How Do You Spell ON?

Pronunciation: [ˈɒn] (IPA)

The word "on" is spelled with the letters O and N. It is pronounced with the phonetic symbols /ɒn/ in British English and /ɑn/ in American English. The vowel sound in "on" is pronounced as a short "o" sound in British English and as a broad "a" sound in American English. This word is commonly used to indicate a surface or location, such as to be on a chair or to live on a street. It is a very common and simple word in the English language.

ON Meaning and Definition

On is a small but versatile word used in various contexts with multiple meanings. As a preposition, on indicates a position or place physically touching or covering an object or surface. For instance, "The book is on the table." It can also imply being supported by or balanced on something, such as "He stood on one leg." In addition, on can denote a state of engagement, participation, or performing a task, like "She is on the phone" or "They are on a break."

On can also function as an adverb, indicating progression or forward movement. For example, "Keep on walking" implies to continue walking, promoting onward motion. Moreover, on can express a sense of dependency or reliance on someone or something, as in "He is always on his parents for support."

As a noun, on refers to the state of being in operation, like "The TV is on." It can also denote a situation, event, or topic of particular focus, like "What's going on?" or "Let's discuss the issue at hand."

Additionally, on may serve as an adjective indicating that something is functioning or in working order, such as "The lights are on." It can also mean having the necessary resources or advantages, like being "on top of the situation" or "on the ball."

Overall, the word on is a multifaceted word with numerous meanings and applications, allowing for its extensive usage across various contexts of the English language.

Top Common Misspellings for ON *

  • ont 18.5224839%
  • om 7.2269807%
  • oon 5.5139186%
  • onn 5.5139186%
  • oin 5.0856531%
  • opn 3.372591%
  • ona 2.9443254%
  • onm 2.4625267%
  • aon 2.3554603%
  • onb 2.248394%
  • omn 2.0877944%
  • pn 1.8736616%
  • gon 1.4989293%
  • ons 1.2847965%
  • onw 0.9100642%
  • obn 0.8029978%
  • onf 0.7494646%
  • ofn 0.6423982%
  • oun 0.5353319%
  • pon 0.4817987%
  • ond 0.4817987%
  • ong 0.4817987%
  • ony 0.4817987%
  • onr 0.4282655%
  • onh 0.4282655%
  • onl 0.4282655%
  • lon 0.3211991%
  • ou 0.3211991%
  • fon 0.3211991%
  • jon 0.1605995%
  • oc 0.1605995%
  • oo 0.1070663%
  • oe 0.1070663%
  • dn 0.1070663%
  • ow 0.1070663%
  • oen 0.1070663%
  • og 0.1070663%
  • hon 0.1070663%
  • nn 0.1070663%
  • ojn 0.588865%
  • onj 0.588865%
  • ohn 0.588865%
  • uon 0.0535331%
  • oi 0.0535331%
  • orn 0.0535331%
  • opon 0.0535331%
  • oa 0.0535331%
  • ol 0.0535331%
  • onc 0.0535331%
  • onmy 0.0535331%
  • cn 0.0535331%
  • oln 0.0535331%
  • oj 0.0535331%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for ON

Etymology of ON

The word "on" can be traced back to the Old English word "on" or "an", which came from the West Germanic language family. It is also related to the High German word "an" and the Dutch word "aan". These words all ultimately derive from the Proto-Germanic word "ana", which meant "on or upon". The Proto-Germanic word was likely derived from the Proto-Indo-European root "*an-", which denoted spatial relations. From Old English, the word "on" has continued to be used in various forms in different languages, maintaining its basic meaning of indicating position or location.

Idioms with the word ON

  • on your rounds The idiom "on your rounds" typically refers to a person's regular routine or scheduled visits to various places or individuals. It is commonly used to describe the activities of professionals, such as doctors, nurses, security guards, or delivery personnel, who have a predetermined route or list of places to visit.
  • on skid row The idiom "on skid row" refers to someone who is destitute, impoverished, or living in an area with extreme poverty and homelessness. It is often used to describe individuals who have hit rock bottom and are struggling with severe addiction, poverty, or social isolation.
  • be running on empty The idiom "be running on empty" means to be exhausted, lacking energy or resources, and feeling completely depleted or drained. It is often used to describe a person or situation that has used up all their reserves or is functioning with very limited resources.
  • run sb out of town (on a rail) The idiom "run someone out of town (on a rail)" refers to forcefully and unanimously expelling or driving someone away from a place or community due to their undesirable behavior or actions. The phrase often implies strong disapproval, hostility, or outrage towards the person being targeted. The imagery of being "run out of town on a rail" suggests a public humiliation or ostracism, where the person is forced to leave town in a disgraceful manner, potentially being subjected to ridicule or punishment along the way.
  • be on the run The idiom "be on the run" means to be actively evading capture or to be continuously moving from place to place in order to avoid being caught by authorities or pursued by someone.
  • on the run The idiom "on the run" means to be in a state of constant motion or to be constantly busy or hurried. It can also refer to someone who is evading capture or trying to avoid being caught by authorities.
  • be sacrificed on the altar of sth To be sacrificed on the altar of something means to endure great suffering, loss, or harm for the sake of or in pursuit of a particular goal, belief, or objective. It often refers to a situation where an individual's personal interests or well-being are disregarded or overshadowed in favor of something considered more important or valued. This idiom conveys the notion of making a significant sacrifice or being made to bear the consequences of a particular cause or ideal.
  • (just) to be on the safe side The idiom "(just) to be on the safe side" means to take precautionary measures or actions in order to avoid potential risks, problems, or negative outcomes. It implies an extra level of caution beyond what may be considered necessary, ensuring safety or minimizing the chances of any unwanted consequences.
  • be on the same wavelength The idiom "be on the same wavelength" means to have a shared understanding or similar way of thinking with someone else. It suggests that two or more people are in agreement or have a harmonious connection, as if they are mentally or emotionally attuned to the same frequency.
  • and the same to you with (brass) knobs on The idiom "and the same to you with (brass) knobs on" is a British phrase used as a sarcastic response to someone who has insulted or demeaned you. It implies that whatever negative words or actions the other person has directed at you, they will receive it back in an exaggerated or amplified manner. The mention of "brass knobs" adds an emphasis on the excessive and showy nature of the reciprocated insult. Overall, it serves as a retaliatory expression meant to convey that the insults will be returned with higher intensity or extravagance.
  • does what it says on the tin The idiom "does what it says on the tin" means that something performs or functions exactly as its name or description implies, without any hidden or unexpected elements. It is commonly used to convey that a product or service delivers exactly what it promises, leaving no room for doubt or disappointment.
  • wasted on sb The idiom "wasted on sb" means that something, usually a talent, quality, or opportunity, is not fully appreciated or understood by a particular person. It implies that the person does not make good use of or properly acknowledge the value of the thing being wasted.
  • no flies on sb The idiom "no flies on sb" is used to describe someone who is quick, sharp, and intelligent. It implies that the person is clever and always alert, leaving no opportunity for others to take advantage of them.
  • be down on sb To be down on someone is an idiomatic expression meaning to have a negative or critical opinion of someone. It suggests that one feels disapproving, unsupportive, or unfriendly towards that person.
  • be on the scene The idiom "be on the scene" refers to being present or available at a particular location or event, especially in situations where immediate assistance, action, or involvement is required. It suggests that someone is actively engaged in a situation and is ready to react or participate.
  • on the scent The idiom "on the scent" refers to being close to discovering or finding something, usually through following clues or evidence methodically. It originates from the practice of dogs, especially hounds, using their keen sense of smell to track and follow a specific scent, often in pursuit of a target or prey. When someone is "on the scent," they are actively and determinedly following a trail or leads to uncover or locate something.
  • set/put the seal on sth To "set/put the seal on something" means to finalize or confirm something, often in an official or authoritative manner. It refers to an action that completes a process or makes a decision official and binding, similar to sealing a document with a stamp or an official insignia.
  • bums on seats The idiom "bums on seats" is used to describe the number of people attending an event or occupying seats in a venue, particularly in the context of entertainment or public gatherings. It implies that the success or popularity of an event or performance is determined by the number of people present.
  • fannies in the seats, at bums on seats The idiom "fannies in the seats" or "bums on seats" refers to the presence or attendance of people in a particular place, especially in the context of events or performances. It signifies the importance of having a substantial number of people or audience members present for a successful or profitable event. The idiom emphasizes the idea that the ultimate goal is to have a full or well-attended venue.
  • let sb in on a secret The idiom "let someone in on a secret" means to share private or confidential information with someone, allowing them to be included in the knowledge or understanding of something that others may not be aware of.
  • on a needtoknow basis The idiom "on a need-to-know basis" refers to the practice of sharing certain information only with individuals who require it for a specific purpose or task. In this context, information is shared selectively, usually due to confidentiality, security, or the need to avoid overwhelming or burdening individuals with unnecessary facts.
  • not set the world on fire The idiom "not set the world on fire" means to not achieve something extraordinary or remarkable; to not make a significant impact or impression. It suggests mediocrity or a lack of exceptional ability or performance.
  • be set on/upon sth The idiom "be set on/upon sth" means to be strongly determined or committed to achieving or obtaining something. It implies a strong desire or intention to pursue a particular goal or objective.
  • set sth/sb on fire The idiom "set something/someone on fire" commonly means to ignite or cause something or someone to ignite or become very successful, inspiring, or excited. It often implies that the person or thing brings about a lot of enthusiasm, passion, energy, or creativity.
  • set sb's teeth on edge The idiom "set sb's teeth on edge" means to cause someone to feel irritated, annoyed, or uncomfortable, usually as a result of an unpleasant sound, taste, or behavior. It implies a feeling of intense discomfort that can be similar to the sensation of nails scraping against a chalkboard.
  • set your sights on sth To "set your sights on something" means to establish a clear goal or objective, usually an ambitious one, and focus one's efforts and attention towards achieving it. It implies directing one's aspirations or determination towards a specific target, often with the intention to succeed despite challenges or obstacles.
  • on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your marks, get set, go!" is used as a command or phrase often employed at the start of a race or event, to indicate to competitors that they should prepare themselves, be ready, and then start the activity or competition. It serves as a countdown signaling the imminent start of an action or a race, encouraging participants to get ready, prepare themselves mentally and physically, and then commence with full effort.
  • on your mark, get set, go, at on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your mark, get set, go!" is a phrase that is typically used to initiate a race or a competition. It is a countdown or a signal given to participants to prepare themselves and then start the activity simultaneously. It is often used figuratively to encourage someone to begin a task or take action promptly.
  • clap/lay/set eyes on sb/sth The idiom "clap/lay/set eyes on sb/sth" means to see someone or something, often for the first time, or after a long period of anticipation or desire. It implies a sense of curiosity, excitement, or surprise upon encountering the person or object.
