples, or testimonials. It can also refer to creating a duplicate copy of computer files or data for safekeeping.
  • give something up as a bad job To "give something up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop pursuing a task or endeavor because it is proving to be unsuccessful, unproductive, or futile. It implies that despite one's efforts, the outcome or progress is not as desired or expected, leading to the decision to discontinue any further attempts.
  • pull something out of the bag The idiom "pull something out of the bag" means to unexpectedly produce or achieve something, especially in a situation where success or a positive outcome seemed unlikely or impossible. It implies surprising others with an impressive or clever solution or performance at the last moment.
  • bare something The idiom "bare something" means to expose or reveal something, typically when it was previously hidden or kept secret. It implies showing or displaying a truth, fact, or aspect that was previously unknown or concealed.
  • bash something in To "bash something in" is an idiomatic expression that means to forcefully hit or strike something repeatedly until it is damaged, destroyed, or significantly impacted. It often implies using excessive force or aggression in order to make a strong impact or cause significant damage.
  • bash something up The idiom "bash something up" means to cause damage or destruction to something, usually done intentionally or haphazardly. It implies a forceful action that may result in significant damage or rough handling of an object or a place.
  • bask in something The idiom "bask in something" means to enjoy and take pleasure in a particular situation or experience, typically by luxuriating in its positive aspects and celebrating its success or achievement. It conveys the idea of indulging oneself in the enjoyment and glory of a specific circumstance.
  • bay at something The idiom "bay at something" means to loudly express anger, frustration, or disapproval towards someone or something, usually in a vocal or aggressive manner, similar to the howling of a bayed hound. It can also imply persistent or relentless protest or criticism.
  • align something with something The idiom "align something with something" means to place or position something in a way that it is parallel, in agreement, or in harmony with another thing or idea. It implies making sure that the two things are matched or coordinated to achieve a desired outcome or to work together efficiently.
  • all of a piece with something The idiom "all of a piece with something" means consistent or harmonious with something else, indicating that the elements or parts being compared share the same characteristics, qualities, or style. It implies that they fit together perfectly or seamlessly, creating a cohesive whole.
  • all over something The idiom "all over something" typically means to be fully engaged or thoroughly involved in a particular activity, topic, or situation. It can imply having a deep understanding, control, or enthusiasm about something.
  • go all out for something The idiom "go all out for something" means to put in maximum effort, energy, or enthusiasm while pursuing or achieving a particular goal or objective. It suggests fully dedicating oneself to the task at hand, without holding back or leaving any effort unused.
  • allow something for something The idiom "allow something for something" means to consider or take into account a certain factor or circumstance when making plans, calculations, or judgments. It involves adjusting or making provisions for a particular element in order to ensure accuracy, fairness, or success in a given situation.
  • sort of something The idiom "sort of something" is used to convey an approximation or an element of uncertainty or hesitation. It suggests that something is not exactly as described or does not completely fit a certain category but comes close or shares certain characteristics.
  • jump at something The idiom "jump at something" means to eagerly and quickly accept or take advantage of an opportunity or offer.
  • break balls to do something The idiom "break balls to do something" is an informal expression which means to put in a lot of effort, exert oneself greatly, or work tirelessly to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It often implies overcoming obstacles, facing challenges, or dealing with difficult circumstances in order to succeed.
  • break one’s balls to do something The idiom "break one’s balls" is an informal and vulgar expression that means to exert an extreme or excessive amount of effort, often with great frustration or annoyance, in order to accomplish something. This phrase is primarily used in a figurative sense rather than relating to actual physical discomfort.
  • ball something up The idiom "ball something up" means to crumple, compress, or twist something into a compact or rounded shape, often referring to paper, cloth, or other malleable materials. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of muddling or confusing a situation or plan.
  • go over something (with someone) The idiom "go over something (with someone)" refers to the act of reviewing or examining something together with another person. It typically implies discussing the details, analyzing, or giving thorough consideration to a topic, idea, plan, or information. It can involve explaining, clarifying, or getting feedback from someone in order to ensure a comprehensive understanding or to make improvements.
  • bang something out To "bang something out" is an idiomatic expression that means to quickly and easily produce or complete something, usually with great energy or efficiency. It often refers to writing something quickly or effortlessly.
  • bang something up The idiom "bang something up" typically means to cause damage or harm to something, often unintentionally. It can refer to an accidental impact, a rough handling, or a careless treatment of objects.
  • bank on something The idiom "bank on something" means to rely or depend on something or someone with confidence and certainty. It implies that you have a strong belief that something will happen or be true, and you are counting on it as a sure thing. It often suggests a level of trust or assurance in the outcome.
  • bank something up The idiom "bank something up" has several possible meanings, depending on the context, but generally it refers to accumulating, piling, or stockpiling something, often for future use or as a precautionary measure. It can be related to saving or hoarding resources, money, or supplies.
  • be a mass of something The idiom "be a mass of something" means that someone or something is made up or filled with a large quantity or amount of a particular thing.
  • be a slave to/of something The idiom "be a slave to/of something" means to be completely controlled or dominated by something, often leading to one being excessively obedient or subservient to it. It implies a lack of control or freedom, as if one is figuratively enslaved to a particular thing or idea.
  • bear something in mind The idiom "bear something in mind" means to remember or keep something in one's thoughts or consideration. It refers to being aware of a specific piece of information or advice and holding onto it for future reference or application.
  • bear something out The idiom "bear something out" means to support, confirm, or validate something that was previously stated or claimed. It implies giving evidence or providing proof to substantiate an argument or a belief.
  • keep something in mind The idiom "keep something in mind" means to remember or retain something in one's thoughts or consideration. It suggests being aware of or not forgetting a particular piece of information, advice, or request.
  • beat one’s brains out to do something The idiom "beat one’s brains out to do something" means to struggle earnestly and exhaustively in order to achieve or accomplish something, often involving a lot of mental effort or problem-solving. It implies putting in a great amount of hard work, concentration, and persistent thinking in order to find a solution or complete a task.
  • beat something out The idiom "beat something out" typically means to repeat an action tirelessly or persistently until a desired result or outcome is achieved. It can also refer to playing a musical instrument vigorously or forcefully.
  • beat something down The idiom "beat something down" means to negotiate or haggle aggressively or persistently to get a lower price or better deal. It often refers to a situation where someone is trying to lower the price of a product or service by bargaining firmly or tenaciously.
  • beat something up The idiom "beat something up" usually refers to physically damaging or harming something or someone through physical force or violence. It can also be used metaphorically to describe thoroughly discussing or analyzing something, often in a critical or harsh manner.
  • beef something up The idiom "beef something up" means to strengthen, improve, or make something more substantial or extensive. It is often used when referring to enhancing security, increasing power or intensity, or adding more substance or value to something.
  • make a beeline for something The idiom "make a beeline for something" means to go straight towards something without any delay or deviation. It implies a direct and focused approach in reaching a specific destination or objective.
  • beg something off The idiom "beg something off" refers to politely declining or excusing oneself from attending or participating in an event or task that one was previously committed to or expected to be a part of.
  • it behooves one to do something The phrase "it behooves one to do something" is an idiomatic expression that means it is necessary, appropriate, or beneficial for someone to do something. It implies a strong sense of obligation or responsibility. It suggests that undertaking the mentioned action is not only socially or morally right, but also advantageous or beneficial to the individual.
  • restore someone's trust in something The idiom "restore someone's trust in something" means to regain or rebuild someone's confidence, faith, or belief in something or someone that has previously been damaged or lost. It refers to the process of repairing and renewing trust that has been broken or shaken, often through actions or evidence that demonstrate reliability, honesty, or dependability.
  • belt something out The idiom "belt something out" means to sing or perform something with great energy, volume, or enthusiasm. It typically refers to a powerful and forceful delivery of a song or performance, often characterized by a strong and confident voice.
  • best part of something The idiom "best part of something" refers to the most enjoyable or desirable aspect or element of a particular thing or situation. It represents the highlight or the most significant feature that stands out in a positive way.
  • get/have the best of something The idiom "get/have the best of something" means to experience or possess the most favorable or advantageous aspects of something. It refers to having a superior or dominant position or outcome in a particular situation.
  • give something your best shot The idiom "give something your best shot" means to put forth one's maximum effort or attempt something with utmost determination and skill. It encourages giving the task or situation one's best effort in order to achieve the best possible outcome.
  • the better/best part of something The idiom "the better/best part of something" refers to the majority or largest portion of a given thing or period of time. It signifies the main or most important aspect, often implying that the remaining part is relatively insignificant or less desirable.
  • do better to do something The idiom "do better to do something" means that it would be wise, more advantageous, or more appropriate to do a particular action instead of the one currently being done. It implies that the current action is not the best or most effective choice, and suggests an alternative course of action that is deemed superior.
  • kiss something better The idiom "kiss something better" means to give comfort or solace to someone who is hurt or upset, typically by using gentle words or actions to make them feel better emotionally or psychologically. It often suggests offering reassurance or support to alleviate emotional pain or distress.
  • make a better, good, poor, etc. fist of something The idiom "make a better, good, poor, etc. fist of something" means to attempt or handle a task or situation with varying degrees of success or effectiveness. It describes the ability to make a competent or inadequate effort in dealing with something. The phrase often implies that the person is trying their best, but the outcome may not meet expectations. The term "fist" in this context refers to the action of clenching or grasping something, symbolizing the endeavor or approach taken towards a particular matter.
  • the better for something The idiom "the better for something" means to benefit or improve as a result of a particular event, circumstance, or action. It suggests that something has had a positive effect on a person or situation, leading to advantageous outcomes or overall improvement.
  • bid something up The idiom "bid something up" refers to the act of increasing the price or value of something, usually in an auction or competitive market, by making higher and higher bids. It implies a scenario where multiple individuals or parties are actively and continually offering larger amounts of money or resources to secure the desired item.
  • do something in a big/small way The idiom "do something in a big/small way" means to do something to an extreme or exaggerated degree, either positively (big way) or negatively (small way). It implies doing something with great enthusiasm, effort, or intensity, often surpassing what is expected or necessary.
  • gone to the big something in the sky The idiom "gone to the big something in the sky" is a euphemistic expression that refers to the death of someone or something, particularly a person or a beloved pet. It implies that the individual or creature has passed away and is now residing in an afterlife or a peaceful place beyond this world. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous manner as a way to soften the impact or sadness associated with the topic of death.
  • be so bold as to do something The idiom "be so bold as to do something" means to have the audacity or courage to do something, even if it may be seen as impolite, disrespectful, or socially unacceptable. It suggests that the person is taking a daring or fearless action.
  • bollix something up To "bollix something up" means to mess up, spoil, or make a mistake while attempting to accomplish or complete something. It implies causing confusion, bungling the task, or situations becoming chaotic or disorganized due to one's actions or mistakes.
  • bolt something down The idiom "bolt something down" means to secure or fasten something firmly in place, typically by using a bolt or similar device. It can also be used figuratively to describe the action of consuming food or drink quickly and voraciously.
  • put a bomb under something The idiom "put a bomb under something" means to exert pressure, urgency, or motivation in order to accelerate or improve the progress, performance, or outcome of a particular situation or project. It implies using a metaphorical bomb to create a sense of urgency, intensity, or figurative explosion to get something done quickly or to push others into action.
  • cut something to the bone The idiom "cut something to the bone" means to reduce, eliminate, or decrease something to the bare essentials or absolute minimum, often referring to financial matters or budgetary constraints. It involves making significant and deep cuts to an organization, project, budget, etc., leaving only the essential and most basic elements or resources.
  • feel something in your bones The idiom "feel something in your bones" means to have a strong intuitive feeling or a strong sense of certainty about something, often without any logical explanation or evidence. It implies a deep and instinctive understanding or belief in something, as if it were an innate part of one's being.
  • make book on something The idiom "make book on something" typically means to predict or place bets on the outcome or likelihood of something happening. It is often used in the context of gambling or making informed guesses.
  • book something up The idiomatic expression "book something up" means to research or find information about something, typically by referring to a book or other written material. It involves looking up or consulting references to gather the necessary knowledge or facts.
  • boom something out The idiom "boom something out" typically means to announce or broadcast something loudly and forcefully. It suggests projecting something with great intensity or volume, often to grab attention or make a strong impact.
  • boot something up The idiom "boot something up" refers to starting or initiating a computer, device, or system by loading the necessary software and initializing its operations. It can also be used figuratively to mean to begin or activate any kind of process or operation.
  • botch something up The idiom "botch something up" means to do something clumsily or incorrectly, often resulting in a mess or failure. It implies the idea of making mistakes or causing damage while attempting to complete a task or accomplish something.
  • buy something at something The idiom "buy something at something" refers to purchasing an item or object at a specific price or cost. It implies that the purchase was made at a specific price or value, often highlighting a good deal or bargain.
  • buy something up The idiom "buy something up" means to purchase or acquire a large quantity of something, often with the intention of gaining control over it, monopolizing the market, or preventing others from obtaining it.
  • spring for something The idiom "spring for something" means to treat someone or pay for something, often unexpectedly or generously. It refers to the act of willingly and promptly paying for a particular item, service, or experience, often as a gesture of kindness or appreciation for someone else.
  • be/feel duty/honour bound to do something To be/feel duty/honour bound to do something means to have a strong sense of obligation or responsibility to perform a particular action, often due to a moral or ethical code or personal commitment. It implies feeling compelled to act based on one's sense of duty, honor, integrity, or commitment, regardless of personal preferences or circumstances.
  • box something up The idiom "box something up" means to put something into a box or package it for storage, transport, or delivery.
  • brave something out The idiom "brave something out" means to endure or withstand something difficult or challenging, often by showing courage, determination, and resilience. It involves facing and confronting a tough situation head-on, without giving in to fear or despair.
  • put a brave front on something The idiom "put a brave front on something" means to attempt to appear confident, courageous, or optimistic in a difficult or challenging situation, even though one may feel scared, worried, or unsure deep down. It refers to the act of maintaining composure or putting up a facade of bravery despite inner turmoil or adversity.
  • put a brave (or bold or good) face on something The idiom "put a brave (or bold, or good) face on something" means to try to appear brave, positive, or optimistic in a difficult or challenging situation, even though one may be feeling fearful, worried, or disappointed. It implies the act of concealing one's true emotions or fears and presenting oneself as composed and confident.
  • break something down The idiom "break something down" means to divide or analyze something into smaller, more manageable parts or components in order to understand it better or make it easier to deal with.
  • break for something The idiomatic expression "break for something" refers to taking a short pause or interruption from a current activity or situation in order to pursue or engage in something else. It can involve temporarily stopping one task or action to address another matter or to participate in a different activity.
  • break something free (from something) The idiom "break something free (from something)" means to release or liberate something from a constraint, restriction, or entanglement. It often implies overcoming obstacles or breaking through boundaries in order to set something or someone free.
  • break something in The idiom "break something in" means to wear or use something new or unfamiliar several times until it becomes more comfortable, functional, or less stiff. It is often used in reference to breaking in new shoes, clothes, equipment, or anything that needs adjustment or adaptation with use.
  • break in (to something or some place) The idiom "break in (to something or some place)" refers to forcefully entering or gaining unauthorized access to a building, location, or system, often with unlawful intent. It implies actions such as breaking locks or doors, trespassing, or hacking into computer networks.
  • break into something Definition: The idiom "break into something" typically means to forcefully enter or gain unauthorized access to a place, such as a building, vehicle, or locked area, often with the intention of committing a crime or theft.
  • break something off (of) something The idiom "break something off (of) something" refers to the act of separating, detaching, or removing a part or piece from an object, often with force or by applying pressure. It implies a sudden or forceful action resulting in separation.
  • break something off To "break something off" is an idiom that means to end or terminate a relationship, partnership, or engagement. It can be used in both personal and professional contexts.
  • break something out (of something) The idiom "break something out (of something)" refers to extracting or removing something forcibly from a particular place or container. It often implies that significant effort is necessary to get the object out of its usual or expected location.
  • break something up (into something) The idiom "break something up (into something)" means to divide or separate something into smaller parts or pieces. It often refers to the process of breaking down a whole into individual components or dividing a larger group into smaller groups or sections. This idiom is commonly used when discussing tasks, projects, organizations, or any situation that involves breaking down a complex entity into more manageable parts.
  • break something up The idiom "break something up" means to disrupt or separate a group or gathering of people or things. It can also refer to ending a relationship or partnership.
  • make a clean breast of something (to someone) The idiom "make a clean breast of something (to someone)" means to confess or reveal something, especially something that has been weighing on one's conscience, to someone else in an honest and open manner. It involves a complete and candid disclosure of the truth or the admission of wrongdoing.
  • make a clean breast of something (or of it) The idiom "make a clean breast of something" or "make a clean breast of it" means to confess or reveal something, especially after keeping it a secret for some time. This expression implies a complete and honest disclosure of information, often associated with feelings of guilt or remorse. It suggests that the person is coming clean and letting go of the burden of withholding the truth.
  • say, etc. something in the same breath The idiom "say something in the same breath" means to mention or bring up two contrasting or contradictory things or ideas while speaking at the same time. It implies that the two statements are incongruous or incompatible.
  • brew something up The idiom "brew something up" means to create, concoct, or prepare something, especially something, like a plan or scheme, that may be seen as secretive or potentially harmful. It can also refer to preparing a drink, especially a hot beverage like tea or coffee.
  • brick something up The idiom "brick something up" refers to the act of permanently sealing or closing off a space, usually by placing bricks or blocks in the opening. It implies making something inaccessible or creating a barrier that cannot be easily undone.
  • hold no brief for something The idiom "hold no brief for something" is typically used to convey that someone does not support or endorse a particular idea, belief, or cause. It implies a lack of enthusiasm, advocacy, or defense for that particular thing.
  • on the something side The idiom "on the something side" typically means slightly more than or exceeding a particular quantity, quality, measurement, or age. It implies being closer to one end of a spectrum or range.
  • brush something down The idiom "brush something down" typically means to clean or remove dirt or debris from something using a brush or a similar tool.
  • brush something up To "brush something up" means to review, refresh, or improve one's knowledge or skills in a particular subject or area in order to make it more thorough or proficient. It generally implies an act of revisiting and polishing existing knowledge or abilities.
  • buff something down The idiom "buff something down" typically refers to the process of smoothing or polishing a surface by using a buffing tool or material. It is commonly used in reference to car detailing, where it signifies the act of removing scratches or imperfections from the vehicle's paintwork by using a buffing pad or compound. Figuratively, it can also be used to describe refining or improving something through repeated polishing or refining efforts.
  • buff something up The idiom "buff something up" refers to improving or enhancing the quality, appearance, or performance of something or someone. It typically involves putting effort into refining, polishing, or practicing a particular skill or attribute to make it better or more impressive.
  • build (up)on something The idiom "build (up)on something" means to develop, enhance, or expand on an existing idea, concept, or foundation in order to make it stronger, more substantial, or more successful. It involves improving or elaborating on something that already exists. It can also refer to using a previous achievement or success as a base to progress further.
  • build something (up)on something To "build something (up)on something" is an idiom that means to establish or develop something new or additional based on something that already exists or is in place. It implies using a foundation or starting point as a basis for further growth or expansion. It often refers to building upon existing ideas, knowledge, or resources to create something bigger or better.
  • build something on(to) something The idiom "build something on(to) something" typically means to establish, develop, or create something based on or using a particular foundation, idea, or concept. It can refer to the literal act of constructing a physical structure on or attached to an existing structure, or it can have a metaphorical sense of building upon existing knowledge, principles, or accomplishments. It suggests a process of expansion or enhancement, where one thing is added or developed in connection with another.
  • build something up The idiom "build something up" means to enhance, create, or develop something gradually over time or with deliberate effort. It refers to the process of increasing the size, importance, or reputation of something, usually by investing time, resources, or energy into its growth.
  • build something to order The idiom "build something to order" means to construct or create something specifically according to someone's exact specifications or requirements. It often suggests customization, where a product or service is tailored to meet individual needs or preferences.
  • bum something The idiom "bum something" typically means to obtain or acquire something, especially by asking for it or taking it without permission. It can also refer to getting something for free or without putting in any effort.
  • drop a bundle on something The idiom "drop a bundle on something" typically means to spend a significant amount of money on something, usually more than necessary or expected. It implies a substantial financial investment or expenditure.
  • bung something in The idiom "bung something in" typically means to hastily or carelessly put something into a place, container, or situation without much thought or consideration. It implies a lack of precision or organization in the action.
  • bung something up The idiom "bung something up" refers to causing damage, harm, or impairment to something or someone. It implies the act of inadvertently or carelessly making a mistake that results in negative consequences.
  • burn something down The idiom "burn something down" refers to intentionally destroying or setting fire to a building or structure, often resulting in complete destruction. It can also be used metaphorically to mean ruining or devastating something.
  • burn something in The idiom "burn something in" means to deeply imprint or commit something to memory through intense repetition or practice. It refers to the process of engraving or etching something firmly in the mind or memory so that it becomes difficult to forget or erase.
  • burn something off something The idiom "burn something off something" typically refers to the act of eliminating or removing something, usually through fire or heat. It can be used metaphorically to imply the removal of obstacle, excess, or unwanted elements.
  • burn something out The idiom "burn something out" refers to the act of using up or exhausting something completely or excessively, often resulting in its malfunction, failure, or depletion. It can be applied to objects, systems, or even individuals who have exhausted their resources or energy to the extent of detrimental consequences.
  • burn something up The idiom "burn something up" generally means to consume or destroy something by fire, or to use up or deplete something quickly or excessively.
  • burn something to a crisp The idiom "burn something to a crisp" means to burn or cook something completely or thoroughly, often implying that it has been overcooked or charred to the point of being inedible or ruined.
  • blow something wide open To "blow something wide open" means to expose or reveal a secret, truth, or hidden information that can dramatically change a situation or completely alter one's understanding of it. It refers to a significant breakthrough or discovery that disrupts the existing state of affairs.
  • bust a gut to do something The idiom "bust a gut to do something" means to put in a tremendous amount of effort, work extremely hard, or exert oneself to the maximum in order to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies going above and beyond the normal level of effort, often to the point of physical or mental strain.
  • bust butt to do something The idiom "bust butt to do something" means to work extremely hard, putting in a lot of effort, energy, and determination, in order to accomplish a task or goal. It implies going above and beyond the usual level of exertion and dedication to complete something successfully.
  • bust one’s butt to do something The idiom "bust one's butt to do something" means to work extremely hard or put in a great amount of effort to achieve or accomplish something. It signifies the intense dedication, determination, and exertion one puts forth to accomplish a specific task or goal.
  • bust one’s nuts to do something The idiom "bust one's nuts to do something" is an informal expression often used to describe someone putting forth extreme effort, working extremely hard, or going to great lengths to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies giving one's maximum effort, usually in a strenuous or demanding situation. Alternatively, it can refer to someone going to extreme lengths to please or impress others.
  • bust something up The idiom "bust something up" means to break, damage, or destroy something, typically in a forceful or violent manner. It can also refer to dismantling or disassembling something.
  • bust something wide open The idiom "bust something wide open" generally means to expose or reveal a secret, hidden truth, or conspiracy, often resulting in significant consequences or a major breakthrough. It signifies the act of discovering or uncovering a previously unknown or hidden situation, resulting in a profound impact.
  • buy something (from someone) (for something) To "buy something (from someone) (for something)" means to purchase an item or service from someone by exchanging it for a particular price or value. It implies a transaction where a buyer obtains something in exchange for a specified amount of money, goods, or services.
  • buy something The idiom "buy something" typically means to believe or accept something, especially when it may not be entirely true or logical. It implies being persuaded or convinced by someone's argument, idea, or story.
  • buy, get, etc. something off the shelf The idiom "buy, get, etc. something off the shelf" refers to purchasing or obtaining a product that is readily available and in stock, rather than having it custom-made or specifically tailored to one's needs. It implies acquiring an item that is already prepared and can be immediately taken from a store shelf or inventory.
  • buy something out The idiom "buy something out" refers to the act of purchasing all of something, usually a business, company, or stock, entirely, thereby gaining full ownership or control over it.
  • by dint of something/doing something The idiom "by dint of something/doing something" is used to describe achieving or accomplishing something through the force, effort, or energy put into it. It suggests that the outcome is a result of hard work, determination, or perseverance.
  • by/in virtue of something The idiom "by/in virtue of something" means because of or due to a particular quality, condition, or circumstance. It suggests that a certain attribute or factor is the reason or justification for a specific outcome or situation. It emphasizes the significance or authority of that attribute in bringing about a certain result.
  • do something by the skin of your teeth The idiom "do something by the skin of your teeth" means to narrowly or barely accomplish or achieve something, often referring to a difficult or challenging situation where success or survival is achieved just in the nick of time and by a very narrow margin or small degree of success.
  • make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand The idiom "make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand" means to create or accomplish something using your own personal effort or skills. It emphasizes the idea of doing the task manually or without assistance, showcasing one's own abilities and craftsmanship.
  • play something by ear The idiom "play something by ear" refers to approaching a situation or task without a predetermined plan or method, instead relying on one's instincts, improvisation, or adaptability to make decisions or execute actions as the situation unfolds.
  • kiss something good-bye The idiom "kiss something good-bye" means to give up on or accept the loss of something or someone, often in a resigned or regretful manner. It implies acknowledging that the desired outcome or opportunity is no longer achievable or realistic.
  • call something your own The idiom "call something your own" means to possess or claim something as belonging to oneself. It implies a sense of ownership and personal connection to the item or concept in question.
  • call something down (to someone) The idiom "call something down (to someone)" typically refers to the act of bringing or requesting an item or object to be delivered to someone. It implies asking or summoning something to be given to a specific person.
  • call something down The idiom "call something down" typically means to request or invoke the intervention or punishment of a higher power or authority upon someone or something. It can also be used to describe bringing upon oneself negative consequences or attracting trouble.
  • call something forth The idiom "call something forth" means to evoke or bring about a particular emotion, reaction, or response from someone or something. It refers to the act of summoning or causing something to be present or expressed.
  • call something (back) in The idiom "call something (back) in" typically means to request the return of something, such as an object, document, or person, that was previously sent out or allowed to leave. It implies bringing back or retracting something that was previously released or dispatched.
  • call something off The idiom "call something off" means to cancel or terminate an event, activity, or plan that was previously scheduled or arranged.
  • call on something The idiomatic phrase "call on something" typically means to request or ask for something, often in a formal or official manner. It can also refer to relying on or utilizing a particular resource or skill when needed.
  • call something out The idiom "call something out" refers to publicly pointing out or drawing attention to something, typically to criticize, condemn, or challenge it. It can also mean to identify or acknowledge someone or something in a clear, direct, or straightforward manner.
  • call something to mind The idiom "call something to mind" means to remember or recollect something, often triggered by a similar experience, sight, sound, or thought. It refers to the act of bringing a memory or thought back into one's consciousness.
  • call something up The idiom "call something up" can have several meanings depending on the context. 1. To summon or request something: This meaning is often used when referring to contacting a person or organization to ask for information, assistance, or a service. For example, "I need to call up customer support to inquire about my order." 2. To recall something from memory: This meaning is used when referring to bringing a thought, memory, or image to mind. For instance, "I can call up the details of that incident from years ago." 3. To activate or bring into operation: This meaning is often associated with technology or equipment. For example, "I need to call up the settings on my computer" or "They decided to call up
  • can't/couldn't very well do something The idiom "can't/couldn't very well do something" means that it is difficult or practically impossible to do something due to certain circumstances or limitations. It implies that while the action may be desired or suggested, it is not feasible or suitable considering the circumstances.
  • care for something The idiom "care for something" typically means to like or have an interest in something. It can also refer to taking responsibility for or looking after something or someone.
  • carve something out The idiom "carve something out" means to create or achieve something through determination, effort, or skill, especially when faced with obstacles or challenges. It refers to the act of shaping or forming something by removing parts or carving through obstacles. It implies the necessary action to establish or secure a position, opportunity, or success through hard work and persistence.
  • carve something out (of something) To "carve something out (of something)" typically means to create or achieve something by making a deliberate effort or through hard work and determination. It often refers to the process of establishing or obtaining a particular position, opportunity, or success by overcoming obstacles or working hard in a specific context. The phrase implies that the person is shaping or extracting what they desire from a larger whole.
  • carve something up The idiom "carve something up" has several possible interpretations: 1. To divide or separate something into smaller parts: It refers to dividing or splitting a larger entity or object into smaller, more manageable pieces. It can be used metaphorically when talking about dividing resources, assets, territories, or responsibilities among different parties or individuals. Example: After winning the lottery, they had to carve up their earnings among family members and charities. 2. To cut or dissect something, typically food: It refers to the act of cutting or slicing something, usually food, into smaller portions for serving or consumption. It can be used in a literal sense during mealtime or to describe preparing food. Example: The chef skillfully carved up the roasted turkey and served
  • cash something in (for something) The idiom "cash something in (for something)" means to exchange or convert something for its monetary value or a different form of value. It often refers to redeeming or utilizing an asset, such as stocks, bonds, or points, in exchange for money or another desired item.
  • cash something in The idiom "cash something in" means to convert or redeem something, such as goods, assets, or investments, into cash or money. It often implies selling or exchanging something for immediate monetary value.
  • cast something in someone's teeth The idiom "cast something in someone's teeth" typically means to remind or reprimand someone about something they have done wrong or to criticize them harshly for their actions. It conveys the idea of confrontationally and aggressively reminding them of their mistakes or faults.
  • cast your eyes on something To "cast your eyes on something" means to look at or gaze upon something, usually with interest or curiosity. It implies focusing one's attention or directing one's gaze towards a particular object, person, or scene.
  • cast/draw/throw a veil over something The idiom "cast/draw/throw a veil over something" means to deliberately obscure, hide, or keep something secret or hidden from others. It refers to the act of covering or masking the truth or reality of a situation, usually to prevent others from knowing or understanding it fully.
  • cast something aside The idiom "cast something aside" means to discard or abandon something, often with disregard or indifference. It refers to getting rid of something which is perceived as unnecessary, no longer useful, or unimportant.
  • cast something back (some place) The idiom "cast something back (some place)" means to throw or propel something forcefully in the direction it came from. It implies a forceful return or rejection of something back to where it originated.
  • cast something down The idiom "cast something down" means to throw or toss something forcefully or with great power. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate the act of diminishing or degrading someone or something in a negative or disrespectful manner.
  • catch something The idiom "catch something" refers to the act of acquiring or contracting a disease, illness, or infection. It can also mean to become affected or influenced by something negative, such as a bad habit, a mistake, or a lie.
  • catch something on something The idiom "catch something on something" typically means to accidentally get an object or body part stuck or entangled on something. It can also refer to discovering or understanding something after a closer examination or realization.
  • catch something up in something The idiom "catch something up in something" refers to the act of becoming entangled, trapped, or caught in a difficult or complicated situation or problem. It indicates getting involved in an issue or being unable to escape from a dilemma. It can also imply being ensnared emotionally or mentally in a perplexing or burdensome circumstance.
  • go on something The idiom "go on something" typically means to embark or participate in a particular activity, event, or experience. It suggests making a decision to proceed with or be involved in a specific action or venture.
  • bitch something up The idiom "bitch something up" is a slang phrase that means to mess up or ruin something through careless or ineffective actions or behaviors. It typically implies incompetence, poor execution, or intentionally making something worse.
  • bite into something The idiom "bite into something" refers to the act of taking a forceful or decisive action or decision. It implies fully committing to or engaging in an activity and putting in significant effort and resources. It often involves immersing oneself in a situation without hesitation or reservation.
  • bite something off The idiom "bite something off" means to take on or accept a large or challenging task or responsibility, often implying that the task is more than one can handle. It can also suggest impulsively committing to something without thoroughly considering the consequences or potential difficulties.
  • blab something out To blab something out means to reveal or disclose something secret or private without restraint or caution. It refers to the act of being indiscreet or careless in sharing information that was meant to be kept confidential.
  • black something out The idiom "black something out" commonly refers to the act of intentionally obscuring, deleting, or covering up specific information, memories, or events, usually done to maintain secrecy or protect one's privacy. It can also indicate the blocking or suppression of certain aspects or details, such as in media censorship or redaction.
  • lay something on The idiom "lay something on" means to provide or offer something to someone, especially in a generous or excessive manner. It can refer to presenting information, sharing a burden, giving a lecture, organizing an event, or offering an opportunity or benefit.
  • fill something in The idiom "fill something in" can have two meanings: 1. To complete or provide missing information in a form, document, or record. For example, if you are asked to fill in a questionnaire, you are expected to add the necessary details or answer the questions. 2. To give someone details or information about something. This can be used in conversation or communication when someone wants to be updated or informed about a certain topic.
  • bleed from something The idiom "bleed from something" typically means to suffer or experience the negative consequences or impacts of a particular situation, action, or circumstance. It often suggests enduring emotional, financial, or physical losses or hardships.
  • bleep something out The idiom "bleep something out" refers to the act of censoring or obscuring a specific word, phrase, or content in media by replacing it with a "bleep" sound. This is often done to remove offensive or explicit language while still allowing the audience to understand that something has been intentionally censored.
  • block something off The idiom "block something off" refers to the act of preventing access to or isolating a particular area by placing barriers or obstacles. It means to physically or metaphorically separate or contain something within a confined space or to restrict entry or exit from a specific location.
  • block something out The idiom "block something out" refers to the act of deliberately ignoring or disregarding something, usually in order to cope with a distressing or uncomfortable situation. It involves consciously preventing oneself from thinking about or remembering a specific event, memory, emotion, or concept.
  • block something up The idiom "block something up" means to obstruct or prevent the flow or passage of something, typically by creating an obstacle or barrier. It suggests the action of making something unable to move or progress smoothly due to an obstruction.
  • blot something out The idiom "blot something out" means to eliminate or erase something completely, usually from one's memory, vision, or existence. It refers to the act of removing or disregarding something so thoroughly that it is as if it never occurred or had any significance.
  • blow something The idiom "blow something" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To mess up or ruin something: This could refer to making a mistake or causing something to fail. For example, "I blew the presentation by forgetting my lines." 2. To spend or waste large amounts of money: This generally implies spending money in a reckless or extravagant manner. For example, "He blew his entire inheritance on a luxurious vacation." 3. To release strong emotions or express anger: This refers to venting or expressing feelings forcefully. For example, "He blew off steam by yelling at his teammates after the game." 4. To dismantle or destroy something with explosives: In a literal sense, this phrase is
  • lift, blow, etc. the lid off something The idiom "lift, blow, etc. the lid off something" means to expose or reveal something that was previously concealed or kept secret. It refers to the act of uncovering a hidden truth or bringing to light covert information, often causing a scandal, controversy, or significant change as a result.
  • blow into something The idiom "blow into something" typically means to enter or arrive at a place suddenly and forcefully, often causing a commotion or disruption.
  • blow something out The idiom "blow something out" generally means to extinguish or put out flames, candles, or any source of fire by blowing air onto it forcefully. It can also refer to forcefully expelling air or releasing it, such as blowing out air from lungs. Additionally, it can be used metaphorically to indicate cancelling plans, events, or strategies abruptly or without any prior notice.
  • blow something up The idiom "blow something up" typically means to exaggerate or amplify the importance, significance, or impact of something, often in a misleading or exaggerated manner. It can also refer to causing something to fail, break, or be destroyed, both literally and metaphorically.
  • blurt something out (at someone) The idiom "blurt something out (at someone)" means to speak or say something without thinking or without caution, often in a sudden or impulsive manner, directly to someone else. It implies an unfiltered or hasty remark that may be surprising, inappropriate, or unexpected.
  • chain something up The idiom "chain something up" means to secure or fasten something, typically using a chain, in order to prevent it from being accessed, stolen, or used without permission.
  • chance something The idiom "chance something" typically means to take a risk or gamble on something. It refers to undertaking an action or making a decision despite uncertain or unfavorable outcomes, often hoping for a positive result. It implies a willingness to try something uncertain or take a leap of faith rather than sticking to a safe or predictable option.
  • change something back The idiom "change something back" refers to undoing a previously made alteration or modification in order to restore something to its original state, typically as an attempt to rectify or revert a change that is considered undesirable or unfavorable.
  • channel something in To "channel something in" means to direct or focus a particular energy, emotion, or resource in a specific way or towards a specific goal. It involves intentionally harnessing or utilizing something and directing it towards a desired outcome or purpose.
  • check something out The idiom "check something out" means to examine, inspect, or evaluate something, often with the intention of making a judgment or gathering information. It can also imply looking at or exploring something for the purpose of taking interest or gaining experience.
  • check something in The idiom "check something in" typically refers to the act of submitting or returning an item or document for official or formal examination or storage. It is commonly used in contexts such as airports, hotels, libraries, or any place where items need to be registered, logged, or stored securely.
  • cherry-pick something The idiom "cherry-pick something" refers to the act of selectively choosing or taking only the best or most desirable items, options, or pieces of information from a larger set or group. It often implies the deliberate disregard of less favorable or less desirable elements, with the intention of obtaining only what is advantageous or beneficial.
  • chicken out of something The idiom "chicken out of something" means to back out or withdraw from a task, challenge, or commitment due to fear, apprehension, or lack of courage. It is often used to describe someone who fails to follow through on a previous agreement or succumbs to fear or uncertainty.
  • a poster child for something The idiom "a poster child for something" is used to describe a person or thing that embodies or represents a specific quality, characteristic, or situation. It is often used in a positive sense to highlight someone as an ideal example or symbol of a particular concept, idea, or cause.
  • chip something in The idiom "chip something in" means to contribute or donate something, whether in the form of money, resources, or effort, to a common cause or group endeavor. It often implies a collective effort where each person involved pitches in their share to achieve a goal or support a project.
  • chop something back The idiom "chop something back" refers to the act of cutting or trimming something, typically plants, trees, or shrubs, in order to control their growth or maintain their shape. It involves pruning or reducing the size of the vegetation by cutting off excess or overgrown branches, shoots, or leaves.
  • chop something down The idiom "chop something down" means to cut down something, typically a tree or a plant, using a cutting tool like an axe or a saw. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate the act of getting rid of or terminating something, such as a project, a plan, or an idea.
  • chop something off (of) something The idiom "chop something off (of) something" means to cut or remove a piece or part of something, typically with a swift and forceful motion. It implies a physical separation or detachment.
  • chuck something up The idiom "chuck something up" typically means to vomit or throw up.
  • claim something for something The idiom "claim something for something" means to assert ownership, right, or responsibility over something based on a particular reason or justification. It implies staking a formal or official declaration of possession or authority.
  • stake out a claim to something The idiom "stake out a claim to something" refers to establishing or asserting one's right or ownership over something, typically a piece of land, a territory, or a position. It originates from the act of physically marking or placing stakes on a specific area to demarcate one's ownership or intention to possess it. Figuratively, it can also be used to describe laying a claim or asserting one's dominance or authority in a particular field or pursuit.
  • clash with something The idiom "clash with something" means to come into conflict or disagreement with something, such as ideas, opinions, values, or actions. It indicates a situation where two or more things are incompatible or in opposition to each other, resulting in a confrontation or discord.