  • set your heart on sth/doing sth To set your heart on something or doing something means to be determined or passionate about achieving or obtaining it. It implies having a strong desire or ambition towards a particular goal or outcome.
  • cast a shadow over/on sth To "cast a shadow over/on something" is an idiom that means to create a feeling of sadness, gloom, or negativity, usually by causing a problem or setback that affects a particular situation or person. It implies that the negative influence is causing a dampening or overshadowing effect on the positive or hopeful aspects of the situation.
  • keep your shirt on The idiom "keep your shirt on" means to remain calm, patient, or composed in a situation that may provoke anger, impatience, or frustration. It is often used to advise someone not to overreact or get agitated.
  • put your shirt on sth "Put your shirt on something" is an idiom that means to have complete confidence in or have a strong belief in the success or outcome of a particular thing, event, or situation. It implies a high level of certainty and assurance.
  • the boot/shoe is on the other foot The idiom "the boot/shoe is on the other foot" refers to a situation where the roles or circumstances have been reversed or switched. It implies that the person who was previously in a position of power, advantage, or control now finds themselves in a position of disadvantage or subordination, while the other person now holds the advantage or control. It signifies a shift in circumstances, perspectives, or fortunes.
  • on short notice, at at short notice The idiom "on short notice" or "at short notice" refers to something that is arranged or required to be done with little advance warning or time for preparation. It suggests that there is limited time available to plan or organize something, and it typically implies a sense of urgency or immediacy.
  • long on sth and short on sth The idiom "long on something and short on something" refers to being plentiful or abundant in one aspect while lacking or deficient in another aspect. It highlights a situation where someone or something possesses an excess or surplus of one thing but is insufficient or lacking in another thing.
  • a shoulder to cry on The idiom "a shoulder to cry on" means someone who offers comfort, support, and understanding to someone who is sad, upset, or in need of emotional consolation. It refers to a person who is willing to listen and provide empathy during difficult times, offering a source of strength and solace.
  • have a chip on your shoulder To have a chip on your shoulder means to have a persistent attitude of resentment or readiness for confrontation. It refers to harboring a grudge or feeling unjustly treated, often leading to a confrontational or defensive demeanor.
  • get the/this show on the road The idiom "get the show on the road" means to start a particular activity, project, or event. It is often used to encourage the beginning of an endeavor or to prompt action.
  • the show must go on The idiom "the show must go on" means that despite any obstacles or difficulties, a performance or event must proceed as planned. It emphasizes that the show or event should not be halted or postponed, and all involved must continue regardless of any setbacks.
  • close/shut the door on sth The idiom "close/shut the door on sth" typically means to put an end to or eliminate the possibility of something happening. It refers to rejecting or abandoning a certain situation, opportunity, or idea, and not allowing any further consideration or possibility.
  • come down on one side of the fence or the other The idiom "come down on one side of the fence or the other" means to make a firm decision or take a definite position on an issue or situation. It implies that someone should choose and commit to one option, opinion, or course of action rather than remaining indecisive or neutral.
  • get on the right/wrong side of sb The idiom "get on the right/wrong side of somebody" means to behave in a manner that either earns someone's favor or displeasure. Getting on the right side of someone implies winning their approval or support, while getting on the wrong side denotes actions that result in someone's disapproval, anger, or opposition.
  • have sth on your side The idiom "have something on your side" means to possess a particular advantage or favorable circumstance that supports or aids your cause or position. It implies having a factor or support working in your favor, which can contribute to success or achieving desired outcomes.
  • keep on the right side of sb The idiom "keep on the right side of someone" means to maintain a good relationship with that person, usually by treating them well, being polite, and not doing anything to upset or annoy them. It implies the importance of staying in someone's good favor or avoiding their disapproval or anger.
  • on the large, small, etc. side The idiom "on the large, small, etc. side" refers to expressing a subjective opinion or estimation of something's size, quantity, or scale, usually with an emphasis on it being more or less than expected or desired. It implies a measurement or judgment that is not precise or exact, but gives a general sense of the magnitude or extent.
  • on the right/wrong side of 40, 50, etc. The idiom "on the right/wrong side of 40, 50, etc." is commonly used to refer to someone's age and whether they are older or younger than a specific milestone age. Typically, "on the right side of [certain age]" means the person is younger than that age, often suggesting that they still have a significant amount of time or youth ahead of them. For example, being "on the right side of 40" implies that the person is younger than 40 years old. On the other hand, "on the wrong side of [certain age]" implies that the person is older than that age and may have passed their prime or optimal age for certain activities. It suggests that the individual
  • on the right/wrong side of the law The idiom "on the right/wrong side of the law" means someone is either acting within the boundaries of the law (on the right side) or engaging in illegal activities (on the wrong side). It refers to whether someone's actions or behavior comply with or violate the legal system.
  • on the side The idiom "on the side" is commonly used to describe an action or activity that is done in addition to one's main job, occupation, or primary focus. It suggests engaging in something as a secondary source of income or interest, often outside regular working hours or obligations.
  • put/lay sth on/to one side The idiom "put/lay something on/to one side" means to set something aside or keep something separate, usually for future use or consideration. It implies temporarily disregarding or postponing attention or action on something.
  • put/leave sth on/to one side The idiom "put/leave something on/to one side" means to temporarily set aside or ignore something, usually an issue, task, or decision, so that it can be dealt with later or at a more suitable time. It implies intentionally reserving or postponing something for future consideration.
  • take/lead sb on/to one side The idiom "take/lead sb on/to one side" means to separate or remove someone from a group or a larger gathering in order to have a private conversation with them. It typically implies that the conversation is important or confidential and requires a more isolated setting away from others.
  • a bit on the side The idiom "a bit on the side" refers to having a secret or extramarital affair or a hidden romantic relationship outside one's primary relationship or marriage. It implies engaging in an additional or secondary romantic or sexual involvement alongside the existing one.
  • time is on sb's side The idiom "time is on someone's side" means that someone has the advantage of having plenty of time on their side and can afford to wait patiently for something to happen, without feeling rushed or pressured.
  • have time on your side, at time is on sb's side The idiom "have time on your side" or "time is on someone's side" means that someone has the advantage of having enough time to achieve their goals or objectives. It suggests that having ample time allows for patience, planning, and favorable outcomes. Time, in this context, is viewed as an ally rather than a constraint.
  • look on the bright side The idiom "look on the bright side" means to try and find the positive aspects or silver lining in a difficult or negative situation. It encourages a positive outlook and optimism in the face of challenges or setbacks.
  • err on the side of caution The idiom "err on the side of caution" means to take a cautious or less risky approach in a situation, even if it may seem unnecessary or excessive. It suggests that it is better to be overly careful and avoid potential risks or problems, rather than taking a chance and facing potential negative consequences.
  • be on the side of the angels The idiom "be on the side of the angels" refers to being morally right or virtuous in a situation or conflict. It implies supporting or advocating for the morally just and righteous path, often associated with goodness and integrity. It suggests taking a position aligned with what is perceived as right and just, as if being supported by the forces of good or higher powers (referred to as angels).
  • get out of bed (on) the wrong side The idiom "get out of bed (on) the wrong side" refers to starting the day in a grumpy, irritable, or negative mood. It suggests that someone woke up in a manner that left them feeling out of sorts or easily annoyed.
  • get up on the wrong side of the bed, at get out of bed (on) the wrong side The idiom "get up on the wrong side of the bed" or "get out of bed (on) the wrong side" is a figurative expression used to describe someone who starts their day or approach a situation with a negative or grumpy attitude. It implies that someone is in a bad mood, irritated, or easily annoyed right from the beginning of their day, often for no apparent reason.
  • know which side your bread is buttered (on) The idiom "know which side your bread is buttered (on)" means to understand where one's advantage lies or where one's loyalty should be directed. It refers to being aware of the person or situation that provides the most benefits or support, and acting accordingly to maintain that advantage or loyalty.
  • be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of your face" means to suddenly stop feeling happy or satisfied when faced with an unexpected negative outcome or consequence. It implies that someone's initial joy or confidence is reversed, leading to a change in their demeanor.
  • laugh out of the other side of your mouth, at be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh out of the other side of your mouth" or "laugh on the other side of your face" is used to convey the idea that someone will experience a completely different, often unpleasant, outcome or situation than they initially anticipated or believed. It implies that their current confidence or amusement will be replaced by disappointment or regret.
  • the grass is always greener on the other side (of the fence) The idiom "the grass is always greener on the other side (of the fence)" refers to the tendency of people to believe that other people's situations or circumstances are preferable to their own. It suggests that individuals often view other people's lives through an idealized lens, assuming that they would be happier or better off if they were in someone else's position, without considering the potential drawbacks or challenges that come with it.
  • sign on the dotted line The idiom "sign on the dotted line" means to formally agree to a contract or agreement by providing one's signature in the designated place, usually represented by a dotted line. It denotes the act of finalizing a commitment or a binding agreement.
  • give/hand sth to sb on a (silver) platter The idiom "give/hand something to someone on a (silver) platter" means to give or provide something to someone very easily or without any effort or struggle. It implies that the person receiving it did not have to work hard or make any significant effort to obtain what they desire. Similar to serving a meal on a platter, it suggests that something is being delivered or presented in a convenient, effortless manner.
  • sit in judgment on/over sb The idiom "sit in judgment on/over someone" means to have the authority or responsibility to make a judgment or decision about someone's actions, behavior, or character. It implies being in a position of power or authority to assess, evaluate, or pass judgment on someone.
  • sit on your arse The idiom "sit on your arse" is an informal expression that means to be inactive, lazy, or not making an effort to do anything productive. It implies someone sitting or lounging around without taking any action or showing motivation.
  • sit on sb's stomach
  • sit on the fence The idiom "sit on the fence" means to remain neutral or undecided in a particular situation, not taking a side or giving a clear opinion or stance on an issue.
  • sit on your hands The idiom "sit on your hands" typically refers to a situation where someone deliberately avoids taking action or doing something when they should or could have. It implies remaining inactive, passive, or refusing to intervene, often due to fear, indecision, or a lack of motivation.
  • sit on your ass, at sit on your arse The idiom "sit on your ass" or "sit on your arse" is a colloquial expression that means to be inactive, laze around, or do nothing productive. It suggests a lack of motivation or dedication, often accompanied by a sense of laziness or procrastination.
  • sit (around) on your backside The idiom "sit (around) on your backside" is an expression used to indicate someone's inactive or unproductive behavior. It implies that the person is being lazy, neglecting their responsibilities, or wasting time by sitting or lounging rather than taking action or getting things done.
  • try sth on for size, at try sth for size The idiom "try something on for size" or "try something for size" means to test or evaluate something to see if it fits well or feels right for one's needs or preferences. It can be used metaphorically to refer to trying out or examining an idea, concept, theory, or lifestyle before fully committing to it.
  • pick on sm your own size The idiom "pick on someone your own size" is a phrase used to advise or caution against bullying or targeting someone who is smaller, weaker, or less able to defend themselves. It suggests that one should challenge or confront others who are in a similar position or have similar capabilities rather than engaging in unfair behavior.
  • get/put your skates on The idiom "get/put your skates on" means to hurry up or move quickly. It derives from the literal action of getting or putting on ice skates, which suggests the need for speed or immediate action.
  • be skating on thin ice The idiom "be skating on thin ice" means to be engaging in a risky or dangerous situation, where one is likely to face negative consequences or failure. It implies that the person's actions or decisions are perilous and they are treading on unstable or uncertain ground, much like someone skating on thin ice risks falling through and plunging into cold water.
  • on the skids The idiom "on the skids" typically means to be in a state of decline, deterioration, or failure. It refers to a situation or enterprise that is experiencing a downturn or facing significant obstacles.
  • on the slate The idiom "on the slate" refers to something that is recorded or noted for future reference or action. It can also imply that an obligation or debt is being acknowledged, but not yet settled.
  • wear your heart on your sleeve The idiom "wear your heart on your sleeve" means to openly display or show one's emotions or feelings, without attempting to hide them. It refers to someone who is transparent with their emotions, allowing others to easily see and understand how they truly feel.
  • be quick/slow on the uptake The idiom "be quick/slow on the uptake" refers to a person's ability to understand or comprehend things quickly or slowly. "Quick on the uptake" describes someone who grasps ideas or concepts promptly, while "slow on the uptake" denotes someone who is relatively slow in understanding or responding to information.
  • be on ice The idiom "be on ice" refers to a state or situation where something or someone is being kept or held in temporary suspension, often in order to be later used or dealt with. It can also imply keeping something secret or undisclosed for a period of time.
  • be not on The idiom "be not on" means to not be happening or occurring at a particular time or place. It can also refer to something that is not possible or feasible. It generally implies a lack of availability, suitability, or appropriateness in a given situation.
  • be bang on The idiom "be bang on" means to be exactly correct or accurate in assessing or describing something. It implies being on target or hitting the mark precisely.
  • be on about The idiom "be on about" means to persistently talk or complain about something, often in a repetitive or unclear manner. It suggests that someone is fixated on a particular topic, subject, or issue, and keeps bringing it up in conversation. It can also imply that the person is being overly obsessive or obnoxious about the topic.
  • be on record, at go on record The idiom "be on record, at go on record" means to publicly state or express one's opinion, position, or stance on a particular matter. It implies that the statement is officially documented and can be referred to or used as evidence in the future.
  • be on relief The idiom "be on relief" refers to a situation where someone is receiving financial assistance or government aid, typically in the form of unemployment benefits or welfare. It implies that an individual is depending on such assistance to sustain themselves financially due to unemployment or other challenging circumstances.
  • be on a roll The idiom "be on a roll" means to be experiencing a series of repeated successes or victories, often consecutively or without interruption. It refers to a period of time when someone is performing exceptionally well or having a winning streak in various aspects of life, such as work, sports, or personal accomplishments.
  • be on the books The idiom "be on the books" refers to something that is officially recorded, documented, or registered, typically in an organization, institution, company, or Government. It means that something is legally or formally established or recognized.
  • be on the cards The idiom "be on the cards" means that something is likely or possible to happen in the future. It suggests that there is a chance or a high probability of a particular event or outcome occurring.
  • be on the carpet The idiom "be on the carpet" is used to describe a situation where someone is being called to account for their actions or behavior. It often implies that someone is being summoned for a meeting or disciplinary action to address a problem or issue.
  • be on the case The idiom "be on the case" typically means to be actively investigating or working on a particular task or problem. It suggests being fully engaged and devoted to finding a solution or getting to the bottom of something.
  • be on cloud nine The idiom "be on cloud nine" means to be extremely happy, elated, or ecstatic. It refers to a state of great joy or euphoria.
  • be on sb's ass The idiom "be on someone's ass" is slang and has a figurative meaning. It is an expression used to describe the act of closely monitoring or closely following someone's actions or behavior, often in a critical or demanding manner, in order to stay informed or maintain control over the person. This idiom indicates a high level of scrutiny, oversight, or pressure being exerted on someone.
  • be on sb's back The idiom "be on someone's back" means to constantly criticize, nag, or pester someone in a persistent and bothersome manner. It implies that the person is constantly monitoring or reminding someone about something, often causing annoyance or frustration.
  • be on the ball The idiom "be on the ball" means to be attentive, alert, and well-prepared, especially in terms of being quick to understand and respond to a situation. It implies a high level of competence, awareness, and proactiveness.
  • be big on sth The idiom "be big on sth" means to have a strong liking or preference for something, to be enthusiastic or passionate about it. It can also imply that someone considers something important or gives it a high priority.
  • be on the pull The idiom "be on the pull" is a colloquial expression in British English that means to be actively seeking or trying to attract a romantic partner or engage in casual flirting or dating. It is commonly used to describe someone who is actively looking for a potential romantic or sexual encounter.
  • be on the rack The idiom "be on the rack" refers to a person experiencing extreme physical or mental distress or being subjected to intense pressure or stress. It originates from the medieval torture device called the rack, where a person's limbs were stretched or compressed causing immense pain.
  • be sweet on sb The idiom "be sweet on somebody" means to have a strong romantic attraction or affection for someone. It implies having a crush or being infatuated with someone.
  • be on sb's tail The idiom "be on someone's tail" means to closely follow or pursue someone, usually with the intent of monitoring or tracking their actions. It suggests relentless pursuit or observance, often in a persistent or intrusive manner.
  • be thin on top The idiom "be thin on top" typically refers to someone who is bald, specifically the lack of hair on the top of one's head.
  • be gone on sb The idiom "be gone on sb" means to have a strong infatuation or strong affection for someone. It generally implies a deep emotional attachment or being smitten by the person mentioned.
  • be heavy on sb The idiom "be heavy on sb" means to be overly critical, demanding, or burdensome towards someone. It refers to a situation where someone is putting excessive pressure or responsibility on another person, often causing them stress or hardship.
  • be hell on wheels The idiom "be hell on wheels" is typically used to describe someone or something that is extremely active, aggressive, or determined. It suggests a person or thing that is persistently unstoppable, relentless, or highly effective in achieving their goals or objectives.
  • be soft on sb The idiom "be soft on someone" means to treat someone leniently, show them sympathy, or be undemanding in their regard. It can also indicate being forgiving or tolerant of someone's faults or mistakes.
  • be on the stage The idiom "be on the stage" means to be performing or actively involved in a theatrical production or presentation. It refers to someone being part of a play, musical, or any live performance that takes place on a stage.
  • be on your honour The idiom "be on your honour" means to be trusted or expected to act in an honest and honorable manner, without any form of supervision or enforcement. It implies that someone is relying on your integrity and sense of duty to fulfill a certain task or fulfill an obligation in a responsible and trustworthy way.
  • be on the level The idiom "be on the level" means to be honest, sincere, or telling the truth. It refers to someone's trustworthiness and integrity in their words or actions.
  • be on the line The idiom "be on the line" typically means that someone or something is at risk or in a critical position. It implies that there is a lot at stake and that the outcome or consequences are significant. It can also suggest a sense of pressure or accountability for one's actions or decisions.
  • be lost on sb The idiom "be lost on someone" means that someone does not understand or appreciate something that has been said or done, usually because it is too complicated, obscure, or uninteresting to them.
  • be on the make The idiom "be on the make" refers to someone who is actively seeking personal advantage or pursuing romantic or sexual interests. It often implies that the person is being opportunistic or scheming in their efforts to gain something or win someone's favor.
  • be on the mend The idiom "be on the mend" means to be in the process of recovering or improving one's health or circumstances after a setback or illness. It suggests that the person or situation is progressing towards a better state or condition.
  • be on the move The idiom "be on the move" typically means to be active, constantly busy, or regularly changing locations or positions. It implies that someone is constantly engaged in various activities, traveling, or making progress towards their goals.
  • be on the move, at make a move The idiom "be on the move" and "make a move" generally refer to taking action or making progress in a situation. It implies being proactive, actively engaging, or initiating movement towards a goal or objective. It can also denote a state of constant activity, restlessness, or a desire for change and new experiences.
  • be/go on at sb The idiom "be/go on at someone" refers to repeatedly criticizing, nagging, or urging someone to do something in a persistent manner. It implies that someone is being constantly annoyed or pressured by another person in an argumentative or controlling way.
  • be on top of sth The idiom "be on top of something" means to be fully informed, knowledgeable, or in control of a situation or task. It implies having a strong understanding of something and being able to handle it competently.
  • be on your guard The idiom "be on your guard" means to be cautious, attentive, and prepared for potential dangers, threats, or deceitful situations. It suggests being vigilant and maintaining a state of heightened awareness.
  • be/go off on one The idiom "be/go off on one" means to become excessively angry, agitated, or behave in an irrational or unrestrained manner, often involving outbursts of criticism, shouting, or argumentative behavior.
  • be on your uppers The idiom "be on your uppers" typically means to be in a state of financial hardship or extreme poverty. It suggests that a person has little to no money or resources and is struggling to meet basic needs.
  • be floating on air The idiom "be floating on air" means to feel extremely joyful, happy, or elated about something. It suggests a state of euphoria or extreme excitement.
  • be on your deathbed The idiom "be on your deathbed" refers to the state of being extremely ill and close to death. It suggests that a person is at the end of their life and may have little time left to live. This expression is often used figuratively to describe a situation or scenario that is in a critical condition or nearing its inevitable end.
  • be on familiar terms The idiom "be on familiar terms" refers to having a friendly or casual relationship with someone. It means being comfortable and at ease with another person, often involving a level of acquaintance or closeness that goes beyond formalities.
  • be out on your ear The idiom "be out on your ear" means to be abruptly dismissed or expelled from a place, especially from a job, with little or no warning or consideration. It implies being forced to leave in a disgraced or humiliating manner.
  • be on another planet The idiom "be on another planet" is used to describe someone who is completely disconnected from reality or is in a world of their own, often due to their eccentric behavior, unusual thoughts, or inability to understand or relate to others. It signifies that the person's thoughts or actions are so detached from the norm that they seem to be living in a different world or mental state.
  • be/go heavy on sth The idiom "be/go heavy on sth" means to use or include a large amount or high concentration of something, typically in cooking, seasoning, or other forms of preparation. It implies an excessive or abundant use of a particular ingredient or element.
  • be hellbent on sth The idiom "be hellbent on something" means to be extremely determined or obsessed with achieving a specific goal or outcome, often without considering obstacles or consequences. It implies an unwavering resolve or obsession to pursue something regardless of the challenges or risks involved. It suggests an intense and often single-minded commitment towards achieving one's objective.