  • clean up on something The idiom "clean up on something" typically means to make a large profit or achieve great success in a particular endeavor or situation. It can refer to a significant financial gain or a high level of accomplishment.
  • pick something clean The idiom "pick something clean" means to thoroughly examine or search something in a meticulous and exhaustive manner, leaving no area or detail untouched or unexplored.
  • clean something off The idiom "clean something off" means to remove dirt, dust, stains, or any other unwanted material from something, making it tidy and free from impurities. This can refer to physical objects, surfaces, or even abstract concepts.
  • clean something out To "clean something out" in the idiomatic sense means to remove or get rid of the contents of something completely or thoroughly. It can refer to physically emptying and tidying an area or container, as well as metaphorically eliminating or expelling unwanted or unnecessary elements from a situation or group.
  • see your way clear to do something The idiom "see your way clear to do something" means to find a solution or make arrangements in order to accomplish a particular task or complete a certain action. It implies the ability to overcome obstacles or difficulties that may be in the way and proceed with the desired action.
  • clear something off something The idiom "clear something off something" means to remove, eliminate or tidy up something from the surface or location where it is present. It implies the act of taking away or wiping away something to make it clean, organized or free of any obstructions.
  • clear something up The idiom "clear something up" means to resolve or explain a misunderstanding, confusion, or uncertainty so that there is no further doubt or ambiguity.
  • clock something up The idiom "clock something up" means to accumulate or accumulate a certain number or amount of something over time. It is often used when referring to achievements, accomplishments, or records.
  • clog something up The idiom "clog something up" means to block or obstruct something, usually a passage, tube, or system, by causing it to become blocked or jammed. It refers to hindering or impeding the normal flow or operation of something.
  • shut/close the door on something The idiom "shut/close the door on something" means to put an end to or to refuse to consider or pursue further a particular course of action, opportunity, or possibility. It implies decisively rejecting or eliminating any chance or option related to the mentioned subject.
  • close something off The idiom "close something off" can be defined as to block or restrict access to a particular area, usually by using barriers or physical obstacles. It implies creating a separation or boundary that prevents entry or passage into an area.
  • close on something The idiom "close on something" typically refers to the act of finalizing or concluding a deal, agreement, or transaction. It denotes the stage when all the necessary details and terms have been negotiated and agreed upon, and the parties involved are near to reaching a final decision or settlement on a particular matter. It signifies the imminent completion or achievement of a specific objective or goal.
  • close something out The idiom "close something out" typically means to bring something to an end or conclude it in a final manner.
  • close something up The idiom "close something up" refers to the act of sealing, shutting, or securing something tightly or completely. It can be used to describe the action of closing a physical object, such as a door, window, or container, but it can also be used in a metaphorical sense to describe the completion or finalization of a process, event, or situation.
  • coax (someone or an animal) out of something The idiom "coax (someone or an animal) out of something" means to persuade or gently convince someone or an animal to relinquish or release something that they are holding, guarding, or reluctant to part with, typically by using kind words, encouragement, or gentle behaviors.
  • coil (itself) up into something The idiom "coil (itself) up into something" typically refers to a situation where someone or something curls or twists into a specific shape or form. It can be used metaphorically to describe someone retracting into a defensive or protective position, withdrawing from the outside world or isolating themselves emotionally. It can also describe an object or material naturally forming a spiral or circular shape.
  • coil something up The idiom "coil something up" typically means to neatly or tightly roll or wind something, such as a rope, cord, or wire, into a circular or spiral shape.
  • pay something back (to someone) The idiom "pay something back (to someone)" refers to the act of returning money or a favor that was previously borrowed or received from someone. It implies reciprocating the kindness or repaying a debt owed to another person.
  • collect (money) for something The idiom "collect (money) for something" refers to the act of gathering or assembling funds for a specific purpose or cause. It implies the action of soliciting or receiving monetary contributions from individuals or groups, typically to support a particular project, charity, or event.
  • collect something up The idiom "collect something up" means to gather or accumulate items or things together in one place or to gather things that are dispersed or scattered.
  • give something the old college try The idiom "give something the old college try" means to make a sincere, determined effort or attempt to accomplish something, often in the face of challenges or obstacles. It references the dedication and persistence typically associated with college students when they set out to achieve their goals.
  • color something in The idiom "color something in" typically means to provide more detail or further explanation about a topic or situation. It can also refer to making something more vivid or interesting by adding depth or embellishments.
  • come face to face with something The idiom "come face to face with something" means encountering or confronting a particular situation, problem, or challenge directly and personally. It often implies a sense of a close and direct encounter with something, typically unexpected or intense.
  • come to terms with something The idiom "come to terms with something" means to accept and reconcile oneself to a difficult or unpleasant situation or reality. It implies a process of acknowledging, understanding, and making peace with a particular circumstance or truth.
  • get to grips with something The idiom "get to grips with something" means to understand, master, or deal effectively with a difficult or complex task, concept, or problem. It suggests making a sincere effort to comprehend and engage with the subject matter, typically with the goal of gaining control or proficiency.
  • come by something The idiom "come by something" refers to managing to find or obtain something, often with some degree of difficulty or effort.
  • come down to something The idiom "come down to something" means that a decision, situation, or outcome is ultimately determined by a particular factor, circumstance, or choice. It suggests that after considering various options or factors, the final resolution or conclusion is based on a specific element.
  • come to something The idiom "come to something" typically means that a situation or outcome has reached a certain point or developed into a particular state, often implying a negative or unexpected result. It can also refer to an individual's realization or understanding of something important or significant.
  • come under something The idiom "come under something" typically means to be subjected or affected by something, such as rules, regulations, authority, or scrutiny. It implies being included within the scope or jurisdiction of something.
  • connect (up) to something The idiom "connect (up) to something" means to link or join an object or device to another object or device, usually through a physical or electrical connection. It refers to establishing a connection between two things or systems to enable communication, shared functionality, or interaction.
  • connive at something (with someone) The idiom "connive at something (with someone)" means to secretly cooperate or conspire with someone to engage in a dishonest, illegal, or morally wrong activity. It implies an understanding or tacit agreement between individuals to ignore or overlook wrongdoing.
  • in the context of something The idiom "in the context of something" refers to considering or understanding something in relation to its surrounding circumstances, environment, or background information. It implies that to fully interpret or evaluate a particular thing, it is necessary to consider the larger framework or situation within which it exists.
  • contract something out To "contract something out" means to delegate or outsource work or tasks to an external party or individual, rather than handling them internally. This can involve hiring a third-party contractor, company, or freelancer to perform a specific job or provide a service on behalf of an organization or individual. It allows for specialized expertise, cost-effectiveness, and flexibility in managing certain aspects of a project or business.
  • contrast (someone or something) with (someone or something else) The idiom "contrast someone or something with someone or something else" means to highlight the differences or dissimilarities between two or more people, things, or concepts, usually for the purpose of highlighting their distinctive qualities or characteristics. It is often used to emphasize disparities, discrepancies, or variations between the compared elements.
  • cook something up (with someone) The idiom "cook something up (with someone)" means to create or devise an idea, plan, or scheme together with someone, often in a secretive or deceptive manner. It implies collaborating or conspiring with someone to come up with something, typically with an element of craftiness or mischief involved.
  • copy something out (by hand) The idiom "copy something out (by hand)" refers to the act of reproducing or transcribing written content manually, typically using pen and paper rather than print or digital means. It implies the process of creating a duplicate or a transcription of a text word by word, often done for practice, study, or preservation purposes.
  • cork something up The idiom "cork something up" means to stop, suppress, or keep something hidden or secret. It is often used to refer to emotions or feelings that are forcefully concealed or repressed. The phrase originates from the act of sealing a bottle or container with a cork, preventing the contents from escaping or being exposed.
  • cost something out The idiom "cost something out" refers to the act of making a detailed calculation or estimation for the expenses or costs associated with a particular project, plan, or action. It involves carefully considering all the factors, materials, labor, and other elements in order to determine the total cost or expenditure involved.
  • count something in The idiom "count something in" means to include or consider something as part of a decision-making process, plan, or calculation. It implies taking into account or giving importance to something when making a judgment or decision.
  • count something out The idiom "count something out" means to exclude or eliminate something from consideration or consideration of a plan, action, or possibility. It refers to the act of removing or disregarding a specific option or item when making a decision or determining a course of action.
  • under cover of something The idiom "under cover of something" typically refers to doing something secretly or discreetly, often taking advantage of a particular situation or circumstance to mask one's actions or intentions. It implies that there is a hidden motive or agenda behind the actions being taken.
  • cover something up To "cover something up" means to conceal or hide something, especially a mistake, wrongdoing, or embarrassing information, in order to prevent it from being revealed or known by others. It involves taking actions or creating a false explanation in an attempt to protect oneself or someone else from the consequences of the truth.
  • take a crack at (doing) something The idiom "take a crack at (doing) something" means to make an attempt or try one's hand at doing something. It implies taking a chance, giving it a try, or making an effort to accomplish a task or solve a problem.
  • take a crack at something The idiom "take a crack at something" means to make an attempt or try something, often implying an effort to solve a problem, complete a task, or achieve a desired outcome. It suggests giving it a try or taking a shot at something, even if there is uncertainty or a possibility of failure.
  • crack something up The idiom "crack something up" means to cause someone to burst into laughter or amusement. It refers to making someone laugh uncontrollably or finding something extremely funny.
  • crease something up The idiom "crease something up" typically means to fold or crumple something in such a way that it creates a crease or wrinkle. This can refer to either intentionally or accidentally causing folded lines or wrinkles on an object, such as a piece of clothing, paper, or any flexible material.
  • inject something into something The idiom "inject something into something" typically means to introduce or incorporate something new or additional into a situation, conversation, or system. It often implies the act of infusing or adding something for a specific purpose or effect, such as information, energy, enthusiasm, or a new perspective.
  • cross over something Definition: The idiom "cross over something" means to move or travel from one side or area to the opposite side or area of a specific object, place, or boundary. It implies traversing or crossing a barrier, obstacle, divide, or threshold physically, metaphorically, or symbolically.
  • crown something with something The definition of the idiom "crown something with something" is to ​complete or ​finish something in an impressive or successful manner, often by adding a final touch of excellence or a notable element.
  • crum something up The idiom "crum something up" means to crinkle, fold, or crush something into a small, compact shape, often by twisting or applying pressure. The phrase is commonly used when referring to paper or fabric, where it implies making the material wrinkled or crumpled. It can also be used metaphorically to describe ruining or damaging something by mishandling or mismanaging it.
  • crumple something up The idiom "crumple something up" means to physically crush or crinkle something, usually a piece of paper or fabric, into a smaller or distorted shape. It implies bending or folding the object forcefully and messily.
  • put something on the cuff The idiom "put something on the cuff" refers to charging or purchasing something with the intention of paying for it at a later time. It implies buying on credit, often without immediate payment or settlement.
  • cure something of something The idiom "cure something of something" means to find a remedy or solution to eliminate or relieve a problem, habit, or negative condition. It implies treating and removing a particular issue or affliction.
  • curl something up The idiom "curl something up" refers to the act of bending or rolling something, typically with the intention of making it compact or small in size.
  • curl up (in(to) something The idiom "curl up (in/to something)" means to adopt a comfortable, relaxed position, typically by drawing one's body into a curled or fetal position. It implies a desire for coziness, warmth, or a feeling of security. It can be used both literally, referring to physically curling up, or figuratively, portraying a person seeking emotional comfort or finding solace in a particular situation or environment.
  • cut something short The idiom "cut something short" means to intentionally end or terminate something prematurely or abruptly, often referring to a conversation, a presentation, or an activity. It implies stopping before its natural or expected completion.
  • cut your teeth on something The idiomatic expression "cut your teeth on something" means to gain initial experience or develop skills in a particular field or activity. It often refers to the process of learning or practicing something in a hands-on manner, similar to the way a baby or young child first learns by biting or cutting their teeth on objects. It implies a process of trial and error, growth, and acquiring fundamental skills or knowledge in order to progress or excel in a specific area.
  • not be cut out for something The idiom "not be cut out for something" means that an individual is not suitable or well-suited for a particular task, job, or activity. It implies that the person lacks the necessary skills, abilities, or temperament required to succeed in that particular endeavor.
  • cut something back The idiom "cut something back" means to reduce or decrease the quantity, size, or extent of something. It refers to the act of reducing or limiting something, typically in order to save money, resources, or to exercise restraint.
  • cut something down The idiom "cut something down" typically means to reduce the amount, size, or quantity of something. It can also refer to physically chopping or trimming something, such as cutting down a tree or reducing the length of an object.
  • cut something into something The idiom "cut something into something" means to divide or divide up something, typically a solid object or a larger whole, into smaller parts or pieces. It implies the physical action of cutting or dividing an object or a concept into specific segments or sections. It can also be used metaphorically to describe breaking down a complex task or problem into more manageable parts for easier understanding or completion.
  • cut something off The idiom "cut something off" means to remove or separate something, usually by using a sharp object or a tool. It can also refer to ending or interrupting a communication or connection abruptly. Moreover, it can be used figuratively to suggest stopping support, funding, or access to someone or something.
  • dam something up The idiom "dam something up" typically means to block or obstruct the flow of something, such as a river or a stream, by constructing a dam. It can also be used figuratively to mean to impede or stop the progress or natural course of something.
  • damp something down To "damp something down" is an idiomatic expression that means to reduce the intensity, vigor, or enthusiasm of something or someone. It refers to the act of making something less intense, fiery, or active. The phrase can be used to describe various situations, such as toning down a discussion or debate, calming down emotions, or reducing the energy of a situation.
  • dangle something from something The idiom "dangle something from something" means to hang or suspend an object loosely or casually from a particular place. It refers to the act of letting something hang down or swing freely.
  • dart across something The idiom "dart across something" refers to the act of moving swiftly or quickly across a particular place or area. It typically implies a sudden or brief movement, similar to the flight path of a dart being thrown. It can be used to describe physical movement, such as a person quickly crossing a road or a small animal scurrying across a field. This idiom can also be used metaphorically to describe a fleeting thought or idea that quickly comes to someone's mind and disappears just as swiftly.
  • dash across something To "dash across something" refers to crossing a particular area or distance quickly and hurriedly, typically with a sense of urgency or haste. It implies moving swiftly and sharply while trying to reach the other side or accomplish a task in a short amount of time.
  • dash something off The idiom "dash something off" typically means to write or create something quickly and without much effort or thought.
  • dash something to pieces The idiom "dash something to pieces" means to completely destroy or break something into fragments with force or violence. It suggests a violent or forceful action that leads to complete destruction, often implying irreparable damage.
  • daub something with something The idiom "daub something with something" means to smear, cover, or apply a substance, often in a careless or haphazard manner. It can refer to the act of spreading a thick or sticky substance over a surface, usually using your hands or a tool. The "something" in the idiom represents the substance being applied, such as paint, mud, or any other kind of coating.
  • rue the day (that something happened) The idiom "rue the day (that something happened)" means to deeply regret or feel remorse for something that took place in the past. It implies a sense of lamentation and wishing that the event or action had never occurred due to its negative consequences or impacts.
  • be dead set on something The idiom "be dead set on something" means to be extremely determined or resolute about achieving or obtaining a particular goal, outcome, or desire. It implies unwavering and unyielding determination.
  • kill something stone dead The idiom "kill something stone dead" means to completely and decisively eliminate or bring an end to something, usually referring to an idea, hope, or possibility. It implies that there is no chance of revival or continuation.
  • stop something in its tracks The idiom "stop something in its tracks" means to halt or prevent something from progressing or continuing further. It refers to taking immediate action to cease or hinder the development or advancement of a particular situation, plan, or action.
  • deal something out The idiom "deal something out" means to distribute or allocate something, usually in a fair or impartial manner, as if dealing cards in a game. It can also refer to excluding or removing someone or something from a situation or group.
  • death on something The idiom "death on something" typically means having a strong distaste, aversion, or extreme dislike for something.
  • knee-deep in something The idiom "knee-deep in something" means to be heavily involved or deeply immersed in a particular situation or activity. It implies being in a state of great involvement, often to the point of being overwhelmed or having a significant effect on one's life or actions.
  • dab something off (of) something The idiom "dab something off (of) something" means to remove or clean a small amount of substance or dirt from something using quick, light, and gentle touches or strokes.
  • dab something on(to) something The idiom "dab something on/to something" refers to the act of applying a small amount of a substance, typically a liquid or cream, onto a specific area or surface using quick, light patting strokes.
  • rush on something The idiom "rush on something" means to act quickly or eagerly in completing a task or making a decision without thoroughly considering all aspects or consequences. It implies a sense of urgency or impatience, often leading to potential mistakes or overlooking important details.
  • dent something up The idiom "dent something up" refers to causing minor damages or deformities to an object, typically by creating small indentations or dents on its surface.
  • make a dent in something The idiom "make a dent in something" means to make progress or achieve a small part of a larger task or goal. It implies that a significant impact or accomplishment has been made, although there is still more to be done. It originates from the idea of denting an object, where a dent represents a visible mark or change to its original state.
  • desert (someone or something) for (someone or something else) The idiom "desert (someone or something) for (someone or something else)" refers to abandoning or leaving someone or something in favor of someone or something else. It implies a betrayal or act of disloyalty where one forsakes their previous commitment or allegiance.
  • design something for something The idiom "design something for something" means to create or develop something specifically tailored or intended for a particular purpose, function, or target audience. It implies the act of creating or constructing with a specific objective or end result in mind.
  • raise the devil with something The idiom "raise the devil with something" refers to creating a situation of extreme chaos, trouble, or commotion with a particular action, event, or decision. It implies stirring up trouble, controversy, or troublemaking behavior.
  • dibs on something The idiom "dibs on something" means to claim or lay a prior right or claim to something before anyone else does. It is often used playfully or informally to express one's desire or intention to have or use something.
  • put one's dibs on something The idiom "put one's dibs on something" means to claim or reserve something for oneself, often implying that one has staked their claim before others. It expresses an assertive or possessive action of ensuring that the person gains control or ownership over something, typically by being the first to indicate interest or intent.
  • dig something into something The idiom "dig something into something" typically means to forcefully or deeply embed or bury an object into a particular substance or material. It can also be used metaphorically to convey the idea of firmly establishing or ingraining something in a specific context or situation.
  • dig something out The idiom "dig something out" means to search or retrieve something that is buried, hidden, or difficult to find. It can be used both literally and figuratively, implying the act of locating and bringing to the surface something, whether it is a physical object, information, memories, or ideas.
  • dip something in(to) something The idiom "dip something in(to) something" refers to the action of briefly immersing an object or one's hand into a substance or liquid. It commonly implies a quick, partial submerging that may include retrieving, coating, or saturating something with the substance.
  • dip to something The idiomatic expression "dip to something" typically refers to a sudden decrease or decline in a particular quality, level, or performance. It implies a temporary or brief decrease before recovering or stabilizing.
  • dip your toe into something The idiom "dip your toe into something" means to start or engage in a new activity or venture with caution and hesitation, usually by trying it in a small or limited way before fully committing or getting involved. It refers to testing the waters or exploring something cautiously to assess its feasibility or appeal before fully committing to it.
  • dish something out The idiom "dish something out" typically refers to the act of distributing or allocating something, particularly in an efficient or rapid manner. It can be used to describe the action of giving information, sharing responsibilities, or sharing resources with others. The expression often implies a sense of easily doling out or dispensing something without much thought or effort.
  • send something into something The idiom "send something into something" typically means to submit, convey, or dispatch something to a particular place or organization for a specific purpose. It implies the action of sending a particular item, such as a document, form, application, or request, to a designated recipient or institution.
  • distill something from something The idiom "distill something from something" means to extract or derive important or essential information, essence, or substance from a larger or complex whole. It refers to the process of isolating and identifying the most crucial or valuable elements from a mixture or compilation.
  • dim something down The idiom "dim something down" typically means to decrease or reduce the intensity, brightness, or volume of something, such as lights, sounds, or a particular effect, in order to make it less intense or overwhelming.
  • take a dim view of something To "take a dim view of something" means to have a negative or critical opinion or perspective about it. It suggests disapproval, lack of enthusiasm, or unfavorable judgment.
  • take a poor view of something The idiom "take a poor view of something" means to have a negative or unfavorable opinion or perspective on something. It implies that someone does not see a particular situation, idea, or action in a positive light and may have critical or disapproving thoughts about it.
  • eat something out The idiom "eat something out" typically refers to the act of consuming or finishing all of a particular food item or dish. It suggests consuming the entire portion or quantity of something that is edible.
  • be out to do something The idiom "be out to do something" means to have a determined or clear intention to accomplish or achieve a particular goal or objective. It implies a strong sense of purpose and focus.
  • be somebody's place to do something The idiom "be somebody's place to do something" means that a particular location is the appropriate or expected setting for a certain activity or behavior. It implies that it is customary, suitable, or often done in that specific place.
  • be sure to do something The idiom "be sure to do something" means to have certainty or confidence in completing or attending to a particular task or action. It implies a strong recommendation or advice to not forget or neglect doing that specific thing.
  • do something at your own pace The idiom "do something at your own pace" means to perform a task or activity at a speed or rate that is comfortable and suitable for one's own abilities, preferences, or individual timing, without feeling pressured or rushed by others. It suggests that individuals have the freedom to work, learn, or accomplish something at a speed that suits them best, allowing for a more personalized and relaxed approach.
  • do something for luck The idiom "do something for luck" refers to performing a specific action, often considered superstitious or symbolic, in the hopes of increasing the chances of success or good fortune in a particular endeavor. It involves undertaking a certain task or ritual as a means to believe in and invite favorable outcomes.
  • do something for somebody/something The idiom "do something for somebody/something" means to perform an action or task specifically to benefit or assist someone or something. It implies taking action on behalf of someone or something else to fulfill their needs or desires.
  • do something in a vacuum The idiom "do something in a vacuum" means to perform a task or take action in a detached or isolated manner, without considering or being influenced by external factors, interactions, or feedback. It implies a lack of awareness or consideration of the broader context, consequences, or input from others.
  • do something in your own sweet time/way To do something in your own sweet time/way means to take as much time as you need or to do something at your own pace, without feeling rushed or pressured by others. It implies that you have the freedom to do things on your own terms, without conforming to external expectations or deadlines.
  • do something on sight The idiom "do something on sight" means to immediately or instinctively react to something or someone as soon as you see them, often in a forceful or aggressive manner. It suggests acting without hesitation or delay upon encountering a particular object or person.
  • do something on somebody's/your terms To do something on somebody's/your terms means to do it according to someone's or your own specific preferences, conditions, or requirements. It implies that the person has the freedom or authority to dictate how a situation is handled or a task is completed, typically in a way that aligns with their own interests or needs. It involves asserting control or setting the rules to ensure that things are done according to one's own desired standards or conditions.
  • do something on spec The idiom "do something on spec" means to undertake a task or project without any prior guarantee of payment or a specific outcome. It often refers to doing work in the hopes of being paid or achieving a desired result, but without a confirmed agreement or commitment beforehand. It involves taking a risk or making an investment of time, effort, or resources to pursue an opportunity in a speculative manner.
  • do something on the sly The idiom "do something on the sly" means to do something secretly or in a clandestine manner, typically with the intention of concealing it from others or avoiding detection. It implies that the action is done covertly or sneakily, often to avoid scrutiny, punishment, or disapproval.
  • do something out of turn The idiom "do something out of turn" means to act or behave in a manner that is not in accordance with proper order or protocol. It refers to taking an action or doing something without waiting for one's designated or expected turn or without following established procedures.
  • do something willy-nilly The idiom "do something willy-nilly" means to do something in a careless, haphazard, or impulsive manner, without much thought or consideration. It implies acting without a clear plan or intention and often results in a chaotic or random outcome.
  • do the something thing The idiom "do the something thing" typically means to perform a task or activity with a high level of proficiency or effectiveness. It implies that the person is skilled or experienced in the particular thing they are doing. This phrase emphasizes competence and proficiency in a given area.
  • do well to do something The idiom "do well to do something" means to strongly advise or recommend someone to take a specific action because it is beneficial or advantageous. It implies that the action being suggested is the wisest or best course of action given the circumstances.
  • do you want to make something of it? "Do you want to make something of it?" is an idiom used to challenge someone's statement or claim, implying a willingness to confront them physically or verbally. It's often used in a confrontational or defiant manner when faced with a disagreement, conflict, or perceived challenge. This expression suggests readiness to engage in a physical or verbal altercation to prove one's point or defend oneself.
  • do/learn something the hard way The idiom "do/learn something the hard way" means to gain knowledge or experience through difficulty, struggle, or failure instead of learning or doing it in a more conventional or easier way. It implies that the person has faced challenges, made mistakes, or incurred negative consequences in order to gain understanding or proficiency in a particular subject or skill.
  • do justice to something The idiom "do justice to something" means to render or perform something in a way that is fair, accurate, or favorable, so that its true value, quality, or importance is fully recognized or displayed. It often implies that the subject being described or portrayed is worthy of more praise, attention, or appreciation than is currently being given.
  • do something over The idiom "do something over" means to repeat a task or activity, typically because the initial attempt was not successful, satisfactory, or correct.
  • do something up The idiom "do something up" typically means to fasten or secure something tightly, often involving buttons, zippers, or other closures. It can also refer to renovating or improving the appearance or condition of something, such as a room, house, or piece of furniture.
  • dole something out The idiom "dole something out" means to distribute or dispense something, usually in a regulated or limited manner. It implies the act of giving out or allotting something in measured portions or quantities.
  • lay something at somebody's door To lay something at somebody's door means to blame or attribute something to someone or hold them responsible for a particular action, mistake, or problem. It implies assigning fault or holding someone accountable for something negative.
  • lay something at someone's door The idiom "lay something at someone's door" means to blame or accuse someone for something, often by attributing a fault or responsibility to them for a particular action or outcome.
  • dope something out To "dope something out" means to figure out or solve a problem or situation by carefully thinking and analyzing it. It involves using one's intelligence, knowledge, or logical thinking to determine a solution or to understand something complex.
  • a drag on something The phrase "a drag on something" is an idiomatic expression that means to slow down, hinder, or impede the progress, efficiency, or success of something. It refers to a factor or element that has a negative impact on the desired outcome. It can be used to describe a person, situation, process, or any other element that is causing a delay or holding back the overall performance or advancement of a particular thing.
  • drain from something The idiom "drain from something" typically means to cause the gradual and continuous loss or reduction of something valuable, such as energy, resources, motivation, or enthusiasm, from a particular source or situation. It implies a constant decrease or depletion, often leading to exhaustion or declining effectiveness.
  • drain something of something The idiom "drain something of something" means to deplete or exhaust a person or thing of a particular quality, attribute, or resource. It refers to the act of sapping or removing an essential element or characteristic from someone or something, leaving them weakened or diminished.
  • drain something off something The idiom "drain something off something" means to remove or extract a liquid, typically by letting it flow out slowly or using a specific method. It is often used when referring to getting rid of excess or unwanted liquid from a container or an area.
  • draw something down To "draw something down" can have several interpretations and meanings based on the context. Here are two possible definitions for this idiom: 1. To record or document something: In this sense, "drawing something down" means to write or document information, notes, or observations. It can be used when taking notes during a meeting, lecture, or interview. For example, "As the speaker shared her insights, I quickly drew down the important points she was making." 2. To gradually decrease or deplete something: In this sense, "drawing something down" refers to reducing the quantity or amount of something. It might be used in financial contexts when referring to withdrawing or reducing funds from an account. For instance, "They had to draw down
  • draw something forth The idiom "draw something forth" means to retrieve, evoke, or extract something, usually from a person or a situation. It implies bringing out or bringing to light something that was hidden, unconscious, or not obvious initially.
  • draw something to a close The idiom "draw something to a close" means to bring something to an end or to conclude something. It is often used when describing the process of finishing an event, activity, or situation.
  • draw something up The idiom "draw something up" typically means to create or prepare something, especially in writing or in the form of a plan or a document. It refers to the act of formulating or designing something in a structured or organized manner.
  • dream something up The idiom "dream something up" means to use one's imagination or creativity to invent or create something, typically an idea or a solution to a problem. It refers to the act of coming up with a new concept or conceptually envisioning something new.
  • dry something out The idiom "dry something out" can have two meanings: 1. To remove or evaporate moisture or liquid from something, usually by exposing it to air or heat. For example, you can dry out wet clothes by hanging them in the sun or using a dryer. 2. To detoxify or rehabilitate someone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol, by abstaining from substance use. This can involve medical intervention, therapy, or joining support groups. The phrase implies the process of helping someone overcome addiction and regain sobriety.
  • dry something up To "dry something up" is an idiomatic expression that means to stop or eliminate a source of information, especially by making someone reluctant or unwilling to talk or share it. It can also refer to putting an end to the supply of something, such as money or resources.
  • drip something into something The idiom "drip something into something" refers to the act of slowly and gradually adding or incorporating something into a particular situation, process, or system. It can imply taking a cautious or measured approach in introducing or implementing something, ensuring it doesn't overwhelm or disrupt the existing situation. It conveys the idea of a slow, steady, and controlled introduction or infusion of something, often with the intention of achieving a desired outcome.
  • drive something home The idiom "drive something home" means to emphasize or make something clear and easily understood, typically by repeating or reinforcing a point or argument. It is often used to ensure that a message or idea is fully comprehended by the listener.
  • drive/hammer something home The idiom "drive/hammer something home" means to repeatedly emphasize or reinforce a point, idea, or concept in order to ensure it is fully understood, remembered, or believed. It implies the use of force, persistence, or intensity to make a message clear or to leave a lasting impression.
  • drive something down The idiom "drive something down" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To decrease or reduce the price, value, or level of something: This meaning is often used in relation to a product, service, or economy. For example, "The company plans to drive down prices to attract more customers" or "The recession drove down stock prices." In this context, "drive something down" means to make something go lower or become more affordable. 2. To forcefully push or bring something downward: This meaning is often used in a literal sense when describing physical actions. For example, "She used a hammer to drive the nail down" or "The chef drove the knife down into the cutting board
  • drive something into something The idiom "drive something into something" typically means to forcefully insert or push something into a particular object or place, often with great strength or determination. It implies a vigorous or forceful action of penetrating or inserting something forcefully into something else.
  • drop/dump something in somebody's lap The idiom "drop/dump something in somebody's lap" means to unexpectedly burden or give someone a responsibility or problem, often without their consent or prior knowledge. It implies the act of suddenly putting all the responsibility, work, or an unwanted task onto someone else without considering their willingness or readiness to handle it.
  • drum something out The idiom "drum something out" typically means to expel or force someone out of a place or position, often through persistent and aggressive tactics. It can also refer to publicly shaming or discrediting someone to the point where they are forced to leave or resign from a certain task or role.
  • drum something up The idiom "drum something up" refers to the act of creating, generating, or stirring up support, enthusiasm, interest, or business for something, typically through active promotion, advertising, or persuasion. It can also imply to assemble or bring together something, like support or resources, often in a determined or energetic manner. In a figurative sense, it means to generate or create something by actively encouraging or initiating it.
  • dub something in The idiom "dub something in" refers to the act of adding or substituting voices or audio tracks in a film, TV show, or recording after the original recording has been made. It commonly involves replacing dialogue or sound effects in a scene to enhance or correct the audio quality, or to translate the spoken words into a different language.
  • dub something over The idiom "dub something over" refers to the process of replacing or altering the original audio or soundtrack of a video, film, or recording with a new recording, typically using a different language or voice. It involves matching the new audio to the visual content, thereby creating a synchronized and modified version of the original.
  • dust something out The idiom "dust something out" refers to the act of cleaning or removing dust from something, typically by using a cloth, a duster, or other cleaning tools. It can be used both literally, referring to the physical act of dusting, as well as figuratively, implying the need to refresh or revive something that has been neglected or forgotten.
  • be up to your ears in something The idiom "be up to your ears in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular situation, task, or responsibility. It implies being deeply involved or immersed in something to the point where one feels overwhelmed or swamped.
  • wipe something off the face of the earth To "wipe something off the face of the earth" means to completely eliminate or erase something or someone, usually in a forceful or violent manner. It implies complete annihilation or destruction, leaving no trace or evidence behind. This idiom is often used figuratively to express a strong desire or intention to eradicate something or someone completely.
  • go easy on something The idiom "go easy on something" means to consume or use something in a restrained or moderate manner, rather than in excess or too vigorously. It suggests being cautious, sparing, or gentle in handling or dealing with something.
  • eat something up The idiom "eat something up" means to consume food, especially with great enthusiasm. However, when used figuratively, it means to thoroughly enjoy or appreciate something, often demonstrating a high level of enthusiasm or excitement towards it.
  • eat (away) at something The idiom "eat (away) at something" means to gradually consume, erode, or undermine something, typically causing a sense of discomfort, frustration, or distress. It can refer to a physical process or the impact of negative emotions or thoughts.
  • edit something out of something The idiom "edit something out of something" means to remove or eliminate specific content or information from a larger piece, such as a text, film, or conversation. It refers to the act of cutting out or excluding certain parts in order to modify or improve the overall quality, clarity, or suitability of the work or discussion.
  • eke something out The idiom "eke something out" means to make something last longer or to extend something, usually in a frugal or resourceful manner, typically when resources or supplies are scarce or insufficient. It can also be used when referring to stretching one's budget or making a small amount of something sufficient for one's needs.
  • palm (something) off (on one) (as something else) The idiom "palm (something) off (on one) (as something else)" means to deceive or trick someone by falsely presenting or passing off something as something else. It involves intentionally misleading or misrepresenting information to gain advantage or avoid responsibility.
  • pass (someone or something) off (as something else) To "pass (someone or something) off (as something else)" means to present or portray someone or something as being different from what they actually are, usually with the intention of deceiving others. It involves pretending or pretending to be someone or something else in order to fool or mislead others.
  • pawn (something) off (on one) (as something else) The idiom "pawn (something) off (on one) (as something else)" means to deceive or trick someone by selling or persuading them to accept something of lesser value or quality as if it were something more valuable or desirable. It involves dishonestly passing off one thing as another in order to get rid of it or avoid responsibility.
  • short on (something) (and long on something else) The idiom "short on (something) (and long on something else)" typically means lacking in one aspect or quality but having an abundance of another. It refers to a situation where one thing or characteristic is insufficient or in short supply while another thing or characteristic is plentiful or excessive.
  • emblazon something with something The idiom "emblazon something with something" means to prominently display or depict a particular symbol, image, or design on something. It refers to the act of adorning or decorating an object, typically with a conspicuous or striking motif, logo, or emblem. It conveys the idea of highlighting or making something easily recognizable through visual representation.
  • empty something out The idiom "empty something out" refers to removing or extracting the contents or entirety of something, typically in a thorough and complete manner. It implies the act of completely emptying and clearing away whatever is contained in a particular object, space, or container.
  • the something to end all sths The idiom "the something to end all something" is used to describe or emphasize that a particular thing or event is the final or ultimate one in a specific category. It implies that nothing else afterwards will match or surpass it in significance, magnitude, or impact.
  • the tail end of something The idiom "the tail end of something" refers to the final or last part of an event, activity, or time period. It implies that the remaining portion is smaller or less significant compared to the earlier part.
  • end something up The idiom "end something up" means to finish or conclude something, generally referring to a task, project, or process. It implies reaching the final stage or completing the specified action.
  • end up at something The idiom "end up at something" means to eventually arrive or find oneself in a particular situation, place, or state, often without initially intending or foreseeing it. It refers to the outcome or result of a series of actions or decisions.
  • enter in(to) something The idiom "enter in(to) something" typically means to become involved or participate in a particular activity, event, or situation. It often implies taking a committed or active role in the matter at hand.
  • enter in something The idiom "enter in something" means to record or input information into a database, register, or system. It refers to the act of adding or documenting data or details for future reference or use.
  • enter into something The idiom "enter into something" means to become involved or engaged in a particular activity, agreement, or situation. It typically refers to actively participating or committing oneself to a specific endeavor or undertaking.
  • a lot, not much, etc. in the way of something The idiom "a lot, not much, etc. in the way of something" is used to describe the quantity or extent of something, typically in a negative context. It indicates the amount or level of a particular thing that is lacking, insufficient, or inadequate. It implies that there is a limited amount or absence of something.
  • half the fun, trouble, etc. of something The idiom "half the fun, trouble, etc. of something" means that a significant portion of the enjoyment, difficulty, or other experience is derived from a specific aspect or element of that thing. It suggests that this particular factor contributes substantially to the overall experience or outcome.
  • it's a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will do something The idiom "it's a hundred to one that somebody/something will do something" is used to express an extremely high likelihood or probability of someone or something taking a particular action or behaving in a certain way. It implies that the chances of the predicted event happening are overwhelmingly certain.
  • lend support, weight, credence, etc. to something The idiom "lend support, weight, credence, etc. to something" means to provide assistance, authority, credibility, or significance to a particular idea, belief, argument, or cause. It implies giving backing or reinforcing the validity, importance, or strength of something.
  • make great, much, etc. play of/with something The idiom "make great, much, etc. play of/with something" means to greatly emphasize, exaggerate, or boast about something. It suggests that someone is celebrating or reveling in a particular thing, often by making it the focus of attention or exaggerating its significance. It can also convey the idea of taking pleasure in showcasing or publicizing something to a large extent.
  • pick, etc. something out of a hat The idiom "pick, etc. something out of a hat" means to choose something randomly or unexpectedly, without any prior planning or thought. It refers to the act of drawing a choice from a hat, which is often associated with a random selection process.
  • see, spot, smell, etc. something a mile off The idiom "see, spot, smell, etc. something a mile off" means to detect or recognize something easily, often due to its evident or distinctive characteristics. It implies that the thing being observed is so obvious or noticeable that it can be identified or perceived even from a great distance or with minimal effort.
  • shout, etc. something from the housetops/rooftops The idiom "shout, etc. something from the housetops/rooftops" refers to the act of expressing or proclaiming something openly and enthusiastically, without any reservations or secrets. It conveys the idea of sharing information or opinions with great excitement and vigorously spreading it to everyone.
  • get euchred out of something The idiom "get euchred out of something" means to be tricked, deceived, or cheated out of something, often through unfair or deceptive means. It originates from the card game Euchre, in which players attempt to take more tricks than their opponents, and being euchred means to be prevented from achieving one's intended outcome or goal.
  • even something out The idiom "even something out" means to make a situation or condition more balanced or fair, usually by making adjustments or corrections. It involves making things equal or leveling the playing field by addressing any disparities or inequalities.
  • even something up The idiom "even something up" means to make things fair or balanced, usually by adjusting or correcting a situation to ensure equality or equivalence. It is similar to "level the playing field" or "restore equilibrium."
  • give evidence of something The idiom "give evidence of something" means to provide proof or demonstrate the existence or truth of something. It refers to presenting or showing supporting information, facts, or testimonies that substantiate a claim or argument.
  • exchange something for something The idiom "exchange something for something" means to trade or swap one thing for another of equal value, typically involving a mutual agreement or transaction. It implies giving up or relinquishing something in order to obtain something else in return.
  • squeeze something out of something The idiom "squeeze something out of something" means to extract or obtain something, often reluctantly or with difficulty, from a situation, resource, or person. It implies that the desired outcome or result requires significant effort or manipulation.
  • exult at something The idiom "exult at something" means to feel great delight, joy, or satisfaction about a particular achievement, event, or success. It implies expressing happiness, triumph, or jubilation due to the positive outcome of a situation.
  • exult in something To "exult in something" means to feel or show great joy, delight, or satisfaction in something. It implies a state of celebration, triumph, or pride.
  • be up to your eyes/eyeballs in something The idiom "be up to your eyes/eyeballs in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task or situation. It implies that one is completely engulfed or deeply involved in something to the point where it may be challenging to handle any additional responsibilities or commitments.
  • give your eye teeth for something/to do something The idiom "give your eye teeth for something/to do something" refers to a strong desire or longing for something or to do something. It implies being willing to make great sacrifices or give up something highly valuable or important in order to obtain the desired object or experience. The phrase "eye teeth" refers to the canine teeth located in the upper and lower jaws, which are considered of utmost importance. Thus, giving them up would symbolize an extreme willingness to sacrifice.
  • keep (one's) eye(s) peeled (for something or someone) The idiom "keep (one's) eye(s) peeled (for something or someone)" means to remain alert and watchful, paying close attention in order to spot or notice something or someone of interest or importance. It suggests being vigilant and actively looking out for any potential occurrences or changes.
  • cut one's eyeteeth on something The idiom "cut one's eyeteeth on something" means to gain experience or expertise in a particular field or activity, often as a result of enduring challenging or formative circumstances or situations. It implies that someone has acquired knowledge or skill through firsthand experience or a period of intense learning.
  • stare something in the face The idiom "stare something in the face" means to confront or acknowledge a difficult or unpleasant situation directly, without avoiding or ignoring it. It implies facing the reality or truth of something, often implying the need for courage or determination.
  • face something down The idiom "face something down" means to confront or stand up to a difficult or challenging situation, issue, or opponent with confidence, determination, and courage. It implies not backing down or being intimidated in the face of adversity or conflict.
  • face something with something The idiom "face something with something" means to confront or deal with a difficult or challenging situation using a particular attitude, approach, or resource. It implies taking on the situation head-on and using a specific tool, method, strategy, or mindset to address it effectively.
  • fade from something The idiom "fade from something" means to gradually lose importance, significance, or presence in a particular situation or context. It suggests a gradual decline or disappearance over time.
  • fade into something The idiom "fade into something" typically means to gradually merge or transition from one thing or state into another, often becoming less noticeable or prominent over time. It can refer to the gradual blending of colors, the diminishing of a sound, the decline in popularity or significance of something, or the gradual transition from one scene or event to another.
  • fade something in To "fade something in" is an idiom used mainly in film, video, or audio production. It refers to gradually increasing the volume, brightness, or visibility of something, such as a sound effect, music, or a visual element, typically at the beginning of a scene or a recording. It is the opposite of "fade out," which means gradually decreasing the volume, brightness, or visibility of something.
  • fade something out The idiom "fade something out" typically refers to the gradual reduction or elimination of something, often with the intention of making it less noticeable or prominent. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • fade something up "Fade something up" is an idiomatic expression used in audio engineering and production. It refers to gradually increasing the volume or intensity of a sound or music until it reaches the desired level. It involves smoothly transitioning from silence or a low volume to a higher volume, creating a gradual build-up or escalation of sound.
  • fail in something The idiom "fail in something" refers to an individual or an effort being unsuccessful or not achieving the desired result in a particular task, endeavor, or objective. It means to have insufficient or inadequate performance in completing or accomplishing something.
  • your fair share of something The idiom "your fair share of something" means receiving or experiencing an amount or portion that is considered just, equal, or reasonable. It implies that the distribution or allocation is balanced or equitable among individuals involved.
  • lose (one's) faith (in something or someone) The idiom "lose (one's) faith (in something or someone)" means to no longer believe in or trust a particular thing or person due to disappointment, betrayal, or a loss of confidence in their ability, reliability, or goodness. It refers to a profound loss of trust or belief that can result in a significant change in one's perspective or outlook.
  • fan something out The idiom "fan something out" means to spread or arrange something, such as papers, cards, or objects, in a way that they are opened or displayed in a shape resembling a fan. It can also be used figuratively to indicate spreading or dispersing something, like a group of people or information, in a similar manner.
  • go as/so far as to do something The idiom "go as/so far as to do something" means to take an extreme or extreme action, often beyond what is considered normal or reasonable. It implies that the person is willing to do something unexpected, unconventional, or unusual because of strong feelings or beliefs.
  • farm something out The idiom "farm something out" means to delegate or contract out work, tasks, or responsibilities to another person, organization, or company. It typically implies seeking external assistance, particularly when one lacks the resources, skills, or time to accomplish the task independently.
  • fasten something down (to something) The idiom "fasten something down (to something)" means to secure or attach something firmly to another object or surface, typically using nails, screws, or adhesive. It implies making sure that the item is tightly held in place and not easily movable or detached.
  • fasten something up The idiom "fasten something up" typically means to securely close or connect something, often using fasteners such as buttons, zippers, hooks, or buckles. It refers to the action of making sure that an item is properly closed, secured, or attached.
  • for fear of something The idiom "for fear of something" means to do or prevent something in order to avoid or prevent the occurrence of a particular event or outcome. It typically demonstrates a strong concern or apprehension about the consequences of an action or situation.
  • there’s no fear of something The idiom "there's no fear of something" means that there is no possibility or likelihood of something happening. It is often used to express confidence or assurance that a certain event or outcome will not occur.
  • feast (up)on something The idiom "feast (up)on something" means to greatly enjoy or indulge in something, typically food or an activity, to the point of excess or to derive great pleasure and satisfaction from it. It often implies an intense or voracious appetite for something pleasurable.
  • feed off (of) something The idiom "feed off (of) something" means to derive energy, inspiration, or support from something or someone. It is often used to describe how one gains strength or motivation from a particular source or situation.
  • feel up to something The idiom "feel up to something" means to have the physical or emotional energy, strength, or willingness to do something. It implies being in a state or condition where one feels capable or prepared for a specific task or activity.
  • feel something with something The idiom "feel something with something" typically means to experience or perceive a certain emotion or sensation due to a particular object, substance, or action. It suggests a strong connection between the feeling and the specified thing.
  • fence something in The idiom "fence something in" means to enclose or secure an area by erecting a physical barrier, typically a fence or wall. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of confining or restricting something or someone within certain limits or boundaries.
  • ferret something out (from something) The idiom "ferret something out (from something)" means to search or seek out something diligently and persistently, usually to uncover or find information or hidden objects. It implies the act of thorough exploration or investigation in order to reveal or discover something that is concealed, obscure, or hard to find.
  • fight something down To "fight something down" means to struggle against or resist a strong feeling, impulse, or temptation. It refers to the act of exerting control over one's emotions, desires, or urges, particularly when they are intense or disruptive. The phrase suggests the idea of actively suppressing or subduing an inner battle or conflict.
  • fight something out The idiom "fight something out" refers to resolving or settling a disagreement, conflict, or issue through confrontation, often involving a vigorous or intense argument or battle until a resolution or decision is reached. It can imply a willingness to engage in a lengthy or determined struggle to achieve a desired outcome.
  • filch something (from someone) The idiom "filch something (from someone)" refers to the act of stealing or taking something in a sneaky and secretive manner, usually without the owner's knowledge or permission. It implies a sense of slyness or cunning in the way the item is taken.
  • filch something (from someone/something) The idiom "filch something (from someone/something)" means to steal or take something in a sneaky or dishonest manner, often without the knowledge or permission of the rightful owner. It implies a sense of cunning or slyness in the act of theft.
  • filch something The idiom "filch something" means to steal or take something in a sly or sneaky manner, often without the owner's knowledge or permission.
  • file something (away) The idiom "file something (away)" typically means to organize and store documents or information in a systematic manner for future reference or safekeeping. It often refers to the physical act of placing papers into a file folder and arranging them in an orderly fashion. However, it can also be used figuratively, indicating the action of storing or categorizing information or ideas in one's mind for later use.
  • file for something The idiom "file for something" means to officially apply for or request something, typically by submitting the required documents or paperwork to the appropriate authority or institution. It is often used when referring to legal actions, such as filing for divorce, filing for bankruptcy, or filing for a permit or license.
  • file something off To "file something off" is an idiom that means to remove or smooth out a particular aspect, usually referring to eliminating sharp edges, rough surfaces, or unwanted details. It is derived from the action of using a file, a tool with roughened edges, to reshape or refine an object by slowly grinding away unwanted parts. This idiom can be used metaphorically to indicate the process of refining or perfecting something by removing unnecessary or extraneous elements, both in a physical or abstract sense.
  • fill something out The idiom "fill something out" means to complete or provide all the required information on a form, document, or application. It is commonly used when referring to the act of filling in blanks, answering questions, or adding necessary details to a written piece.
  • find it in your heart to do something The idiom "find it in your heart to do something" means to have the compassion, forgiveness, or generosity to do something, especially when it may be difficult or against one's initial inclination. It implies making an effort to overcome personal hesitations or negative emotions in order to act with kindness or understanding.
  • find something out The idiom "find something out" means to discover or learn information or facts about something or someone, often through investigation or research.
  • fine-tune something The idiom "fine-tune something" means to make small adjustments or refinements in order to improve the performance, accuracy, or effectiveness of something. It refers to the act of making minor changes in order to achieve optimal or desired results.
  • finish something off The idiom "finish something off" means to complete or conclude a task, project, or activity, often by adding final touches or performing the last necessary steps. It implies bringing something to its desired or intended end.
  • finish with something The idiom "finish with something" means to complete or conclude a particular task, activity, or topic of discussion. It implies reaching the end or finalizing a certain matter before moving on to the next one.
  • fire something up The idiom "fire something up" means to ignite or start something, typically with enthusiasm or energy. It can refer to physically starting a fire, such as lighting a stove or fireplace, or metaphorically sparking enthusiasm or motivation in oneself or others.
  • set something on fire The idiom "set something on fire" typically means to ignite or ignite something, usually in a literal sense, by lighting it with fire. However, it can also be used metaphorically to mean to energize, stimulate, or provoke excitement or enthusiasm.
  • fire something off (to someone) The idiom "fire something off (to someone)" means to send or deliver something quickly and without taking much time or effort. It often implies urgency or a desire for prompt action or response. It can refer to sending emails, messages, documents, or other forms of communication.
  • firm something up The idiom "firm something up" means to finalize or confirm plans, arrangements, or details that were previously discussed or uncertain. It typically implies making decisions or commitments more definite and less flexible.
  • the first/last to do something The idiom "the first/last to do something" refers to being the initial or final person to accomplish a particular task or take a certain action. It highlights the act of being at the forefront or the tail end of an action or achievement.
  • fish for something The idiom "fish for something" means to attempt to get or obtain something indirectly or by coaxing, often through subtle or strategic means. It can refer to seeking information, compliments, favors, or any kind of desired response, typically by prompting or provoking others.
  • fit in(to) something The idiom "fit in(to) something" means to belong, assimilate, or adapt smoothly into a particular group, environment, or social setting. It refers to the ability to become socially accepted and integrated into a specific context or situation without causing disruption or standing out.
  • fit something to something The idiom "fit something to something" means to adapt or adjust a particular object or matter to complement or align with another object or context. It implies making modifications or alterations so that the two elements can work together harmoniously or meet specific requirements.
  • fit with something The idiom "fit with something" means to be compatible or suitable with something. It can refer to physical compatibility, where a part or object fits perfectly into a specific place or matches the desired specifications. It can also refer to a person or thing being well-suited to a particular situation or group. In general, it implies a harmonious or suitable alignment between different elements.
  • fix something The idiom "fix something" typically means to repair, mend, or resolve a problem or situation. It can also refer to finding a solution or making something right.
  • fix something on(to) something The idiom "fix something on(to) something" means to attach or fasten something to another object or surface securely. It implies making something stable, secure, or properly positioned by attaching it firmly.
  • flash on something The idiom "flash on something" means to suddenly remember or recall something, particularly a memory or piece of information, usually for a brief moment or in a quick and unexpected manner. It often implies that the memory or information came to mind swiftly and vividly, as if it "flashed" before one's eyes.
  • flex something out of shape The idiom "flex something out of shape" refers to the act of bending or manipulating something excessively or forcefully to the point where it becomes distorted or deformed. It is often used metaphorically to describe the process of putting too much strain or pressure on a particular thing or situation, causing it to become unstable, dysfunctional, or compromised.
  • the flip side of something The idiom "the flip side of something" refers to an alternative or contrasting perspective, typically highlighting the drawbacks, negatives, or consequences of a particular situation, decision, or action. It suggests that there are two sides to every story or issue, with this phrase emphasizing the less favorable or less visible side.
  • flit from (something to something else) The idiom "flit from (something to something else)" means to move or shift quickly and easily from one thing or activity to another without focusing or staying in one place for an extended period. It implies a lack of commitment or attention and a tendency to be restless or easily distracted.
  • float into something The idiom "float into something" means to enter or join a situation or activity in a casual, effortless, or nonchalant manner. It implies a lack of urgency or a relaxed approach to getting involved.
  • float (up)on something The idiom "float (up)on something" typically means to rely or depend on something or someone for support or guidance. It suggests that one is able to navigate through a situation or life in general by finding solace or stability in that particular thing or person. It can also imply a sense of being carried along effortlessly or being buoyed by the given support or dependency.
  • flop as something The idiom "flop as something" refers to an action or endeavor that fails or is unsuccessful. It typically describes a situation or performance that does not meet expectations or falls short of anticipated success.
  • flop into something The idiom "flop into something" means to enter or settle into something in a careless or relaxed manner, often with a lack of consideration for proper or formal behavior. It implies a casual or spontaneous action, as opposed to a deliberate or calculated one.
  • flop something down on(to) something The idiom "flop something down on (to) something" refers to the act of placing or throwing something down in a careless or casual manner. It implies a lack of care or thoughtfulness in the way an object is handled or positioned.
  • flow across something The definition of the idiom "flow across something" is: To move or pass smoothly and continuously across a particular area or boundary, typically referring to a liquid substance. It signifies the seamless movement of a fluid without interruption or obstruction over a specific surface or through a specific location.
  • flow from something The idiom "flow from something" refers to the natural consequence, result, or outcome that occurs as a direct or indirect result of a particular action, event, or situation. It implies a logical progression or connection of ideas, actions, or occurrences.
  • flow in(to) something The idiom "flow in(to) something" refers to something that is being introduced or entering a particular place or situation gradually and consistently, usually in a smooth and continuous manner. It often implies the movement of people, things, or ideas into a specific space or context.
  • flow with something The idiom "flow with something" typically means to adapt and go along smoothly with a situation or circumstances, without resistance or difficulty. It refers to being flexible and adjusting oneself in order to fit into or be compatible with whatever is happening or being presented.
  • flub something up The idiom "flub something up" means to make a mistake or error that causes a failure or mess up a task, situation, or performance. It implies a blunder or misstep that results in messing up or spoiling something.
  • fly across something To "fly across something" is an idiomatic expression that means to move swiftly or rapidly across a place or object. It often implies going through the air quickly, as if flying, to reach a destination.
  • fly into something The idiom "fly into something" typically means to suddenly and uncontrollably become very angry, upset, or agitated.
  • fly to something The idiom "fly to something" typically means to travel rapidly or eagerly towards a particular thing or destination. It implies a sense of excitement, urgency, or enthusiasm in reaching the desired object, goal, or place.
  • fog something up The idiom "fog something up" refers to the act of causing something, usually a mirror, glass surface, or lens, to become covered or obscured by condensation or fog. It implies obstructing visibility or clarity. Additionally, it can be used metaphorically to mean making a situation, discussion, or understanding unclear or confusing.
  • fold something back The idiom "fold something back" typically means to bend or crease a part of something, such as a page or a piece of fabric, so that it is turned back or tucked under itself, usually to reveal or expose what is underneath or to create a neat and tidy arrangement.
  • fold something into something To "fold something into something" is an idiom that means to incorporate or blend one thing into another, typically in order to create a unified or integrated whole. It implies the act of combining or merging different elements or components to form a cohesive entity. This idiom can be used both in a literal sense, as when folding ingredients into a recipe, and in a figurative sense, when referring to the integration of ideas, concepts, or groups into a larger whole.
  • fold something over The idiom "fold something over" typically means to bend or crease something, such as a sheet of paper or fabric, in order to bring one part of it to lie flat on top of another part. This can be done by doubling or bending one part of the object over onto itself. Metaphorically, "fold something over" can also mean to consider or reflect upon something deeply or thoroughly.
  • fold something up The idiom "fold something up" means to carefully and neatly compact or close an object by repeatedly bending or layering parts of it until it can be easily stored or transported.
  • a lightning rod for something The idiom "a lightning rod for something" refers to a person or thing that attracts or absorbs criticism, blame, or negative attention. It suggests that the person or thing becomes the focus of such negative elements, much like a lightning rod attracts and absorbs lightning strikes.
  • a nose for something The idiom "a nose for something" typically means having a natural ability or talent to detect or find something, often suggesting a strong intuition or keen sense. It can refer to being skilled at discovering opportunities, detecting lies or deception, or having an instinctive knowledge in a particular area.
  • be good for something The definition of the idiom "be good for something" is that someone or something has abilities, qualities, or skills that are beneficial or useful in a particular situation or task. It implies that the person or thing has a valuable or practical purpose, and can contribute positively towards achieving a goal or solving a problem.
  • be hard up for something The idiom "be hard up for something" means to be in a situation where one lacks or is in desperate need of something, typically referring to money, resources, or necessities. It implies experiencing financial or material difficulties, being impoverished, or struggling to meet certain requirements.
  • be in line for something The idiom "be in line for something" means to be likely or expected to receive or achieve something in the future. It suggests that someone is next in line or has a high chance of getting a particular opportunity, position, or reward.
  • be well off for something The idiom "be well off for something" refers to having an abundant or sufficient supply of something. It conveys the idea of having a surplus or an ample amount of a specific resource or item.
  • force something down The idiom "force something down" typically means to make oneself eat or drink something, especially when one does not find it appetizing or enjoyable. It implies overcoming reluctance, disgust, or resistance to consume something.
  • fork something out The idiom "fork something out" means to reluctantly or begrudgingly spend or pay a significant amount of money for something, often when one feels it is expensive or unnecessary. It usually implies a sense of dissatisfaction or annoyance with the cost involved.
  • fork something over (to someone) The idiom "fork something over (to someone)" means to give or hand over something, often reluctantly or unwillingly. It implies that the person giving something up may not be happy about it or may feel as though they are losing something valuable.
  • fork something over The idiom "fork something over" means to reluctantly give or surrender something, usually money or possessions, often under pressure or against one's will. It implies a lack of willingness to part with the item or to give it freely.
  • found something (up)on something The idiom "found something (upon) something" typically means to come across or discover something unexpectedly while looking through or searching for something else.
  • frame something in something To "frame something in something" is an idiom that means to provide a particular perspective or context for understanding or presenting something. It refers to presenting or portraying something in a particular way that influences the interpretation or perception of that thing. It involves setting or positioning something within a specific framework or point of reference to guide how people perceive and understand it.
  • frame something out The idiom "frame something out" refers to the act of constructing or outlining a structure or plan, typically with basic or preliminary elements. It involves creating a framework or rough outline before proceeding with further details or filling in the specifics of the project or idea.
  • make free with something The idiom "make free with something" means to use, handle, or consume something without hesitation, reservation, or permission, often in a careless or excessive manner. It implies taking liberties or assuming entitlement beyond what is considered appropriate or acceptable.
  • be fresh out of something The idiom "be fresh out of something" means to have completely run out of or be devoid of a particular item or resource. It implies that there is none left or readily available.
  • get a kick from/out of something The idiom "get a kick from/out of something" means to experience enjoyment, excitement, or pleasure from something. It often implies that the person finds it thrilling or highly entertaining.
  • front on something The idiom "front on something" typically refers to facing or confronting a particular situation or problem directly, without hesitation or evasion. It suggests taking a proactive and assertive approach to tackle a challenge without any delay or avoidance.
  • fry something up The idiom "fry something up" typically means to cook something by frying it in hot oil or fat.
  • fuck something up The idiom "fuck something up" refers to the act of ruining, damaging, or making a mess of something, typically as a result of careless or incompetent actions. It conveys the idea of severely and irreversibly impairing or sabotaging a certain situation, plan, object, or outcome.
  • fuck with something The idiom "fuck with something" is a colloquial expression that means to tamper with or interfere with something in an inappropriate, disruptive, or bothersome manner. It implies intentionally disturbing or altering something, often with negative intentions or consequences.
  • fuel something (up) The idiom "fuel something (up)" means to supply or provide something, typically with energy or resources, in order to enhance its performance or function. This can be used literally, such as adding fuel to a vehicle to make it run, or metaphorically, like providing motivation or inspiration to someone.
  • know something full/perfectly/very well The idiom "know something full/perfectly/very well" refers to having a comprehensive understanding or knowledge about a particular subject or topic. It implies that the person has extensive familiarity and expertise in the matter in question, leaving little room for doubt or uncertainty.
  • the woods are full of something The idiom "the woods are full of something" typically means that there are a large number or abundance of something, often in a negative or undesirable context. It suggests that there are many instances of whatever is being referred to, often implying that they are problematic, troublesome, dangerous, or deceitful.
  • fuse something with something To "fuse something with something" means to combine or blend two or more things together, usually in a way that creates a new or unified entity. It implies merging or melding elements, ideas, or concepts to form a cohesive whole.
  • fuse with something The idiom "fuse with something" means to combine or merge with something, usually resulting in a unified or integrated entity or concept.
  • Futz something up The idiom "futz something up" refers to the act of messing something up, typically by tinkering with or making unnecessary changes to it. It implies a sense of damaging or ruining something through careless or misguided actions.
  • gag on something The idiom "gag on something" means to have a strong physical or emotional reaction of disgust or dislike towards something, often leading to retching or choking. It can be used figuratively to express extreme distaste or aversion to an idea, situation, or experience.
  • gain from something The idiom "gain from something" means to derive benefit, advantage, or personal growth from a particular experience, situation, or activity. It implies that an individual or group has obtained something valuable or positive as a result of their involvement or interaction.
  • gain in something The idiom "gain in something" typically refers to acquiring or obtaining an advantage, improvement, or increase in a particular aspect or quality. It suggests progress or development in a specific area.
  • gain something from something The idiom "gain something from something" means to acquire or obtain a benefit, advantage, or positive outcome as a result of a particular situation, experience, or action. It typically implies receiving something valuable or useful from a specific source or circumstance.
  • gas something up The idiom "gas something up" typically means to fill a vehicle with fuel, such as gasoline or diesel, in order to make it ready for use or to ensure it has enough fuel to operate.
  • run something out of something The idiom "run something out of something" refers to depleting or exhausting the supply or quantity of something, often unintentionally or excessively. It means using up or consuming all of a particular resource, product, or substance.
  • gasp something out The idiom "gasp something out" refers to the act of uttering something with great effort or difficulty while drawing a quick, sharp breath. It usually indicates a state of surprise, shock, or intense emotion.
  • gather something from something The idiom "gather something from something" means to obtain information, knowledge, or a sense of something from a particular source or situation. It implies the act of collecting or extracting relevant details or ideas from a given context.
  • gather something The idiom "gather something" typically means to collect, accumulate, or bring together people, things, or information. It can also refer to the act of understanding or comprehending something.
  • gather something up The idiom "gather something up" refers to the act of collecting or assembling various items or things that are dispersed or scattered in order to consolidate or organize them.
  • get something The idiom "get something" typically means to obtain or acquire something, either physically or metaphorically. It implies the act of receiving, procuring, or achieving something desired or needed.
  • be/get on top of something The idiom "be/get on top of something" means to have control over or be fully aware of a situation, task, or problem. It implies being in a position of understanding and being able to handle something effectively.
  • get a grip on something The idiom "get a grip on something" means to take control of or gain a better understanding of a situation, problem, or task. It implies the need to focus, gather one's thoughts, and develop a sense of control or mastery over the matter at hand.
  • get a kick out of something The idiom "get a kick out of something" means to find great enjoyment, amusement, or excitement in something. It often implies a sense of pleasure derived from a particular experience or activity.
  • get something across The idiom "get something across" means to successfully convey or communicate information, ideas, or feelings to someone in a way that they can understand or grasp. It implies effectively making a point or ensuring the message is clearly understood by the recipient.
  • get at something The idiom "get at something" means to find a way to understand or discover something, especially if it is difficult or hidden. It can also refer to attempting to approach or engage with a particular topic or issue in a deliberate manner.
  • get back to something The idiom "get back to something" means to return or resume an activity or task after a temporary interruption or break. It implies a need to continue or revisit a particular matter that was put on hold or set aside temporarily.
  • get something down (in black and white) The idiom "get something down (in black and white)" means to have something written or documented officially, typically in a clear and explicit manner, often as a means to ensure clarity, accuracy, or official recognition.
  • get down to (doing) something The idiom "get down to (doing) something" means to begin doing or focusing on a task or activity in a serious and determined manner. It implies that the person is no longer procrastinating, but has finally started working on the task at hand.
  • get something in(to) something The idiom "get something in(to) something" refers to the act of successfully including or fitting something into a particular place, situation, or schedule. It implies the accomplishment of incorporating or inserting something in a desired manner.
  • get inside something The idiom "get inside something" typically refers to gaining access to or understanding something deeply or thoroughly. It can also refer to entering a physical location or space.
  • get into something The idiom "get into something" means to become involved or interested in a particular activity, subject, or situation. It implies engaging or immersing oneself into something, often willingly or with enthusiasm.
  • get something out The idiom "get something out" generally means to remove or extract something from a place, to retrieve or obtain something, or to express or communicate something.
  • get something over The idiom "get something over" typically means to complete or finish something, especially if it is difficult, uncomfortable, or undesired. It suggests getting through a task or situation in order to move on or relieve oneself from it.
  • get something past To "get something past" someone means to successfully deceive or trick them, often by hiding information or persuading them to overlook something. It is usually used in situations where one person is attempting to do or obtain something without another person's awareness or approval.
  • get to something To "get to something" means to finally be able to do or address something that you have been wanting or needing to do, often after waiting for a certain period of time or overcoming obstacles. It implies reaching a point where you are able to attend to a task, complete a project, or deal with a particular matter.
  • get up something The idiom "get up something" typically means to organize, arrange, or put effort into creating or preparing something. It implies actively working towards accomplishing a goal, especially in terms of planning or setting up a particular event, project, or situation.
  • get up to something The idiom "get up to something" means to engage in or actively involve oneself in something, especially something mischievous, secretive, or improper.
  • get with something The idiom "get with something" typically means to become familiar with or to start using or participating in something. It implies adapting, acquainting oneself with, or understanding a particular concept, activity, or situation.
  • lay the ghost of something The idiom "lay the ghost of something" means to finally put an end to or overcome a past experience, trauma, fear, or problem. It implies finding closure, resolution, or peace regarding a particular issue that has been lingering or haunting someone's mind or emotions.
  • give out with something The idiom "give out with something" means to express or utter something, typically with enthusiasm, confidence, or in a vibrant manner. It often implies offering information, opinions, or emotions freely or in an unrestrained manner.
  • give something a try The idiom "give something a try" means to attempt or make an effort to do or achieve something, often with the intention of testing or evaluating its success or feasibility.
  • give something back The idiom "give something back" means to return or repay something to someone or something with gratitude or reciprocity for what they have done or provided. It often implies an act of kindness, generosity, or service to show appreciation or make amends.
  • give something off The idiom "give something off" means to emit or release a specific smell, gas, or substance. It refers to the process of producing or dispersing something into the environment.
  • give something out The idiom "give something out" means to distribute or hand out something to a group of people or individuals. It implies the act of giving or distributing something to others, often in a systematic or organized manner. It can refer to disseminating information, sharing resources, or providing materials to others.
  • give something up The idiom "give something up" means to quit or stop doing something, usually because it is difficult, unsustainable, or undesirable. It can refer to giving up a habit, a hobby, a pursuit, or even a relationship.
  • give vent to something The idiom "give vent to something" means to express or release one's emotions, thoughts, or frustrations openly and freely. It signifies the act of letting out one's feelings, typically in a passionate or unrestrained manner.
  • give with something The idiom "give with something" typically means to accompany or provide something along with another item or action. It implies offering an extra or bonus item or action in addition to the main item or action being discussed.
  • glass something in The idiom "glass something in" typically means to enclose or cover an area with glass, such as windows or a roof. It refers to the process of constructing or installing glass panels to create a transparent barrier, usually in buildings or structures, to let in natural light and provide a view of the surroundings.
  • gleam with something The idiom "gleam with something" means to have a shining or radiant quality, often accompanied by a particular emotion or expression. It implies a sense of brightness, excitement, or intense feeling that is noticeable in a person's eyes, smile, or overall appearance.
  • glide across something The idiom "glide across something" means to move smoothly and effortlessly across a surface or through a situation. It implies graceful and fluid movement without encountered obstacles or difficulties.
  • glint with something The idiom "glint with something" typically means that something is shining or reflecting light in a way that suggests a particular quality or emotion. It is often used to describe eyes or other objects that emit a gleam or sparkle, indicating a certain emotion or attitude, such as excitement, mischief, intelligence, or determination.
  • gloat over something The idiom "gloat over something" means to take great pleasure or satisfaction in something, often in a way that is smug, boastful, or enjoyed at the expense of others. It involves expressing or displaying one's happiness or superiority over a situation, accomplishment, or misfortune of someone else.
  • glow with something The idiom "glow with something" typically means to radiate or display a particular emotion, feeling, or quality prominently or intensely. It suggests a visible manifestation of inner warmth, joy, excitement, or satisfaction. For example: - "She was glowing with happiness after receiving the promotion." - "The bride glowed with love and anticipation on her wedding day." - "The Olympic champion glowed with pride as she held her gold medal." - "The garden glowed with vibrant colors in the evening sun." In general, when someone or something is described as glowing with a certain attribute, it implies a noticeable and positive aura or appearance associated with that quality.
  • glue something down The idiom "glue something down" means to fix or secure something firmly in place by using glue or adhesive. This can be both literal or figurative, suggesting that someone or something is being firmly attached or made secure.
  • glue something on(to) something The idiom "glue something on(to) something" means to attach, stick, or fix something securely onto another object or surface using glue or adhesive. It implies a permanent or tight binding. It can also be used figuratively to describe the act of joining or attaching something in a non-literal sense.
  • go after someone, something The idiom "go after someone, something" means to actively pursue or make an effort to capture, obtain, achieve, or pursue someone or something. It implies taking determined action, often with determination or aggression, to attain a desired goal or outcome.
  • go down something The idiom "go down something" typically refers to the act of descending or traveling along a path or route, often metaphorically. It can imply physically going down a slope or incline, such as a hill or staircase, or figuratively progressing through a series of actions or steps. The phrase is versatile and can be used in various contexts, depending on the specific situation or task at hand.
  • go down with something The idiom "go down with something" typically means to become ill or sick with a certain illness or disease.
  • go on with something The idiom "go on with something" means to continue doing or pursuing something despite difficulties, interruptions, or distractions. It implies persistence, determination, or perseverance in the face of challenges. It can also refer to carrying on with a task, conversation, or event without stopping or getting sidetracked.
  • go out with something The idiom "go out with something" typically means to conclude or end something, especially in a successful or noteworthy manner. It can also refer to sharing or distributing something, often one's final contribution or action in a particular context.
  • go up something The idiom "go up something" typically means to ascend or climb a particular place or object. It refers to physically moving in an upward direction along a path or structure.
  • go with something The idiom "go with something" means to agree, accept, or choose something; to be compatible or suitable with something; or to accompany or be present with something.
  • (have) got something going (with someone) The idiom "(have) got something going (with someone)" means to be involved in a romantic or personal relationship with someone. It implies that there is a mutual attraction or connection between the two individuals.
  • be going on something The idiom "be going on something" is used to describe the approximate amount or duration of time something has reached or will reach. It indicates that something is approaching or reaching a specific state, condition, or age.
  • get something going The idiom "get something going" is used to indicate the act of initiating, starting, or getting something started or moving. It typically refers to kick-starting an event, project, discussion, or any other activity.
  • make good something The idiomatic phrase "make good something" means to rectify or put right something that has gone wrong or caused damage. It refers to taking necessary actions or measures to fix the problem and restore the situation or object to its original or proper state.
  • take something with a pinch (or grain) of salt The idiom "take something with a pinch (or grain) of salt" means to view or accept something with skepticism, doubt, or a degree of caution. It advises one not to completely believe or trust the information or statement being presented.
  • grapple with something The idiom "grapple with something" means to struggle with or attempt to understand or solve a difficult problem or situation.
  • make great play of something The idiom "make great play of something" means to emphasize, showcase, or draw attention to something, often with a sense of exaggeration or showmanship. It implies putting a significant amount of effort or emphasis on an activity, action, or event for the purpose of making it seem impressive or important.
  • grind something down The idiom "grind something down" means to wear away or physically reduce the size of something by using consistent and persistent effort or force. It can also refer to continuously working on a task or problem until it is completed or resolved, often through diligent and repetitive actions.
  • grind something into something The idiom "grind something into something" typically means to crush, pulverize, or reduce something into very small particles or a fine powder by applying significant pressure or force. It can also be used figuratively to describe a repetitive and laborious process of learning or studying something in great detail until it becomes deeply ingrained or understood.
  • grind something out The idiom "grind something out" means to produce or accomplish something through persistent and hard work, usually in a repetitive or tedious manner, often in spite of challenges or difficulties. It refers to the act of diligently and tirelessly working on a task until it is completed, even if it requires enduring monotony or performing repetitive actions.
  • grind something to something The idiom "grind something to something" typically refers to the act of reducing or transforming something into a particular state or condition through continuous and persistent effort or work. It conveys the idea of meticulously working on or processing something until it reaches a desired outcome or result.
  • grind something up The idiom "grind something up" typically means to reduce something into small, fine particles or create a powdery substance by crushing or pulverizing it. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate the process of working hard or putting in significant effort consistently to achieve a particular goal or outcome.
  • in the grip of something The idiom "in the grip of something" refers to being under the control or influence of something or someone, often describing a situation or condition that has a strong hold or power over a person or a group. It denotes a feeling of being trapped, overwhelmed, or unable to escape from a particular circumstance or emotion.
  • grovel (about) in something The idiom "grovel (about) in something" typically means to excessively and servilely seek forgiveness, favor, or approval from someone or to act in a subservient and obsequious manner in a particular situation. It conveys the idea of behaving in a manner that appears desperate or overly submissive to gain approval or avoid punishment.
  • grow in something The idiom "grow in something" refers to the process of becoming more skilled or proficient in a particular activity, field of study, or role over time. It suggests the development, improvement, or increasing mastery of a specific area of expertise through experience and learning.
  • grow into something The idiom "grow into something" means to develop the abilities, skills, or characteristics required for a certain role or situation over time. It implies personal or gradual growth, adaptability, and progress until one becomes suitable, competent, or comfortable in a specific role, position, or task.
  • grow over something The idiom "grow over something" means to gradually recover from or let go of a past hurt or disappointment. It implies that with time and personal growth, the pain or negative feelings associated with a particular event or circumstance diminish and eventually fade away.
  • grub on something The idiom "grub on something" refers to eating or consuming food, typically with enthusiasm or in a hearty manner. It implies an eagerness to enjoy and indulge in eating.
  • grunt something out The idiom "grunt something out" typically means to speak or express something with effort, strain, or without enthusiasm. It implies that the person is putting in a minimal amount of effort or enthusiasm while communicating.
  • gulp something back The idiom "gulp something back" means to forcefully suppress or restrain one's emotions or reaction, particularly when experiencing something shocking, surprising, or overwhelming. It implies the act of swallowing, or holding back, one's initial response or outburst.
  • gulp something down To "gulp something down" means to eat or drink quickly and in large amounts, usually without savoring or taking time to enjoy it. It implies consuming something hastily or voraciously.
  • gum something up The idiom "gum something up" means to cause a situation or process to become complicated, ineffective, or inoperable, often unintentionally or due to ineptitude. It refers to obstructing or muddling a task, plan, or system, similar to how chewing gum can stick and cause problems.
  • gush with something The idiom "gush with something" typically means to express or speak with strong and unrestrained enthusiasm, excitement, or praise about something. It can also refer to when something flows or pours out in a steady and forceful manner.
  • guzzle something down To "guzzle something down" means to consume a drink or food quickly and greedily, without taking time to savor or enjoy it. It implies drinking or eating in a hurried or excessive manner.
  • make a habit of something The idiom "make a habit of something" means to repeatedly engage in a particular action or behavior, often with the aim of creating a routine or customary practice. It implies consistent repetition and regularity over time.
  • hack something The idiom "hack something" typically means to find a clever or unorthodox solution to a problem, to quickly and skillfully accomplish a task, or to modify or manipulate something (such as a computer program or system) for a desired purpose, often by circumventing or exploiting its intended design or security measures.
  • hack something down The idiom "hack something down" refers to forcefully or vigorously cutting or chopping something, usually with repetitive and heavy strikes. It can be used literally when referring to physically cutting down trees, branches, or other objects with a sharp tool or instrument. Figuratively, it can mean to dismantle or destroy something or to overcome or eliminate a problem or obstacle in a forceful manner.
  • hack something off The idiom "hack something off" typically refers to forcibly cutting or removing something, often with quick and rough movements.
  • hack something out of something The idiom "hack something out of something" typically means to forcefully and roughly extract something from a larger entity or whole. It refers to a hasty or crude way of obtaining or achieving something, often without taking the time or effort for a more refined approach.
  • hack something to something The idiom "hack something to something" typically means to find a clever or alternative way to achieve a desired outcome or result. It involves using unconventional methods or making creative adjustments to accomplish a particular goal. The word "hack" in this context refers to a skillful or resourceful solution, rather than its negative connotation of unauthorized computer access.
  • hack something up The idiom "hack something up" typically means to cut, chop, or sever something roughly or forcefully, usually with a knife or another sharp object. It can also refer to the act of dismembering or dividing something into smaller parts hastily or carelessly.
  • ham something up The idiom "ham something up" means to exaggerate or overact in a deliberately exaggerated and melodramatic manner, often to grab attention or provoke a reaction. It is commonly used in theater, film, or any situation where someone is making a performance or trying to be the center of attention by being overly dramatic or flamboyant.
  • hammer something into something The idiom "hammer something into something" means to forcefully instill or impress an idea, concept, or information into someone's mind through repetition, persistence, or forceful persuasion. It implies that the information or idea is repeatedly emphasized or enforced to ensure it is fully understood or remembered.
  • hammer something out The idiom "hammer something out" means to negotiate, resolve or work on something through extensive discussion, compromise, or focused and persistent effort. It refers to the process of reaching an agreement, finding a solution, or finalizing details through a determined and often intense exchange of ideas, opinions, or actions. The term "hammer" in this context refers to the repetitive and forceful nature of working diligently and persistently, similar to the action of using a hammer.