  • get on top of sm The idiom "get on top of something" means to gain control or effectively manage a situation, problem, or task. It implies taking proactive steps to understand and address the issue at hand in order to achieve success or resolution.
  • have sth on good authority The idiom "have something on good authority" means to have information or knowledge that is obtained from a trustworthy or reliable source. It suggests that the information being shared is reliable and can be trusted.
  • be on speaking terms The idiom "be on speaking terms" refers to the state of having a friendly or cordial relationship with someone, usually after a period of conflict or disagreement. It implies that the individuals involved are able to communicate with each other without any animosity or hostility.
  • not be on speaking terms The idiom "not be on speaking terms" means that two individuals or parties are not on good or friendly terms with each other and are refusing to communicate or talk to each other.
  • know sb to speak to, at be on speaking terms The idioms "know sb to speak to" and "be on speaking terms" are used to describe a relationship where you are acquainted with someone, but only on a superficial or formal level. It suggests that you are familiar with the person's name and may exchange a few words or greetings when you encounter them, but you don't have a deeper or close relationship with them. It implies a level of politeness and civility in your interactions but not necessarily a friendship or true familiarity.
  • put sb on the spot The idiom "put someone on the spot" refers to a situation where someone is made to feel uncomfortable or pressured by being asked a difficult or challenging question, or given a task or responsibility that is unexpected or demanding, especially in front of others. It essentially puts someone in a difficult position where they may struggle to provide an immediate response or feel embarrassed.
  • on the spur of the moment The idiom "on the spur of the moment" is used to describe something that is done or decided upon suddenly, without much thought or planning. It refers to an action or decision taken impulsively, often in response to a situation or feeling at that specific moment.
  • put the squeeze on sb To "put the squeeze on someone" means to exert pressure or force on someone in order to make them comply with a request or do something against their will. It involves applying pressure, usually through coercion or intimidation, to achieve a desired outcome.
  • go on the stage The idiom "go on the stage" refers to someone entering the profession of acting or performing in theater.
  • stand sth on its head The idiom "stand something on its head" means to completely reverse or change the usual or expected order, meaning, or perspective of something. It suggests turning something upside down and looking at it from a different angle, often leading to unconventional or innovative results.
  • stand on your dignity The idiom "stand on your dignity" means to assert or uphold one's sense of self-respect and pride, especially in the face of disrespect, humiliation, or compromise. It refers to maintaining one's integrity and refusing to let others diminish or disrespect one's personal worth or values.
  • stand on your hands/head The idiom "stand on your hands/head" refers to a physical feat where one balances themselves on their hands or head, often showcasing agility, strength, or flexibility. In a figurative sense, it can denote the act of doing something extraordinary, remarkable, or unconventional. It implies going beyond societal norms or expectations to achieve a particular goal or outcome.
  • stand on your own (two) feet The idiom "stand on your own (two) feet" means to be independent and self-sufficient, both financially and emotionally. It refers to having the ability to take care of oneself and not relying on others for support or assistance.
  • stand on ceremony The idiom "stand on ceremony" means to insist on following strict etiquette or formalities, often unnecessarily or excessively, in a particular situation. It refers to someone being overly concerned about adhering to traditional customs or protocols, even when they are not crucial or essential.
  • standing on your head The idiom "standing on your head" refers to the ability to effortlessly accomplish a task or handle a situation with great ease and expertise, often implying that the task is so simple or insignificant that it can be done in a seemingly effortless manner. It highlights the notion of one's skill, competence, or mastery in completing a particular task or dealing with a challenging situation.
  • make sb's hair stand on end The idiom "make sb's hair stand on end" is used to describe a situation or statement that is extremely shocking, frightening, or disturbing, causing someone to feel extreme fear or horror. It refers to a feeling, similar to the sensation of one's hair standing up straight or tingling on the back of their neck due to fear or alarm.
  • not have a leg to stand on The idiom "not have a leg to stand on" means to lack evidence, justification, or a valid argument to support one's position or claim. It signifies a situation where someone is unable to provide solid proof or credible reasoning to support their case.
  • stay on the sidelines To "stay on the sidelines" means to watch a situation or activity without actively participating in it. It often implies choosing not to get involved or take a direct role, but observantly staying at a distance and not taking any action.
  • go steady on sth The idiom "go steady on sth" means to proceed or engage in something with moderation, restraint, or caution. It implies being careful, not rushing or overdoing something, or not being too excessive or intense in one's actions or behavior.
  • steady on! The idiom "steady on!" is a phrase used to encourage someone to remain calm, composed, or to slow down, especially in a situation where they may be getting too worked up, excited, or rushing. It is a way of advising someone to maintain control or caution.
  • steal a march on sb The idiom "steal a march on someone" means to gain an advantage over someone or to take action secretly or without their knowledge in order to get ahead or be in a better position. It implies being one step ahead or having a head start on a particular situation or competition.
  • step on it The idiom "step on it" means to do something more quickly, to accelerate the pace, or to hurry up. It is often used as an urgent request or command to prompt someone to move or act faster.
  • tread/step on sb's toes The idiom "tread/step on someone's toes" means to unintentionally interfere with or take over someone else’s responsibilities, projects, or area of expertise, causing them to feel offended, annoyed, or undermined. It can also refer to accidentally causing harm or offense to someone by intruding upon their personal space, opinions, or beliefs.
  • in on sth The idiom "in on sth" typically means being involved or included in a particular situation, event, or activity, usually implying having knowledge or awareness of something. It signifies that someone is a participant or has access to information about a specific matter.
  • a blitz on sth The idiom "a blitz on sth" refers to a concentrated and intense effort or attack on something, usually in a rapid and overwhelming manner. It is derived from the military term "blitzkrieg," which means a swift and powerful offensive. In a figurative sense, "a blitz on sth" implies a strong and focused assault or effort aimed at accomplishing a specific goal or addressing a particular issue.
  • on top of sth The idiom "on top of something" generally means being in control or managing something effectively. It implies having a complete understanding and awareness of a situation or being fully informed and attentive to events or responsibilities. It can also refer to being successful or superior in a particular area or situation.
  • go easy on sth, at go steady on sth The idiom "go easy on sth" or "go steady on sth" means to do or consume something in moderation or to treat someone or something gently or leniently. It advises to avoid excessive or harsh behavior towards a particular thing or person. The idiom emphasizes the need for restraint, caution, or a more measured approach in order to prevent potential harm or negative consequences.
  • on an empty stomach The idiom "on an empty stomach" refers to doing something or consuming something when one has not eaten anything, usually referring to consuming food or drink without having had a meal beforehand.
  • the man/woman/person in/on the street The idiom "the man/woman/person in/on the street" refers to the average person, usually an ordinary citizen who does not have any specialized knowledge or expertise in a particular field. It represents the opinions, beliefs, or experiences of everyday individuals who may not have a deep understanding of complex issues or topics. It is often used to contrast with the views of experts or professionals.
  • on the streets The idiom "on the streets" typically means to be homeless or living without a fixed residence. It refers to individuals who do not have a permanent place to live and may spend their time either wandering or seeking shelter in public spaces.
  • on the street, at on the streets The idiom "on the street" or "at on the streets" generally refers to someone who is homeless or living without a fixed residence, often sleeping and living in public places, such as parks or sidewalks. It can also represent individuals who engage in illegal or illicit activities, such as drug dealing or gambling.
  • on easy street The idiom "on easy street" means to be in a comfortable, prosperous, or financially secure situation where one does not face any difficulties or hardships. It refers to a state of being well-off and free from worries or troubles.
  • on the strength of sth The idiom "on the strength of something" refers to relying or depending on something as a basis or justification for a certain action or decision. It suggests that the mentioned thing is influential or persuasive enough to support or give credibility to the position taken.
  • be stuck on sb/sth The idiom "be stuck on sb/sth" means to have strong feelings of affection, infatuation, or attraction towards someone or something. It implies being fixated or obsessed with a particular person or thing, often to the extent of being unable to think about anything else or move on.
  • get/muscle in on the act The idiom "get/muscle in on the act" refers to someone trying to participate in or take advantage of a situation that is already happening or proving to be successful, typically to gain some benefit or attention for themselves. It implies entering into an ongoing activity or opportunity to ensure one also receives a share of the benefits or recognition.
  • put on an act The idiom "put on an act" means to display emotions, behavior, or characteristics that are not genuine or authentic in order to deceive others or manipulate a situation. It refers to pretending or feigning to be someone or something that one is not.
  • act/do sth on your own responsibility The idiom "act/do something on your own responsibility" means to take independent action or make a decision without relying on or seeking the advice or guidance of others. It implies that the individual must accept full accountability for the consequences or outcomes of their actions without expecting support or assistance from others.
  • with bells on The idiom "with bells on" means being very enthusiastic, eager, or excited while showing up or participating in something. It implies a strong willingness to join or engage in an activity.
  • the sun sets on sth The idiom "the sun sets on sth" means that something is coming to an end, often referring to the decline or conclusion of a particular era, event, or period. It implies that there is a sense of finality or a moment of closure. The phrase is derived from the literal sunset, where the sun disappearing below the horizon signifies the end of the day.
  • what you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts The idiom "what you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts" refers to a situation where one may experience some losses or setbacks in one aspect of life or a particular situation, but eventually compensates or gains in another aspect. It suggests that the overall outcome or balance remains positive or equal in the long run, even if there are temporary difficulties.
  • keep tabs on sth/sb The idiom "keep tabs on something/somebody" means to closely monitor or stay informed about something or someone. It implies maintaining a watchful and detailed record of activities or developments.
  • on the table The idiom "on the table" refers to an idea, proposal, or issue that is being considered or discussed. It suggests that something is open for discussion or up for consideration.
  • wait on table(s), at wait at table(s) The idiom "wait on table(s), or wait at table(s)" refers to the act of serving food and drinks in restaurants by taking orders, bringing meals to customers, and attending to their needs during their dining experience.
  • put/lay your cards on the table The idiom "put/lay your cards on the table" means to be honest and open about your intentions, opinions, or feelings, especially in a negotiation, discussion, or relationship. It refers to revealing or disclosing all relevant information or issues in a straightforward manner, similar to the act of revealing all the cards in a card game.
  • on the take The idiom "on the take" refers to individuals who are involved in dishonest or corrupt practices, often accepting bribes or illicit payments in exchange for special favors or services. It implies someone who is engaged in an act of deceit or corruption for personal gain.
  • take sth on board The idiom "take something on board" means to accept, consider, or take into careful consideration a particular idea, suggestion, or criticism. It implies being receptive to different perspectives or incorporating feedback in order to understand or improve something.
  • take it on the chin The idiom "take it on the chin" means to accept criticism, defeat, or adversity bravely or stoically, without complaint or bitterness. It refers to facing hardships or setbacks with resilience and a strong determination to overcome them.
  • accept/take sth on faith The idiom "accept/take something on faith" refers to believing or trusting in something without concrete evidence or proof. It means accepting something as true or accurate based solely on faith or trust in the source or the information itself, without requiring further validation or evidence.
  • take a rain check (on sth) The idiom "take a rain check (on sth)" means to politely decline an invitation or offer, but express interest in accepting it at a later time or date. It implies postponing or rescheduling a planned engagement or experience.
  • take a hard line on sb/sth The idiom "take a hard line on sb/sth" means to adopt a strict, uncompromising stance or approach towards someone or something. It refers to being firm, resolute, and unwavering in dealing with a particular person or situation, often without showing leniency or flexibility.
  • go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent" means to suddenly shift or veer from the main topic of conversation or main focus of attention onto an unrelated or unrelated direction. It describes a situation where someone starts discussing or pursuing a completely different idea or topic, often irrelevant or tangential to the original discussion or context.
  • have sb on tape, at have sb taped The idiom "have sb on tape" or "have sb taped" means to have recorded evidence of someone's actions or words, usually obtained in secret or without their knowledge. It implies having concrete proof or evidence of someone doing or saying something that may potentially incriminate or embarrass them.
  • be bent on sth/doing sth The idiom "be bent on sth/doing sth" means to have a strong determination or fixed intention to achieve or do something, often with a sense of stubbornness or single-mindedness. It implies being resolutely focused on a particular goal, without being easily swayed or deterred.
  • be on good, friendly, etc. terms (with sb) The idiom "be on good, friendly, etc. terms (with somebody)" means to have a positive, amicable, or friendly relationship with someone. It implies that there is a mutual understanding, respect, and cooperation between individuals involved.
  • from then on The idiom "from then on" means starting from a particular point in time or a specific event, and continuing or changing permanently from that moment forward.
  • hang in there, at hang on in there The idiom "hang in there" or "hang on in there" is an expression used to encourage someone to continue persevering or enduring through difficult or challenging circumstances without giving up. It emphasizes the importance of staying strong, patient, and maintaining resilience in the face of adversity.
  • hang on in there The idiom "hang on in there" means to persevere or continue to strive in difficult or challenging circumstances. It is often used as an encouragement or motivational phrase to urge someone to keep going despite obstacles or hardships.
  • thick on the ground The idiom "thick on the ground" is used to describe a situation or occurrence where there is an abundant or overwhelming presence of something or someone. It suggests that there is a dense or numerous quantity of the mentioned thing or people in a particular area or context.
  • lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overdo something, especially when trying to make something seem more emotional, dramatic, or impressive than it actually is. It refers to emphasizing or embellishing a statement, story, or performance in an excessively noticeable or conspicuous way.
  • be thin on the ground The idiom "be thin on the ground" means that there is only a small or limited number of something available or present. It refers to a scarcity or a lack of quantity or availability.
  • be on to a good thing The idiom "be on to a good thing" means to be engaged in or connected to something advantageous or promising. It implies that someone has found or discovered a positive opportunity or situation that is likely to bring benefits or success.
  • move on to higher/better things The idiom "move on to higher/better things" means to progress or advance from a current situation or position and transition to something superior, more rewarding, or more important. It often implies leaving behind an unfavorable or less desirable situation in favor of a more favorable or desirable one.
  • think on your feet The idiom "think on your feet" refers to the ability to quickly make decisions, solve problems, or respond to unexpected or challenging situations without much time for preparation or planning. It implies being mentally agile, resourceful, and able to adapt to changing circumstances in a timely manner.
  • put your thinking cap on The idiom "put your thinking cap on" means to start thinking deeply or to focus one's attention and mental effort on a particular task or problem. It suggests the need for increased concentration and engagement in order to generate creative ideas or solve complex issues.
  • be on your best behaviour The idiom "be on your best behaviour" means to behave in a very polite, well-mannered, and controlled manner, particularly in a situation that requires you to make a good impression or when someone important is observing or evaluating your behavior. It suggests displaying exemplary conduct and avoiding any actions that may be considered improper, rude, or disruptive.
  • hear (sth) on/through the grapevine The idiom "hear (something) on/through the grapevine" means to hear information or news indirectly through unofficial or informal channels, typically through gossip or rumors. It implies that the information may not be entirely reliable or accurate.
  • throw sb back on their own resources The idiom "throw sb back on their own resources" means to leave someone to rely on their own abilities, skills, or knowledge in a challenging or difficult situation, often without any external support or assistance.
  • throw cold water on sth The idiom "throw cold water on sth" means to discourage or dampen enthusiasm or excitement about something, often by providing negative feedback, criticism, or disapproval. It implies acting to extinguish or diminish someone's enthusiasm or excitement. It can also refer to undermining or rejecting an idea or proposal by pointing out its flaws or impracticality.
  • pour/throw cold water on sth The idiom "pour/throw cold water on something" means to discourage or dampen someone's enthusiasm, ideas, or plans by expressing doubt, criticism, skepticism, or disagreement.
  • cast/shed/throw light on sth To cast/shed/throw light on something means to provide clarity, understanding, or insight into a topic or situation. It refers to the act of illuminating or revealing information that was previously unclear or unknown. This idiom is often used when discussing new facts, evidence, or perspectives that help to clarify a subject or solve a problem.
  • don't bet on it The idiom "don't bet on it" is a way of expressing doubt or skepticism regarding the likelihood of something happening. It suggests that the outcome or result being discussed is highly uncertain and not worthy of placing a bet or wager on it.
  • do sth on a bet, at do sth for a bet The idiom "do something on a bet" or "do something for a bet" refers to engaging in an action or task as a result of a wager or a challenge. It implies that the individual is motivated to take part in an activity due to the possibility of winning a bet or the desire to prove themselves in a challenge.
  • I wouldn't bet on it, at don't bet on it The idiom "I wouldn't bet on it" or "don't bet on it" is used to express doubt or skepticism about something. It implies that the speaker does not believe that a particular event or outcome will occur, and advises against making a wager or trusting in its likelihood.
  • hold on/tight The idiom "hold on" or "hold tight" means to maintain a strong grip, both literally and figuratively, in order to stay secure, endure through challenging situations, or maintain one's position or belief despite difficulties or setbacks. It implies not letting go or giving up easily, staying resilient, and showing determination or perseverance.
  • keep a tight rein on sb/sth The idiom "keep a tight rein on sb/sth" means to maintain strict control or close supervision over someone or something. It implies the need for close monitoring and regulation, often to prevent mistakes, misbehavior, or deviation from a particular course of action. This expression is derived from the imagery of a horse bridle, where a tight rein gives the rider complete control over the horse's movements.
  • keep sb/sth on a tight rein, at keep a tight rein on sb/sth The idiom "keep sb/sth on a tight rein" or "keep a tight rein on sb/sth" means to exercise strict control or supervision over someone or something. It implies keeping a close watch or tightly regulating someone's actions, behaviors, or a situation to avoid any mistakes, negative outcomes, or deviations from expected standards. It suggests maintaining a firm grip on the situation or person in order to prevent any potential problems or maintain discipline.
  • put/tighten the screws on sb The idiom "put/tighten the screws on someone" means to exert pressure or apply forceful measures in order to compel someone to act or comply with certain demands or expectations. It typically refers to a situation where one party increases the level of scrutiny, control, or punishment over another individual to ensure compliance or cooperation.
  • have time on your hands The idiom "have time on your hands" commonly means having an excess amount of free time or having nothing important or urgent to do.
  • live on borrowed time The idiom "live on borrowed time" means to live or exist with the knowledge that one's time is limited or coming to an end soon. It describes a situation where someone is continuing to be alive or functioning despite being expected to die or end soon, often due to an illness or imminent danger.
  • fall on hard times The idiom "fall on hard times" means to experience a period of financial difficulty or hardship. It refers to a situation where someone or something undergoes a significant decline in prosperity or success.
  • like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "like a cat on a hot tin roof" refers to a state of extreme nervousness, restlessness, or agitation. It implies a person's inability to sit still or be at ease in a situation, typically due to high levels of anxiety, tension, or discomfort.
  • be on the tip of your tongue The idiom "be on the tip of your tongue" means that something, usually a word or a piece of information, is on the verge of being remembered or spoken but is temporarily eluding one's memory or ability to articulate it.
  • on your toes The idiom "on your toes" means to be alert, attentive, or prepared to take quick action or respond to a situation. It refers to being ready and vigilant, usually in order to deal with unexpected or potentially challenging circumstances.
  • come down on sb like a ton of bricks The idiom "come down on sb like a ton of bricks" means to express extreme disapproval or punishment towards someone. It implies confronting or criticizing someone strongly and forcefully.
  • not to put too fine a point on The idiom "not to put too fine a point on" means to express something directly or to be blunt and straightforward in conveying an idea or opinion. It is often used when someone wants to emphasize a point without being too subtle or diplomatic.
  • on top of the world The idiom "on top of the world" means to feel extremely happy, proud, or successful. It represents a sense of accomplishment, satisfaction, or elation.
  • on the town The idiom "on the town" refers to going out or enjoying a night or day of social activities, usually in a city or town. It implies engaging in various forms of entertainment, such as dining at restaurants, visiting bars or clubs, attending parties, or exploring cultural events. It is often used to describe a fun and lively excursion or night out with friends or loved ones.
  • a night on the town The idiom "a night on the town" refers to an evening spent outside the usual routines or activities, often involving entertainment, socializing, dining out, or engaging in enjoyable leisure pursuits. It implies an outing or gathering that offers excitement, fun, and a break from the ordinary.
  • on track The idiom "on track" means to be making progress or moving in the right direction towards a goal or objective. It suggests that someone or something is moving forward with a plan, timeline, or set of actions in an organized and successful manner. It can also imply that someone is following a predetermined course or path to achieve desired results.
  • be on the right track To be on the right track means to be heading in the correct direction or making progress towards a goal or objective. It suggests that someone's actions, strategies, or ideas are leading them towards successful outcomes or solutions.
  • be hot on sb's track/trail The idiom "be hot on sb's track/trail" means to closely follow or pursue someone, often with the intention of catching or finding them. It expresses the idea of relentless pursuit or determination in trying to locate or apprehend a particular person.
  • play a joke/trick on sb The idiom "play a joke/trick on someone" means to deceive or prank someone in a mischievous or playful manner, often with the intent of causing laughter or amusement.
  • on the trot The idiom "on the trot" typically means to do things or complete tasks continuously and in quick succession, without taking a break or pause in between. It can also imply being constantly busy or active without a break or rest.
  • pour oil on troubled waters The idiom "pour oil on troubled waters" means to try to calm or pacify a tense or difficult situation or diffuse a conflict by providing a calming or soothing influence. It implies that someone is trying to smooth things over and restore harmony in a troubled or contentious situation.