  • get your hands on something The idiom "get your hands on something" means to obtain or acquire something, often emphasizing the difficulty or effort required to do so.
  • get/lay your hands on something The idiom "get/lay your hands on something" means to acquire, obtain, or have possession of something, often suggesting that it may be difficult or challenging to find or obtain.
  • make something with (one's) own fair hand(s) The idiom "make something with (one's) own fair hand(s)" means to create or produce something using one's own skills, abilities, or efforts. It emphasizes personal involvement and craftsmanship in the making of something rather than relying on others or external resources. It connotes a sense of pride and ownership in the work accomplished.
  • old hand at something The idiom "old hand at something" refers to a person who is experienced, skilled, or knowledgeable in a particular activity, skill, or situation due to having done it for a long time. This individual is highly proficient and capable in their area of expertise.
  • hand something back (to someone) The idiom "hand something back (to someone)" means to return or give something that belongs to someone, usually by physically giving it to them or returning it to its original owner.
  • hand something down The idiom "hand something down" typically refers to the act of passing or transmitting something, such as an object, tradition, knowledge, or skills, from one generation or person to another, usually within a family or a community. It can involve the transfer of physical items, like heirlooms or possessions, as well as intangible concepts, beliefs, or teachings. This idiom implies the continuity and preservation of something valuable over time, ensuring its legacy and significance endure.
  • hand something in The idiom "hand something in" means to submit or give something, usually a document or assignment, to a person in authority or a designated recipient. It typically refers to fulfilling an obligation or completing a task by physically delivering the required item.
  • hand something on The idiom "hand something on" means to pass or transfer something to someone else, typically passing down knowledge, skills, or responsibilities to someone younger or less experienced.
  • hand something out The idiom "hand something out" means to distribute or give something to multiple people. It refers to the act of physically providing or giving out items, information, or assignments to a group of individuals.
  • hand something over The definition of the idiom "hand something over" is to transfer or relinquish possession or control of something to someone else.
  • hard on the heels of something The idiom "hard on the heels of something" means that one event or thing directly follows another in quick succession, usually with little or no time in between. It implies a sense of immediate or rapid succession.
  • run with something The idiom "run with something" means to take an idea, suggestion, or opportunity and enthusiastically pursue it or act upon it. It implies a sense of enthusiasm, initiative, or taking charge to make the most of a situation or idea.
  • it does no harm (for somebody) to do something The expression "it does no harm (for somebody) to do something" means that it is not detrimental or bad for someone to do a specific action. It suggests that there may be potential benefits or positive outcomes from performing the mentioned action, even if it is not necessarily crucial or mandatory. It implies that the action has little or no negative consequences and could potentially be beneficial in some way.
  • keep something under your hat The idiom "keep something under your hat" means to keep something a secret or to refrain from sharing information with others. It implies that one should keep certain knowledge or information to themselves, not revealing it to prevent others from knowing or gossiping about it.
  • pick something out of a hat The idiom "pick something out of a hat" means to choose or select something at random, often without any thought or deliberation. It refers to the act of picking an item from a hat without knowing what it is beforehand, indicating a random or arbitrary selection process.
  • get something into your/somebody's head The idiom "get something into your/somebody's head" means to make someone understand or accept something, especially when they are resistant or unwilling to do so. It implies the act of trying to convince or persuade someone to change their perspective or way of thinking.
  • put something into someone's head The idiom "put something into someone's head" means to implant an idea or suggestion in someone's mind, often with intention of influencing their thoughts, beliefs, or actions. It implies the act of persuading or convincing someone about something, leading them to ponder, consider, or act upon the idea or suggestion that has been instilled in their mind.
  • put something out of your head The idiom "put something out of your head" means to forget about or stop thinking about something, especially an idea or a worry, in order to focus on other things or to avoid dwelling on it.
  • head something out The idiom "head something out" typically means to go in a particular direction or take action in order to prevent or handle a problem, situation, or conflict. It suggests taking a proactive approach to address or resolve an issue before it becomes more problematic.
  • head something up The idiom "head something up" means to be in charge of or take the lead in organizing, managing, or supervising a project, team, or organization. It refers to being the person at the forefront or taking the highest position of authority in a particular endeavor.
  • heap something up The idiom "heap something up" refers to the act of piling or stacking a large quantity of objects or material in a disorderly manner. It implies creating a heap or mound by gathering and accumulating things without organizing or arranging them neatly.
  • rip/tear the heart out of something The idiom "rip/tear the heart out of something" means to completely devastate, destroy, or remove the most essential or important part of something, resulting in its deterioration or loss of value. It is often used to emphasize the severity or impact of an action or event.
  • set your heart on something The idiom "set your heart on something" means to have a strong determination or desire to obtain or achieve something. It implies being focused and dedicated towards attaining a specific goal.
  • your heart isn't in something The idiom "your heart isn't in something" means that you lack the motivation, enthusiasm, or passion for a particular task, activity, or goal. It suggests that you are not fully committed or emotionally invested in what you are doing.
  • heat something up (to something) The idiom "heat something up (to something)" means to increase the temperature of something, often by using a heat source, until it reaches a specific level or temperature.
  • play hell with something The idiom "play hell with something" means to have a disruptive or damaging effect on something, causing chaos, difficulties, or significant problems. It implies that the situation becomes disorderly or goes awry due to certain actions or factors.
  • raise hell with something To "raise hell with something" means to cause a commotion or create trouble regarding a particular issue or situation. It implies taking aggressive or assertive actions to express anger, frustration, or disapproval, often by complaining loudly, challenging authority, or demanding change.
  • make something of (oneself) The idiom "make something of (oneself)" refers to someone achieving success, recognition, or status by improving their skills, abilities, or position in life through hard work, determination, or ambition. It often implies someone transforming their life into something better or accomplishing their goals.
  • hew something down The idiom "hew something down" means to cut down or chop down something, typically referring to trees, bushes, or other vegetation. It implies the act of using force or a tool, such as an axe or a saw, to remove or fell something, usually for clearing or shaping purposes.
  • hew something out of something The idiom "hew something out of something" typically means to carve or shape something out of a larger material or to create or achieve something through hard work, determination, or skill by starting from a basic or challenging situation.
  • hew to something The idiom "hew to something" means to adhere strictly or conform to a particular set of principles, beliefs, or standards. It implies staying true to a certain course of action or following a specific path without deviating from it.
  • high on something The idiom "high on something" typically refers to a state of euphoria, excitement, or intense enthusiasm caused by a certain experience, substance, or activity. It implies a feeling of elation or extreme positivity.
  • the high point/spot of something The idiom "the high point/spot of something" typically means the best or most successful part or moment of something. It refers to the peak or climax of an event, experience, or achievement. It can also describe the highlight or most memorable aspect of a situation or period of time.
  • hint at something To "hint at something" means to indirectly suggest or imply something, without explicitly stating it. It involves dropping small clues or indications about a particular topic or idea without fully disclosing it.
  • hint for something The idiom "hint for something" typically means to indirectly or subtly suggest or indicate something. It refers to giving a clue or indication about a particular thing or topic without explicitly stating it.
  • hiss something out The idiom "hiss something out" typically refers to someone speaking or pronouncing words in a forceful and angry manner, often accompanied by a sharp or sibilant sound like a hiss. It implies that the person is expressing their words with strong emotions and hostility.
  • hit on something The idiom "hit on something" means to discover or come across something valuable, significant, or useful by chance or through efforts.
  • hit something off To "hit it off" is an idiomatic phrase that means to establish a good or friendly relationship with someone quickly and easily. It typically refers to two people instantly connecting or getting along well with each other.
  • hit out (for something or some place) The idiom "hit out (for something or some place)" means to travel or depart to a specific destination or seek something with determination or urgency. It implies making a concentrated effort to reach a goal or desired location by overcoming obstacles or challenges along the way.
  • fish something up out of something The idiom "fish something up out of something" refers to the action of retrieving or finding something, often with difficulty or after searching extensively in a particular place or situation. It implies that the object or idea being obtained is hidden, elusive, or hard to reach, similar to how one would try to catch a fish from water.
  • hold something in The idiom "hold something in" means to control or suppress one's emotions, feelings, or thoughts without expressing them outwardly. It refers to the act of keeping something private, not letting it be known or shown to others.
  • hold something out (to someone) The idiom "hold something out (to someone)" means to offer or present something to someone. It can be literal, referring to physically extending or presenting an object, or figurative, indicating the act of offering an opportunity, proposition, or suggestion to someone.
  • hold something over someone('s head) The idiom "hold something over someone's head" means to have leverage or control over someone by using information or a particular circumstance to manipulate or intimidate them. It refers to having power or influence in a situation that can be used to one's advantage.
  • hook something into something The idiom "hook something into something" means to connect or attach something to another thing, often with the use of hooks or fasteners. It can also refer to integrating or incorporating something into a larger system or structure.
  • hook something up The definition of the idiom "hook something up" is to connect, attach, or link one thing to another, typically in terms of electrical or electronic devices. It signifies the act of establishing a physical or functional connection between two or more components. It can also be used metaphorically to imply establishing a social or romantic connection.
  • hop something up The idiom "hop something up" means to make something more powerful, intense, or exciting, often by adding or increasing the amount of a particular ingredient or element. It can be used in various contexts, such as enhancing the taste of a drink by adding more flavor or increasing the horsepower of a vehicle by making modifications.
  • in the hope of something The idiom "in the hope of something" means to do or undertake an action with the expectation and desire for a specific outcome or result. It implies having a hopeful attitude or belief that the desired outcome will be achieved.
  • hope for something The idiom "hope for something" means to have a desire or expectation that a particular outcome or result will occur in the future. It implies anticipating or wishing for a positive or favorable outcome.
  • hotbed of something The idiom "hotbed of something" refers to a place or situation that is characterized by an intense or excessive amount of a particular thing or quality. It implies that the place is a breeding ground or center for the occurrence or development of that thing.
  • not give something houseroom The idiom "not give something houseroom" means to strongly reject or refuse to accept or tolerate something or someone. It indicates a complete lack of willingness to accommodate or include something in one's life or environment.
  • howl with something The idiom "howl with something" typically means to express or display a strong and intense emotion, usually negative or unpleasant, such as anguish, pain, sorrow, laughter, or joy. It implies that the emotion is so intense that it elicits a vocal and intense reaction, resembling a howling sound.
  • hunker down to something The idiom "hunker down to something" means to settle down comfortably or firmly commit oneself to a task or situation. It implies a sense of focus, determination, and readiness to put in the effort and dedication required to accomplish something or endure a difficult situation.
  • hush something up The idiom "hush something up" means to conceal or suppress information or a scandal in order to prevent it from being widely known or discussed. It implies trying to keep something secret or hidden to avoid public attention or embarrassment.
  • hype something up The idiom "hype something up" means to promote or advertise something in an exaggerated or excessive way in order to create excitement or anticipation. It often involves using exaggerated language, extravagant claims, or excessive promotion to generate interest and boost public perception, typically in relation to a product, event, or idea.
  • put something on ice The idiom "put something on ice" means to postpone or delay something for a later time or to temporarily set something aside. It refers to the act of preserving or preserving something by putting it in the freezer or on ice, where it can be kept fresh and ready for future use. In a figurative sense, it means to temporarily suspend or hold off on a plan, project, or idea until a more suitable or opportune moment arises.
  • ice something down The idiom "ice something down" means to cool or chill something, typically by placing it on or surrounded by ice. It is commonly used when referring to beverages, where ice is added to make them cold. However, it can also be used metaphorically to suggest a need to calm down or reduce the intensity of a situation.
  • ice something up The idiom "ice something up" typically means to cool, chill, or freeze something, either physically or metaphorically. It can refer to the act of applying ice or making something extremely cold, such as icing up a beverage or icing up a wounded body part. In a metaphorical sense, it can imply the need to calm or cool down a situation that has become heated or tense, by introducing a cooling factor or finding a solution to ease it.
  • a peg to hang something on The idiom "a peg to hang something on" refers to having a specific point or basis on which to build or support an argument, theory, or plan. It implies the need for a clear and solid foundation to provide credibility or evidence for a particular idea or concept.
  • hang tough on something To "hang tough on something" means to remain firm, resolute, and determined in one's stance or position, especially in the face of adversity, opposition, or challenges. It involves staying strongly committed and refusing to give up or back down despite difficult circumstances.
  • hang something up The idiom "hang something up" typically refers to putting an object, especially clothes or a phone, in its designated place for storage or display.
  • import something (from something) (into something) The idiom "import something (from something) (into something)" usually refers to the action of bringing or introducing something, typically goods or products, from one place or source into another place or market. It signifies the act of bringing in or acquiring items or concepts from a specific origin or location and incorporating them into a different setting.
  • impress something into something The idiom "impress something into something" typically means to firmly or forcefully make a mark or indentation on a surface, often using pressure or a tool.
  • impress something (up)on something The idiom "impress something (up)on something" means to convey or communicate something forcefully and firmly onto someone or something. It typically refers to expressing an idea, message, or knowledge in a way that ensures its understanding or acceptance.
  • imprint something on(to) something The idiom "imprint something on(to) something" means to make a strong or lasting impression or impact on something or someone. It refers to the act of embedding or etching something firmly into a person's memory, consciousness, or an object's surface. It implies leaving a significant mark that can't easily be forgotten or erased.
  • imprint something with something The idiom "imprint something with something" means to make a strong or lasting impression on someone or something, usually by firmly instilling certain qualities, beliefs, ideas, or characteristics. It refers to the act of leaving a significant or indelible mark on someone or something that is not easily forgotten or erased.
  • improve (up)on something The idiom "improve (up)on something" means to make something better or of higher quality by adding modifications, enhancements, or refinements to an existing thing or idea. It implies surpassing or exceeding the original form or concept in terms of effectiveness, efficiency, performance, or overall value.
  • in for something The idiom "in for something" typically means that someone is going to experience or endure a specific situation, usually one that may be challenging, unexpected, or possibly negative. It implies that the person has committed themselves to a predicament or consequence, either willingly or unknowingly.
  • in pursuit of something The idiom "in pursuit of something" means actively working towards or seeking to attain a goal, ambition, or desired outcome.
  • ink something in The idiom "ink something in" means to make a commitment or agreement official and binding by writing it down or signing a document. It implies a level of certainty and permanence.
  • make inroads into something The idiom "make inroads into something" refers to making progress or gaining success in accomplishing or establishing something, usually in a challenging or competitive context. It implies making significant advancements or penetrating a previously untapped or difficult area or market.
  • make inroads in/into something The idiom "make inroads in/into something" means to gradually gain progress, success, or influence in a particular domain or area. It refers to making advancements or penetrating into a new territory, market, or field. It often implies overcoming obstacles or establishing a presence where one previously did not exist.
  • inscribe something into something The idiom "inscribe something into something" means to engrave or write something onto a surface or object. It implies the act of permanently marking or documenting information, words, or symbols onto a material or medium.
  • inscribe something on(to) something To inscribe something on or onto something is an idiom that means to carve, engrave, or write words or a message onto a surface or object. It often implies a permanent or lasting mark.
  • inscribe something with something The idiom "inscribe something with something" means to engrave, carve, or write something onto a surface or object, using a specific material or element to create a lasting mark or message. It often refers to creating a permanent record or personalizing something with meaningful words, symbols, or designs.
  • turn something inside out/upside down The idiom "turn something inside out/upside down" means to thoroughly examine or search through something, often causing disorder or chaos in the process. It implies a complete reversal or thorough investigation of something in order to understand or find what one is looking for.
  • instill something in(to) something The idiom "instill something in(to) something" means to gradually or firmly introduce or implant an idea, belief, value, or quality into someone's mind, understanding, or character. It suggests the process of slowly and persistently influencing or teaching someone, typically with the intention of having a long-lasting impact or effect.
  • interpose something in (to) something The idiom "interpose something in (to) something" means to insert or place something between two objects or entities in order to create a barrier or separation. It can also refer to interrupting or inserting oneself into a conversation or situation in order to express an opinion or mediate between two parties.
  • get one’s teeth into something The idiom "get one's teeth into something" means to become deeply engaged or intensely involved in a task or activity. It implies a level of enthusiasm, focus, and determination to fully understand, tackle, or succeed in whatever one is involved in. It often indicates a desire to thoroughly comprehend or accomplish something challenging or complex.
  • get your teeth into something The idiom "get your teeth into something" means to become fully engrossed or deeply involved in a task or project, often suggesting a sense of determination and enthusiasm in tackling it. It implies a high level of commitment and willingness to work hard in order to complete or understand something.
  • get/sink your teeth into something To "get/sink your teeth into something" is an idiomatic expression meaning to become deeply involved or engaged in a task, project, or activity. It refers to the act of approaching something with enthusiasm, determination, and wholehearted effort, often implying intense focus and commitment.
  • invest someone's time in something To "invest someone's time in something" means to allocate or dedicate someone's time, effort, or energy towards a specific task, activity, or endeavor. It implies giving one's full attention, involvement, or commitment to that particular thing, often with the expectation of achieving a worthwhile outcome or result.
  • iron something out The idiom "iron something out" means to resolve or settle a problem, disagreement, or dispute through discussion, negotiation, or compromise. It refers to the act of smoothing out the wrinkles or eliminating the difficulties, just as an iron smoothes out the creases in fabric.
  • be not cut out for something The idiom "be not cut out for something" means that a person is not suited or naturally inclined to excel or succeed in a particular task, role, or occupation. It implies that they lack the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities to perform well in that specific area.
  • issue a call for something The idiom "issue a call for something" means to make a formal or official request or demand for a particular action, response, or resource. It involves publicly or officially asking others to contribute, respond, or provide something that is deemed necessary or important.
  • issue from something The idiom "issue from something" generally means to originate or arise from a certain source or cause. It implies that a particular result, outcome, or consequence stems directly from a specific situation, event, or action.
  • issue something as something The idiom "issue something as something" typically means to officially release or distribute something, such as a document, report, statement, or announcement, in a specific form or format. It implies the act of making something known or publicizing it in a specific manner or under a particular designation.
  • take issue with something To "take issue with something" means to disagree with or challenge it, often expressing one's dissatisfaction or objection to a particular statement, opinion, action, or belief.
  • leave something in its/his/her wake The idiom "leave something in its/his/her wake" means to cause a significant impact or consequence as a result of a particular action or event. It refers to the aftermath or the lingering effects that remain after something or someone has passed through a specific situation, leaving a lasting impression or influence.
  • stand/turn something on its head To stand/turn something on its head means to completely change or reverse a situation, perspective, or understanding of something. It refers to radically altering the usual or expected way of thinking or doing something, often leading to a different interpretation or outcome.
  • jab something into something The idiom "jab something into something" means to swiftly and forcefully insert or thrust something into another object or place. It typically implies a quick and often aggressive action.
  • jab something out The idiom "jab something out" typically refers to hastily or quickly producing or completing something, often with little thought or care. It implies doing something quickly and roughly, without much attention to detail or quality.
  • jack something up The idiom "jack something up" typically means to raise, elevate, or increase something to a higher level or degree, often involving a great amount of effort or force. It can also refer to intentionally causing damage or making a situation worse through actions or decisions.
  • jam something up something The idiom "jam something up something" typically means to forcefully insert or place something into a narrow or tight space, often causing obstruction or difficulty. It suggests a sense of pushing or wedging something tightly into a confined area.
  • jam something up The idiom "jam something up" typically means to block, obstruct, or hinder the progress or function of something or someone. It suggests a situation where there is a difficult or problematic issue that is preventing smooth operations or advancement.
  • jerk something up The idiom "jerk something up" typically means to quickly or abruptly lift or raise something. It implies a sudden and often forceful movement to elevate an object.
  • jet from something The idiom "jet from something" means to quickly and abruptly leave or depart from a particular place or situation. It implies a sudden and swift movement, often in response to a need or desire to escape, avoid, or disengage from something.
  • jot something down To "jot something down" means to quickly and informally write down a note or piece of information. It implies writing something briefly and without much detail or elaboration.
  • judge something on its own merits The idiom "judge something on its own merits" means to evaluate or form an opinion about something based solely on its inherent qualities or specific merits, without being biased or influenced by external factors. It suggests making a fair and objective assessment, considering the attributes, characteristics, or worth of a subject independently, rather than being swayed by personal opinions, prejudices, or comparisons to other things.
  • juice something up The idiom "juice something up" means to make something more exciting, energetic, or powerful. It often refers to adding extra energy, enthusiasm, or intensity to a situation, activity, or object.
  • jumble something up The idiom "jumble something up" means to mix or scramble things together in a disorganized or confused manner. It refers to creating a state of disorder or chaotic arrangement.
  • jump across something The idiom "jump across something" refers to the act of overcoming or bypassing an obstacle or difficulty in a quick or agile manner. It can be used both in a literal sense, to describe physically leaping over an object, and in a figurative sense, indicating finding a way around a problem or challenge.
  • jump down something The idiom "jump down something" typically refers to physically leaping or jumping from a higher place to a lower place, often with some level of risk or difficulty. It can also be used metaphorically to describe making a hasty or impulsive decision without considering the potential consequences.
  • jump over something The idiom "jump over something" typically means to physically leap or vault over an obstacle or barrier. It can also be used metaphorically to describe overcoming or bypassing a difficulty or challenge.
  • keep (one's) eye(s) open (for something or someone) The idiom "keep (one's) eye(s) open (for something or someone)" means to pay attention and remain alert in order to notice or find a specific thing or person. It suggests being observant and vigilant to avoid missing or overlooking something important.
  • keep a sharp lookout (for something or someone) The idiom "keep a sharp lookout (for something or someone)" means to remain vigilant, careful, and constantly aware of one's surroundings in order to spot or notice something or someone. It implies being highly observant and alert to avoid missing any significant details or potential threats.
  • keep something from (someone) The idiom "keep something from (someone)" means to not reveal or disclose information, knowledge, or truth to someone. It implies withholding something intentionally or keeping it secret from someone in order to protect, deceive, or prevent them from knowing or understanding it.
  • keep at something The idiom "keep at something" means to continue to work, persistently or determinedly, on a task or project until it is completed or accomplished. It suggests not giving up despite challenges, difficulties, or setbacks, and maintaining focus and effort until the desired outcome is achieved.
  • keep something down The idiom "keep something down" can mean to control or suppress something, especially when it comes to emotions, thoughts, or physical symptoms. It implies trying to prevent or limit the expression or manifestation of that particular thing.
  • keep from something The idiom "keep from something" means to prevent or avoid doing or experiencing something. It typically refers to restraining oneself or taking measures to avoid a particular action, feeling, or situation. It implies the act of consciously holding back or refraining from engaging in or being affected by something.
  • keep something inside The idiom "keep something inside" refers to the act of suppressing or concealing one's emotions, thoughts, or feelings instead of expressing them openly or sharing them with others. It implies the tendency to keep personal matters to oneself without sharing them with others, leading to a lack of communication or emotional release.
  • keep something on The idiom "keep something on" means to continue wearing, using, or having something, without taking it off or stopping its usage.
  • keep on something The idiom "keep on something" generally means to continue working on or focusing on a specific task, goal, or issue without giving up or becoming distracted. It implies persistent effort and determination in order to accomplish the desired outcome.
  • keep something quiet The idiom "keep something quiet" means to not reveal or disclose certain information or to keep it a secret.
  • keep to something The idiom "keep to something" means to stick to a particular plan, course of action, or schedule and avoid deviating or straying from it. It implies maintaining discipline, focus, or adherence to a set routine or task.
  • keep under something The idiom "keep under something" typically means to maintain control or dominance over someone or something, often by suppressing or restricting their actions or behavior. It can also refer to keeping something or someone in a subordinate or subservient position.
  • kick something down The idiom "kick something down" generally refers to forcefully breaking or overcoming a barrier, obstacle, or resistance in order to achieve a goal or desired outcome. It implies a strong, determined, and sometimes aggressive approach to dealing with challenges or difficulties.
  • kick something off The idiom "kick something off" means to start or initiate something, usually an event, project, or activity. It refers to the act of giving the initial push or motion to get something underway or into action. It often implies taking the first step or setting things in motion.
  • kill for something The idiom "kill for something" is an exaggerated expression used to convey an intense desire or longing for something. It implies that a person is willing to go to extreme lengths or do whatever it takes to acquire or have that particular thing or experience. However, it is important to note that this idiom is figurative and should not be taken literally, as it does not endorse or encourage actual violence.
  • something of the kind The idiom "something of the kind" is used to describe something that is similar or comparable to the topic being discussed, without specifying exact details or providing an exact example. It implies that there is a resemblance or similarity between the subject being referred to and something else, without providing specific details or examples.
  • something of the sort The idiom "something of the sort" is used when referring to something which is similar or comparable to what has been mentioned or implied, but the exact details or specifics are uncertain or unknown. It is often used to express an approximation or generalization rather than a precise description.
  • something of the/that kind/sort The idiom "something of the/that kind/sort" refers to an unspecified thing or object that shares similarities or characteristics with another thing or object that was previously mentioned or implied. It is used to generalize or categorize something without providing specific details about it.
  • kiss something off The idiom "kiss something off" typically means to disregard, dismiss, or ignore something with a casual or nonchalant attitude. It suggests not taking something seriously or giving it little importance.
  • tie something in a knot The idiom "tie something in a knot" typically means to tie something, such as a rope or string, into a twisted or tangled shape, making it difficult to unravel or undo. In a figurative sense, it can also refer to complicating or confusing a situation, making it more difficult to resolve or understand.
  • have/know/get something off pat To have/know/get something off pat means to have thoroughly memorized or learned something to the point of being able to recite or perform it flawlessly and effortlessly. It implies having absolute mastery over a particular skill, piece of information, or task.
  • know from something The idiom "know from something" means to have knowledge or familiarity about a specific subject or experience, typically derived from personal experience, information, or evidence. It implies being able to recognize, understand, or identify something based on previous knowledge or exposure to it.
  • know what it is to be/do something The idiom "know what it is to be/do something" means to have personal experience or understanding of a particular situation, condition, or emotion. It implies that one has firsthand knowledge or empathy towards a specific circumstance or action.
  • you know something The idiom "you know something" is often used to express a feeling of anticipation or suspense before revealing information or a piece of knowledge. It implies that the speaker is about to share something important, surprising, or interesting with the listener and wants to grab their attention before doing so.
  • know something from something The idiom "know something from something" means to have knowledge or understanding of a particular subject or topic based on experience, evidence, or information obtained from a specific source.
  • know something inside out The idiom "know something inside out" means to have a thorough and comprehensive knowledge or understanding of a particular subject or topic. It implies a deep familiarity, awareness, and expertise, with no aspect or detail left unknown or unexplored.
  • labor at something The idiom "labor at something" means to work persistently or diligently on a task or project. It implies putting in a significant amount of effort, often for an extended period, in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • labor for something The idiom "labor for something" means to work persistently and with great effort in order to achieve or obtain something. It implies putting in significant physical or mental exertion towards a specific goal or outcome.
  • lace something up The idiom "lace something up" refers to the act of tightening, fastening, or securing something by tying laces or tightly closing. It can be used both literally, such as tying shoelaces, or figuratively, to describe the action of closing or securing a garment, bag, or any other item by using laces.
  • lace something with something The idiom "lace something with something" is used when something, usually a substance or an element, is added in small amounts or sprinkled throughout something else. This could be taken literally, such as lacing a drink with alcohol, or figuratively, such as lacing a speech with humor or sarcasm. Overall, the idiom implies adding or incorporating a specific element discreetly or subtly within something more significant.
  • lack for something The idiom "lack for something" means to not have enough of something or to experience a scarcity or absence of something. It implies a shortage or insufficiency in a particular resource, quality, or condition.
  • lash into something The idiom "lash into something" typically means to criticize, attack, or reproach someone or something aggressively and vehemently. It implies forcefully expressing one's disapproval, usually through harsh words or actions.
  • last something out The idiom "last something out" means to endure or persist until the end or until a specified event or situation concludes. It implies the ability to withstand challenges, hardships, or difficulties until the very end without giving up or surrendering.
  • latch onto something The idiom "latch onto something" means to seize or fasten onto something tightly, either physically or figuratively. It can refer to grabbing onto an object firmly, or more commonly, to fully understanding, accepting, or becoming obsessed with an idea, concept, or belief.
  • laugh something off The idiom "laugh something off" means to respond to a negative or uncomfortable situation by treating it as amusing or unimportant and responding with laughter or a light-hearted attitude. It refers to the act of minimizing the seriousness or impact of something through humor or indifference.
  • launch out on something The idiom "launch out on something" typically means to embark or start on a new venture, project, or undertaking with enthusiasm, energy, or boldness.
  • set forth on something The idiom "set forth on something" typically means to start or begin a particular task, journey, or endeavor. It implies taking the initial steps or actions towards accomplishing a certain goal or embarking on a specific path.
  • lay something on thick The idiom "lay something on thick" means to exaggerate or overemphasize something, often to an excessive or insincere extent. It is usually used to describe someone who is being overly effusive or excessively praising someone or something.
  • lay something out The idiom "lay something out" typically means to arrange or organize something in a systematic or methodical manner. It can refer to physically arranging objects or planning and explaining a concept or idea in a clear and structured way.
  • lay something to rest The idiom "lay something to rest" means to resolve or settle a matter, dispute, or controversy so that it no longer bothers or causes concern. It implies putting an issue or argument to rest, making peace, or finding closure.
  • lay something aside The idiom "lay something aside" means to set something aside or keep it for future use or consideration. It can refer to setting aside money, time, resources, or any other valuable asset for a specific purpose or future need.
  • lay something at someone's feet The idiom "lay something at someone's feet" means to attribute the responsibility or blame for something to someone. It is often used when someone is being held accountable or accused of causing a particular situation or problem.
  • lay something down (on something) The idiom "lay something down (on something)" typically means to establish or state something clearly and definitively, usually as a rule or requirement. It can also imply setting down specific guidelines or principles for others to follow.
  • lay something in The idiom "lay something in" generally refers to the act of stockpiling or accumulating something in preparation for future use or need. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • lay something on thick (or with a trowel) The idiom "lay something on thick" (or with a trowel) means to exaggerate or overstate something, particularly in a way that may seem insincere or excessive. It refers to the act of applying an excess amount of a substance, such as plaster or paint, in a heavy and conspicuous manner, thus drawing attention to it. Metaphorically, it implies using excessive or overly flattering language, compliments, or emotions to make a point or influence others' perceptions.
  • lay something to something The idiom "lay something to something" means to attribute the cause or responsibility of a situation or problem to a particular factor or person. It can also refer to assigning or attributing a particular meaning or interpretation to something.
  • lay something under something The idiom "lay something under something" typically means to place an object or item beneath or underneath another object or surface. It can also imply the act of hiding or concealing something beneath another thing.
  • lay something up The idiom "lay something up" means to store or reserve something for future use or to save something for later. It often refers to keeping an item or a supply of something safe and secure until it is needed or desired.
  • put something in layaway The idiom "put something in layaway" refers to the act of reserving or setting aside an item for future purchase by making installment payments over a period of time, typically in a retail store. It allows individuals to secure an item they want to purchase by holding it in the store until they can afford to pay for it in full.
  • leach out of something The idiom "leach out of something" means to gradually drain or seep out of a substance or object over time. It often refers to the process of a liquid or substance slowly escaping from a confined space or material.
  • lead (someone or an animal) to something The idiom "lead (someone or an animal) to something" means to guide or direct someone or an animal towards a specific destination, objective, or outcome. It implies taking responsibility for showing the way or encouraging someone to pursue a particular course of action.
  • lead up to something The idiom "lead up to something" means to gradually progress towards or build up to a particular event, outcome, or conclusion. It involves a series of events, actions, or developments that precede and prepare for something significant or important.
  • lead with something To "lead with something" means to begin or start a conversation, presentation, or argument by introducing or emphasizing a particular point, idea, or topic. It can also refer to initiating an action or making an offer by highlighting a specific aspect or element.
  • leak something (out) The idiom "leak something (out)" refers to the act of releasing or disclosing information, often confidential or secret, to the public or unauthorized individuals. It typically involves the unintentional or deliberate sharing of private or sensitive information without proper authorization, potentially causing embarrassment, controversy, or legal consequences.
  • lean out of something The idiom "lean out of something" typically means to physically incline or bend one's body out of a window, door, or other opening, often in order to see or get a better view of something outside. It can also figuratively refer to being excessively eager or curious about something and involving oneself in matters that may not concern oneself.
  • lean something forward The idiom "lean something forward" typically means to incline or move an object or idea in a direction that is more progressive, innovative, or advanced. It suggests promoting change or development by supporting new or unconventional approaches.
  • leap over something The idiom "leap over something" means to jump over an obstacle or hurdle, either physically or metaphorically. It suggests overcoming challenges or difficulties in order to achieve a goal or find a solution.
  • learn something by heart To learn something by heart means to memorize it completely and perfectly, so that it can be recited or recalled without any mistakes or hesitation.
  • learn something by rote The idiom "learn something by rote" refers to the act of memorizing or learning information by repeating it over and over without necessarily understanding the meaning or the underlying concept. It implies a mechanical, repetitive learning process rather than a genuine comprehension or critical thinking.
  • lease something back The idiom "lease something back" refers to the act of selling an asset, such as a property or equipment, and then immediately renting or leasing it back from the buyer. This arrangement allows the original owner to regain access to the asset while also receiving a cash influx from the sale.
  • leave/put something on/to one side The idiom "leave/put something on/to one side" means to set something aside or disregard it temporarily. It suggests not giving immediate attention or consideration to a particular matter or issue, often with the intention of dealing with it at a later time when it is more appropriate or feasible.
  • leave something aside The idiom "leave something aside" typically means to put something aside or set it apart temporarily, often with the intention of dealing with it later. It can refer to physically setting something aside or mentally disregarding or tabling an issue or concern for the time being.
  • leave something for (someone or an animal) The idiom "leave something for (someone or an animal)" means to save or reserve something for someone or an animal to use or consume later. It implies not using or taking all of something oneself, but ensuring that someone else also gets a fair share or opportunity.
  • leave off something To "leave off something" is an idiomatic expression that means to stop doing or using something. It implies the act of discontinuing or ceasing a particular action, habit, or behavior.
  • leave something open The idiom "leave something open" typically means to intentionally keep a decision, option, or matter undecided, unresolved, or available for future consideration or action. It refers to not making a final commitment and maintaining the ability to revisit or change it later.
  • leave something up in the air The idiom "leave something up in the air" means to leave a decision, plan, or issue uncertain or undecided, often creating a state of suspense, ambiguity, or unresolved situations. It implies postponing a final conclusion or leaving something unsettled.
  • legislate for something The idiom "legislate for something" refers to the act of creating or enacting laws, rules, or regulations specifically to address or accommodate a particular issue, situation, or concern. It involves the formal process of establishing legal provisions or frameworks in order to effectively govern or regulate a specific matter.
  • lend your name to something The idiom "lend your name to something" means to publicly associate oneself or one's reputation with a cause, organization, or project in order to enhance its credibility or status. It implies that the person is allowing their name to be used for endorsement or support.
  • lend something out (to someone) The idiom "lend something out (to someone)" means to allow someone to borrow or use something temporarily, typically with the expectation that it will be returned or used responsibly.
  • let's get something straight The idiom "let's get something straight" typically means to clarify or establish a particular point or understanding between people. It is often used to address misunderstandings or to ensure that everyone involved has a clear and accurate understanding of a situation or idea.
  • let something off The idiom "let something off" typically means to allow something to be discharged, emitted, or released, often referring to gases, sounds, or light. It can also indicate granting someone permission to avoid punishment or to not hold them accountable for something they have done.
  • let on something The idiom "let on something" means to reveal or disclose a secret, piece of information, or one's true feelings unintentionally or deliberately. It involves sharing or giving away information that was previously unknown or concealed. It can be used in situations where someone inadvertently exposes a hidden fact or intention, or when someone intentionally reveals something they were keeping a secret.
  • let something out (to someone) The idiom "let something out (to someone)" means to reveal or disclose information or a secret to someone, often unintentionally or without realizing the significance or impact of the information shared. It implies the act of accidentally letting slip or making an accidental revelation of something that was intended to be kept secret or undisclosed.
  • let something out The idiom "let something out" typically means to release or reveal a secret, hidden information, or a suppressed emotion. It can also refer to making something known to others, often unintentionally or accidentally.
  • let out (with) something The idiom "let out (with) something" means to disclose or reveal something, especially something that was previously kept secret or private. It implies speaking or sharing information that was previously unknown to others.
  • let something slip (out) The idiom "let something slip (out)" means to accidentally reveal or disclose information that was supposed to be kept secret or confidential.
  • lap something up The idiom "lap something up" means to eagerly and enthusiastically enjoy or appreciate something, often with a sense of satisfaction or pleasure. It is often used to describe someone who wholeheartedly embraces or indulges in an experience, activity, or information.
  • keep/put a/the lid on something The idiom "keep/put a/the lid on something" means to control or restrict something in order to prevent it from escalating, spreading, or causing trouble. It can refer to maintaining confidentiality, suppressing information or emotions, maintaining order or secrecy, or preventing the disclosure of negative or harmful information. It is often used in situations where there is a need to maintain control or containment.
  • lie your way into/out of something The idiom "lie your way into/out of something" refers to the act of using deception or falsehoods to either gain access or avoid a particular situation or consequence. It implies that someone is resorting to dishonesty or fabrications to achieve their desired outcome, whether it is entering a place or evading a negative situation.
  • lie in something The idiom "lie in something" typically means to be based on or consist of a particular factor or reason. It refers to the underlying cause or essence of something.
  • make something of (one's) life The idiom "make something of (one's) life" refers to the act of achieving success, fulfillment, or accomplishment in one's personal or professional pursuits. It implies making meaningful choices, setting and achieving goals, and utilizing one's abilities or talents to create a purposeful and successful existence.
  • shed light on something The idiom "shed light on something" means to provide clarification, explanation, or understanding on a particular subject or issue, especially by revealing relevant information or facts to make it clearer and easier to comprehend.
  • light something up The idiom "light something up" often means to illuminate or brighten something, typically by turning on lights or lighting an object. It can also refer to providing energy or excitement to a situation or event.
  • limit something to something The idiom "limit something to something" means to restrict or confine something to a particular scope or extent, often to prevent it from exceeding certain boundaries or parameters. It involves setting a specific constraint or boundary on something in order to maintain control or regulate it effectively.
  • make little of something The idiom "make little of something" means to downplay, underestimate, or disregard the importance, significance, or value of something. It suggests treating something as if it is unimportant or inconsequential.
  • live by something The idiom "live by something" means to adhere to a particular principle, belief, or code of conduct as a guiding philosophy in one's life. It implies that one consistently follows and applies that principle in their daily actions and decisions.
  • live in something The idiom "live in something" typically refers to residing or dwelling in a particular place, such as a house, apartment, or other type of accommodation. It implies physically inhabiting and making that place one's home.
  • live in hope(s) of something The idiom "live in hope(s) of something" means to maintain a positive mindset or anticipation in the face of uncertainty, while eagerly waiting for or aspiring towards a particular outcome or event. It implies that one holds onto optimism and faith, despite not knowing if or when the desired thing will happen.
  • live on something The idiom "live on something" means to sustain oneself by consuming or relying on a particular resource, such as funds, savings, food, or a specific source of income or support. It implies that someone is able to survive or subsist by continually using or depending on a specific thing or resource.
  • live something out To "live something out" is an idiom that means to fully experience or fulfill something, typically a desire, dream, or goal. It suggests actively engaging in and making the most of a particular experience or situation.
  • live something over The idiom "live something over" refers to the act of reliving or experiencing an event or situation from the past again, usually in one's imagination or memories. It implies mentally replaying the event or situation, potentially with the intention of analyzing it, understanding it better, or finding closure.
  • live with something The idiom "live with something" means to accept and cope with a situation, condition, or problem, even though it may not be ideal or desired. It implies to adapt oneself to something that cannot be changed and continue to endure or tolerate it.
  • liven something up The idiom "liven something up" means to make something more exciting, interesting, or lively by adding energy, enthusiasm, or variety to it. It refers to the act of bringing more life or vitality to a situation, event, or environment.
  • cough something out The idiom "cough something out" means to speak or utter something quickly, abruptly, or without much thought or consideration. It suggests that the words or information are expressed in a rushed or involuntary manner, similar to a cough.
  • hover over someone or something The idiom "hover over someone or something" means to closely monitor, observe or scrutinize someone or something with an attitude of close supervision or protection. It implies being in near proximity, ready to intervene or interfere if necessary.
  • have an itch for something The idiom "have an itch for something" typically means to have a strong desire or craving for something, often an activity or a particular experience. It conveys a sense of longing or eagerness to engage in or pursue a specific thing.
  • acquit someone of something The idiom "acquit someone of something" means to officially declare or find someone not guilty or free from blame or responsibility for a specific action, crime, or accusation. It refers to the act of proving someone's innocence or absolving them of any wrongdoing.
  • churn something up The idiom "churn something up" means to stir up or cause disturbance, usually in regards to emotions, memories, or feelings. It suggests the act of bringing something to the surface or making it more prominent or active.
  • chuck someone or something away The idiom "chuck someone or something away" means to discard or throw away someone or something as if it were of no value or importance. It implies getting rid of someone or something casually or without consideration.
  • jest about someone or something To "jest about someone or something" means to joke or make light-hearted remarks in a playful or often sarcastic manner about a person or a specific topic. It involves not taking someone or something seriously and usually serves the purpose of humor or teasing.
  • be what something is all about The idiom "be what something is all about" means to represent the essence or core purpose of something. It describes the main focus or fundamental characteristic that defines a particular thing or concept.
  • fall on(to) someone or something The idiom "fall on(to) someone or something" typically means that something unexpected or burdensome occurs and someone needs to deal with it. It can refer to a situation or problem that is suddenly thrust upon an individual or a group. It implies a sense of responsibility or duty to handle the situation or support the person affected.
  • hit someone (or an animal) on something The idiom "hit someone (or an animal) on something" generally means to physically strike or make contact with someone or an animal on a particular body part or object. It implies causing physical harm or injury by hitting them in a specified area. However, it is worth noting that this idiom can also be used figuratively to describe a confrontation or conflict between individuals.
  • drive something around something The idiom "drive something around something" typically refers to physically maneuvering a vehicle or mode of transport around an object or obstacle. It can also be used metaphorically to describe finding a way to work through or navigate challenges or difficulties. The phrase implies problem-solving and finding alternative routes or approaches.
  • lock something onto someone or something The idiom "lock something onto someone or something" means to focus or direct one's attention, interest, or gaze intensely on someone or something. It implies a strong fixation or concentration on a specific target or object.
  • gobble something down The idiom "gobble something down" means to eat food quickly and without much enjoyment. It implies consuming the food hastily or in a greedy manner.
  • give somebody something to think about The idiom "give somebody something to think about" means to provide someone with new and stimulating information or ideas that require serious thought or reflection. It refers to offering a compelling or thought-provoking viewpoint, argument, or situation that encourages someone to consider different perspectives, make informed decisions, or contemplate deeply.
  • endear someone to someone or something To "endear someone to someone or something" means to make someone feel fondly or affectionately towards someone or something. It implies instilling a sense of likability, charm, or positive feelings in the person towards another person, group, or thing.
  • get someone or something off someone or something The idiom "get someone or something off someone or something" means to remove, dislodge, or take away someone or something from a person or object. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • growl at someone or something The idiom "growl at someone or something" means to express disapproval or anger towards someone or something by making a low, guttural sound resembling that of a growl, typically associated with animals. It implies a sign of aggression or hostility towards the person or thing being growled at.
  • have a bash at (doing) something The idiom "have a bash at (doing) something" means attempting or trying to do something, often without much prior experience or skill. It implies taking a chance or giving something a go in order to see if one can succeed or accomplish the task.
  • condemn someone for something The idiom "condemn someone for something" means to express strong disapproval or criticism towards someone for a particular action, behavior, or decision. It implies passing a negative judgment, denouncing their actions, and holding them accountable for their behavior or choices.
  • get someone in(to) something The idiom "get someone in(to) something" generally means to persuade or convince someone to participate or become involved in a particular activity, event, or situation. It implies that someone is encouraging or influencing another person to join, often emphasizing the idea of convincing or initiating them.
  • have the courtesy to do something The idiom "have the courtesy to do something" means to show politeness, respect, or consideration by doing a certain thing that is expected or desired by others. It implies that someone should have the decency or manners to perform a particular action as a way of displaying good manners or thoughtfulness towards others.
  • confess something to someone The idiom "confess something to someone" means to admit or reveal a personal secret, wrongdoing, or truth to another person, especially when it is difficult or uncomfortable to do so. It involves acknowledging something that one may have been hiding or keeping to oneself, and sharing it with someone else in a sincere and honest manner.
  • guide someone or something across (something) The idiom "guide someone or something across (something)" refers to the act of leading or directing someone or something from one side of a place or obstacle to the other. It typically involves providing assistance or giving instructions to ensure a safe and successful passage.
  • take something to extremes The idiom "take something to extremes" means to carry a certain action, behavior, or belief to an exaggerated or excessive level. It implies pushing or going beyond the normal or rational limits, often resulting in extreme or excessive outcomes.
  • bring something to someone's aid The idiomatic phrase "bring something to someone's aid" means to provide assistance or support to someone or something in a time of need or difficulty. It implies that the person is actively helping or providing resources to alleviate a problem or situation.
  • boil down to something The idiom "boil down to something" means to simplify or reduce a complex situation or problem to its most basic or essential elements. It refers to the process of identifying and focusing on the key factors, facts, or ideas of a particular matter.
  • put/throw your weight behind something To put/throw your weight behind something means to support or contribute to a cause, idea, or effort with one's influence, power, or resources. It implies actively promoting or championing something, often by utilizing one's authority, reputation, or connections.
  • line someone or something up (in something) The idiom "line someone or something up (in something)" means to arrange or organize someone or something in a particular order or formation, typically in a line or row. It can also refer to scheduling or preparing someone or something for a specific event or activity.
  • get someone or something down something The idiom "get someone or something down something" refers to the act of successfully accomplishing the task of directing, persuading, or convincing someone or something to move or travel down a specific path, route, or location. It usually implies overcoming initial resistance or reluctance.
  • ask for someone or something The idiom "ask for someone or something" typically means to request or demand the presence or availability of a particular person or item. It implies the act of seeking or inquiring about the desired individual or object.
  • have a feel for something The idiom "have a feel for something" means to possess a natural understanding, intuition, or aptitude for a particular activity, subject, or skill. It implies having a capability to gauge, comprehend, or judge something accurately and effortlessly.
  • be one for something/for doing something The idiom "be one for something/for doing something" is used to describe someone's inclination, preference, or suitability for a particular activity or behavior. It implies that the person enjoys, approves of, or is skilled at the specified action or situation.
  • inspire something in someone The idiom "inspire something in someone" means to evoke a particular emotion, feeling, idea, or action in someone. It refers to the ability to motivate, encourage, or stimulate someone to think, feel, or do something inspiring or creative.
  • hold (or keep) someone or something at bay The idiom "hold (or keep) someone or something at bay" means to keep someone or something at a distance, prevent them from getting too close, or to keep them under control. It implies keeping threats, danger, or unwanted things away through continuous effort or resistance.
  • he, she, etc. has gone/been and done something The idiom "he, she, etc. has gone/been and done something" is typically used to express surprise, shock, or disbelief about someone's actions or accomplishments. It implies that the person has done something remarkable, unexpected, or out of character. It often conveys a sense of astonishment or disbelief towards the person's achievement or behavior.
  • divide something (off) The idiom "divide something (off)" means to separate or partition a specific area or portion from a larger whole. It often involves creating physical boundaries or barriers to demarcate the divided section.
  • be/go/keep on about something The idiom "be/go/keep on about something" means to constantly talk or complain about a particular subject or issue, often in a repetitive or excessive manner. It implies that the person is persistent and may not let go of the topic easily.
  • keep someone or something back The idiom "keep someone or something back" means to prevent someone or something from progressing forward or moving ahead, often due to a desire to restrict or control their actions or to protect them from potential harm or danger.
  • any amount/number of something The idiom "any amount/number of something" refers to an indefinite or unlimited quantity or quantity that is difficult to count or measure. It suggests that there is an abundance or large quantity of something, without specifying an exact or specific number.
  • according to someone or something The idiom "according to someone or something" is used to indicate that the information being presented or referenced is based on the opinion, viewpoint, or interpretation of a specific person or source. It implies that the information may not be universally accepted or proven true, but is being attributed to the particular individual or reference mentioned.
  • labor over someone or something The idiom "labor over someone or something" is usually used to describe the act of putting excessive effort, time, or attention into someone or something. It implies working tirelessly, often with great persistence and dedication, to achieve a desired outcome or to assist and support someone.
  • direct something to someone The idiom "direct something to someone" means to address or send something specifically to a particular person or group. It refers to the act of focusing or aiming communication, thoughts, or actions towards a specific individual or intended recipient.
  • within (the) sound of something The idiom "within (the) sound of something" means being close enough to hear or be aware of something. It suggests proximity to a certain event, action, or location.
  • haggle about something The idiom "haggle about something" refers to the act of negotiating or bargaining persistently and argumentatively over the terms, price, or details of something, typically a purchase or agreement. This involves engaging in a back-and-forth discussion or debate with the aim of reaching a satisfactory compromise or lowering the cost.
  • in the thick of something/of doing something The idiom "in the thick of something/of doing something" refers to being fully engaged or deeply involved in a particular activity, situation, or difficult task. It signifies being amidst the most intense or crucial part of an event or process.
  • lather something up The idiom "lather something up" means to vigorously or vigorously react to or excite something or someone, often exaggerating it or making it larger than it actually is. It can also refer to the act of creating a foam or froth by mixing a soap or similar substance with water and agitating it. Overall, the idiom conveys the idea of intensifying or exaggerating a situation or emotion.
  • above and beyond something The idiom "above and beyond something" generally means to exceed expectations or go beyond what is required or expected in a particular situation. It refers to going the extra mile or doing more than what is normally asked or anticipated.
  • your eyes glued to something The idiom "your eyes glued to something" refers to a situation where someone is intensely focused or fixated on a particular object or event and does not divert their attention away from it. It implies a strong and unwavering concentration or captivation.
  • go well with someone or something The idiom "go well with someone or something" means that two or more things complement each other or work harmoniously together. It describes the compatibility or suitability between people, objects, or concepts.
  • stop short of something/of doing something The idiom "stop short of something/of doing something" means to refrain from doing something or to come close to a specific action but intentionally not go all the way or complete it. It implies holding back or displaying restraint just before reaching a certain point or taking a decisive action.
  • jerk someone or something out of something The idiom "jerk someone or something out of something" means to forcefully remove or extract someone or something from a particular situation, place, or state, often abruptly and without warning. It implies a sudden, rough, or disruptive action that disrupts or interrupts the current condition or activity.
  • follow something up The idiom "follow something up" means to take further action in order to investigate, confirm, or complete something that has already been started or initiated. It involves pursuing additional steps, information, or details in order to ensure the success or completion of a previous action or task.
  • flip someone or something over The idiom "flip someone or something over" means to turn someone or something upside down or to reverse their position or situation abruptly or suddenly.
  • I, etc. would sooner do something The idiom "I, etc. would sooner do something" means that the person expressing this sentiment strongly prefers to do a specific action or follow a certain path rather than a suggested alternative. It indicates a firm rejection or disinterest in the alternative solution or course of action.
  • lay hold of someone or something The idiom "lay hold of someone or something" means to seize, grab, or take hold of someone or something securely and firmly using force or determination.
  • disengage something from something The idiom "disengage something from something" means to separate, detach, or disconnect one thing from another thing, usually by releasing a physical or emotional connection or involvement. It implies breaking free or removing oneself from a particular situation, relationship, or commitment.
  • business end of something The common definition for the idiom "business end of something" is the end of an object or tool that usually performs the main or most important function. It is often used metaphorically to refer to the crucial or effective part of a situation, task, or endeavor.
  • credit something to someone or something The idiom "credit something to someone or something" means to attribute or acknowledge something, such as a success, achievement, or idea, to a particular person or thing. It suggests giving recognition or acknowledgment for the role or contribution someone or something has made in a particular situation.
  • be devoured by something The idiom "be devoured by something" means to be consumed or overwhelmed by a particular emotion, obsession, or activity to the point that it dominates one's thoughts, time, or attention. It can also imply being completely absorbed or preoccupied with something to the extent that it becomes all-consuming.
  • gawk at someone or something The idiom "gawk at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something with a sense of curiosity, surprise, or in an impolite or rude manner. It often implies a sense of being amazed, bewildered, or fascinated by someone or something unusual or extraordinary.
  • disguise someone in something The idiom "disguise someone in something" means to dress or alter the appearance of a person in order to make them unrecognizable or to deceive others about their true identity. It involves concealing someone's true appearance by using clothing, accessories, or other props.
  • all manner of someone or something The idiom "all manner of someone or something" means a wide variety or assortment of people or things. It suggests a broad range or diversity in terms of types, styles, or characteristics. It implies that there are many different examples or instances encompassing a particular someone or something.
  • advertise for someone or something The idiom "advertise for someone or something" means to actively promote or seek individuals or items, typically through advertising or public communication channels. It involves making a targeted effort to inform others or generate interest in a specific person, product, service, or cause.
  • do something without stint The idiom "do something without stint" means to do something generously, wholeheartedly, or without holding back or restricting oneself. It indicates a willingness to give or provide abundantly or excessively. It suggests an absence of hesitation or reservation in one's actions.
  • advance something to someone or something (against something) The idiom "advance something to someone or something (against something)" typically means to provide support, assistance, or resources to someone or something in a situation where they are facing opposition, challenges, or difficulties. It implies helping or promoting someone or something's cause, often when they are being confronted with opposition or obstacles.
  • fit something together The idiom "fit something together" typically means to assemble or put various parts or pieces together to form a whole, often referring to solving a puzzle, constructing something, or organizing different components. It could also symbolize combining different ideas or concepts to create a cohesive understanding or solution.
  • bode somehow for someone or something The idiom "bode somehow for someone or something" means to indicate or suggest a particular outcome or future event for someone or something. It typically implies a negative or troubling prediction about the person or thing being discussed.
  • get something from someone or something The idiom "get something from someone or something" means to obtain or acquire something from a particular person or source. It can refer to receiving physical objects, information, advice, or any other form of assistance or interaction.
  • fuss about someone or something The idiom "fuss about someone or something" means to give excessive attention, concern, or excessive display of excitement or agitation about someone or something. It often implies a situation where there is unnecessary or undue fussing or making a big deal out of something.
  • insert something in (to) something The idiom "insert something in (to) something" means to place or put something into a specific location or position. It implies the act of inserting an object or item into another object or container. It can be used both literally and figuratively, depending on the context.
  • in reference to someone or something The idiom "in reference to someone or something" means mentioning or regarding someone or something. It is commonly used to specify that the following statement, discussion, or information is related to the mentioned person or topic.
  • sound the death knell of something The idiom "sound the death knell of something" means to signify or announce the imminent end or downfall of something. It conveys the idea that a particular event or action is a clear indication that the situation or entity in question is ending or will no longer survive.
  • abstain from something To "abstain from something" means to deliberately choose not to do or participate in that particular thing, especially when it comes to refraining from a specific action or behavior, often due to personal or moral reasons. It commonly implies restraining oneself from indulging, consuming, or engaging in certain activities, substances, or behaviors.
  • go/put something into reverse The idiom "go/put something into reverse" refers to the act of reversing a previous decision, action, or course of events. It means to change direction or course, typically in order to go back to a previous state, undo something that has been done, or retreat from a position or plan.
  • take advantage of something The idiom "take advantage of something" means to fully utilize or make the most of an opportunity, situation, or resource for personal gain or benefit. It implies seizing an advantageous moment or using something to one's advantage in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • hang over someone or something To "hang over someone or something" is an idiom that refers to a feeling of impending or lingering negativity or trouble, usually caused by a previous situation or action. This negative influence is present and affects the person or situation, often creating a sense of unease, guilt, or responsibility.
  • confide something in someone The idiom "confide something in someone" means to trustfully share or reveal something private or confidential to someone, typically for the purpose of seeking advice, support, or relief. It implies expressing one's thoughts, feelings, or secrets openly and in confidence.
  • apply oneself to something The idiom "apply oneself to something" means to make a sustained and consistent effort or dedication toward a particular task or activity. It implies focusing one's energy, attention, and skills on accomplishing a specific objective or goal.
  • guess at something The idiom "guess at something" means to make an estimation or inference about something without having complete or precise information. It involves forming an opinion or making a conjecture based on limited knowledge or intuition rather than on concrete evidence or facts.
  • set something beside something The idiom "set something beside something" means to compare or contrast two things, often highlighting their similarities or differences to gain a better understanding or perspective.
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do something The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do something" means that a person strongly prefers to endure the harshest or most intimidating consequences rather than facing or engaging in a particular task or situation they dread. It often implies a high level of fear, aversion, or distaste towards the alternative option.
  • not be above doing something The idiom "not be above doing something" means that someone is willing to do a certain action, regardless of how immoral, inappropriate, or unconventional it may seem. The person in question lacks moral or ethical standards and is open to engaging in behavior that others might find objectionable.
  • cut someone in on something The idiom "cut someone in on something" means to include or involve someone in a business venture, plan, or opportunity, typically by granting them a share or portion of it. It implies giving someone a portion of the profits, benefits, or participation in a particular endeavor.
  • make something up of whole cloth The definition of the idiom "make something up of whole cloth" is to fabricate or invent something completely without any basis in truth or reality. It means creating a story, information, or an explanation entirely from one's imagination, without relying on any facts or evidence.
  • clamor against someone or something The idiom "clamor against someone or something" means to express strong and noisy opposition or protest towards someone or something. It describes the act of making a loud and persistent outcry or complaint in a collective and forceful manner.
  • acquaint someone with something To "acquaint someone with something" means to make someone familiar or knowledgeable about a particular thing or concept. It involves providing information or introducing someone to something they did not know or understand previously, in order to give them a basic understanding or awareness of it.
  • hunger after something The idiom "hunger after something" means to have a strong desire or intense craving for something, often in a metaphorical sense. It implies a deep longing or eagerness for a specific goal, achievement, or experience.
  • hurl something around The idiom "hurl something around" typically means to toss or throw something in a reckless or aggressive manner, often without much care or consideration for others. It denotes a forceful or careless handling of an object.
  • an apology for something The idiom "an apology for something" means that something or someone is low-quality, inadequate, or of poor quality, hence being perceived as a poor substitute or representation for the real or expected thing.
  • crunch someone or something up The idiom "crunch someone or something up" typically means to crush or break someone or something into small pieces with a forceful or violent action. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • get someone or something back The idiom "get someone or something back" means to retrieve or recover someone or something that was lost, taken away, or borrowed. It refers to the act of finding or returning someone or something that had been misplaced, separated, or borrowed by someone else.
  • apportion something out (among some people) The idiom "apportion something out (among some people)" means to distribute or divide something equally or proportionally among a group of individuals or entities.
  • level something at someone or something The idiom "level something at someone or something" means to direct criticism, accusations, or blame towards a particular person or thing. It refers to focusing or aiming negative remarks, judgments, or challenges at a specific target.
  • fit someone or something in(to) something The idiom "fit someone or something in(to) something" generally means to find or make time or space for someone or something within a busy schedule or limited area. It can refer to accommodating someone's presence or squeezing something into a specific timeframe or physical location.
  • fluff something out The idiom "fluff something out" means to add additional content or details to something in order to make it more complete, full, or expansive. It often refers to adding more substance or filling in gaps in a writing, speech, or presentation to provide more depth and clarity.
  • line someone or something up The idiom "line someone or something up" means to organize or arrange people or objects in a row, order, or specific formation. It can also refer to scheduling or preparing someone or something for a particular event or task.
  • acknowledge something as something To acknowledge something as something means to accept, recognize, or admit its true or stated status, quality, or importance. It involves acknowledging or accepting the identified characteristics or nature of something, often in a formal or public way.
  • fit someone or something up (with something) To "fit someone or something up (with something)" means to equip or provide someone or something with something necessary or suitable for a particular purpose. It refers to the act of sourcing and supplying someone or something with the required tools, accessories, or provisions to perform a task or meet a specific requirement.
  • have one eye/half an eye on something The idiom "have one eye/half an eye on something" means to pay partial or occasional attention to something while focusing on something else. It implies that one is not fully engaged or attentive to the particular thing in question.
  • put someone or something in(to) jeopardy The idiom "put someone or something in(to) jeopardy" refers to the act of endangering or risking someone or something. It means to expose to potential harm, loss, or danger.
  • commend someone or something to someone or something The idiom "commend someone or something to someone or something" means to entrust or recommend someone or something to another person or entity for acceptance, care, or approval. It signifies expressing trust, gratitude, or appreciation by formally suggesting or assigning someone's actions, behavior, or belongings to another party.
  • address oneself to something The idiom "address oneself to something" means to direct or focus one's efforts, attention, or actions toward dealing with a particular task, issue, problem, or situation. It implies a deliberate and purposeful engagement or involvement.
  • chuck something away The idiom "chuck something away" means to throw or discard something, typically in a careless or hasty manner, without giving it much thought or consideration.
  • keep something to yourself The idiom "keep something to yourself" means to not share or reveal information, thoughts, or opinions with others. It implies keeping something confidential, private, or hidden rather than disclosing it publicly.
  • explain someone or something to someone To explain someone or something to someone means to provide a clear and detailed explanation or description about a person, thing, concept, or situation to someone who doesn't understand it fully or is unaware of it. It involves breaking down the subject matter into simpler terms, providing examples, or sharing relevant information in order to enhance their understanding.
  • do something as if/like there's no tomorrow The idiom "do something as if/like there's no tomorrow" means to do something with great urgency, enthusiasm, or without any consideration for the consequences or for the future. It suggests acting as if time is running out or as if there is no guarantee of any future opportunities.
  • differentiate between (someone or something and someone or something else) The idiom "differentiate between (someone or something and someone or something else)" means to distinguish or recognize the differences or unique characteristics between two or more people or things. It refers to the ability to discern and identify the contrasting features or qualities of different entities.
  • feed (up)on someone or something The idiom "feed (up)on someone or something" generally means to derive satisfaction, energy, or sustenance from someone or something, typically by taking advantage of them or using them for personal gain. It refers to a situation where one person or thing benefits at the expense of another.
  • gather around someone or something The idiom "gather around someone or something" means to congregate or assemble around a person, object, or location, forming a group or a circle. It implies a specific focus or attention given to the central figure or point of interest.
  • a passing acquaintance with something The idiom "a passing acquaintance with something" refers to having limited or superficial knowledge or experience of a particular subject or topic. It suggests a level of familiarity or involvement that is brief or minimal.
  • be calculated to do something The idiom "be calculated to do something" means that something is intended or designed to have a specific effect or outcome. It implies that careful thought or planning has been put into achieving a certain result.
  • dispossess someone of something The idiom "dispossess someone of something" means to take away or strip someone of their possessions or rights, usually forcefully or unfairly. It refers to the act of depriving someone of their property, authority, or belongings.
  • appeal against something The idiom "appeal against something" refers to the act of officially requesting a higher authority to review and reverse a decision or judgment that has been made by a lower authority. It involves presenting arguments, evidence, or legal claims in order to persuade the higher authority to reconsider the original decision.
  • come between (something and something else) The idiom "come between (something and something else)" means to create a division or conflict between two people or things, often causing a strain in their relationship. It refers to a situation where an external force or influence interferes, causing a rift or disruption in the harmony between two entities.
  • put the clamps on someone or something To "put the clamps on someone or something" is an idiomatic expression that means to restrict or control someone or something tightly, generally to prevent them from taking certain actions or limit their activities. It typically implies imposing strict regulations, supervision, or constraints on someone or something. This phrase is often used when a person or authority intervenes forcefully to prevent certain behavior or actions.
  • proclaim (or shout) something from the housetops The idiom "proclaim (or shout) something from the housetops" means to make something widely known or announce something publicly and loudly. It implies broadcasting a message or information openly and without reservation, with the intention of ensuring that everyone is aware of it.
  • attest to something The idiom "attest to something" means to provide evidence, testimony, or confirmation that something is true, accurate, or valid. It implies affirming or vouching for the authenticity or correctness of a statement, belief, or claim based on personal knowledge or experience.
  • enchant someone with something The idiom "enchant someone with something" means to captivate or delight someone by a particular thing, such as an idea, skill, talent, or object. It suggests evoking a sense of fascination, charm, or magic in someone through the mentioned element.
  • arrange something for some time The idiom "arrange something for some time" typically means to plan or organize something to occur or take place at a specific time in the future. It implies making preparations, setting a specific date or schedule, and ensuring that all necessary arrangements are in place for the event or activity.
  • confiscate something from someone or something The idiom "confiscate something from someone or something" means to take someone's or something's possession or property forcefully and often by authority, due to a violation or for legal reasons. It implies the act of seizing or taking control of something that is not rightfully owned by the person or entity it is taken from.
  • have (some) bearing on something The idiom "have (some) bearing on something" means that something is relevant or related to a particular topic, situation, or outcome. It suggests that the information or factors mentioned are capable of influencing or affecting the given subject.
  • breathe (new) life into something The idiom "breathe (new) life into something" means to rejuvenate or revitalize something, often by introducing new ideas, energy, or enthusiasm. It implies the act of giving renewed vigor, excitement, or purpose to something that may have been stagnant, dull, or in decline. It can be applied to various situations, such as projects, organizations, relationships, or even concepts, and suggests bringing about positive change and improvement.
  • shake/rock something to its foundations The idiom "shake/rock something to its foundations" means to greatly disturb or disrupt something fundamental or core. It implies causing a significant and often negative impact that challenges the very basis or principles of a person, organization, system, or belief.
  • conscript someone into something The idiom "conscript someone into something" means to forcibly recruit or force someone to join a particular organization, group, or activity without their consent or willingness. It often implies mandatory or involuntary participation.
  • choke something off The idiom "choke something off" typically means to prevent, hinder, or obstruct the progress, growth, or development of something, often by suppressing or limiting its resources, opportunities, or potential. It implies cutting off or limiting the supply or flow of something that is necessary for the continuation or success of a particular endeavor, resulting in its eventual failure or restriction.
  • head someone or something off To "head someone or something off" means to intercept or prevent someone or something from reaching a particular destination or goal, usually by taking action or taking a different route in order to reach that destination before them. It involves attempting to stop or redirect someone or something in order to avoid a negative outcome or confrontation.
  • not all something is cracked up to be The idiom "not all something is cracked up to be" means that something is not as good, impressive, or enjoyable as it is rumored, advertised, or expected to be.
  • fly someone or something (into some place) (from some place) The idiom "fly someone or something (into some place) (from some place)" means to transport someone or something by air to a particular destination from a different location. It typically refers to traveling by airplane and can involve either people or objects.
  • let alone someone or something The idiom "let alone someone or something" is used to express the idea that if a challenging or difficult task cannot be accomplished, then an even more challenging or difficult task certainly cannot be accomplished. It highlights the impossibility or unlikelihood of the second task when the first one is already challenging enough. It indicates that the mentioned person or thing is even more beyond consideration or possibility.
  • have half a mind to do something The idiom "have half a mind to do something" means to strongly consider or think about doing something, usually with the implication that one is inclined or tempted to take that course of action. It suggests that the person is on the verge of making a decision or taking action but hasn't fully committed yet.
  • hungry for something The idiom "hungry for something" means having a strong desire or craving for something, whether it be food, success, knowledge, or any other physical or metaphorical object of desire. It suggests a deep yearning or appetite for that particular thing.
  • hold someone or something off The idiom "hold someone or something off" means to delay, resist, or prevent the advance, progress, or attack of someone or something. It implies keeping someone or something at a distance or maintaining a defensive position to stop them from getting closer or making further advancements.
  • know about someone or something The idiom "know about someone or something" means to have information or knowledge regarding a person or a particular subject matter. It implies being familiar with details, facts, or qualities concerning someone or something.
  • wrap one's car around something The idiom "wrap one's car around something" means to crash a car into or around a fixed object such as a tree, pole, or building, causing significant damage or destruction to the vehicle.
  • lean toward someone or something The idiom "lean toward someone or something" means to have a slight preference or inclination towards a particular person or thing. It implies a tendency or inclination to favor or support someone or something more than others.
  • not put your finger on something The idiom "not put your finger on something" means being unable to identify or explain something specifically. It signifies a feeling of uncertainty or confusion about the nature or cause of a situation or problem.
  • draft someone into something The idiom "draft someone into something" refers to the act of forcefully or involuntarily appointing or recruiting someone for a specific purpose, role, task, or organization. It often implies a lack of choice or control on the person being drafted, who may be obligated to join, participate, or serve without prior consent or voluntary decision. This idiom originates from the military practice of conscription, where individuals are required to serve in the armed forces. However, it can be used in various contexts beyond the military to describe similar instances of compulsory inclusion or recruitment.
  • fidget with something The idiom "fidget with something" means to continuously and restlessly move or play with an object, often due to boredom, nervousness, or anxiety. It involves repeatedly manipulating or adjusting the item in one's hands or between fingers, without any specific purpose or intention.
  • do someone or something justice (or do justice to someone or something) The idiom "do someone or something justice" or "do justice to someone or something" means to represent or describe someone or something accurately, fully, or skillfully in a way that captures the true qualities, abilities, or importance they possess. It implies giving proper credit or recognition to someone or something deserving and not underestimating or downplaying their worth.
  • drive into someone or something The idiom "drive into someone or something" typically refers to a situation where a person or object is impacted by a vehicle in a forceful or accidental manner, often resulting in damage or injury. It can be used both in literal and figurative senses, implying physical collision or a strong impact on someone's emotions or thoughts.
  • experiment with someone or something To "experiment with someone or something" means to try out, explore, or test someone or something in order to gain knowledge, understanding, or experience. It often involves engaging in new or different methods, techniques, or approaches to see how someone or something reacts or performs.
  • knock someone or something about To "knock someone or something about" is an idiomatic expression that means to criticize, disapprove of, or find fault with someone or something severely. It suggests the act of verbally attacking or harshly criticizing someone's actions, ideas, or behavior in a relentless manner.
  • go as someone or something The idiom "go as someone or something" typically means to dress up or pretend to be a particular person or thing during a specific event or activity. It refers to adopting the appearance, characteristics, or role of someone or something else temporarily.
  • make a point of someone or something To "make a point of someone or something" means to purposefully prioritize or make a conscious effort to focus on or attend to someone or something. It implies highlighting or emphasizing the significance, importance, or value of a particular person or thing.
  • gaze on someone or something The idiom "gaze on someone or something" refers to looking intently or fixedly at someone or something for an extended period, often due to admiration, curiosity, or fascination. It implies a stare of deep concentration or contemplation, typically involving visual admiration or an intense focus on the subject.
  • have the best of someone or something The idiom "have the best of someone or something" means to gain an advantage or prevail over someone or something in a particular situation. It implies being in a superior or dominant position.
  • within an ace of something/of doing something The idiom "within an ace of something/of doing something" means being extremely close to achieving or accomplishing something. It suggests that the person or situation narrowly missed or almost succeeded in reaching a desired outcome.
  • limber someone or something up To "limber someone or something up" means to prepare or loosen someone's body or something before physical activity or exertion. It involves performing gentle stretching exercises or warm-up routines to increase flexibility, prevent muscle injury, and improve performance.
  • go out for someone or something The idiom "go out for someone or something" typically means to make an effort or attempt to achieve success or win someone's affections or favor. It often refers to displaying interest or pursuing someone romantically or competing for a particular role, position, or opportunity.
  • can drive a truck through something The idiom "can drive a truck through something" is used to describe a situation or condition that has a significant flaw, gap, or loophole. It suggests that there is ample room for error, criticism, or exploitation due to the large size or obvious weaknesses in something.
  • hem someone or something in The idiom "hem someone or something in" means to surround, confine, or enclose someone or something, usually creating restrictions and limiting their freedom or movement. It can be used both literally and metaphorically.
  • in quest of someone or something The idiom "in quest of someone or something" means to actively search, seek, or pursue someone or something with great determination and intention. It implies a strong desire to find or achieve a particular person, object, goal, or outcome.
  • flood someone or something out of something The idiom "flood someone or something out of something" refers to the act of overwhelming or forcing someone or something out of a particular place or situation by means of a sudden influx or overwhelming force, typically in the context of water flooding. It may also be used metaphorically to describe a situation where a large number or amount of something hinders or displaces someone or something from their intended place or purpose.
  • ball someone or something up The idiom "ball someone or something up" means to make someone or something confused, puzzled, or tangled. It can also refer to causing disorder or disruption.
  • bounce something off (of) someone or something The idiom "bounce something off (of) someone or something" means to share an idea, proposal, or problem with someone or something in order to get feedback or opinions. It can also refer to discussing something with someone in order to see their reaction or gauge their response. This idiom often implies seeking advice, suggestions, or validation.
  • agonize (oneself) over someone or something The idiom "agonize (oneself) over someone or something" means to excessively worry, obsess, or feel great distress and anxiety while thinking or arguing about a particular person or issue. It implies a state of intense mental and emotional turmoil, often associated with overthinking or dwelling on a matter to the point of suffering.
  • indulge someone with something The idiom "indulge someone with something" means to fulfill or satisfy someone's desire or request by providing them with something they enjoy or desire. It often implies going beyond what is necessary or expected in order to please the person.
  • lash down on someone or something The idiom "lash down on someone or something" typically refers to a situation where someone reacts harshly, severely, or forcefully towards another person or something. It implies the act of criticizing, reprimanding, or punishing someone or something severely.
  • hoover up something The idiom "hoover up something” means to clean or consume something quickly and thoroughly, often referring to quickly gathering or consuming a large amount of food or other resources. It is derived from the name of the Hoover vacuum cleaner brand, which is known for its powerful suction, suggesting the swift and efficient gathering or consumption of something.
  • inoculate someone with something The idiom "inoculate someone with something" commonly means to expose or introduce someone to a particular idea, concept, belief, or viewpoint, typically in a gradual or controlled manner. It refers to the process of making someone familiar or immune to something by gradually exposing them to it. This can also imply trying to instill a particular attitude, perspective, or mindset.
  • buffet someone or something (from someone or something) (to someone or something) The given phrase "buffet someone or something (from someone or something) (to someone or something)" does not appear to be a known or widely used idiom. Consequently, it is difficult to provide a specific definition for it.
  • be badly off for something The idiom "be badly off for something" means to have a scarcity or lack of something, often referring to a specific resource, item, or condition. It implies a situation where one is in great need or is experiencing a significant deficiency or shortage of that particular thing.
  • enfold someone in something The idiom "enfold someone in something" refers to embracing or enveloping someone with care, love, or protection. It signifies providing comfort, support, or security to someone, both physically and emotionally.
  • creep up on someone or something The idiom "creep up on someone or something" means to approach quietly or unexpectedly, usually catching someone off guard or surprising them. It could refer to physical or metaphorical situations where someone or something is not being noticed or anticipated until it is very close or has already happened.
  • be set against something/against doing something The idiom "be set against something/against doing something" means to strongly disapprove of or oppose something or to be unwilling to do something. It implies a firm and determined opposition or resistance towards a particular action or decision.
  • give someone or something away The idiom "give someone or something away" means to reveal or unintentionally disclose information, a secret, or a hidden characteristic about someone or something. It can also refer to participating in or facilitating the act of giving someone in marriage or giving something as a gift.
  • be after doing something The idiom "be after doing something" means to have just completed an action or task, usually with a sense of urgency or purpose. It suggests that the action has been achieved or attempted recently or is still ongoing.
  • group something under something The definition of the idiom "group something under something" means to classify or categorize similar things or objects together based on their common characteristics, features, or qualities for organizational or analytical purposes. It involves organizing or arranging items into specific categories or groups to make it easier to understand, study, or manage them.
  • poke fun at someone or something The idiom "poke fun at someone or something" means to mock, tease, or jest in a lighthearted or playful manner. It involves making jokes or sarcastic comments about a person or thing, often with a friendly intent and without genuine malice.
  • carp at someone or something The idiom "carp at someone or something" means to constantly complain, nag, or criticize someone or something, often in a repetitive or petty manner. It implies finding faults or flaws and expressing dissatisfaction with little reason or justification.
  • kick someone or something around The idiom "kick someone or something around" typically means to mistreat, abuse, or treat someone or something with disrespect or contempt. It can also refer to repeatedly discussing or considering an idea without taking any decisive action.
  • kick something off (of) someone or something The idiom "kick something off (of) someone or something" means to forcefully remove or dislodge something from a person or object by using a forceful kick or sudden movement.
  • gorge oneself on something The idiom "gorge oneself on something" means to consume a large quantity of food or indulge excessively in something pleasurable. It implies overindulgence or excessive consumption beyond one's normal limits.
  • flock around someone or something The idiom "flock around someone or something" refers to a situation where a group of people or animals gather closely around a particular person or thing. It implies that these individuals are attracted or drawn to that person or thing and are surrounding them in a tight-knit manner.
  • license to do something The idiom "license to do something" refers to the authority or permission given to someone to engage in a particular action or behavior. It suggests that the person has the freedom or privilege to do something without facing negative consequences or legal repercussions.
  • kiss something goodbye The idiom "kiss something goodbye" means to accept and reconcile with the fact that one will lose or be without something. It implies giving up or abandoning hope regarding a particular outcome or possession.
  • do someone or something a power of good The idiom "do someone or something a power of good" means to have a strong and positive impact on someone or something's well-being or overall condition. It suggests that the action or situation in question has significantly improved or benefited the person or thing involved.