  • try it on The idiom "try it on" means to attempt or experiment with something new or unfamiliar, typically in order to determine if it suits one's needs, preferences, or requirements. It can refer to trying on clothes or accessories to see how they fit or look, as well as to figuratively trying out new ideas, suggestions, or approaches to see if they are effective or suitable.
  • turn your back on sth The idiom "turn your back on something" means to ignore, reject, or abandon something or someone. It implies deliberately choosing not to acknowledge or support a particular thing or person.
  • turn your back on sb To "turn your back on someone" means to reject, abandon, or disregard them, often after previously being supportive or helpful. It implies deliberately distancing yourself from someone, both physically and emotionally, and refusing to offer assistance or support.
  • turn sth on its head To turn something on its head means to completely change or reverse the conventional or expected way of thinking or doing something. It implies a radical shift in perspective, approach, or interpretation.
  • turn the spotlight on sth The idiom "turn the spotlight on something" typically refers to bringing attention, focus, or scrutiny to a particular matter, subject, or person. It implies shining a figurative spotlight on something in order to highlight, examine, or analyze it more closely or to make it the center of attention.
  • turn the tables on sb The idiom "turn the tables on someone" means to reverse a situation or gain the advantage over someone who had previously held control or power. In other words, it refers to changing the circumstances to one's own advantage, often by using a surprising or unexpected tactic.
  • turn away from sth, at turn your back on sth The idiom "turn away from something" or "turn your back on something" refers to intentionally rejecting, disregarding, or distancing oneself from something or someone. It suggests a refusal to acknowledge or engage with a particular situation, idea, person, or opportunity. It implies a decision to disassociate oneself or avoid involvement, often indicating a lack of interest, trust, or support.
  • turn on the waterworks The idiom "turn on the waterworks" refers to someone suddenly crying or shedding tears, often in an excessive or demonstrative manner. It implies a deliberate act of creating a dramatic emotional display, often in an attempt to manipulate others or gain sympathy.
  • on/under pain of death The idiomatic expression "on/under pain of death" implies that severe consequences, often leading to death, will occur if a certain action is not adhered to or if specific conditions are not met. It signifies a strict warning or threat that obliges complete compliance to avoid dire consequences.
  • on the up (and up) The idiom "on the up (and up)" means that something or someone is on an upward trend or making progress. It implies that there has been improvement in a certain situation or that someone is becoming more successful or honest. It can also refer to a person's moral or ethical improvement.
  • be hung up on sth The idiom "be hung up on something" means to be excessively preoccupied or fixated on someone or something, often to the point of obsession or irrational attachment. It suggests being unable to let go, move on, or focus on other things due to emotional or mental attachment.
  • have a leg up on sb The idiom "have a leg up on sb" means to have an advantage or head start over someone in a competitive situation. It implies having a higher position, more resources, or superior knowledge that gives you an edge over others.
  • be on an upward/downward trajectory The idiom "be on an upward/downward trajectory" refers to the direction or path that someone or something is taking, typically with regard to progress, success, or improvement. When someone or something is on an upward trajectory, it means they are steadily progressing or improving. Conversely, when someone or something is on a downward trajectory, it means they are deteriorating, declining, or experiencing setbacks.
  • on the verge (of) The idiomatic expression "on the verge (of)" means being very close to or near the point of experiencing or achieving something, often implying a critical or significant moment. It signifies that someone or something is on the threshold of a particular event or outcome, implying imminent action or change.
  • to the verge of, at on the verge (of) The idiom "to the verge of" or "on the verge (of)" refers to being on the cusp or brink of something, often implying a critical point or moment just before a significant event or action takes place. It indicates being very close to reaching a particular state or outcome, usually with a sense of anticipation or risk involved.
  • put the bite on sb, at put the squeeze on sb The idiom "put the bite on someone" or "put the squeeze on someone" means to pressure or manipulate someone to give or do something, typically involving asking for money or favors in a forceful or insistent way. It implies exerting coercion or putting someone in a difficult or uncomfortable position to obtain what one wants.
  • on the wagon The idiom "on the wagon" is used to describe a person who has given up or temporarily abstained from consuming alcohol or indulging in a particular habit or addiction.
  • walk on air The idiom "walk on air" means to feel extremely happy, light, or elated, as if one were floating or walking lightly on clouds. It signifies a state of intense joy or excitement.
  • walk on eggs/eggshells The idiom "walk on eggs/eggshells" means to be extremely cautious, delicate or sensitive in one's actions or behavior, often to avoid causing offense, conflict, or making a mistake.
  • fly on the wall The idiom "fly on the wall" refers to the situation where someone secretly observes or overhears a conversation or event without being noticed or actively participating. It implies being in a position to witness something interesting or private without being detected or making one's presence known.
  • the writing is on the wall The idiom "the writing is on the wall" means that an inevitable or impending event or outcome is clearly and unmistakably predicted or indicated. It is often used to suggest that the signs or indications are so evident that it is impossible to ignore or avoid the outcome. The phrase originates from the biblical story in the Book of Daniel, where an inscription on a wall accurately predicts the fall of Babylonian king Belshazzar's empire.
  • the handwriting is on the wall, at the writing is on the wall The idiom "the handwriting is on the wall" or "the writing is on the wall" is used to convey the idea that an inevitable or impending outcome or event can be clearly seen or predicted. It suggests that the signs or indications of an outcome are so obvious that they cannot be ignored or denied. It is often used to warn someone about a situation that appears to be leading to a known, often negative, conclusion.
  • what more do you want jam on it? The idiom "what more do you want, jam on it?" is a colloquial expression used to convey a feeling of frustration or exasperation towards someone who is being demanding or unreasonable. It implies that the person already has something good or desirable and yet is still asking for more, similar to someone who has a slice of bread with jam on it but still demands additional toppings or enhancements.
  • ride (on) a wave of sth The idiom "ride (on) a wave of sth" means to enjoy or benefit from a period of favorable conditions, opportunities, or popularity. It refers to being carried or propelled along by a strong and positive trend, often resulting in success or prosperity.
  • be riding/on the crest of a wave The idiom "be riding/on the crest of a wave" means to be experiencing a period of great success, popularity, or achievement. It implies being at the peak of one's performance or accomplishments, often associated with a feeling of excitement and momentum.
  • be on the way to sth The idiom "be on the way to sth" means to be making progress towards achieving or reaching something. It suggests that one is in the process of moving or advancing towards a specific goal or destination.
  • roll on the weekend, five o'clock, etc. The idiom "roll on the weekend" is an expression used to convey anticipation or eagerness for a specific day or time to arrive, such as the end of the workweek on a Friday or the end of the workday at 5 o'clock. It implies a desire for the current period of time to pass quickly so that one can enjoy leisure time or engage in activities they look forward to during the weekend or after work hours.
  • be/weigh on your conscience To have something be on your conscience means to have a persistent feeling of guilt or remorse about something you have done or failed to do. It refers to a burden or nagging sense of responsibility for one's actions or decisions, causing distress and moral conflict.
  • blow the whistle on sb/sth The idiom "blow the whistle on sb/sth" means to expose or report someone or something's wrongdoing or unethical behavior to the authorities or relevant parties. It suggests bringing attention to a hidden or illegal action with the intention of stopping it or seeking justice.
  • on the whole The idiom "on the whole" means considering everything or overall. It is used to express a general summary or evaluation of a situation without focusing on specific details or exceptions.
  • how, what, why, etc. on earth... The idiom "how, what, why, etc. on earth..." is used to express surprise, disbelief, or astonishment about something. It is often used when asking about or discussing something that seems unlikely, puzzling, or difficult to understand.
  • on a wing and a prayer The idiom "on a wing and a prayer" means to do or achieve something with the greatest of difficulty and with little chance of success or support. It originates from the phrase used during World War II when pilots tried to bring damaged planes back to base with minimal fuel or resources – relying solely on their skills and hope. Thus, the idiom implies relying on good luck or sheer determination rather than on practical means or support.
  • an old/a wise head on young shoulders The idiom "an old/a wise head on young shoulders" refers to someone who is young in age, but possesses a level of maturity, intelligence, or wisdom that is typically associated with someone much older. It suggests that the person demonstrates excellent judgment and understanding beyond their years. This phrase is often used to compliment or acknowledge a young individual who possesses exceptional wisdom, intelligence, or maturity in their thoughts, decisions, or actions. It implies that they possess qualities typically found in individuals who have had more life experience or are older.
  • I/you wouldn't wish sth on anyone/my/your worst enemy The idiom "I/you wouldn't wish something on anyone/my/your worst enemy" means that the situation or experience being discussed is extremely challenging, difficult, or unpleasant. The speaker emphasizes that they do not want anyone, not even their worst enemy, to go through or experience that particular thing. It implies that the situation is so undesirable that no one should have to endure it.
  • the man/woman on the Clapham omnibus The idiom "the man/woman on the Clapham omnibus" refers to an ordinary, average person or member of the general public, who may not be highly educated or have any specialized knowledge. It is often used in legal contexts to represent the reasonable person's perspective when making judgments or decisions. The Clapham omnibus specifically refers to a regular bus service in London, implying that the opinion of an average passenger is a reliable gauge for societal norms and expectations.
  • knock on wood, at touch wood The idiom "knock on wood" or "touch wood" is a superstitious phrase used to ward off or prevent bad luck or misfortune. It is often used after discussing something positive or hopeful, expressing a desire to keep that positive outcome or situation intact. The phrase is accompanied by the action of physically knocking on a wooden surface or lightly touching it to symbolize the act of avoiding any potential jinx or bad luck.
  • knock (on) wood The idiom "knock (on) wood" is used to express a desire to avoid tempting fate or to prevent something negative from happening. It is a superstitious expression, where a person physically knocks on a wooden surface to ward off bad luck or to ensure continued luck or success. It is often said after expressing a positive statement or making a hopeful prediction.
  • play on words The idiom "play on words" refers to a clever and often humorous use of language, involving multiple meanings or similar-sounding words to create a witty effect. It often involves wordplay, puns, double entendres, or any form of linguistic manipulation to produce an amusing or clever outcome.
  • have all the cares of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have all the cares of the world on your shoulders" means to feel an overwhelming sense of responsibility, burdens, or worries. It implies that one is carrying the weight of numerous problems or concerns, as if they are responsible for solving all the troubles in the world. It conveys a feeling of being overwhelmed and weighed down by the challenges and difficulties faced.
  • worship the ground sb walks on The idiom "worship the ground someone walks on" means to deeply admire and adore someone, showing intense love and devotion towards them. It implies that the person is held in such high esteem that even the ground they walk upon is revered.
  • not worth the paper sth is printed/written on The idiom "not worth the paper sth is printed/written on" means that something is completely devoid of value or worth. It implies that whatever is being referred to is insignificant, useless, or unreliable, regardless of its form or presentation. It highlights the lack of importance and trustworthiness associated with the content.
  • catch sb on the wrong foot The idiom "catch someone on the wrong foot" means to surprise or startle someone, usually by doing or asking something unexpected, causing the person to be unprepared or caught off guard.
  • get off on the right/wrong foot The idiom "get off on the right/wrong foot" means to start an activity or interaction in a positive or negative manner, respectively. It refers to the initial impression or the first steps taken in a particular situation, which can significantly impact future outcomes.
  • put years on sb The idiom "put years on sb" means that something has caused someone to appear older or age more quickly. It suggests that the person's experiences or circumstances have had a significant impact on their physical or mental well-being, making them seem older than they actually are.
  • on the blink The idiom "on the blink" means that something is not working properly or is temporarily out of order. It is usually used to describe malfunctioning or faulty machinery, appliances, or systems.
  • go on the block The idiom "go on the block" usually refers to when an item or property is put up for sale or auction. It means that something is being made available for others to purchase or bid on.
  • have/put your head on the block The idiom "have/put your head on the block" means to put yourself in a dangerous or risky situation where failure or negative consequences are likely. It often implies taking responsibility for a decision or action that may have serious consequences. The expression originates from the method of execution by beheading, where placing one's head on the block indicates being willing to face severe punishment or criticism.
  • the new kid on the block The idiom "the new kid on the block" refers to a person or thing that is new, inexperienced, or unfamiliar in a particular environment or field. It implies someone who is a recent addition to a group or an industry and is still in the process of learning or adjusting.
  • have (sb's) blood on your hands The idiom "have (sb's) blood on your hands" means to be responsible for causing someone's injury or death, either directly or indirectly, and implies feelings of guilt or remorse. It is often used metaphorically to describe involvement in a serious negative consequence or the consequences of one's actions.
  • on and off The idiom "on and off" means something that occurs irregularly or intermittently. It refers to a situation or behavior that happens periodically, with alternating periods of activity and inactivity.
  • off and on, at on and off The idiom "off and on" or "at on and off" refers to something that occurs intermittently or sporadically, implying an irregular or inconsistent pattern. It suggests that something happens with breaks, intervals, or pauses in between periods of activity.
  • a blot on sb's character The idiom "a blot on someone's character" refers to a fault, flaw, or negative characteristic that tarnishes or diminishes someone's overall reputation, moral standing, or integrity. It suggests that this particular aspect of their character is seen as a stain or blemish that brings into question their trustworthiness or goodness.
  • a blot on the landscape The idiom "a blot on the landscape" refers to something, such as a building, structure, or feature, that is considered unattractive or out of place in an otherwise beautiful or natural environment. It suggests that the presence of this element negatively affects the overall aesthetic or harmony of the surrounding scenery.
  • on board The idiom "on board" means to be in agreement or willing to participate in something. It can also refer to being physically or mentally present and ready to take part in an activity or project.
  • be firing on all cylinders The idiom "be firing on all cylinders" means to be functioning or performing at maximum capacity and efficiency. It refers to a state where all aspects or components of a system or person are working together harmoniously and effectively.
  • put flesh on (the bones of) sth The idiom "put flesh on (the bones of) something" means to add more details or substance to a vague or basic idea, concept, plan, or proposal. It refers to elaborating or providing more in-depth information to enhance the understanding or clarity of something that initially lacked details or specifics. It can also imply giving life or making something more realistic, complete, or substantial.
  • have both feet on the ground, at have/keep your feet on the ground To have both feet on the ground or to have/keep your feet on the ground means to be realistic, practical, and sensible in one's thinking or approach to life. It refers to a person's ability to stay grounded, maintain a realistic perspective, and not get carried away by fantasies or impractical ideas. It emphasizes the importance of being down-to-earth and having a practical understanding of one's abilities, limitations, and the realities of the situation at hand.
  • be on the lowest/bottom rung of the ladder The idiom "be on the lowest/bottom rung of the ladder" refers to being in the lowest or least important position within a particular hierarchy or organization. It implies having little power, influence, or advancement opportunities. It is often used to describe someone at the beginning of their career or someone who is at the bottom of the social or professional ladder.
  • be on the point of (doing) sth The idiom "be on the point of (doing) something" means to be very close or about to do something. It implies that the action is imminent or about to happen in the near future. It often describes a situation where someone is ready or prepared to take action or make a decision.
  • do a number on sb To "do a number on someone" is an idiomatic expression that means to harm or have a significant negative impact on someone, either physically, emotionally, or psychologically. It suggests inflicting damage, causing distress, or causing someone to be affected in a negative way.
  • give sb a box on the ears, at box sb's ears The idiom "give someone a box on the ears" or "boxing someone's ears" refers to physically striking someone's ears with a forceful blow using open palms or fists. This action is often employed as a form of punishment or to reprimand someone for their behavior, using the ears as a target.
  • have sth on the brain The idiom "have something on the brain" means to constantly think or obsess about something. It refers to having a particular subject or thought dominating one's mind, occupying a significant amount of thought or attention.
  • put the brakes on, at put a brake on The idiom "put the brakes on" or "put a brake on" refers to the act of slowing down or stopping the progress or momentum of something. It means to take measures to halt or limit a particular activity, process, or situation. This idiom often implies the need for caution, control, or moderation in order to prevent negative consequences or excessive speed.
  • jam on the brakes The idiom "jam on the brakes" refers to the sudden application of brakes, usually in a vehicle or any moving object, with full force and urgency in order to make a sudden stop or avoid a potential accident or collision.
  • with (brass) knobs on The idiom "with (brass) knobs on" is a figurative expression used to emphasize that something already good or desirable is made even better or more elaborate. It suggests the addition of extra decorative features or enhancements that enhance the appeal or value of an object, idea, or situation. The phrase implies an excessive or ostentatious embellishment.
  • put on a brave face The idiom "put on a brave face" means to hide one's true feelings or fears behind a facade of strength or courage, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It is often used to describe an individual who tries to appear brave, confident, or unaffected even when they may be feeling scared, anxious, or overwhelmed.
  • put a brave face on it, at put on a brave face The idiom "put a brave face on it" or "put on a brave face" means to conceal one's true feelings or fears and act in a courageous or confident manner, especially in a challenging or difficult situation. It involves presenting a strong or positive outward appearance despite feeling scared, worried, or uncertain on the inside. It often signifies making an effort to mask vulnerability or maintain composure in the face of adversity.
  • land on your feet The idiom "land on your feet" means to quickly recover from a difficult, challenging, or unexpected situation, often by finding success or stability. It implies the ability to adapt, find opportunities, and successfully navigate through adversity.
  • be back on your feet The idiom "be back on your feet" means to recover after a setback or difficult period, regain one's strength, and return to a normal or successful state or condition, often referring to physical, emotional, or financial wellbeing.
  • fall/land on your feet The idiom "fall/land on your feet" means to recover quickly from a difficult or challenging situation and to come out of it successfully. It implies the ability to adapt, persevere, and achieve a positive outcome despite adversity or setbacks.
  • be dead on your feet The idiom "be dead on your feet" means to be extremely exhausted or tired, to the point that one can barely remain standing or functioning. It implies a severe lack of energy or physical stamina.
  • have/keep your feet on the ground The idiom "have/keep your feet on the ground" means to remain practical, realistic, and level-headed in thinking and behavior, not allowing oneself to be overly influenced by emotions, fantasies, or unrealistic expectations. It suggests staying grounded and maintaining a sense of perspective and practicality in various aspects of life.
  • on/from the sidelines The idiom "on/from the sidelines" refers to observing or being uninvolved in a particular situation or activity, often from a position of limited influence or participation. It implies that the person is not directly involved but is watching or commenting on events from a distance.
  • pull the other leg/one (it's got bells on)! The idiom "pull the other leg/one (it's got bells on)!" is often used as a sarcastic response to express disbelief or skepticism towards something someone has said. It implies that the speaker believes the statement to be false or highly unlikely. It can be interpreted as a dismissive way of saying "I don't believe you" or "You must be joking." The phrase "it's got bells on" is added to further emphasize the incredulity of the statement.
  • the heat is on The idiom "the heat is on" refers to a situation where pressure or intense scrutiny is applied, usually in reference to a high-stress or critical circumstance. It signifies that someone is being closely monitored, challenged, or facing a difficult task that requires their full attention and effort.
  • the joke is on sb The idiom "the joke is on sb" implies that someone is being fooled, made fun of, or taken advantage of in a situation where they were expecting to joke or play a prank on others. It suggests that the person being targeted has become the subject or victim of the joke instead.
  • get it on The idiom "get it on" typically refers to engaging in sexual activity or intimacy. It can also mean to initiate or start something, often in a passionate or energetic manner.
  • pile it on The idiom "pile it on" means to add or apply something excessively or disproportionately, usually referring to criticism, pressure, or work. It can also be used to describe overwhelming someone with excessive praise or flattery.
  • on its last legs The idiom "on its last legs" means that something or someone is in a very weak, deteriorating, or failing state, close to the end or about to fail completely.
  • leave your/its mark on sb/sth The idiom "leave your/its mark on someone/something" means to have a lasting, significant impact or influence on a person, object, situation, or place. It refers to the idea of making a noticeable impression or leaving behind a distinct legacy.
  • go a bundle on sth The idiom "go a bundle on sth" means to have a strong preference or enthusiasm for something, often to the point of being obsessive or excessive about it. It implies a great amount of interest, dedication, or investment in a particular activity, hobby, or object.
  • have your business, sensible, etc. head on The idiom "have your business, sensible, etc. head on" means to approach a situation or task with a practical, rational, or level-headed mindset. It implies being focused, attentive, and prepared to make sound decisions or judgments. It suggests using logical thinking and common sense instead of relying purely on emotions or whims.
  • right on the button The idiom "right on the button" means something is done or said at the precise or exact moment, or with great accuracy and precision. It implies being exactly correct or on time.
  • on the one hand ... on the other hand The idiom "on the one hand ... on the other hand" is used to introduce two contrasting or opposing points of view or factors about a specific situation or topic. It signifies a balanced or fair consideration of multiple perspectives or arguments. It is often used when there are two conflicting opinions, options, or aspects to carefully evaluate before making a decision or forming an opinion.
  • could count sth on (the fingers of) one hand The idiom "could count something on (the fingers of) one hand" means that there is a very small number of something, usually less than five. It implies that the quantity being referred to is extremely limited or rare.
  • the icing on the cake The idiom "the icing on the cake" refers to something additional or extra that enhances or completes an already good situation or outcome. It represents a delightful or desirable finishing touch, similar to how icing enhances the appearance and taste of a cake.
  • the frosting on the cake, at the icing on the cake The idiom "the frosting/icing on the cake" is used to describe something that is an additional bonus or enhancement to an already good situation or outcome. It refers to the final touch or element that makes something even more delightful, satisfying, or perfect.