  • keep something on an even keel The idiom "keep something on an even keel" means to maintain stability, balance, or consistency in a situation or relationship, ensuring that it remains steady and without major fluctuations or disruptions. It suggests the need to avoid extremes or extremes of emotion, behavior, or other factors that could lead to chaos, conflict, or turmoil.
  • confer on someone or something (with someone) The idiom "confer on someone or something (with someone)" means to hold a discussion or consultation with someone, typically to make a decision or exchange ideas about a particular person or thing. It involves seeking input or advice from someone before reaching a conclusion or taking action.
  • to say nothing of something The idiom "to say nothing of something" is used to indicate an additional consideration or point that is even more significant or significant in its own right, beyond what has already been mentioned. It highlights that the mentioned thing is noteworthy, and there is an even more important or remarkable aspect that should also be taken into account.
  • never mind (about) (doing) something The idiom "never mind (about) (doing) something" is used to suggest that someone should disregard or forget about a particular action or topic. It implies that the speaker wants to dismiss the matter altogether, indicating that it is not important or significant enough to pursue further.
  • get something to someone The idiom "get something to someone" means to facilitate the delivery or transfer of something to a specific person. It implies taking action to ensure that an item or information reaches its intended recipient.
  • embed someone or something in something The idiom "embed someone or something in something" refers to the act of deeply integrating or immersing someone or something into a particular environment, context, or situation. It implies creating a strong connection or bond where the person or thing becomes an integral part of the setting or group. The embedding process usually involves adding, merging, or intertwining the entity within the existing framework or structure to ensure a seamless fit.
  • suit someone or something down to the ground The idiom "suit someone or something down to the ground" means that something is perfectly suited or ideal for someone or something. It implies that whatever is being referred to fits or satisfies their needs, preferences, or circumstances perfectly.
  • harden something off The idiom "harden something off" refers to the process of gradually acclimating or toughening something, typically a plant, to new conditions. It involves gradually exposing the object to adverse elements, such as changes in temperature or sunlight, to help it adapt and become more resilient.
  • lie about someone or something (to someone) The idiom "lie about someone or something (to someone)" means to intentionally tell falsehoods or spread false information about someone or something to another person.
  • convict someone of something The idiom "convict someone of something" refers to the act of finding someone guilty of a particular crime or wrongdoing through a legal process. It implies that sufficient evidence has been presented and a verdict of guilt has been reached.
  • keep one's mind on someone or something The idiom "keep one's mind on someone or something" means to concentrate or focus one's attention, thoughts, or efforts on a particular person or thing. It implies staying attentive, not being distracted, and maintaining focus on the task at hand or the individual being referred to.
  • drape oneself over something The idiom "drape oneself over something" means to casually and leisurely lounge or recline on an object or piece of furniture in a relaxed manner, often with one's body partially or fully covering it. It implies a posture of ease, comfort, or nonchalance.
  • laugh someone or something out of court To "laugh someone or something out of court" means to dismiss or reject someone or something in a mocking or derisive manner, typically in a legal or formal setting. It suggests that the argument or claim presented by the person or thing being laughed at is so absurd or weak that it deserves no serious consideration or attention.
  • blend something together (with something) The idiom "blend something together (with something)" means to mix or combine different elements or components in such a way that they form a homogeneous mixture. It implies the act of thoroughly incorporating or merging various ingredients, ideas, or elements to create a harmonious or cohesive outcome.
  • fit someone or something out (with something) The idiom "fit someone or something out (with something)" means to provide someone or something with the necessary equipment, furnishings, or accessories for a particular purpose. It refers to the act of fully equipping or outfitting someone or something with all the needed items or resources.
  • favor someone or something with something To "favor someone or something with something" means to grant or bestow a privilege, benefit, or special treatment upon someone or something. It implies showing kindness, generosity, or preference towards a particular person or thing by providing them with something advantageous or desired.
  • happen to someone or something The idiom "happen to someone or something" means for an event or circumstance to occur unexpectedly or by chance, affecting a person or thing in some way. It implies that the person or thing is not in control of or responsible for the occurrence.
  • infuse something into something The idiom "infuse something into something" means to introduce or incorporate an element, idea, or quality into something else, typically in a purposeful or intentional manner. It implies adding a specific attribute, characteristic, or essence to enhance or improve the overall nature or quality of the target entity.
  • bring someone or something to someone's attention The definition of the idiom "bring someone or something to someone's attention" means to make someone aware of someone or something by drawing their attention towards it. It refers to notifying or informing someone about a particular person, issue, problem, or situation.
  • deliver someone of something The idiom "deliver someone of something" means to free or rescue someone from a difficult or troubling situation, burden, or responsibility. It implies providing relief or assistance to someone and removing the constraint or problem they were facing.
  • adorn someone or something with something The idiom "adorn someone or something with something" means to decorate or embellish someone or something with a particular item or attribute. It suggests enhancing the appearance or adding a special touch to make the person or object more visually appealing or impressive.
  • bumble through something The idiom "bumble through something" means to proceed clumsily or awkwardly through a task, situation, or conversation without much skill, preparation, or confidence. It implies that the person is unsure, unorganized, and lacks precision while attempting to handle something.
  • be, come, etc. within a whisker of something/of doing something The idiom "be, come, etc. within a whisker of something/of doing something" means being extremely close or almost achieving or doing something. It implies that the person or thing is just a hair's breadth away from the desired outcome or accomplishment.
  • flop someone or something over The idiom "flop someone or something over" typically refers to the action of turning or flipping someone or something to their opposite side or position, often done in a relaxed or casual manner.
  • drum someone out of something The idiom "drum someone out of something" refers to forcefully expelling someone from a certain position, group, or organization, typically due to their misconduct, incompetence, or disagreement with the rules or values of the entity. It often conveys the idea of dismissal or removal with public disgrace or humiliation.
  • keep someone or something in mind (for someone or something) The idiom "keep someone or something in mind (for someone or something)" means to remember or consider someone or something as a potential option for a future opportunity or consideration. It implies that the person or thing mentioned should be remembered or taken into account when making a decision or thinking about a particular matter.
  • piss something away The idiom "piss something away" means to waste, squander, or lose something, often money, time, or opportunities, in a careless, foolish, or reckless manner. It implies a sense of thoughtlessly or irresponsibly throwing away something of value.
  • dump something on someone The idiom "dump something on someone" means to unfairly burden someone with a responsibility, task, or problem, often without their consent or without providing adequate support or assistance. It implies transferring a burden or undesirable situation to someone else, intentionally or unintentionally.
  • expand (up)on something The idiom "expand (up)on something" means to provide more details, information, or elaboration about a particular topic or idea. It often involves adding further explanation or exploring a subject in more depth.
  • link up to someone or something The idiom "link up to someone or something" refers to the act of connecting or joining with someone or something, typically for collaboration, communication, or coordination. It implies establishing a connection or bond to work together towards a common goal or objective.
  • desensitize someone to something The idiom "desensitize someone to something" means to cause or experience a decrease in sensitivity, emotional response, or reaction towards a particular thing, usually due to repeated exposure to it. It refers to the process of becoming less sensitive or immune to the feelings, impact, or significance of something that might have initially evoked strong emotions or reactions.
  • be about to do something The idiom "be about to do something" means to be on the brink of or preparing to take a particular action or do something soon. It implies that the action is imminent or very close to happening.
  • intimidate someone into something The idiom "intimidate someone into something" means to use fear, threat, or forceful tactics to compel or coerce someone into doing something against their will or better judgment. It implies applying pressure or instilling fear to manipulate someone into compliance or agreement.
  • lay something for someone or something The idiom "lay something for someone or something" means to prepare or set aside something for a specific person or thing in advance, usually for their or its future use or benefit. It can refer to physically laying out an object or metaphorically setting up a situation or opportunity.
  • alight from something The idiom "alight from something" means to get off or disembark from a vehicle or mode of transportation, typically a bus, train, or car. It implies the act of leaving or exiting a specific vehicle after reaching one's destination.
  • something else again The idiom "something else again" is used to describe something or someone that is different, unique, or exceptional in comparison to the norm or previous examples. It implies that the thing being referred to is in a category of its own and cannot be easily compared or categorized with other similar things.
  • extend something to something The idiom "extend something to something" refers to the act of offering or granting something to someone or something. It means providing or allowing access, benefits, privileges, or opportunities to a person, group, or entity.
  • not bother yourself/your head with/about something The idiom "not bother yourself/your head with/about something" means to not be concerned or worried about a particular thing. It implies that a person should not waste their time or mental energy on a specific matter because it is not important or worth their attention.
  • goggle at someone or something The idiom "goggle at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something with wide eyes, often in a surprised, amazed, or bewildered manner. It implies looking at something or someone for an extended period, often with an open mouth or a pronounced expression of astonishment.
  • flavor food with something The idiom "flavor food with something" means to enhance the taste of food by adding a particular ingredient or seasoning to it, thereby imparting a distinct or desired flavor. It suggests a deliberate act of adding flavor to make the food more enjoyable or appealing to the palate.
  • be a (great/firm) believer in something To be a (great/firm) believer in something means to strongly trust, support, or have faith in a particular idea, principle, or concept. It implies having a deep conviction and unwavering belief in its truth or value.
  • at the risk of doing something The idiom "at the risk of doing something" means that one is willing to take a chance or gamble in order to accomplish or say something, even if it may have negative consequences or outcomes. It conveys the idea of proceeding despite the potential dangers or disadvantages involved.
  • handle (or treat) someone or something with kid gloves The idiom "handle (or treat) someone or something with kid gloves" means to handle or treat someone or something very delicately and carefully, often to avoid causing any harm or offense. It implies treating the person or thing in a manner that is extremely cautious, gentle, and considerate.
  • drive a coach and horses through something The idiom "drive a coach and horses through something" is used to indicate that someone has easily exposed flaws, weaknesses, or loopholes in a plan, argument, law, or system. It suggests that the person has effectively undermined or invalidated the mentioned thing by clearly pointing out its vulnerabilities. This idiom originates from the image of a coach and horses being able to effortlessly pass through gaps or breaches in defensive lines or structures.
  • glance through something The idiom "glance through something" means to quickly or briefly look at the contents of something without giving it much attention or thorough examination.
  • flutter over someone or something The idiom "flutter over someone or something" refers to acting excited or enthusiastic, often with a display of nervous energy, towards a person or thing. It implies a feeling of being unsteady or uncertain due to strong emotions or intense anticipation.
  • hurl someone or something into something The idiom "hurl someone or something into something" means to forcefully propel or fling someone or something into a specific place or situation, usually with great speed or force. It implies an abrupt and vigorous action that can often be unexpected or unwelcome.
  • encompass someone or something (with)in something The idiom "encompass someone or something (within) something" means to include or surround someone or something completely within a particular thing or space. It implies that the person or thing is entirely within the boundaries or limits of the specified element.
  • put a figure on something The idiom "put a figure on something" means to determine or estimate the specific amount or value of something, often in financial terms. It refers to assigning a numerical value or providing a precise measurement for a particular concept or item.
  • drop someone or something off The idiom "drop someone or something off" refers to the act of leaving or delivering someone or something at a specific location before continuing on to another destination. It often implies a brief stop or detour to leave the person or item.
  • hold someone to something The idiom "hold someone to something" means to demand or insist that someone fulfills a promise, commitment, or agreement made. It implies a level of accountability or responsibility for one's words or actions and requires someone to stay true to their initial declaration or undertaking.
  • kiss someone or something off The idiom "kiss someone or something off" refers to dismissing or disregarding someone or something in a contemptuous or dismissive manner. It implies a lack of interest, importance, or consideration towards the person or thing being dismissed.
  • draw someone or something into something The idiom "draw someone or something into something" means to involve or entice someone or something to participate or become a part of a situation, activity, or discussion, usually against their will or better judgment. It implies enticing someone to get involved in a situation or making them part of something they originally had no desire or intention to be a part of.
  • know something like the back of your hand The idiom "know something like the back of your hand" means to have a very thorough and deep understanding or knowledge of something, to the point where it becomes familiar and easily recognizable, similar to how one is intimately familiar with the back of their own hand.
  • clear someone of something The idiom "clear someone of something" means to absolve or exonerate someone from an accusation, blame, or wrongdoing.
  • badger someone into something To badger someone into something means to persistently and aggressively pressure or nag someone until they finally agree or take the desired action. It implies continuous pestering or annoying behavior in order to manipulate or convince someone to do something.
  • fall prey to something The idiom "fall prey to something" means to become a target or victim of something, typically negative or harmful. It implies being caught or trapped by a situation, temptation, or deception, resulting in negative consequences or harm.
  • entwine something around someone or something The idiom "entwine something around someone or something" means to wrap, coil, or interlace something firmly around someone or something. This expression often implies a close or binding connection, both physically and metaphorically.
  • belt someone or something down The idiom "belt someone or something down" generally refers to securing or fastening someone or something tightly in place. It can also mean applying force or pressure to keep something or someone under control or restrained.
  • confuse someone about something The idiom "confuse someone about something" means to cause someone to feel uncertain, unsure, or puzzled about a particular topic, issue, or concept. It refers to creating a state of confusion or ambiguity in someone's understanding, making it difficult for them to comprehend or make sense of the situation or information at hand.
  • check someone or something over The idiom "check someone or something over" means to examine or inspect someone or something thoroughly, usually for the purpose of identifying any problems, errors, or potential issues. It involves looking closely, reviewing details, and ensuring everything is in proper order or condition.
  • keen on doing something The idiom "keen on doing something" means to have a strong interest, enthusiasm, or excitement about doing or being involved in a particular activity or pursuing a particular goal.
  • bind someone or something down The idiom "bind someone or something down" refers to limiting or restraining someone or something, usually physically or metaphorically. It implies the act of preventing freedom, movement, or progress.
  • have something to your credit When something is said to be "to your credit," it means that it is a positive or admirable accomplishment that can be attributed to you. It refers to having done something valuable, noteworthy, or praiseworthy which adds to your achievements or reputation.
  • drive someone or something off The idiom "drive someone or something off" means to force or make someone or something go away or leave a particular location or situation. It implies using aggressive or persuasive actions to make sure the person or thing is no longer present or involved.
  • chip something away (from something) The idiom "chip something away (from something)" means to gradually reduce or diminish something, typically through persistent effort or gradual progress. It can be used both in a physical sense, where small pieces are chipped off from a larger object, as well as in a metaphorical sense, where a problem or obstacle is slowly overcome through persistence and small achievements.
  • hack someone or something apart The idiom "hack someone or something apart" means to violently and ruthlessly break or cut someone or something into pieces. It is often used metaphorically to describe thoroughly criticizing, attacking, or dismantling someone or something, typically in a harsh or destructive manner.
  • console someone with something The idiom "console someone with something" means to provide comfort, solace, or support to a person who is feeling distressed, sad, or upset, typically by offering kind words, empathetic gestures, or reassurance.
  • take cognizance of something The idiom "take cognizance of something" means to become aware or take note of something and give it consideration or attention. It refers to acknowledging the existence or importance of a particular issue or matter.
  • hedge someone or something in To "hedge someone or something in" means to restrict or confine someone or something within limits or boundaries, typically with the intention of controlling or containing them. It can also refer to surrounding or enclosing someone or something physically or metaphorically, often to prevent escape or to provide protection.
  • drench someone or something in something The idiom "drench someone or something in something" means to thoroughly soak or saturate someone or something with a liquid.
  • intend something for someone or something The idiom "intend something for someone or something" means to plan, design, or have a particular purpose in mind for someone or something. It implies a deliberate intention or aim towards a specific target or recipient.
  • jockey someone or something into position The idiom "jockey someone or something into position" means to skillfully maneuver or manipulate someone or something in order to achieve a desired outcome or advantage. It typically involves using strategic tactics or influence to position oneself or an object in a favorable or advantageous way. Just like a jockey skillfully directs and controls a horse during a race, this idiom implies actively directing or guiding someone or something to achieve a specific goal or desired position.
  • board something up The idiom "board something up" means to cover, seal, or secure a building, window, or entrance with wooden boards or planks, typically in order to prevent entry or protect against damage, particularly during a period of closure, vacancy, or impending danger.
  • it’s a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will (not) do something The idiom "it's a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will (not) do something" is used to express a strong likelihood or probability of something happening or not happening. It suggests that the odds are overwhelmingly in favor (or against) a particular outcome. For example, if someone says "It's a hundred to one that it will rain tomorrow," it means they strongly believe that it's highly likely to rain, with the odds significantly in favor of rain.
  • alienate someone from someone or something The idiom "alienate someone from someone or something" means to cause someone to feel isolated, disconnected, or estranged from someone or something that they were previously connected to. It suggests that a person's actions or behavior have created a sense of distance or hostility, leading to a breakdown in relationships or a loss of support or loyalty.
  • have an appetite for something The idiom "have an appetite for something" means to have a strong desire or liking for something, often referring to a particular activity, experience, or even a type of food. It implies a keen interest or enthusiasm towards that specific thing.
  • go between (someone or something and someone or something else) The idiom "go between (someone or something and someone or something else)" means to act as an intermediary or mediator between two people or groups, usually to facilitate communication or resolve a conflict. It refers to the role of someone who carries messages, relays information, or negotiates on behalf of others in order to establish a connection or bridge a gap between them.
  • bustle about doing something The idiom "bustle about doing something" means to move or work in a hurried or energetic manner, typically while engaging in various activities or tasks. It suggests being busy or bustling around, actively accomplishing things.
  • flatten someone or something out The idiom "flatten someone or something out" means to make someone or something less agitated, upset, or emotionally distressed; to calm or soothe someone or resolve a difficult situation. It can also refer to straightening or smoothing something out physically, such as flattening out a crease or wrinkle in a fabric or straightening out a crooked object.
  • hoodwink someone out of something To "hoodwink someone out of something" means to deceive or trick them into giving up or losing something of value, such as money, possessions, or opportunities. It implies the act of cunningly manipulating or swindling someone to their disadvantage.
  • would give your right arm for something/to do something The idiom "would give your right arm for something/to do something" means that a person desires something or wants to do something so much that they would be willing to make a great sacrifice or trade something extremely valuable to obtain it. It emphasizes the strong intensity of one's desire or willingness to go to extreme lengths to achieve a particular goal or acquire a specific item or experience.
  • frighten (someone or an animal) into doing something The idiom "frighten (someone or an animal) into doing something" means to force or compel someone or an animal to do something by causing fear or intimidation.
  • labor for someone or something The idiom "labor for someone or something" means to work hard or make significant effort on behalf of someone or something. It refers to dedicating time, energy, and exertion towards a particular task or purpose, often for the benefit or advancement of another person or cause.
  • (somewhere) in the neighborhood of something The idiom "(somewhere) in the neighborhood of something" means approximately or roughly. It is often used to convey that the specific value or number is not exact, but rather an estimation within a certain range or proximity.
  • enforce something on someone The idiom "enforce something on someone" means to compel or make someone adhere to or comply with a particular rule, regulation, policy, or law, often through authoritative or coercive means. It typically implies imposing something upon someone without considering their preferences or opinions.
  • raise havoc with someone or something The idiom "raise havoc with someone or something" means to cause chaos, disorder, or destruction to someone or something. It implies that the actions or behavior have a disruptive and harmful impact, often resulting in confusion, disruption, or damage.
  • hint something to someone The idiom "hint something to someone" means to subtly suggest or indirectly convey information or an idea to someone, usually by dropping small clues or alluding to it without explicitly stating it.
  • rivet one's gaze on someone or something To "rivet one's gaze on someone or something" means to focus intensely or fix one's eyes unwaveringly on a person or object, showing deep concentration or interest, often making it difficult to look away.
  • interpret something as something The idiom "interpret something as something" means to understand or explain something in a particular way or context, often based on personal beliefs, perspectives, or biases. It refers to the act of assigning meaning, significance, or intention to something in a specific manner.
  • embed something in something The idiom "embed something in something" means to firmly or deeply position or insert something into something else. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of placing an idea, concept, or object firmly within another, usually with the intent of making it an integral or inseparable part.
  • back someone or something onto someone or something The idiom "back someone or something onto someone or something" refers to the act of unintentionally forcing or pushing someone or something onto another person or object, often resulting in an unwanted and awkward situation. It can also mean supporting or endorsing someone or something, especially in a confrontational situation.
  • contrast with someone or something The idiom "contrast with someone or something" means to compare and highlight the differences between two people or things, emphasizing the disparities in their characteristics, qualities, or features.
  • burn something away The idiom "burn something away" typically refers to the act of getting rid of or eliminating something completely, especially through intense or prolonged effort or action. It suggests using fire or heat to remove or destroy something, often with the goal of leaving no trace or remnants behind.
  • intersperse something among something The idiom "intersperse something among something" means to place or distribute something at regular intervals or intervals throughout something else. It involves scattering or inserting something among other objects, elements, or occurrences in a way that breaks the uniformity or monotony.
  • drill someone in something The idiom "drill someone in something" means to repeatedly and systematically teach or train someone in a particular skill, subject, or area of knowledge. It implies a thorough and rigorous instruction method, often involving repetition and practice to ensure mastery.
  • invite someone to something The idiom "invite someone to something" means to extend an invitation or offer someone the opportunity to participate or attend an event, gathering, activity, or function. It implies including them and welcoming their presence.
  • crowd someone or something together The idiom "crowd someone or something together" means to gather or group people or things closely or tightly in a limited space or area. It implies the act of closely packing or squeezing individuals or objects together, often resulting in a lack of personal space or room for movement.
  • down through something The idiom "down through something" typically means traveling or progressing through a specific area, period of time, or hierarchy. It suggests moving from a higher to a lower position or going through a sequence.
  • account for something The idiom "account for something" means to provide an explanation, justification, or description for something, especially in order to clarify or provide reasons for a particular situation, event, or outcome. It can also refer to taking responsibility for something or being held responsible for one's actions.
  • interfere in something The idiom "interfere in something" means to become involved or meddle in someone else's affairs or activities without being invited or having the authority to do so. It implies interfering with or disrupting a situation, often with negative consequences.
  • convert someone or something (from something) (into something) The idiom "convert someone or something (from something) (into something)" means to cause someone or something to change their beliefs, opinions, or characteristics, often by persuasion or influence, in order to adopt a different ideology, faith, state, or form.
  • can't be doing with something The idiom "can't be doing with something" means that someone has a strong dislike or cannot tolerate a particular thing or activity. It implies a lack of interest, patience, or willingness to engage with that thing or situation.
  • have something going for one The idiom "have something going for one" means to possess some positive qualities, advantages, or circumstances that can contribute to one's success, appeal, or chances of achieving a desired outcome. It suggests that someone has specific factors or abilities working in their favor.
  • set your face against something The idiom "set your face against something" means to oppose or resist something firmly and immovably. It implies taking a strong stand against a particular idea, action, or behavior, showing a determined and unwavering determination to not support or accept it.
  • get someone or something free (from someone or something) The idiom "get someone or something free (from someone or something)" means to release or liberate someone or something from a person, place, or situation that is confining, controlling, or restricting them. It implies the act of setting someone or something free from any constraints, obligations, or hardships they might be experiencing.
  • bring something before someone or something The idiom "bring something before someone or something" means to present or introduce a matter, issue, or problem to someone or a formal body for discussion, consideration, or resolution. It involves bringing attention to a particular matter and involving another individual or group in addressing it.
  • hurl something away (from someone or something) The idiom "hurl something away (from someone or something)" means to forcefully throw or cast something away from a person or an object. It suggests a strong and abrupt action of discarding or getting rid of something by throwing it forcefully.
  • lean across someone or something The idiom "lean across someone or something" means to bend or reach forward from one side, typically using someone or something as support or leverage. It implies physically stretching or leaning across or over a person or object in order to reach something or gain access to something on the other side.
  • keep someone or something going The idiom "keep someone or something going" means to maintain, sustain, or support someone or something, especially in challenging or difficult circumstances, to ensure their continuous operation, existence, or progress. It implies providing the necessary resources, assistance, or motivation to prevent someone or something from failing or faltering.
  • go over someone or something The idiom "go over someone or something" generally means to examine or review someone or something in detail. It can imply scrutinizing or analyzing someone's actions or behavior, or thoroughly inspecting something to identify any flaws or areas of improvement.
  • set your heart/mind on something/on doing something The idiom "set your heart/mind on something/on doing something" means to have a strong desire or determination to achieve or obtain a particular goal, object, or outcome. It signifies a high level of focus and dedication towards a specific objective.
  • devote someone or something to someone or something The idiom "devote someone or something to someone or something" means to give someone or something entirely to someone or something else, often with dedication or commitment. It implies a deep level of loyalty, dedication, or allocation of resources.
  • do something in/at one sitting The idiom "do something in/at one sitting" means to complete a task or activity without taking a break or pausing. It refers to accomplishing something, such as reading a book or finishing a meal, in a single continuous effort, without interruptions.
  • absorb someone in(to) something The idiom "absorb someone in(to) something" refers to fully engaging or immersing someone in a particular activity, environment, or topic. It indicates the act of capturing someone's attention and interest to the point that they become deeply involved or integrated into a specific situation or context. This can be applied in various contexts, such as work, education, social settings, or hobbies, where one becomes engrossed or absorbed in a particular subject or experience.
  • hold something in abeyance The idiom "hold something in abeyance" means to postpone or defer something, typically a decision or action, temporarily and to keep it on hold until further notice or a more suitable time. It involves putting aside or suspending a matter without taking immediate action or reaching a final resolution.
  • gather someone into something "Gather someone into something" is an idiomatic expression that describes the act of including someone or involving them in a particular activity, group, or project. It implies bringing someone into a collective or making them part of a larger whole.
  • clasp someone or something to something The idiom "clasp someone or something to something" means to hold or secure someone or something tightly or firmly to a particular object or place. It suggests a strong grip or attachment, both literally and metaphorically.
  • check someone or something out The idiom "check someone or something out" means to examine, inspect, or investigate someone or something in order to gather information or assess its quality, credibility, or suitability.
  • increase in something The idiom "increase in something" means a rise or growth in the quantity, level, extent, or intensity of a particular thing or factor. It denotes an upward trend or enlargement in size, amount, or degree.
  • inculcate someone with something The idiom "inculcate someone with something" means to teach or impress upon someone a particular belief, value, or idea by repetition, instruction, or persistent effort. It refers to the act of instilling a specific concept or mindset into someone's thoughts or behavior.
  • it always/never pays to do something The idiom "it always/never pays to do something" means that there are certain actions or behaviors that can lead to advantageous or disadvantageous outcomes. It implies that investing time, effort, or resources in a particular action can either yield positive results or result in negative consequences.
  • jumble something together The idiom "jumble something together" means to assemble or put something together in a haphazard or disorderly manner, without much thought or organization. It implies that the resulting creation may lack coherence or quality due to its rushed or unstructured nature.
  • do something like it's going out of style The idiom "do something like it's going out of style" means to do something excessively, extravagantly, or in a very intense manner, often to the point of overdoing it. It suggests that the action or behavior being done is being performed to the extreme, as if there is no limit or restriction on its indulgence.
  • head toward someone or something The idiom "head toward someone or something" means to move or direct yourself in the direction of a particular person or thing. It implies a physical movement or a deliberate action of approaching or going closer to a specific target.
  • tip the scales at something The idiom "tip the scales at something" means to weigh a certain amount, often implying a relatively large or significant weight. It is commonly used figuratively to describe a person or object being extremely heavy or a situation having considerable importance or impact.
  • pin something on someone The idiom "pin something on someone" means to falsely or wrongly accuse someone of a wrongdoing or to place the blame or responsibility on someone for something they did not do.
  • have something on good authority To have something on good authority means to have reliable information or knowledge about something. It implies that the information has been obtained from a trustworthy or credible source.
  • froth something up The idiom "froth something up" means to stir or agitate something in order to create excitement, excitement, or enthusiasm. It can also refer to exaggerating or embellishing information or events to make them seem more interesting or important than they actually are.
  • hanker after someone or something The idiom "hanker after someone or something" means to have a strong desire or longing for someone or something. It implies a sense of yearning or craving, often for something that is out of reach or unattainable.
  • introduce something into something The idiom "introduce something into something" typically refers to the act of bringing or inserting something new into a particular situation, system, or environment. It can suggest the addition of a new element, concept, idea, or item into an existing context.
  • (all) for someone or something The idiom "(all) for someone or something" means to wholeheartedly support, advocate, or be in favor of someone or something. It implies being completely dedicated, committed, or enthusiastic about a person, cause, or idea.
  • aside from someone or something The idiom "aside from someone or something" means excluding or not including a particular person or thing. It suggests that apart from the mentioned person or thing, everything else is being considered or discussed.
  • let someone or something into something The idiom "let someone or something into something" means to grant someone or something access or admission into a place or situation. It can be both literal and figurative, suggesting the act of enabling someone or something to be a part of or involved in a particular domain, event, or relationship.
  • dawdle something away The idiom "dawdle something away" means to wastefully or aimlessly spend time, especially by procrastinating or engaging in unproductive activities. It suggests a lack of urgency or purpose in using or managing something.
  • let fall something The idiom "let fall something" means to unintentionally reveal or disclose something, usually a secret or hidden information, without intending to do so. It implies the act of accidentally mentioning or letting slip a particular piece of information or letting it become known.
  • bring someone or something to bay The idiom "bring someone or something to bay" refers to the act of trapping or cornering a person or an animal, often in a determined effort to capture or confront them. It evokes the image of a pack of hunting dogs chasing their prey until it is forced to turn and face them, symbolizing the pursuit and imminent confrontation.
  • kick something in (on something) (for someone or something) The idiom "kick something in (on something) (for someone or something)" means to contribute or provide something, usually money, towards a collective fund or cause for the benefit of someone or something. It implies actively participating and offering support to assist with a particular endeavor or financial need.
  • have a (hard/difficult) job doing/to do something The idiom "have a (hard/difficult) job doing/to do something" means to find a specific task challenging, demanding, or arduous. It implies that the task requires a lot of effort, skill, or endurance to complete successfully.
  • bring someone up on something The idiom "bring someone up on something" means to confront or accuse someone about a particular issue or wrongdoing, usually in a formal or official setting. It involves calling attention to someone's actions or behavior, often with the intention of holding them accountable or addressing the matter at hand.
  • level something out The idiom "level something out" means to make something more balanced, stable, or even. It refers to the act of equalizing or correcting any irregularities, differences, or fluctuations in a certain situation or object.
  • drown someone in something The idiom "drown someone in something" typically means to overwhelm or inundate someone with a large amount of something, such as information, tasks, work, or problems, making it difficult for them to handle or cope with.
  • bring someone or something up The idiom "bring someone or something up" means to raise or educate someone, or to mention or introduce a topic for discussion.
  • do something by a whisker The idiom "do something by a whisker" means to accomplish or achieve something very narrowly or by a very small margin. It suggests that the outcome was almost not achieved and required a great deal of luck or precision.
  • put somebody to the expense of something/of doing something The idiom "put somebody to the expense of something/of doing something" means to cause someone to incur costs or expenses by requiring them to do something or by creating a situation that necessitates spending money. It refers to an action or circumstance that places a financial burden on someone.
  • beat someone or something back The idiom "beat someone or something back" means to successfully repel or drive away someone or something using force or aggression. It implies forcefully resisting an attack, assault, or intrusion and ensuring that the person or thing is kept at a distance or prevented from advancing.
  • lay for someone or something The idiom "lay for someone or something" typically means to plan or be prepared to confront, catch, or harm someone or something. It implies waiting in ambush or being ready to take action against a particular person or thing.
  • tell the difference between (someone and someone else) (or something and something else) The idiom "tell the difference between (someone and someone else) (or something and something else)" means being able to distinguish or discern the variations or distinguishing characteristics between two people or things. It suggests having the ability to perceive and accurately recognize the dissimilarities or discrepancies between them.
  • allocate something to someone or something The idiom "allocate something to someone or something" refers to the act of assigning or distributing a certain amount of resources, tasks, responsibilities, or duties to a particular person, group, or entity. It involves dividing or apportioning something, such as time, money, workloads, or resources, among various individuals or entities, ensuring the proper allocation for effective and efficient functioning.
  • hook something on (to someone or something) The idiom "hook something on (to someone or something)" means to attach, fasten, or connect an object to someone or something else. It can be used both literally, referring to physically fixing or joining things together, as well as figuratively, indicating the act of associating or linking something to a person, group, or concept.
  • turn round/around and do something The idiom "turn round/around and do something" typically means to abruptly change one's behavior, actions, or decisions and begin doing something different or unexpected.
  • fuss at someone or something The idiom "fuss at someone or something" can be defined as an expression used to describe the act of scolding, criticizing, or complaining about someone or something in an agitated or anxious manner. It implies an excessive or unnecessary display of concern or anger towards the person or thing being addressed.
  • get something (for an amount of money) The idiom "get something (for an amount of money)" refers to the action of acquiring or purchasing something in exchange for a specific sum of money. It implies the transactional nature of buying or obtaining an item or service.
  • not in the same league with someone or something The idiom "not in the same league with someone or something" means that a person or thing is not comparable to another person or thing in terms of skill, ability, quality, or status. It implies that the two entities are on completely different levels or categories.
  • carry someone or something away The idiom "carry someone or something away" typically means to physically move or take someone or something to a different location or place, often forcefully or without their consent. It can also refer to someone or something being captivated or overwhelmed by a strong emotion or influence.
  • have something to prove The idiom "have something to prove" refers to the desire or motivation to demonstrate one's abilities or worth, usually due to a perceived lack of respect, doubt, or criticism from others. It implies a strong determination to prove oneself capable, competent, or successful in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • hit someone up for something The idiom "hit someone up for something" means to ask someone for something, usually in a casual or informal manner. It implies seeking a favor, help, or an item from that particular person.
  • amount to something The idiom "amount to something" means to have a significant or meaningful result, to achieve a certain level of success or importance, or to have a valid purpose or value. It implies that the effort or actions undertaken have yielded a favorable or desirable outcome.
  • engross someone in something To engross someone in something means to fully captivate or absorb their attention and involvement in a particular activity or topic. It refers to the act of drawing someone into something, making them deeply interested or engrossed in it, to the point where they are fully focused and emotionally invested.
  • with a view to doing something The idiom "with a view to doing something" means to have the intention or purpose of doing something. It implies that one has a specific goal or objective in mind when engaging in a particular action or making a decision.
  • fail someone on something The idiom "fail someone on something" means to evaluate or judge someone negatively, typically by not giving them a passing grade, in a particular aspect or topic. It implies that the person has not met the required standard or expectation in that specific area.
  • an armchair something The idiom "an armchair something" refers to a person who provides opinions and advice on a specific subject without having practical experience or expertise in that area. This phrase suggests that the individual is only a casual observer or theoretician, offering their views from the comfort and safety of an armchair.
  • pump somebody full of something The idiom "pump somebody full of something" typically refers to the act of providing someone with a large quantity or excessive amount of something, usually information, ideas, or emotions. It implies overwhelming or bombarding someone with a particular substance or concept to the point of saturation or excess.
  • jaw about someone or something The idiom "jaw about someone or something" means to talk, chat, or talk excessively about someone or something, often in an informal or gossipy manner.
  • announce something to someone The idiom "announce something to someone" means to formally or officially declare or make known information or news to a particular person or group of people. It implies a deliberate act of communicating something important or significant to the intended individual or audience.
  • have something at your feet To have something at your feet means to have control or mastery over it, or to have easy access and influence over it. It typically suggests that the person has the power or advantage in a particular situation.
  • hover between something (and something else) The idiom "hover between something (and something else)" means to remain undecided or indecisive between two options or possibilities. It suggests being in a state of uncertainty, often struggling to make a choice or unable to commit to a particular course of action.
  • dawdle over something The idiom "dawdle over something" means to waste time or procrastinate when completing a task or activity. It refers to a tendency to be slow or inefficient in the execution of a certain action.
  • leave yourself wide open to something The idiom "leave yourself wide open to something" means to make oneself vulnerable or expose oneself to a potential negative outcome or criticism by not taking necessary precautions or protective measures. It implies that by not being cautious or prepared, a person is setting themselves up for potential harm, criticism, or failure.
  • flake something off of something The idiom "flake something off of something" means to remove or detach small, thin pieces or fragments from a surface or object. It often refers to the act of scraping, peeling, or brushing away these flakes.
  • break something away (from something) The idiom "break something away (from something)" means to separate or detach something forcefully from its current position or connection. It implies the act of removing or escaping from a particular situation, relationship, or pattern, often with a sense of determination or forcefulness.
  • frown on someone or something The idiom "frown on someone or something" means to disapprove or show displeasure towards someone or something. It indicates a negative judgment or viewpoint regarding a person, action, or behavior.
  • bring something about your ears The idiom "bring something about your ears" typically means to bring upon oneself trouble, criticism, or negative consequences as a result of one's actions or decisions. It suggests that the person will face intense or overwhelming challenges or consequences.
  • brimming with something The idiom "brimming with something" means to be filled or overflowing with a particular quality, emotion, or substance. It implies having an abundance or excessive amount of that specific thing.
  • grasp at someone or something The idiom "grasp at someone or something" refers to the act of desperately trying to catch, obtain, or understand someone or something, usually when faced with a challenging situation or limited time. It suggests a sense of urgency or desperation in trying to hold onto or comprehend something fleeting.
  • have a good mind to do something The idiom "have a good mind to do something" means to strongly consider or seriously contemplate taking a particular action. It suggests that the person is close to making a decision or is strongly inclined towards a specific course of action.
  • make arrangements to do something The idiom "make arrangements to do something" means to plan or organize the necessary steps or procedures in order to do a particular activity or achieve a specific goal. It involves taking the necessary actions, such as scheduling, coordinating, or preparing, to ensure that everything is in order for the desired outcome.
  • flash on someone or something The idiom "flash on someone or something" means to suddenly have a brief or vivid recollection or memory of someone or something. It refers to a sudden and usually unexpected return of a memory, thought, or image related to a specific person or thing.
  • substitute for someone or something The idiom "substitute for someone or something" refers to a person or thing that acts as a replacement or alternative in the absence or unavailability of another person or thing. It implies that the substitute serves a similar purpose or function as the original, providing a viable option or stand-in.
  • cut something to ribbons The idiom "cut something to ribbons" means to severely criticize, ridicule, or dismantle something, often resulting in its complete destruction or ruin. It implies a thorough and systematic dismantling or tearing apart of something, leaving it in tatters or shreds.
  • erupt from something The idiom "erupt from something" typically means to suddenly appear or emerge in a forceful or explosive manner from a specific place or situation. It describes a sudden and often intense outburst or manifestation.
  • ask someone for something The idiom "ask someone for something" means to make a request or seek something from someone, typically by expressing one's desire or need for it. It implies directly approaching someone and explicitly communicating what is desired or required in order to obtain assistance, information, a favor, or any other desired outcome.
  • litter something about The idiom "litter something about" typically means to scatter or distribute something in a careless or untidy manner. It implies that the items are spread or thrown around without any concern for order or cleanliness.
  • be at pains to do something The idiom "be at pains to do something" means to put in a great deal of effort or make a particular effort to do something. It implies that one is consciously taking extra care or going out of their way to accomplish a task or fulfill a responsibility.
  • leave someone or something standing The idiom "leave someone or something standing" means to outperform or surpass someone or something to such an extent that the other person or thing seems inferior or inadequate in comparison. It implies that the person or thing being talked about is significantly better or more impressive than the others in a particular context.
  • fling someone or something back The idiom "fling someone or something back" typically means to forcefully or abruptly throw or push someone or something backwards, often with a sudden and strong movement. It denotes a forceful rejection or repulsion of someone or something.
  • focus on someone or something The idiom "focus on someone or something" means to direct all attention, effort, or concentration towards a particular person or thing. It implies giving exclusive priority to a specific individual or situation, emphasizing the importance of paying close attention and dedicating one's energy to that specific target.
  • brush someone or something aside To "brush someone or something aside" means to dismiss or ignore someone or something without giving it proper attention or consideration. It implies disregarding or treating someone or something as unimportant or insignificant.
  • with an eye to something/to doing something The idiom "with an eye to something/to doing something" means planning, considering or having a specific intention or goal in mind. It implies being mindful or attentive to a particular purpose or objective.
  • claim something for someone or something The idiom "claim something for someone or something" means to assert ownership or right to something on behalf of a person or entity. It implies making a formal or public declaration in order to establish a legitimate claim or stake in a particular matter or object.
  • impact (up)on someone or something The idiom "impact (up)on someone or something" refers to the effect or influence someone or something has on another person or thing, often resulting in a significant and noticeable consequence or change. It implies a strong and meaningful influence that can leave a lasting impression or make a difference in the situation.
  • arrange for something To arrange for something means to make preparations or plans in order to ensure that something happens or is provided. It involves taking the necessary steps to make sure that a particular event or outcome is organized or secured.
  • in the absence of someone or something The idiom "in the absence of someone or something" refers to the situation or condition where someone or something is missing or not present. It implies that there is a void or lack that needs to be filled or compensated for in some way.
  • be steeped in something The idiom "be steeped in something" means to be deeply or fully immersed in a particular quality, characteristic, or atmosphere. It often refers to being deeply involved or saturated with a certain belief, tradition, culture, knowledge, or experience.
  • get aboard something The idiom "get aboard something" typically means to join or become a part of something, particularly a group, organization, or opportunity. It implies actively participating or embracing the given situation or endeavor.
  • what someone or something is cracked up to be The idiom "what someone or something is cracked up to be" means that someone or something is not as good or impressive as they were described or rumored to be. It implies that the actual performance, quality, or abilities of the person or thing do not meet the high expectations or reputation that were built up beforehand.
  • flock after someone or something The idiom "flock after someone or something" means to follow or pursue someone or something enthusiastically, usually as a group or in large numbers. It implies a strong attraction or interest in the person or thing being pursued, similar to how birds flock together in large groups.
  • be/fall prey to something The idiom "be/fall prey to something" means to become a victim of or succumb to something, typically a negative situation or circumstance. It implies being defenseless or vulnerable to a particular danger or temptation, resulting in being harmed or affected negatively by it.
  • flush with something The idiom "flush with something" typically means to be in a position of having a surplus or abundant amount of something, particularly in terms of money, resources, or confidence. It signifies being in a state of plenty or being well-supplied with a particular item or quality.
  • knock something into a cocked hat The idiom "knock something into a cocked hat" means to greatly surpass, outperform, or render something else obsolete or insignificant. It implies completely overshadowing a previous achievement or making it seem inadequate in comparison.
  • grieve over someone or something The idiom "grieve over someone or something" refers to the act of feeling deep sorrow, sadness, or mourning caused by the loss of someone or something valuable or important to you. It can also encompass the emotional process of mourning or dealing with a significant disappointment or setback.
  • knit something together The idiom "knit something together" typically means to unite or bring together different elements, parts, or people in order to create a cohesive whole. It refers to the act of connecting or integrating various components or individuals to form a stronger, more organized entity. This can be used to describe the process of building teamwork, creating harmony, or fostering cooperation amongst different entities or individuals.
  • come across someone or something The idiom "come across someone or something" means to find or encounter someone or something unexpectedly or by chance. It can refer to stumbling upon a person, object, or information while not actively seeking them.
  • buckle under something The idiom "buckle under something" means to submit or yield to pressure, adversity, or a difficult situation. It implies giving in or surrendering to overwhelming circumstances or demands.
  • lay something against something The idiom "lay something against something" can have different meanings depending on the context. One possible definition is: To compare or contrast something with another thing in order to evaluate or judge its worth or significance. It involves examining the qualities, merits, or defects of two things side by side to determine differences or similarities.
  • hang something over someone or something To "hang something over someone or something" is an idiomatic expression that means to use a specific event, information, or circumstance as a means of exerting control, influence, or power over someone or something. It implies a situation where a person holds some form of advantage or leverage, often used to intimidate or manipulate others.
  • bear with someone or something The idiom "bear with someone or something" means to be patient or tolerant with someone or something despite difficulties or frustrations. It implies that one should endure or show understanding towards a person or situation, even if it may be challenging or testing one's patience.
  • bear someone or something up The idiom "bear someone or something up" means to support someone or something physically, emotionally, or mentally during a challenging or difficult time. It suggests providing strength, encouragement, or assistance to help them endure or overcome the situation.
  • hiss at someone or something The idiom "hiss at someone or something" refers to the act of showing disapproval, contempt, or anger towards someone or something by making the sound of a hiss. It can also indicate a vocal expression of disagreement or scorn towards a person, an idea, or an action.
  • never tire of doing something The idiom "never tire of doing something" means to say that one never gets bored or weary of repeatedly engaging in a particular action or activity.
  • can't help something The idiom "can't help something" means to be unable to control or prevent a certain action, feeling, or outcome. It conveys a lack of control or ability to resist something even though you may wish to.
  • approach someone about someone or something The idiom "approach someone about someone or something" means to initiate a conversation or discussion with someone in order to address a particular person or issue. It involves seeking out the person or bringing up a specific topic with the intention of discussing, resolving, or gaining information about it.
  • have the grace to do something The idiom "have the grace to do something" means to have the decency, politeness, or courtesy to do something. It often implies that the action requires a certain level of humility, tact, or consideration towards others.
  • addict someone to something The idiom "addict someone to something" means to cause someone to become excessively or habitually dependent on something, typically a substance or an activity. It implies that the person's attachment or obsession with the specific thing has reached an addictive level, where they have difficulty controlling or limiting their engagement with it.
  • brace someone or something up The idiom "brace someone or something up" means to provide support or reinforcement to someone or something. It may involve offering physical assistance or emotional encouragement to help someone cope with a difficult situation or to strengthen and secure something to prevent it from collapsing or falling apart.
  • get your head round something The idiom "get your head round something" means to mentally understand or comprehend something difficult or complex, often after initial confusion or struggle. It implies the act of fully grasping or comprehending a concept, idea, or problem.
  • lay something on someone The idiom "lay something on someone" typically means to burden or impose something upon someone, such as a responsibility, task, or problem. It can also refer to placing a heavy emotional or psychological burden on someone.
  • bump someone or something up The idiom "bump someone or something up" means to elevate or increase the status, position, or level of someone or something. It often refers to giving someone a promotion, raising someone's rank, increasing someone's importance, or upgrading something to a higher level.
  • bail someone or something out The idiom "bail someone or something out" means to provide financial assistance or rescue someone or something from a difficult or challenging situation. It can also refer to the act of posting bail to secure the release of someone from jail.
  • jeer at someone or something To jeer at someone or something means to mock, ridicule, or taunt them in a scornful or derisive manner. It often involves making insulting or derisive remarks, gestures, or sounds, showing contempt or disdain for the person or thing being targeted.
  • enter someone or something in(to) something The idiom "enter someone or something in(to) something" generally means to register or record someone or something into a particular system, database, or contest.
  • choke something down The idiom "choke something down" refers to forcing oneself to eat or consume something unpleasant, whether it's due to the taste, texture, or other reasons, with great effort or difficulty. It implies that the individual does not enjoy or find satisfaction in what they are consuming but reluctantly does so anyway.
  • get someone or something down (from something) The idiom "get someone or something down (from something)" means to physically bring down or remove someone or something from a higher position, often with the help of a ladder or assistance. It can also be used figuratively to indicate helping someone overcome a difficult situation or emotional state.
  • be in two minds about something/about doing something The idiom "be in two minds about something/about doing something" means to be undecided or unsure about a particular issue or decision. It refers to when someone is torn between two opposing options or opinions, unable to make a clear choice.
  • have it in mind to do something The idiom "have it in mind to do something" means to have the intention or plan to do something. It implies that one has thought about, considered, or formulated an idea to carry out a particular action or task.
  • flow over someone or something The idiom "flow over someone or something" means to have a strong and overwhelming emotional impact on someone, often causing them to be unable to control or handle their emotions. It can also refer to a situation where something exceeds or surpasses what is expected or intended.
  • knock something together The idiom "knock something together" means to quickly or haphazardly assemble or construct something, typically without much planning or skill. It implies creating or putting together something in a simple or rough manner, often focusing on functionality rather than aesthetic or precise details.
  • cover someone or something up The idiom "cover someone or something up" means to hide or conceal information or actions, often to protect someone or to avoid negative consequences or exposure. It can also refer to physically hiding something by placing another object or substance on top of it.
  • put flesh on (the bones of) something The idiom "put flesh on (the bones of) something" means to provide more details, information, or substance to a concept or idea, making it more tangible, complete, or fully developed. It refers to adding depth, specificity, or further explanation to a vague or incomplete notion, allowing it to be better understood or visualized.
  • legislate against something The idiom "legislate against something" refers to the act of making or passing laws or regulations in order to prohibit or restrain a particular action, behavior, or practice. It implies that there is a need for a legal framework to address and control the specific issue or activity being targeted.
  • keep someone or something out of the way The idiom "keep someone or something out of the way" means to ensure that someone or something is not hindering or obstructing others, or causing any inconvenience or disturbance. It implies keeping them separate or distant from where they might interfere or pose any problems.
  • deck someone or something out (in something) The idiom "deck someone or something out (in something)" means to dress or adorn someone or something in a particular way, usually with fancy or elaborate clothing or accessories. It implies the act of dressing or decorating someone or something to enhance their appearance or make them look more impressive or festive.
  • curve to something The idiomatic expression "curve to something" typically refers to a situation where an individual or a situation alters its course or direction to align with a particular outcome or objective. It suggests a change of trajectory or path towards a specified direction or purpose. This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe a change in strategy, approach, or behavior to achieve a desired result.
  • fume about someone or something To "fume about someone or something" means to be extremely angry, irritated, or frustrated about a particular person or situation. It implies a high level of emotional intensity, often accompanied by venting or expressing one's anger verbally.
  • lap (up) against something The idiomatic expression "lap (up) against something" typically means to be in close proximity or pressed up against something, often by a liquid or an object. It can be used to describe physical contact or closeness.
  • force someone or something through something The idiom "force someone or something through something" means to make someone or something go through a difficult situation, task, or process against their will or when it is challenging or inconvenient for them. It implies applying pressure or coercion to move or complete something, often disregarding objections or resistance.
  • foist someone or something off (on someone or something) The idiom "foist someone or something off (on someone or something)" means to impose or pass off someone or something onto another person or thing, usually unwelcomed or undesired. It is often used when someone tries to get rid of a responsibility or burden by forcefully assigning it to someone else.
  • be in something for the long haul The idiom "be in something for the long haul" means to be committed or involved in a task, project, relationship, or endeavor for a prolonged period of time. It implies the willingness to endure challenges, setbacks, or difficulties that may arise in order to achieve a desired outcome or goal.
  • hypothesize about something The idiom "hypothesize about something" means to form or propose a hypothesis or conjecture regarding a particular subject or situation. It refers to making an educated guess or assumption based on available information in order to explain, predict, or better understand the given topic.
  • white knuckle something The idiom "white knuckle something" means to grip or hold onto something very tightly due to fear, anxiety, or nervousness. It often refers to a situation that is intense, thrilling, or extremely dangerous, causing someone to feel immense tension or anxiety. The term "white knuckle" describes the physical appearance of the person's knuckles turning white due to the intensity of their grip.
  • fritter something away (on someone or something) The idiom "fritter something away (on someone or something)" means to waste or squander something, often time, money, or resources, on someone or something that is not valuable, productive, or deserving. It usually implies the act of carelessly and thoughtlessly using or spending something without achieving any significant outcome.
  • diffuse something through something (else) The idiom "diffuse something through something (else)" refers to the act of spreading or distributing something, such as information or a substance, throughout a particular medium or container. It conveys the idea of dispersing or circulating whatever is being referred to through another entity or material.
  • beat someone or something out The idiom "beat someone or something out" refers to surpassing or outperforming someone or something, usually in a competition or race. It suggests achieving victory or success by surpassing one's opponents or competitors.
  • fluctuate with something The idiom "fluctuate with something" means to vary or change in response to the changes in something else. It refers to the tendency for one thing to rise and fall in parallel or in relation to another factor or condition.
  • expose something (or oneself) to someone or something To "expose something (or oneself) to someone or something" means to make something or oneself vulnerable, open, or susceptible to a particular person, situation, or influence. It implies putting oneself or something in a position where it could be affected, harmed, or subjected to scrutiny by someone or something else.
  • bedeck someone or something with something The idiom "bedeck someone or something with something" means to decorate or adorn someone or something with an abundant or excessive amount of something, such as ornaments, decorations, jewels, or other embellishments. It implies an extravagant display of adornment or ornamentation.
  • administer something to someone (or an animal) The idiom "administer something to someone (or an animal)" means to give or apply a medication, treatment, or dose of something to another person or animal, generally under professional supervision or guidance. It implies the act of providing necessary care or intervention to someone in need of it.
  • hold someone or something in contempt The idiom "hold someone or something in contempt" is defined as having a strong feeling of disrespect, disdain, or complete disregard towards someone or something. It suggests viewing the person or thing as unworthy, despicable, or lacking in value.
  • cut a swathe through something The idiom "cut a swathe through something" means to move or make progress swiftly and destructively through a particular area or situation, causing significant impact or influence. It implies a forceful and determined manner of dealing with obstacles or challenges, leaving a noticeable and sometimes irreversible impact.
  • entitle someone to do something The idiom "entitle someone to do something" means to give someone the right, permission, or authority to do a particular action or have a certain privilege. It implies that someone deserves or is qualified for a certain benefit or opportunity.
  • bring something around The idiom "bring something around" typically means to convince or persuade someone to change their viewpoint or opinion about something. It may involve presenting new evidence, reasoning, or arguments to get someone to see things differently or to come to an agreement.
  • the fruit(s) of something The idiom "the fruit(s) of something" refers to the positive results or rewards that are achieved as a result of a particular action, effort, or endeavor. It suggests that the benefits or outcomes obtained are the direct consequence of the time, resources, or energy invested into that specific task or project.
  • throw your weight behind something The idiom "throw your weight behind something" means to fully support or endorse a cause, project, or idea by using one's influence, power, or resources to help make it successful. It implies giving substantial and committed support towards achieving a specific goal.
  • flee to something The idiom "flee to something" means to quickly escape or run away from a dangerous or undesirable situation by seeking refuge or safety in a particular place or person. It implies a sense of urgency and a need to find protection or solace.
  • lay alongside something The idiom "lay alongside something" typically means placing or positioning an object or person next to another object or person in a parallel or adjacent manner. It suggests a side-by-side arrangement, often for comparison or evaluation.
  • hedge something against something The idiom "hedge something against something" refers to taking measures or making arrangements to protect oneself from potential risks or losses by creating a safeguard or backup plan. It often involves minimizing the negative impact of a particular situation or event by having alternative options or protections in place. It can be used in a financial context, where individuals or businesses use strategies like hedging to minimize potential losses from market fluctuations.
  • could do with something The idiom "could do with something" means that someone is in need or would benefit from having or receiving something. It implies that the person lacks something and expressing a desire or requirement for it.
  • never hear the end of something The idiom "never hear the end of something" means that someone continuously talks or reminds others about a particular event, mistake, or topic, causing it to be frequently brought up or referenced in conversation or discussion. It implies that the subject is a source of annoyance or irritation, as it receives excessive attention and is repeatedly mentioned.
  • tick something off on your fingers The idiom "tick something off on your fingers" refers to the action of counting something using your fingers as a visual aid. It means to keep track or enumerate items, ideas, or tasks by successively indicating them with your fingers, typically one finger per item. It is often used when mentally organizing or listing things in a specific order for clarity or memory purposes.
  • hear about someone or something The definition of the idiom "hear about someone or something" is to receive information or news about a person or thing, usually through informal means such as word of mouth or casual conversation.
  • get into/out of the way of something/of doing something The idiom "get into/out of the way of something/of doing something" means to either move aside or to remove oneself from a situation or activity in order to avoid interference or harm. It implies taking appropriate action to avoid an oncoming object or to prevent getting involved in something that may have negative consequences.
  • a hell of a someone or something The idiom "a hell of a someone or something" is used to describe something or someone as being extraordinary or exceptional, often in a positive sense. It emphasizes that the person or thing in question stands out in terms of their quality, intensity, or ability.
  • establish someone or something as someone or something The idiom "establish someone or something as someone or something" means to officially declare or prove someone or something as a recognized authority, figure, leader, or entity within a particular field, domain, or role. It refers to the process of establishing credibility, reputation, or status for a person or a thing.
  • abut on something The idiom "abut on something" means to directly border, adjoin, or be adjacent to something, typically a physical location or property. It implies that the two objects or entities share a common boundary or meet at a specific point.
  • drop someone or something off something The idiom "drop someone or something off something" means to leave or deliver someone or something at a particular location, usually by vehicle. It involves the act of stopping momentarily to allow a person or item to exit the vehicle and be left behind at a designated place.
  • make no bones about something/about doing something The idiom "make no bones about something/about doing something" means to be straightforward, honest, and upfront about one's opinion, intentions, or actions. It suggests not hesitating or showing any doubt or ambiguity.
  • groove on someone or something The idiom "groove on someone or something" typically means to feel a strong attraction, admiration, or enjoyment toward someone or something. It can imply being captivated, fascinated, or deeply interested in a particular person or thing.
  • be of two minds about something/about doing something The idiom "be of two minds about something/about doing something" means to be undecided or uncertain about a decision or course of action. It indicates that a person is torn between two opposite opinions or choices, making it difficult for them to make a firm decision.
  • hoard something up The idiom "hoard something up" means to accumulate or gather something in large quantities, typically with the intention of saving or keeping it concealed for future use. It refers to the act of stockpiling or amassing an excessive amount of something.
  • leave someone or something behind The idiom "leave someone or something behind" means to go away from a person or place without taking them or it along. It refers to physically or metaphorically leaving someone or something behind while moving forward or progressing in some way.
  • choke something back The idiom "choke something back" means to suppress or repress one's emotions, typically tears, sobs, or any strong expression of feelings, from being visibly displayed or released. It implies the act of holding or restraining such emotions within oneself.
  • could/can do without something The idiom "could/can do without something" means that one would prefer not to have or experience something because it is not necessary or undesirable. It implies that the person can manage or function perfectly fine without that specific thing or situation.
  • deed something (over) to someone The idiom "deed something (over) to someone" means to transfer ownership or rights of something to someone else. It typically refers to property or assets being legally handed over to another individual or entity. This can be done through a formal process, such as signing a deed document, to legally acknowledge the transfer.
  • according to something The idiom "according to something" is used to indicate that information or a statement is based on or in agreement with a particular source, reference, or belief. It means that the following information is coming from a specific authority, text, or person and is considered to be true or valid as per that source.
  • fulminate against someone or something The idiom "fulminate against someone or something" means to vehemently express strong disapproval or condemnation towards a person, group, or idea, often through intense verbal or written attacks. It refers to passionately denouncing or criticizing someone or something with great anger and outrage.
  • advise someone against doing something To advise someone against doing something means to counsel or recommend someone not to engage in a particular action or behavior because it is considered unwise, dangerous, or unfavorable.
  • feature someone in something The idiom "feature someone in something" means to prominently include or showcase someone in a particular event, project, or production. It implies giving special attention or recognition to an individual, often in a positive or prominent role.
  • hold someone or something over The idiom "hold someone or something over" typically means to delay or postpone someone or something to a later time or date. It can also refer to keeping someone or something in a state of anticipation or suspense for an extended period.
  • accuse someone of something The idiom "accuse someone of something" means to assert or declare that someone is responsible for or involved in a particular action, behavior, or wrongdoing, typically without sufficient evidence or proof. It implies making a formal or informal allegation against a person, suggesting their guilt or involvement in a specific situation or misdeed.
  • go past someone or something The idiomatic expression "go past someone or something" typically refers to physically moving beyond a person or object in a literal sense. It implies that one is walking, running, or traveling in a direction that takes them farther or ahead of another person or thing.
  • affix one's signature to something To "affix one's signature to something" means to officially sign or put one's name on a particular document, contract, or any written material to attest to its authenticity, agreement, or endorsement.
  • bring something home The idiom "bring something home" generally means to make something very clear or understandable, typically by presenting facts, evidence, or experiences that leave no doubt or uncertainty. It can also refer to realizing the full impact or significance of something after previously not fully comprehending it.
  • box someone or something in The idiom "box someone or something in" means to restrict or trap someone or something in a confined or limited space, making it difficult or impossible for them to move or escape. It can also refer to limiting someone's options or preventing them from making progress in a situation.
  • think better of it/of doing something The idiom "think better of it/of doing something" means to change or reconsider one's decision or actions as the result of realizing that it may not be wise, beneficial, or appropriate.
  • keep at arm's length from someone or something The idiom "keep at arm's length from someone or something" means to maintain a cautious or wary distance or avoid getting too involved with someone or something, typically due to suspicion, potential harm, or a desire to protect oneself.
  • take control of someone or something The idiom "take control of someone or something" means to assert authority or dominance over someone or something, often by assuming leadership or managerial responsibilities to direct or manage their actions or decisions.
  • circulate something through something The idiom "circulate something through something" means to distribute, spread, or pass something through a system or network, often to ensure information or resources reach all relevant individuals or locations. It can refer to sharing documents, ideas, news, or any other form of communication or dissemination.
  • crush something in To "crush something in" means to force, squeeze, or wedge an object into a small or restricted space with significant pressure. It can also imply exerting force to fit or compress something tightly into a container or confined area.
  • adjust (oneself) to someone or something The idiom "adjust oneself to someone or something" means to become accustomed, familiar, or comfortable with a new person, situation, or environment. It implies adapting one's behavior, attitudes, or expectations to better fit the specific circumstances or individual involved.
  • assign something to someone The idiom "assign something to someone" means to allocate or designate a task, responsibility, duty, or project to a specific person. It implies that the individual has been assigned a particular job or role to complete or manage.
  • blush with something When we say someone is "blushing with something," it means they experience a slight appearance of a particular quality, usually associated with a negative connotation. It can refer to a person exhibiting signs or traits related to a specific emotion or condition. For example, if someone is said to be "blushing with embarrassment," it suggests that they are displaying visible signs of being embarrassed.
  • have one's hand in something The idiom "have one's hand in something" means to be involved or active in a particular activity, often implying that the person has a significant role or influence in the matter. It suggests that the individual is responsible or participating in the task or project at hand.
  • inspire someone with something The idiom "inspire someone with something" means to motivate or stimulate someone by sharing or presenting something that sparks creativity, enthusiasm, or a desire to take action. It involves evoking positive emotions or generating ideas that drive individuals to achieve or pursue goals.
  • crown someone with something The idiom "crown someone with something" typically means to honor or reward someone greatly, often with a specific accolade, title, or recognition. It reflects the act of placing a symbolic crown, representing honor or authority, upon someone's head. It signifies acknowledging and celebrating someone's exceptional achievements or qualities.
  • fall over someone or something The idiom "fall over someone or something" refers to accidentally tripping or stumbling upon someone or something, usually due to not seeing or being aware of their presence.
  • look like something the cat brought/dragged in The idiom "look like something the cat brought/dragged in" means to appear disheveled, untidy, or worn out. It is often used to describe someone's physical appearance when they look messy, unkempt, or tired.
  • alongside (of) someone or something The definition of the idiom "alongside (of) someone or something" is to be positioned next to or beside someone or something. It implies being in close proximity and typically suggests a cooperative or collaborative relationship.
  • praise someone or something to the skies The idiom "praise someone or something to the skies" means to express great admiration, appreciation, or approval for someone or something excessively or overwhelmingly. It implies giving utmost and extremely positive commendation or acclaim.
  • do something behind someone's back The idiom "do something behind someone's back" means to do or say something without someone's knowledge or consent, typically with the intention of hiding it from them or deceiving them. It suggests acting in a secretive or dishonest manner, often betraying someone's trust or going against their wishes.
  • identify someone or something with someone or something The idiom "identify someone or something with someone or something" means to associate or link someone or something closely with another person or thing. It implies that the person or thing being identified shares traits, characteristics, or an affiliation with the other person or thing.
  • listen to someone or something The idiom "listen to someone or something" means to give attention and consideration to what someone is saying or to pay attention to a particular sound or source of information. It implies actively engaging in listening, understanding, and responding appropriately.
  • bell, book, and candle things that are miraculous or that signal that something The idiom "bell, book, and candle" refers to a ritual or combination of elements used in the Catholic Church during the excommunication ceremony. These items symbolize the supernatural powers or authority exhibited during the procedure. In a broader context, the phrase can be used to describe extraordinary or mysterious actions or events that signify or bring about significant change or consequences.
  • call something into question The idiom "call something into question" means to doubt or challenge the accuracy, reliability, or validity of something. It implies expressing skepticism or raising doubts about the truth or credibility of a particular belief, statement, or action.
  • brush something away (from something) The idiom "brush something away (from something)" means to remove or dismiss something quickly and casually, typically using a brushing motion with one's hand or a similar gesture. It can refer to physically removing dust or debris from an object or surface, as well as metaphorically disregarding or ignoring something without giving it much thought or consideration.
  • case someone or something out The idiom "case someone or something out" refers to the act of carefully observing or studying someone or something, often in a secretive or covert manner. It is commonly used when someone is gathering information, assessing a situation, or planning a strategy, usually with a specific purpose in mind.
  • bargain for something The idiom "bargain for something" means to anticipate or expect something, usually an outcome or consequence, but it turns out to be different or more challenging than originally thought.
  • be (dead) set against something/against doing something The idiom "be (dead) set against something/against doing something" means to strongly oppose or be firmly determined not to do or support something. It suggests a strong resistance or unwillingness to engage in a particular action or idea.
  • keep someone at something The idiom "keep someone at something" means to make someone continue doing a particular activity or task, often with persistence or perseverance, even when they may be reluctant or lose enthusiasm. It implies ensuring someone's commitment or dedication to a specific course of action.
  • give oneself over to someone or something The idiom "give oneself over to someone or something" means to completely surrender or devote oneself to a person, cause, or activity, often without any reservation or hesitation. It implies a level of trust, commitment, or dedication to the subject or individual in question.
  • fly around someone or something The idiom "fly around someone or something" refers to a situation where a person or thing is constantly moving or circulating around someone or something else, often in a frenetic or disorganized manner. It can also imply avoiding direct confrontation or engagement with someone or something.
  • count something on the fingers of one hand The idiom "count something on the fingers of one hand" means to indicate a small number or singularity. It refers to having so few of something that it can be easily enumerated or counted using only the fingers on one hand.
  • advise someone of something The idiom "advise someone of something" means to inform or give counsel to someone about a particular matter or situation. It involves providing guidance, suggestions, or recommendations to help the person understand or take appropriate action regarding the subject being discussed.
  • have something down The idiom "have something down" typically means that someone has practiced or mastered a particular skill or task and can perform it proficiently.
  • not be able to do something for toffee The idiom "not be able to do something for toffee" means to be completely incapable or inept at a particular task or activity. It implies a complete lack of skill, ability, or competence in performing a specific action or undertaking. The phrase "for toffee" is often used in British English to intensify the degree of failure or inability.
  • disabuse someone of something The idiom "disabuse someone of something" means to remove someone's mistaken belief or misconception, often by providing them with correct information or evidence. It involves persuading or convincing them to abandon their false idea or understanding.
  • groan with something The idiom "groan with something" typically means to have an excessive amount or strong intensity of a particular feeling, emotion, or quality. It implies that the abundance or intensity is so overwhelming that one can't help but react with a groan or expression of dissatisfaction. This idiom is often used to describe situations where there is an excessive amount of work, stress, or disappointment.
  • light (up)on someone or something The idiom "light (up)on someone or something" means to suddenly notice, select, or focus on someone or something, often with a feeling of inspiration, revelation, or recognition. It implies that the attention or spotlight falls upon the person or thing in a dynamic or significant way.
  • corral someone or something The idiom "corral someone or something" means to gather, collect, or confine someone or something in a specified area or place, often with the intention of keeping them or it under control or in one place. It can also imply the act of directing or steering someone or something towards a particular goal or destination.
  • hesitate over something To "hesitate over something" means to pause or delay in making a decision or taking action regarding a particular matter. It implies uncertainty or doubt in one's mind about how to proceed or what choice to make.
  • fall through something The idiom "fall through something" means that a plan, agreement, or arrangement unexpectedly fails to happen or is not successful, often at the last moment or due to unforeseen circumstances.
  • there's something about somebody/something The idiom "there's something about somebody/something" refers to a strong, unexplainable or indescribable quality or characteristic that someone or something possesses, which captivates or intrigues others. It suggests that there is a unique or special aspect that sets a person or thing apart, but it can be difficult to pinpoint exactly what it is.
  • hitch someone or something (up) (to something) The idiom "hitch someone or something (up) (to something)" means to attach or connect someone or something to a particular object or vehicle, typically using a rope, strap, or harness. It often implies joining together in order to move or pull the connected objects.
  • examine someone on something The idiom "examine someone on something" means to question or interrogate someone closely about a particular topic or subject. It suggests a thorough investigation or scrutiny of the person's knowledge or understanding regarding the matter being discussed.
  • hammer on someone or something The idiom "hammer on someone or something" typically means to persistently or forcefully criticize, attack, or pursue someone or something in a relentless manner. It implies a relentless or repetitive action, often with a sense of aggressiveness or intensity.
  • absolve someone from something The idiom "absolve someone from something" means to release, pardon, or free someone from a responsibility, blame, guilt, or obligation. It implies that the person is no longer held accountable for the mentioned action or consequence and is cleared of any wrongdoing or liability.
  • not dream of something/of doing something The idiom "not dream of something/of doing something" means to not have any intention or desire to think about or consider doing something. It emphasizes that the mentioned action or idea is completely out of the question or unthinkable for someone.
  • hang something on someone To "hang something on someone" is an idiomatic expression commonly used to mean accusing someone of something, usually a crime or wrongdoing, without sufficient evidence or proof. It implies unfairly assigning blame or responsibility to someone without proper justification.
  • turn something to one's advantage The idiom "turn something to one's advantage" means to make the most out of a situation or circumstance, by using it to benefit oneself or achieve a favorable outcome. It refers to the ability to find opportunities in challenging or unfavorable scenarios and utilizing them to achieve personal gain or success.
  • abscond with someone or something The idiom "abscond with someone or something" means to secretly or unlawfully take someone or something away, often without permission. It implies a sense of stealthy and dishonest behavior in taking possession of someone or something.
  • entreat someone to do something The idiom "entreat someone to do something" means to earnestly or urgently ask or plead with someone to do a particular action or favor. It conveys a sense of strong request or appeal to persuade someone to take a specific course of action.
  • light someone or something up The idiom "light someone or something up" means to illuminate or brighten someone or something, often with joy, enthusiasm, or excitement. It can also refer to a situation where someone is illuminated by strong emotions, such as anger or frustration.
  • bother someone with someone or something The idiom "bother someone with someone or something" refers to the act of causing annoyance, inconvenience, or disturbance to someone by insisting on discussing or involving them in a particular person or topic. It implies imposing unwanted attention or trouble onto someone.
  • convert from something (into something) The idiom "convert from something (into something)" refers to the act of transforming or changing one thing into another. It implies a complete or significant alteration in the form, nature, or purpose of the subject.
  • something fierce The idiom "something fierce" is used to intensify or exaggerate the degree or intensity of something. It implies that the mentioned action, feeling, or quality is very strong, extreme, or intense.
  • bring the curtain down on something The idiom "bring the curtain down on something" means to bring a final and definitive end to something, typically an event, a performance, or a chapter in one's life. It refers to the act of closing a theatrical curtain after a play or performance has finished, symbolizing the completion or conclusion of that particular thing.
  • reflect (back) (up)on someone or something The idiom "reflect (back) (up)on someone or something" refers to the act of thinking deeply or contemplating about someone or something in a thoughtful or introspective manner. It implies carefully considering a person, situation, or past events, often with the purpose of gaining insight or understanding.
  • link someone or something to someone or something The idiom "link someone or something to someone or something" means to establish a connection or association between two people or things. It refers to finding a relationship or correlation between different entities, often for the purpose of identifying or attributing a specific characteristic, action, or influence.
  • hand something to someone The idiom "hand something to someone" means to give or pass something to someone, typically in a literal sense. It implies physically transferring an object from one person's hand to another's. However, it can also be used figuratively to convey the act of giving someone responsibility or acknowledging their superiority in a particular field.
  • explain something away The idiom "explain something away" refers to the act of providing a seemingly reasonable or plausible explanation to dismiss or minimize the significance or importance of something. It suggests the attempt to make something appear less significant or problematic by offering justifications or excuses.
  • embellish something with something To "embellish something with something" means to decorate, enhance, or adorn something by adding additional details, features, or embellishments to make it more aesthetically appealing, elaborate, or impressive. It involves the act of embellishing or ornamenting an object, story, or description with further elements to enhance its visual or descriptive quality.
  • hack one's way through something The idiom "hack one's way through something" refers to overcoming or solving a difficult problem or obstacle using persistent effort, creativity, or unconventional methods. It often implies using determination and resourcefulness to navigate a challenging situation or to make progress despite limited means or unfavorable circumstances.
  • have a passion for someone or something The idiom "have a passion for someone or something" means to have a strong and intense liking, enthusiasm, or love for a particular person or object. It implies a deep and profound emotional connection or attachment towards someone or something, often driving a person's actions or choices related to that person or thing.
  • freeze someone or something to death The idiom "freeze someone or something to death" means to cause someone or something to die or suffer severe harm due to extremely cold temperatures. It implies that the extreme cold is the cause of the harm or demise.
  • extend over someone or something The idiom "extend over someone or something" means to cover, encompass, or reach across someone or something. It refers to a situation where one's influence, authority, or impact spans beyond a particular person or object.
  • see something coming The idiom "see something coming" means to anticipate or be aware of an event or situation before it happens. It suggests that someone is able to predict or forecast something based on their observation, intuition, or understanding of the circumstances. It implies being prepared or not being caught off guard by an impending occurrence.
  • alloy something with something To "alloy something with something" means to mix or blend two or more different elements, qualities, or substances together to create a new and combined entity or result. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe the process of combining or incorporating different ideas, concepts, or characteristics to create a more effective, balanced, or superior outcome.
  • screw around with someone or something The idiom "screw around with someone or something" means to engage in playful, teasing, or mischievous behavior towards someone or something. It often implies a lack of seriousness or the intention to cause confusion or disruption. It can also refer to wasting time or procrastinating.
  • convince someone of something The idiom "convince someone of something" means to persuade or make someone believe or accept a certain idea, opinion, or fact by presenting compelling arguments or evidence. It involves using logical reasoning, convincing arguments, and influencing tactics to change someone's perspective or belief about a particular subject.
  • put a dampener on something The idiom "put a dampener on something" means to diminish or reduce the excitement, enthusiasm, or success of a situation or event. It refers to something or someone that makes people feel less positive or enthusiastic about something.
  • ferry someone or something across something The idiom "ferry someone or something across something" means to transport someone or something across a body of water, usually from one side to another, using a ferry or similar type of boat or transport. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • accept someone as something To "accept someone as something" means to acknowledge and embrace a person's true nature, identity, or role. It involves understanding and affirming their qualities, characteristics, or position without judgment or prejudice.
  • cower from something To "cower from something" means to crouch or shrink back in fear, apprehension, or timidity from a specific thing or situation. It implies a strong sense of intimidation or unease that causes someone to retreat or hide rather than confront or face the feared object or circumstance.
  • something never fails The idiom "something never fails" means that a particular thing or action is consistently effective, successful, or reliable in achieving a desired outcome. It suggests that the mentioned thing can be relied upon and will always produce the intended result.
  • in accordance with something The idiom "in accordance with something" means to act or behave in a manner that is consistent or in agreement with a particular rule, standard, guideline, or requirement. It conveys the idea of following a specific set of instructions or principles.
  • have regard to something The idiom "have regard to something" means to consider or take into account a particular thing or factor when making a decision or judgment. It implies giving importance or attention to something as part of the overall assessment or evaluation.
  • your eyes glued on something The idiom "your eyes glued on something" means to be intensely staring at or fixated on a particular object, person, or situation without diverting one's gaze. It implies complete focus, concentration, or captivation.
  • draw someone's attention to someone or something The idiom "draw someone's attention to someone or something" means to make someone aware of or focus their attention on a specific person, thing, or situation.
  • keel something over The idiom "keel over" means to suddenly fall over or collapse, typically due to exhaustion, fainting, or losing consciousness.
  • hide someone or something behind something The idiom "hide someone or something behind something" means to conceal or keep someone or something out of sight or discovery by placing them behind an object or within an obscured location.
  • bring someone or something forward The idiom "bring someone or something forward" means to present or introduce someone or something in a discussion, meeting, or event, often to share information, offer a solution, or contribute to the conversation. It involves bringing someone or something to the attention of others or placing them in a prominent position for consideration or evaluation.
  • flash something around The idiom "flash something around" means to show or display something ostentatiously, often in a boastful or showy manner. It refers to flaunting or exhibiting something for others to see and admire.
  • introduce someone into something The idiom "introduce someone into something" refers to the act of acquainting or familiarizing an individual with a new concept, activity, or situation. It implies guiding or assisting someone in becoming familiar or involved in something they were previously unfamiliar with.
  • get someone or something together The idiom "get someone or something together" means to gather or assemble someone or something in a specific location or to organize or prepare a person or thing for a particular purpose or event. It can refer to physically collecting people or objects in one place or mentally coordinating or arranging them for a specific task or occasion.
  • hound something out of someone The idiom "hound something out of someone" means to persistently or relentlessly pressure someone in order to obtain information or a desired response from them. It refers to the act of continuously pursuing or badgering someone until they reveal or provide what is wanted.
  • put the kibosh on someone or something The idiom "put the kibosh on someone or something" means to put an end to, stop, or prevent someone or something from succeeding, progressing, or happening. It refers to the act of halting or thwarting a person or situation.
  • mess around with something mess about with something The idiom "mess around with something" or "mess about with something" means to tinker, experiment, or play with something without any specific purpose or intention. It implies engaging in casual or aimless activities without a clear objective.
  • dig someone or something up The idiom "dig someone or something up" generally means to search or find someone or something after a period of time, effort, or investigation. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • flinch from someone or something The idiom "flinch from someone or something" means to recoil or hesitate because of fear, discomfort, or aversion towards a person or thing. It indicates a reflexive response to avoid or shy away from a specific individual or situation due to apprehension or dislike.
  • inform someone about someone or something The idiom "inform someone about someone or something" means to provide someone with information or details about a person or something specific. It suggests the act of delivering knowledge or facts to someone, typically to provide them with an understanding or awareness of a particular person or subject matter.
  • badger someone or something to death To "badger someone or something to death" means to pester, annoy, or harass someone or something excessively and persistently, often to the point of wearing them down or causing extreme annoyance or frustration. It implies relentless and bothersome behavior that doesn't allow any respite or relief.
  • goad someone into something The idiomatic expression "goad someone into something" means to provoke or incite someone in order to convince or persuade them to do or engage in something, often using persistent, aggressive, or manipulative methods. It implies the act of pressuring or urging someone to take a particular action or make a decision they may not originally intend to do.
  • advance (up)on someone or something The idiom "advance (up)on someone or something" means to move forward or approach someone or something, often with a sense of aggression, hostility, or determination. It can imply making progress or closing in on a target, either physically or figuratively.
  • hype someone or something (up) The idiom "hype someone or something (up)" means to promote or create excitement, anticipation, or enthusiasm about a person, event, or thing, often through exaggerated or excessive claims or publicity. It involves generating buzz or increasing the perceived significance or appeal of someone or something.
  • divide by something The idiom "divide by something" typically refers to a situation or action that creates a division or conflict between individuals or groups. It implies the creation of a disagreement or separation based on a particular factor or issue.
  • hunt through something The idiom "hunt through something" means to search or rummage through something in order to find what you are looking for. It implies a thorough and sometimes labor-intensive process of searching for a specific item or information within a particular space or collection.
  • awake(n) someone to something The idiom "awake(n) someone to something" means to make someone aware of or recognize a certain fact, situation, or truth that they were previously unaware or ignorant of. It involves opening someone's eyes or enlightening them about something.
  • augur well for someone or something The idiom "augur well for someone or something" means to indicate or predict a favorable outcome or success for a person, group, or situation. It implies a positive outlook or promising signs for the future.
  • throw someone or something into confusion The idiom "throw someone or something into confusion" means to cause someone or something to become uncertain, disorganized, or bewildered. It refers to an action or event that disrupts the normal order or clarity, making it difficult for individuals or processes to function effectively.
  • insure someone or something with something The idiom "insure someone or something with something" means to provide financial protection or coverage to someone or something by obtaining an insurance policy. It implies taking a measure to safeguard against potential risks, damages, or losses by transferring the responsibility to an insurance provider.
  • bring something on The idiom "bring something on" means to intentionally provoke or cause something unpleasant or challenging to happen. It suggests that the individual is willing to face or deal with the consequences or difficulties that their actions may entail.
  • have no truck with something The idiom "have no truck with something" means to refuse to be associated with or involved in something, often due to moral or ethical reasons. It implies a strong disapproval or rejection of a particular person, idea, or action.
  • kick against someone or something The idiom "kick against someone or something" refers to an act of rebelling or resisting against a person, group, or situation. It implies defiance or opposition towards an authority or a circumstance.
  • cure someone of something The idiom "cure someone of something" means to successfully treat or eliminate a vice, habit, or undesirable behavior that someone possesses or displays. It implies finding a way to free someone from a bad habit or addiction, helping them overcome an affliction or negative trait.
  • no sooner (do something) than (do something else) The idiom "no sooner (do something) than (do something else)" is used to express that one action or event happens immediately after the completion of another action or event. It emphasizes the quick timing or promptness of the second action or event following the first one.
  • hear of someone or something The idiom "hear of someone or something" means to be informed or to learn about a person or thing, often for the first time. It implies gaining knowledge or receiving news about someone or something.
  • lift something off (of) someone or something The idiom "lift something off (of) someone or something" means to remove or take off an object or burden from someone or something. It can be used both literally and metaphorically.
  • bless someone or something with something The idiom "bless someone or something with something" typically means to bestow or grant a person or thing with a particular quality, attribute, or desirable feature. It implies that the person or thing is fortunate or privileged to have that particular thing.
  • fetch something out of something The idiom "fetch something out of something" means to retrieve or obtain something from a particular place or source. It typically involves searching or reaching into a specific location to obtain what is needed.
  • call someone or something in The idiom "call someone or something in" generally refers to the act of summoning or inviting someone or something to come closer or to a particular place for help, assistance, or consultation. It can often be used in situations where a professional, expert, or additional support is required to deal with a specific issue or problem.
  • entrust someone or something to someone The idiom "entrust someone or something to someone" means to give someone or something a responsibility or duty with trust or confidence in their abilities to handle it properly.
  • bring something home to somebody The idiom "bring something home to somebody" means to make someone understand or realize something clearly and deeply, often by presenting evidence or explaining it in a compelling way. It involves ensuring that a message or concept has a clear impact on someone's understanding or awareness.
  • lay something alongside (of something) The idiom "lay something alongside (of something)" typically refers to comparing or placing two or more things together, usually for the purpose of contrast, evaluation, or analysis. It suggests examining similarities and differences or laying out side by side for comparison and assessment.
  • get a load of something or someone The idiom "get a load of something or someone" means to observe or take a look at something or someone closely, often with surprise, amazement, or disbelief. It conveys the idea of examining someone or something in detail or with great interest.
  • allow for someone or something To "allow for someone or something" means to consider or make provisions for the presence, needs, or potential impact of a specific person or thing. It implies taking into account someone or something in plans or calculations, to ensure they are included or accommodated appropriately.
  • land (up)on someone or something The definition of the idiom "land (up)on someone or something" means to come upon or find someone or something unexpectedly or by chance. It refers to the act of discovering or encountering someone or something without prior knowledge or intention.
  • buckle someone or something down The idiom "buckle someone or something down" means to apply oneself or make a determined and concentrated effort to complete a task or achieve a goal. It suggests focusing, being diligent, and committing to a specific activity or objective. It can be used both for individuals ("I need to buckle down and finish this project") or for groups or organizations ("We have to buckle down and increase our productivity").
  • be dying for something/to do something The idiom "be dying for something/to do something" means to have an intense desire or craving for something or to have a strong eagerness to do something. It implies a sense of longing or longing for a particular thing or experience.
  • generalize about someone or something The idiom "generalize about someone or something" means making broad, sweeping statements or judgments about a particular person or thing based on limited information or experiences. It is a tendency to draw broad conclusions about a group or category of individuals or things, assuming that the characteristics exhibited by one or few represent the entire group or category.
  • dash someone or something against someone or something The idiom "dash someone or something against someone or something" means to forcefully throw, smash, or collide someone or something against another person or object with great force or violence. It typically implies a violent or aggressive action that results in significant impact or damage.
  • not have a bar of something The idiom "not have a bar of something" means to have no interest or tolerance for something, to reject or refuse to participate or be involved in a particular situation or activity. It implies a strong dislike or complete disregard for that specific thing being referred to.
  • change into someone or something The idiom "change into someone or something" refers to a transformation or transition that occurs, either in terms of a person's character, behavior, or appearance, or in terms of a specific situation, state, or condition. It implies a noticeable shift or alteration from one state or form to another.
  • a peg on which to hang something The idiom "a peg on which to hang something" means having a basis or foundation for building or supporting ideas, arguments, or discussions. It refers to having a starting point or a reference point upon which further information or related concepts can be added.
  • be riddled with something The idiom "be riddled with something" means to be filled or plagued with an abundance or excessive amount of something, typically problems, difficulties, flaws, or faults. It implies being overwhelmed or burdened by a particular issue or condition.
  • dismiss something as something To dismiss something as something means to regard or treat it as if it is of little importance or unworthy of serious consideration. It implies disregarding or belittling the significance, importance, or value of a topic, idea, or statement.
  • enlist someone for something The idiom "enlist someone for something" means to persuade or recruit someone to join or participate in a specific activity, cause, or endeavor. It is often used when seeking assistance, support, or involvement from someone for a particular purpose.
  • commit oneself to someone or something The definition of the idiom "commit oneself to someone or something" means to devote or dedicate oneself fully to a person, cause, belief, or activity. It implies a strong level of dedication, loyalty, or obligation towards the person or thing being committed to.
  • alight (up)on someone or something The idiom "alight (up)on someone or something" means to suddenly notice or come across someone or something, often by chance or luck. It suggests a moment of discovery or realization.
  • lash something about The idiom "lash something about" means to handle or use something in a careless, rough, or aggressive manner. It implies a lack of control or consideration when dealing with the particular thing, often resulting in negative consequences.
  • blame something on someone To "blame something on someone" means to hold someone responsible or accountable for a mistake, misdeed, or failure, even if they are not at fault or may only have a partial role in the situation. It involves attributing the blame or responsibility for something to someone else, often in an unfair or unjust manner.
  • bring someone or something back The idiom "bring someone or something back" means to restore someone or something to a previous state or condition, oftentimes with the intention of returning to an earlier point in time or revisiting a particular situation or experience. It can also refer to reviving a feeling, memory, or past trend.
  • base something (up)on someone or something The idiom "base something (up)on someone or something" means to use someone or something as a foundation or fundamental source of information, inspiration, or guidance when making a decision, creating something, or developing a concept or theory. It implies deriving knowledge, principles, or ideas from a particular person, object, event, or situation to form the basis of one's actions or beliefs.
  • carry someone or something out The idiom "carry someone or something out" means to complete or execute a task or action as planned or requested, often involving physical movement or transport of a person or object from one place to another.
  • at the height of something The idiom "at the height of something" refers to the peak or pinnacle of a specific situation, event, or experience. It represents the point where something is most intense, successful, influential, or prominent. It implies that something has reached its maximum level or state of achievement, popularity, or intensity.
  • jimmy something up The idiom "jimmy something up" means to hastily or improvisedly fix, modify, or manipulate something, typically using makeshift or unconventional methods, often with the intention of making it work temporarily or in a less-than-ideal manner.
  • have a weakness for someone or something The idiom "have a weakness for someone or something" means to have a strong inclination or fondness towards someone or something, often despite knowing or acknowledging their flaws. It suggests a lack of self-control or resistance when it comes to that person or thing, leading to being easily swayed or attracted to them/it.
  • curse someone for something The idiom "curse someone for something" means to express intense anger, frustration, or disapproval towards someone for causing a negative situation, harm, or inconvenience. It implies wishing or invoking a curse upon someone as a means of expressing strong negative emotions towards them.
  • admonish someone for something The idiom "admonish someone for something" means to reprimand, scold, or criticize someone for their actions, behavior, or mistake in order to correct or discourage them from repeating the same action in the future.
  • look someone or something up The idiom "look someone or something up" means to search for information about someone or something in a reference book, a database, or on the internet. It refers to the act of researching and finding specific data or details to gain knowledge or understanding about a particular person or subject.
  • cover someone or something for something The idiom "cover someone or something for something" typically means to take responsibility or provide protection for a person or thing in a particular situation or circumstance. It can refer to providing financial compensation, assuming a duty or role temporarily, or offering support or assistance.
  • something about someone or something The idiom "something about someone or something" suggests that there is a specific quality or characteristic that is intriguing or noteworthy about a person or thing, even if it is difficult to pinpoint or describe exactly. It implies an intangible or indescribable allure or appeal that captures one's attention or interest.
  • knock something off (of) someone or something The idiom "knock something off (of) someone or something" means to remove or cause something to fall off someone or something else by striking it with force or by accident.
  • blow someone or something away The idiom "blow someone or something away" is defined as the act of impressing, astounding, or overwhelming someone or something. It refers to being amazed or surprised by someone's abilities, performance, or the quality of something to an extent that exceeds expectations or previous experiences.
  • anoint someone with something To "anoint someone with something" in idiomatic usage means to give someone a highly regarded or prestigious position, honor, or responsibility. It often implies that the person is being officially appointed or recognized for their skills, qualities, or achievements in a specific field or industry. This idiom draws inspiration from the literal act of anointing, where sacred oils or perfumes are applied to someone as a sign of consecration, glory, or authority.
  • laze something away The idiom "laze something away" means to spend a period of time lazily or without productivity, typically by indulging in idle or leisurely activities. It refers to wasting time or being lazy instead of engaging in more fruitful or purposeful pursuits.
  • drill something into someone or something The idiom "drill something into someone or something" means to repeatedly and forcefully teach or instill something in someone's mind or to repeatedly practice or repeat something in order to make it become automatic or deeply ingrained. It implies a persistent, intense, and sometimes repetitive effort to ensure that something is learned or understood thoroughly.
  • appear before something The idiom "appear before something" means to face or stand in front of a person, group, or authority figure, typically as a part of a formal proceeding, such as a court hearing, interview, trial, or presentation. It often refers to being summoned or required to be present in a specific context where one's actions, words, or case can be examined or evaluated.
  • apply to someone or something The idiom "apply to someone or something" means that a particular rule, condition, statement, or action is relevant, appropriate, or can be used in relation to a specific person or thing. It implies that the described situation is applicable or valid for a particular scenario or individual.
  • come up with someone or something The idiom "come up with someone or something" means to produce, create, or find something, usually in response to a request or demand. It implies the act of presenting an idea, solution, or suggestion that is innovative, original, or unexpected. It can also refer to bringing forward a particular person, such as inviting them to participate or collaborate in a project or event.
  • count someone among something The idiom "count someone among something" means to consider someone as part of a particular group or category. It implies that the person or entity mentioned genuinely belongs to the stated group or category.
  • take something as the gospel truth The idiom "take something as the gospel truth" means to believe or accept something completely and without question, as if it were an unquestionable truth or absolute fact. It originated from the religious connotation of the word "gospel," which refers to the teachings or accounts of Jesus Christ in the New Testament of the Bible, considered by believers to be the ultimate truth. Consequently, taking something "as the gospel truth" implies having an unwavering and unquestioning faith in its accuracy or validity.
  • fling something off (of) something The idiom "fling something off (of) something" refers to forcefully removing or getting rid of something that is on top of or attached to another object or surface. It implies a quick and forceful action of throwing or tossing the item off or away.
  • talk your way out of something/out of doing something The idiom "talk your way out of something/out of doing something" means to use persuasive or diplomatic language skills in order to avoid a situation, obligation, or punishment. It refers to the ability to convince or negotiate your way out of a predicament or to convince someone to exempt you from a particular task or responsibility.
  • fight over someone or something The idiom "fight over someone or something" means to have a disagreement or conflict with others, usually involving a strong competition or argument, to determine who gets control, possession, or influence over a particular person or thing.
  • drag something away (from something ) The idiom "drag something away (from something)" typically means forcefully or reluctantly removing something from a particular place or situation, often against its will or resistance. It implies a sense of difficulty or resistance in the process of moving or separating something.
  • level something off The idiom "level something off" means to stabilize or reach a state of balance after a period of fluctuation or growth. It can refer to various contexts including leveling off a slope or surface, leveling off a quantity or rate, or leveling off a situation or progression. It implies the action of bringing something to a more even or consistent state after experiencing changes or variations.
  • there's some/no question of something/of doing something The idiom "there's some/no question of something/of doing something" implies that there is a doubt or uncertainty regarding the possibility or likelihood of something happening or being true. It can suggest that the situation or action mentioned is either very likely or completely impossible, depending on whether the phrase is used with "some" or "no."
  • once a something, always a something The idiom "once a something, always a something" means that a person's essential qualities or traits tend to remain consistent over time. It implies that a person who has possessed certain attributes or exhibited certain behaviors in the past is likely to continue doing so in the future. This idiom is often used to highlight a person's ingrained habits, character traits, or tendencies.
  • count someone or something up The idiom "count someone or something up" refers to the action of adding or tallying up numbers or quantities to determine a total amount. It involves the process of calculating or summing up figures or items to arrive at a final count.
  • sacrifice someone or something on the altar of The idiom "sacrifice someone or something on the altar of" means to willingly give up or destroy someone or something for the sake of a higher goal or value. It implies making a profound sacrifice or offering, often involving personal loss or harm, to achieve a desired outcome or to fulfill a greater purpose. It portrays a situation where one's devotion or dedication leads them to make a significant sacrifice in pursuit of a particular objective or as a means of appeasing or satisfying a greater cause, often at their own expense.
  • not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other The idiom "not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other" means to be completely unfamiliar or incompetent with a particular subject or matter. It implies that someone lacks basic knowledge or understanding, to the extent that they cannot even differentiate between the most basic aspects or components of that thing.
  • bring something into force The idiom "bring something into force" refers to the act of initiating or implementing something, such as a law, policy, or rule, to make it officially applicable or effective. It means to put something into operation or to start enforcing it.
  • lash at someone or something The idiom "lash at someone or something" means to criticize, attack, or speak harshly to or about someone or something in a forceful and angry way. It can involve expressing anger, frustration, or disapproval openly and aggressively toward a person or thing.
  • drag someone or something through the dirt The idiom "drag someone or something through the dirt" means to severely criticize, humiliate, or publicly shame someone or something. It implies subjecting someone to disgrace or tarnishing their reputation by exposing their faults or misdeeds.
  • break your neck to do something The idiom "break your neck to do something" means to put in extreme effort or go to great lengths to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It implies a sense of urgency, determination, and willingness to do whatever is necessary, even if it requires risking one's safety or comfort.
  • become of someone or something The idiom "become of someone or something" refers to inquiring about the current situation or fate of a person or thing, often implying a concern about what has occurred or happened to them. It is used to ask about the current status, condition, or whereabouts of someone or something, particularly when you haven't seen or heard from them in a while.
  • keep someone or something away (from someone or something) The idiom "keep someone or something away (from someone or something)" means to prevent someone or something from getting close to or accessing someone or something else. It implies maintaining a distance or barrier between two entities to avoid possible harm, interference, or negative effects.
  • grin at someone or something To "grin at someone or something" means to smile widely and openly, usually as a sign of amusement, friendliness, or approval towards that person or thing. It conveys a positive and jovial expression, often done with the intention of creating a friendly atmosphere or showing fondness.
  • aid someone in doing something The idiom "aid someone in doing something" means to provide assistance or support to someone in accomplishing a task, objective, or goal. It signifies lending a helping hand to facilitate the completion of a specific action or endeavor.
  • glare down on someone or something The idiom "glare down on someone or something" means to look at or observe someone or something with a strong, intense, and disapproving gaze or stare. It implies a feeling of superiority or contempt, as if the person doing the glaring thinks they are better or more powerful than the one being looked at.
  • free someone or something from someone or something To "free someone or something from someone or something" means to liberate or release someone or something from the control, influence, or constraints imposed by someone or something else. It implies breaking free from restrictions, oppression, or dependency, allowing the person or thing to act independently or to escape a negative situation.
  • clamor for someone or something The idiom "clamor for someone or something" means to make a loud, continuous noise or outcry in demand or protest for a particular person or thing. It signifies a strong desire or demand for someone or something, often accompanied by a sense of urgency or intensity.
  • grieve for someone or something The idiom "grieve for someone or something" means to express intense sadness and sorrow over the loss or absence of a person, relationship, or thing. It implies mourning, deep emotional pain, and a process of coming to terms with the grief.
  • jolt someone out of something The idiom "jolt someone out of something" means to abruptly and forcefully snap someone out of a particular state or condition, typically involving shock or surprise. It refers to the act of shaking someone both physically and figuratively, aiming to disrupt their current mindset, reverie, or complacency.
  • fix someone or something up The idiom "fix someone or something up" means to repair, improve, or arrange someone or something in a satisfactory or suitable manner.
  • drown someone or something out The idiom "drown someone or something out" means to make someone's voice or something else inaudible or difficult to hear by producing a louder sound or talking more loudly. It can also refer to overpowering or overshadowing someone or something through sheer volume or intensity.
  • barter something off The idiom "barter something off" refers to the act of exchanging or trading something, usually goods or services, by haggling or negotiating with someone else in order to reach a mutually beneficial agreement. This typically involves giving up or disposing of an item or service in exchange for another item or service.
  • disengage (oneself) from someone or something The idiom "disengage (oneself) from someone or something" refers to the act of detaching oneself from a person or thing, typically due to a desire to create distance, avoid involvement, or end a relationship or commitment. It implies a conscious decision to withdraw, detach, or dissociate oneself emotionally or physically from a particular individual or situation.
  • make a point of doing something The idiom "make a point of doing something" means to take a deliberate and intentional action or effort to ensure that a specific task or activity is done, often with the purpose of emphasizing its importance or demonstrating commitment.
  • keep something with someone The idiom "keep something with someone" typically means to entrust or give the responsibility of something to someone for safekeeping, ensuring that person will maintain possession or care of the item.
  • accompany someone with something The definition of the idiom "accompany someone with something" means to go along with someone or be present alongside them while using or having a particular thing. It implies providing support, company, or partnership to someone while engaging in a specific activity or possessing a particular item.
  • catch someone up in something The definition for the idiom "catch someone up in something" is to involve or entangle someone in a particular situation or activity, often inadvertently or unexpectedly. It implies that the person becomes embroiled in something, usually without their consent or knowledge.
  • put a downer on something The idiom "put a downer on something" means to ruin or dampen the mood or atmosphere of a situation, event, or experience, typically by bringing negativity, sadness, or disappointment. It describes the act of making someone feel less enthusiastic or excited about something.
  • fasten someone or something (on)to someone or something The idiom "fasten someone or something (on) to someone or something" means to secure or attach someone or something tightly or firmly onto someone or something else. It refers to the act of affixing or tying objects or individuals together.
  • alternate with something The idiom "alternate with something" means to take turns with or to occur alternatively or in a repeated pattern with something else.
  • chalk something out The idiom "chalk something out" means to sketch, outline, or plan something informally or roughly. It is often used when discussing preliminary or initial ideas or arrangements.
  • get behind something The idiom "get behind something" typically means to support, endorse, or rally in favor of a particular cause, idea, or person. It often implies actively working towards the success or advancement of something.
  • not know shit about something The idiom "not know shit about something" is a colloquial expression used to convey that someone has a profound lack of knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or topic. It emphasizes a person's ignorance or incompetence in relation to the matter being discussed.
  • set/put (great, etc.) store by something The idiom "set/put (great, etc.) store by something" means to place a high value or importance on something. It suggests that the person has a strong belief in the significance or worth of that particular thing and holds it in high regard.
  • honor someone with something The idiom "honor someone with something" means to bestow or give someone a special recognition, privilege, or tribute. It often implies showing respect, admiration, or appreciation towards that person by offering them something significant or prestigious.
  • lead someone up something The idiom "lead someone up something" typically refers to guiding or directing someone towards a particular path, route, or destination, often in a literal sense. It implies taking on the role of a guide or showing someone the way in a specific context.
  • leave someone or something (at) The idiom "leave someone or something (at)" means to abandon or intentionally separate from someone or something at a particular location or place. It implies leaving someone or something behind temporarily or permanently.
  • send someone or something up To "send someone or something up" is an idiomatic expression that means to mock, imitate, or parody someone or something in a humorous manner. It refers to the act of creating a comedic impression or caricature of a person, object, or idea.
  • something awful The idiom "something awful" is used to describe a situation, event, or behavior that is extremely bad, unpleasant, or of a very high degree. It signifies that the thing being described is notably negative, terrible, or extremely intense.
  • tack something onto something The idiom "tack something onto something" means to add or append something to an existing idea, plan, or situation. It implies attaching a supplementary or additional element to enhance or complete the original.
  • attached to someone or something The idiom "attached to someone or something" refers to a strong emotional connection or bond formed with an individual or thing. It suggests that the person is deeply involved, invested, or reliant on that specific person or thing.
  • hedge against something The idiom "hedge against something" refers to taking a precautionary action or making an investment to protect oneself from potential risks or losses. It involves creating a safeguard or a backup plan to minimize the impact of a negative outcome or uncertain event. Ultimately, it aims to reduce the potential harm or adverse effects associated with a specific situation or event.
  • sell something for a certain price The idiom "sell something for a certain price" means to exchange a specific item or product for a particular amount of money. It implies the act of offering or exchanging goods or services at a predetermined cost.
  • knock something against something To "knock something against something" means to accidentally hit or strike an object or surface with another object, often resulting in a loud noise or collision. It implies an inadvertent action of bringing two things together forcefully, causing a dull or loud thudding sound.
  • choose something for someone The idiom "choose something for someone" means to make a decision or selection on behalf of someone else. It refers to the act of selecting something that you believe the other person will like or prefer, perhaps based on their tastes, preferences, or needs.
  • noise something about The idiom "noise something about" refers to spreading or circulating rumors, gossip, or information about someone or something. It means to disseminate or make known certain details, often in a casual or unverified manner.
  • boil something up The idiom "boil something up" typically means to create or produce something through intense effort or activity. It can also refer to bringing something to a boiling point, often in a metaphorical sense.
  • direct someone's attention to someone or something The idiom "direct someone's attention to someone or something" means to guide or redirect someone's focus or awareness towards a specific person or thing. It typically involves drawing someone's attention to a particular subject or object in order to make them notice, acknowledge, or consider it.
  • fall into/avoid the trap of doing something The idiom "fall into/avoid the trap of doing something" refers to a situation where someone either unknowingly or willingly engages in a behavior or activity that is considered negative, disadvantageous, or harmful. "Falling into the trap" implies becoming ensnared or caught in a negative pattern or habit, while "avoiding the trap" suggests successfully evading or steering clear of such behavior.
  • have something for someone The idiom "have something for someone" means to have a message, news, information, or something specific to give or share with someone.
  • embroil someone in something The idiom "embroil someone in something" means to involve or entangle someone in a difficult, complicated, or problematic situation or conflict. It suggests that the person is being pulled into a potentially damaging or troublesome circumstance that they may find themselves unable to easily extricate from.
  • knock someone or something down The idiom "knock someone or something down" means to physically or figuratively cause someone or something to fall or collapse. It can refer to forcefully bringing someone to the ground or defeating them in a competition or argument. It can also refer to demolishing or destroying a structure or object.
  • build someone or something up (into someone or something) The idiom "build someone or something up (into someone or something)" means to enhance or embellish the reputation or importance of a person, thing, or idea. It involves deliberately creating a positive image or perception to make someone or something appear more significant, powerful, or successful than they actually are.
  • appoint someone to something The idiom "appoint someone to something" means to choose or designate someone for a specific position, role, or task, often within an organization or institution. It implies giving someone a position of authority, responsibility, or a specific duty.
  • in control of someone or something The idiom "in control of someone or something" means to have authority, power, or the ability to manage and direct someone or something according to one's own will or desire. It implies being responsible and having command over a person or situation.
  • within an ace of doing something The idiom "within an ace of doing something" means being extremely close to achieving or succeeding in something, just one step away or on the verge of accomplishing it.
  • dress someone up (as someone or something ) The idiom "dress someone up (as someone or something)" means to put clothes or costumes on someone to resemble or imitate a specific person or character. This can be done for various purposes, such as acting, pretending, or costume parties.
  • crank something out The idiom "crank something out" means to produce or create something quickly and in large quantities, often without paying much attention to quality. It implies a fast and sometimes mechanical or repetitive process of generating something, be it writing, artwork, or any other form of production.
  • bandy something about The idiom "bandy something about" refers to the act of discussing or debating an idea, opinion, or suggestion back and forth among a group of people. It implies the exchange and consideration of different views or perspectives.
  • launch something against someone or something The idiom "launch something against someone or something" typically refers to initiating a vigorous action, attack, or strategy against a person, group, or object. It implies taking forceful measures to confront or engage one's opposition to achieve a particular goal.
  • gobble something up The idiom "gobble something up" means to eat something quickly and voraciously, often without taking the time to fully appreciate or savor it. It can also be used figuratively to imply quickly consuming or absorbing something, such as information or an opportunity.
  • back onto someone or something The idiom "back onto someone or something" generally refers to turning one's back towards someone or something, often in an unhelpful or dismissive manner. It can signify refusing to offer support, assistance, or attention to someone or something.
  • there’s no rhyme or reason to/for something The idiom "there's no rhyme or reason to/for something" means that something lacks logic, a clear order, or a rational explanation. It implies that an action, event, or situation seems random, arbitrary, or without any discernible pattern or purpose.
  • get a buzz out of someone or something The idiom "get a buzz out of someone or something" means to derive pleasure, excitement, or enjoyment from someone or something. It suggests experiencing a stimulating or exhilarating feeling, often related to a particular person, activity, or situation.
  • guide someone around something The idiom "guide someone around something" means to provide direction or assistance to someone in navigating a place or area they are unfamiliar with. It involves taking on the role of a tour guide or mentor to show someone the various places, landmarks, or important aspects of a specific location. This idiom emphasizes the act of leading or accompanying someone to ensure their understanding and familiarity with their surroundings.
  • ram, force, thrust, etc. something down somebody's throat The idiom "ram, force, thrust, etc. something down somebody's throat" means to aggressively and forcefully impose one's opinions, ideas, beliefs, or information onto someone else, without allowing them to object or choose their own perspective. It refers to a situation where one person is being compelled or coerced to accept or understand something, often against their will or without giving them a fair chance to express their own thoughts.
  • grouse about someone or something The idiom "grouse about someone or something" means to complain or grumble about someone or something in an ongoing or persistent manner. It implies expressing dissatisfaction or dissatisfaction with a particular person, situation, or thing.
  • hurry someone or something up The idiom "hurry someone or something up" means to make someone or something go faster or speed up the pace of something. It implies the need for urgency or quickness in completing a task or reaching a destination.
  • short of something/of doing something The idiom "short of something/of doing something" typically means lacking or falling just below a certain requirement, expectation, or goal. It can also indicate a situation where someone is almost doing or achieving something but is not quite there yet.
  • hunt someone or something out The idiom "hunt someone or something out" means to search for and find someone or something by making a deliberate effort, often involving thorough investigation or exploration.
  • excite someone about something To "excite someone about something" means to generate enthusiasm, interest, or excitement in someone regarding a particular topic, event, idea, or object. It involves capturing someone's attention or sparking their curiosity, making them eager or passionate about the subject at hand.
  • hold someone or something up to scorn The idiom "hold someone or something up to scorn" means to publicly criticize, mock, or ridicule someone or something, usually due to disapproval or contempt. It involves highlighting the faults, shortcomings, or perceived negative qualities of a person or thing, often with the intention of publicly shaming or humiliating them.
  • gut reaction to something The idiom "gut reaction to something" refers to an instinctive or immediate response to a situation, usually based on intuition or a strong feeling rather than logical reasoning. It implies that the reaction comes from deep within a person, from their gut or stomach area, which supposedly represents a primal and instinctive part of their being.
  • fit someone or something out To "fit someone or something out" means to provide the necessary equipment, supplies, or accommodations for someone or something in order to fulfill a specific purpose or need. It implies the act of furnishing or supplying someone or something with the necessary resources or items for a particular task or situation.
  • break someone or something of something The idiom "break someone or something of something" means to help someone or something to stop a habit, behavior, or addiction. It implies overcoming or eliminating a bad or detrimental exercise.
  • dress someone or something up (in something) The idiom "dress someone or something up (in something)" means to put clothes or accessories on someone or something in a way that makes them appear more formal, elegant, or attractive. It often involves dressing up for a special occasion or to create a desired impression.
  • frighten someone or something away The idiom "frighten someone or something away" means to cause someone or something to become scared or intimidated, causing them to run or stay away. It implies using fear or intimidation to deter or repel someone or something.
  • be dead set against something The idiom "be dead set against something" means to have a strong and unwavering opposition or resistance towards something, usually a proposal, idea, or decision. It indicates an absolute unwillingness to support or agree with the mentioned thing, often stemming from deep conviction or personal preference.
  • bring someone or something into disrepute The idiom "bring someone or something into disrepute" means to damage or harm the reputation or standing of someone or something.
  • increase something by something The idiom "increase something by something" means to raise or enlarge a certain quantity or amount by a specific number or proportion. It indicates the action of making something bigger, greater, or more significant by a designated measure or ratio.
  • annex to something The idiom "annex to something" refers to the act of attaching, adding, or joining something as an extension or supplementary part of something else. It often implies the incorporation of a smaller or subsidiary part into a larger whole.
  • conjure someone or something up The idiom "conjure someone or something up" means to bring someone or something to mind or into existence, often through imagination or memory. It implies the act of summoning or creating someone or something, as if by magic or a mental effort.
  • make heavy weather of something/of doing something The idiom "make heavy weather of something/of doing something" means to unnecessarily struggle with or complicate a task or situation that could have been handled more easily or straightforwardly. It implies an excessive amount of effort, difficulty, or hardship in dealing with a particular matter.
  • criticize someone for something The idiomatic expression "criticize someone for something" means to express disapproval or make negative comments about someone's actions, behavior, or choices related to a specific matter or issue. It implies pointing out faults or shortcomings and offering a judgmental evaluation or assessment of their actions or decisions.
  • keep someone or something off (of someone or something) The idiom "keep someone or something off (of someone or something)" means to prevent someone or something from getting on or coming into contact with another person or thing. It suggests keeping someone or something away or at a distance in order to ensure their separation or avoid their influence.
  • hire someone or something out To "hire someone or something out" means to arrange for the temporary use or employment of someone or something that is owned or controlled by you in exchange for payment. It involves renting out or leasing a person, object, or service to another individual or organization for a specific period of time.
  • churn something out The idiom "churn something out" means to produce or create something quickly and in large quantities, usually without much thought or care for quality. It implies a sense of mass production or the act of creating something rapidly and efficiently, often in a repetitive manner.
  • have a job doing/to do something The idiom "have a job doing/to do something" means to find a task or activity difficult, challenging, or time-consuming. It implies that the specific task requires effort or skill to accomplish efficiently or successfully.
  • put the brakes on something The idiom "put the brakes on something" means to slow down, halt, or stop a process, activity, or plan. It is often used to describe taking measures to slow or prevent the progress or continuation of something.
  • bring something on someone The idiom "bring something on someone" means to cause trouble, difficulties, or consequences to another person, usually as a result of their own actions or choices. It implies that the person is responsible for the negative outcome they are experiencing.
  • sound off about something To "sound off about something" means to express one's opinion or thoughts on a particular topic in a forceful or emphatic manner. It implies speaking out loudly and passionately, often in a critical or complaining way.
  • ache for someone or something The idiom "ache for someone or something" refers to a deep longing or yearning that one feels towards someone or something they desire greatly. It implies a strong emotional or physical pain resulting from the intense desire for the person or thing in question.
  • have something made The idiom "have something made" means to arrange for someone to create or produce something according to specified requirements or preferences. It refers to the act of commissioning or ordering items or services, often involving customization or personalization to suit individual needs or desires.
  • have a good command of something The idiom "have a good command of something" means to possess a high level of knowledge, skill, or proficiency in a particular subject, language, or discipline. It implies having full control over or mastery of the specific area or domain, typically indicating expertise or competence in utilizing or understanding it.
  • get (around) to someone or something To "get (around) to someone or something" means to finally address, approach, or attend to a person or task after a delay or in due course. It implies that the person or task in question has been on hold or given lower priority until now.
  • accommodate oneself to something The idiom "accommodate oneself to something" means to adjust or adapt to a particular situation or circumstance, often by making necessary changes in behavior, attitude, or expectations. It implies being flexible, willing to compromise, or finding a way to fit in or function effectively within a given context.
  • the beauty of something/of doing something The idiom "the beauty of something/of doing something" refers to the exceptional or appealing aspect, quality, or advantage of a particular thing or action. It emphasizes the positive and desirable attributes or characteristics that make something or the act of doing something worthwhile or enjoyable. It implies that there is something uniquely satisfying or advantageous about the situation or experience being described.
  • install something in someone or something The idiom "install something in someone or something" typically means to establish, introduce, or implement something firmly into a person or thing. It refers to the act of setting up or embedding a particular quality, idea, behavior, belief, or habit within someone or something.
  • hear from someone or something The idiom "hear from someone or something" means to receive communication, information, or news from a specific person or source. It implies getting updates or messages from them, typically in written or verbal form.
  • in the interest of someone or something The idiom "in the interest of someone or something" refers to doing something that is beneficial, advantageous, or helpful for a particular person, group, or purpose. It implies acting in a way that promotes the well-being, satisfaction, or progress of someone or something.
  • in honor of someone or something The idiom "in honor of someone or something" means to commemorate, celebrate, or show respect for a person, event, or achievement by acknowledging it in some special way. It typically involves an action or event that serves as a tribute or recognition to honor the person or thing being acknowledged.
  • the acceptable face of something "The acceptable face of something" refers to a person, group, or representation that serves as a positive or desirable example of a particular concept or practice, often in contrast to negative or less desirable aspects. It suggests that this person or entity possesses qualities or characteristics that make them more palatable or socially acceptable in comparison to other similar instances.
  • awake(n) someone from something The idiom "awaken someone from something" means to bring someone out of a state of unawareness or ignorance, usually by providing information or insight that challenges their beliefs or perception. It can also imply rousing someone from a particular situation or mindset.
  • fall heir to something The idiom "fall heir to something" typically means to inherit or receive something, such as property, money, or a title, usually after someone's death. It implies gaining possession or ownership of something without actively seeking or earning it.
  • lighten something up The idiom "lighten something up" means to make something less serious, intense, or heavy by adding humor, lightheartedness, or reducing the severity of a situation.
  • allow someone or something into a place The idiom "allow someone or something into a place" means to grant permission for someone or something to enter a particular location, facility, or area. It refers to giving authorization for access or admission.
  • tell somebody where to put/stick something The idiom "tell somebody where to put/stick something" refers to expressing anger, frustration, or annoyance towards someone by forcefully instructing them on where to place an object. It implies a strong desire to distance oneself from the person or dismiss their opinion or request.
  • close someone or something in (something) The idiom "to close someone or something in (something)" refers to the act of confining or enclosing someone or something within a certain space or area. It implies the restriction of movement or freedom, often metaphorically, as if trapping or imprisoning someone or something.
  • change someone or something into someone or something The idiom "change someone or something into someone or something" means to transform or convert one person or thing into another person or thing. It implies a significant alteration, either in the physical or metaphorical sense, resulting in a complete or substantial change in character, appearance, or nature.
  • lead someone to believe something The idiom "lead someone to believe something" means to intentionally or unintentionally give someone information or make statements that cause them to form a certain understanding or belief about a particular situation or topic. It refers to guiding or influencing someone's perception or assumption, often with the intent of manipulating or misinforming them.
  • keep someone or something together The idiom "keep someone or something together" means to maintain unity, coherence, or the collective parts of something in a group or entity. It refers to the act of preventing or avoiding disintegration, disunity, or separation.
  • in the bosom of something The idiom "in the bosom of something" typically means being deeply immersed or enclosed within a particular thing, place, or group. It implies a sense of being surrounded by or protected by that entity.
  • bombard someone or something with something The idiom "bombard someone or something with something" means to subject someone or something to a large amount or intense activity, information, or objects in a short period, overwhelming them. It typically implies a rapid and continuous onslaught or barrage of something.
  • lease something (ou