  • on call The idiom "on call" refers to the state of being available or ready to act or respond to a situation, especially in terms of work or medical emergencies. It typically implies being reachable or accessible to be summoned or needed at any given time.
  • (you can) depend on/upon it The idiom "(you can) depend on/upon it" means that something is reliable or trustworthy, and you can be assured that it will happen or be true. It conveys a sense of certainty and assurance in the statement or promise being made.
  • what's on The definition of the idiom "what's on" is to inquire about what events or activities are currently happening or scheduled to take place, usually in reference to movies, shows, concerts, or other entertainment options.
  • money doesn't grow on trees The idiom "money doesn't grow on trees" means that money is not easily or readily available and must be earned through hard work and effort. It emphasizes the idea that money is finite and must be valued rather than seen as something that is abundant or easily obtained.
  • on the go The idiom "on the go" refers to being busy, active, or constantly moving or involved in various activities or tasks.
  • on the fly The idiom "on the fly" means to do something quickly or spontaneously, typically without prior planning or preparation. It refers to performing a task or making a decision in real-time or on the spot, often in a fast-paced or dynamic situation.
  • on the dot The idiom "on the dot" means to do something or be somewhere exactly at the arranged or specified time, without being late or early.
  • on the hoof The idiom "on the hoof" refers to something that is done or decided quickly, without much thought or preparation. It can also refer to something that is happening in real-time or on the spot. The phrase originally comes from the practice of buying livestock while still alive, inspecting them while they are on their feet (hooves) before making a purchase.
  • on the nod The idiom "on the nod" typically refers to the act of agreeing or giving approval without much thought or consideration. It can also mean receiving something, such as a prize or award, due to favoritism or without deserving it.
  • on the nose The idiom "on the nose" has multiple interpretations, depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To be exact or precise: When something is "on the nose," it means it is exactly as expected or predicted, without any variation or deviation. It can refer to hitting a target accurately, being punctual, or meeting expectations precisely. Example: The weather forecast predicted rain at 2 pm, and sure enough, it started pouring on the nose at exactly 2 pm. 2. To be too obvious or on-the-nose: In this context, "on the nose" means something is excessively direct, lacking subtlety or nuance. It can refer to a statement, artwork, or any form of communication
  • to hand, at on hand The idiom "to hand" or "at hand" is used to refer to something that is easily accessible or available in a particular situation or location. It implies that the object or information is within reach, nearby, or ready to be used when needed.
  • be in the cards, at be on the cards The idiom "be in the cards" or "be on the cards" means that something is likely or possible to happen in the future. It suggests that there is a reasonable chance or probability of a specific event or outcome occurring. This idiom originates from the practice of fortune-telling or divination using playing cards, in which the cards are used to predict and indicate potential events or situations.
  • you're on! The idiom "you're on!" typically means that someone has accepted a challenge or a proposition. It signifies agreement to participate in an activity or competition, often in an enthusiastic or competitive manner.
  • good on you!, at good for you! The idiom "good on you!" or "good for you!" is a phrase used to express approval, admiration, or commendation towards someone for their actions, achievements, or choices. It is often used to show encouragement or support for someone's positive efforts or accomplishments.
  • on your bike! The idiom "on your bike!" is an informal and somewhat rude way to tell someone to go away or leave. It is often used dismissively to express a lack of interest or annoyance with someone's presence or actions.
  • get/keep a grip on yourself The idiom "get/keep a grip on yourself" means to regain or maintain control over one's emotions or behavior, especially in difficult or chaotic situations. It implies the need to stay calm, composed, and rational.
  • get on sb's case The idiom "get on someone's case" means to constantly criticize, nag, or hassle someone about something. It implies being in someone's face, often pointing out their faults or mistakes and generally giving them a hard time.
  • like a cat on hot bricks, at like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "like a cat on hot bricks" typically means someone who is very nervous, restless, or agitated, unable to sit still or relax. Similarly, the idiom "like a cat on a hot tin roof" also describes someone who is highly anxious, fidgety, or ill at ease. Both expressions draw a parallel between the uneasy behavior of a cat on a hot surface and someone who is unable to find calm or comfort in a given situation.
  • be/get in on the ground floor The idiom "be/get in on the ground floor" refers to being involved or starting something at its early stages or inception. It often implies having the advantage of being part of a new opportunity or venture from the beginning, which could potentially lead to greater benefits, success, or influence in the future.
  • catch sb on the hop The idiom "catch someone on the hop" means to surprise or catch someone off guard, typically by catching them unaware or unprepared for a particular situation.
  • on your last legs The idiom "on your last legs" generally means to be in very poor or deteriorating condition, often referring to someone or something that is physically worn out, exhausted, or near the point of collapse or failure.
  • go off on one The idiom "go off on one" means to become very angry or lose control emotionally or verbally, expressing strong feelings, frustration, or anger in an unrestrained or excessive manner.
  • on no account The idiom "on no account" means under no circumstances or in no situation should something be done. It emphasizes that there are absolutely no exceptions or conditions where the action specified is acceptable.
  • put on the dog The idiom "put on the dog" means to dress or behave in an extravagant or showy manner, particularly to create an impression of sophistication, high status, or luxury.
  • put a brake on The idiom "put a brake on" means to slow down or control something, often to prevent it from progressing or escalating further. It refers to the act of using brakes on a vehicle to reduce its speed or bring it to a halt. In a figurative sense, it suggests applying restraint or imposing limitations on a particular activity, behavior, or situation.
  • put a figure on it The idiom "put a figure on it" means to assign a specific numerical value or provide a specific estimate for something that was previously uncertain or unclear. It is often used when discussing financial matters, budgeting, or quantifying a particular situation.
  • put one over on sb The idiom "put one over on someone" means to deceive or trick someone in a cunning or sly manner, usually to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome for oneself.
  • put a gloss on sth The idiom "put a gloss on something" means to give a positive or favorable interpretation or presentation of something, often to make it appear better or more appealing than it actually is. It involves providing a superficial or deceptive explanation to hide the true nature or shortcomings of a situation or thing.
  • put the heat on sb The idiom "put the heat on someone" means to apply pressure or intensity to someone in order to make them feel uncomfortable, stressed, or compelled to do something. It usually implies a demanding or challenging situation where someone is being urged or scrutinized with a sense of urgency.
  • put the lid on sth The idiom "put the lid on something" means to apply a final or decisive action to bring an end to something, to prevent further developments, or to keep a secret from being revealed. It is often used to convey the idea of closing or sealing off a situation or issue.
  • put sb on a pedestal The idiom "put sb on a pedestal" means to greatly admire or idealize someone, often to the point of considering them perfect or infallible. It suggests the act of elevating someone's status or attributes to an unrealistic or exaggerated level.
  • put your finger on sth The idiom "put your finger on something" means to accurately identify or discover the exact cause, reason, or solution for something. It refers to the ability to pinpoint or clearly identify a specific issue or aspect.
  • put the finishing touches on, at put the finishing touches to The idiom "put the finishing touches on" or "put the finishing touches to" means to make final adjustments, modifications, or improvements to something in order to complete it or make it perfect. It denotes the act of adding final details or refinements to bring a task or project to its desired state of completion or excellence.
  • put/lay sth on the line To put/lay something on the line means to risk something valuable or important in order to achieve a desired outcome, or to be willing to face the consequences of one's actions. It often implies taking a bold or courageous stance, and being willing to give up something significant in pursuit of a goal.
  • put sth/sb on the map The idiom "put something/someone on the map" means to make someone or something famous, widely recognized, or important. It refers to the act of bringing attention, recognition, or prestige to a person, place, or thing that was previously relatively unknown or insignificant.
  • put your neck on the line The idiom "put your neck on the line" means to put oneself at risk or in a vulnerable position by doing something that may have negative consequences or be met with criticism or opposition. It implies taking a bold or courageous stance despite the potential dangers or consequences involved.
  • put (your) money on sb/sth The idiom "put (your) money on sb/sth" means to bet or wager on someone or something, typically expressing confidence or belief in their success or ability to perform well. It can also imply investing time, resources, or support in a person or thing with the expectation of favorable results.
  • that'll put hairs on your chest! The idiom "that'll put hairs on your chest!" is a colloquial expression used to describe something that is believed to have the potential to make a person braver, stronger, tougher, or more resilient. It implies that whatever experience or action is being referred to will have a significant impact or challenge that can develop a person's character or make them more courageous.
  • get/lay/put your hands on sb The idiom "get/lay/put your hands on somebody" means to physically find, locate, or make contact with a person, often with the intention of confronting, attacking, or engaging with them. It can be used both literally and figuratively, depending on the context.
  • get/lay/put your hands on sth The idiom "get/lay/put your hands on sth" means to find or obtain something, especially something that is difficult to locate or acquire. It suggests actively searching or reaching out to obtain the desired object or item.
  • be/go out on the tiles The idiom "be/go out on the tiles" typically refers to someone going out for a night of socializing, partying, or enjoying a lively and spirited time outside of their home. It often implies engaging in activities such as clubbing, visiting bars, or attending social events with friends or colleagues.
  • have sth on your hands The idiom "have something on your hands" means to have a problem, responsibility, or task that requires one's attention or action. It implies that a person is dealing with a difficult or challenging situation that needs to be addressed or resolved.
  • lay it on with a trowel, at lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on with a trowel" or "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, typically for dramatic effect or to emphasize a point. It implies that someone is presenting information, compliments, or flattery in an excessively embellished and insincere manner. It suggests an over-the-top expression that may seem exaggerated or unbelievable.
  • give/hand sth to sb on a plate The idiom "give/hand something to someone on a plate" means to provide or offer something to someone very easily or without much effort on their part. It implies that the person receiving it did not have to work for or strive for it. It is often used to express the idea that something was given or provided too easily, without any challenge or opportunity for personal growth or achievement.
  • be knocking (on) 60, 70, etc. The idiom "be knocking (on) 60, 70, etc." is an expression used to describe someone who is approaching or about to reach a particular age. It implies that the person is close to turning the specified age, suggesting that they are in their late fifties, sixties, seventies, or so on. For example, if someone says, "She's knocking on 60," they mean that the person is almost 60 years old or is in their late fifties.
  • pull a gun, knife, etc. on sb The idiom "pull a gun, knife, etc. on someone" means to physically brandish or draw a firearm, knife, or any other weapon in a threatening or aggressive manner towards another person. It suggests the intention to harm, intimidate, or force the other person into compliance through the display of a weapon.
  • jump/climb/get on the bandwagon The idiom "jump/climb/get on the bandwagon" refers to the act of supporting or joining a cause or trend that is currently popular or gaining momentum. It implies that an individual is aligning themselves with the majority or the perceived winning side.
  • have/keep your eye on the clock, at be watching the clock The idiom "have/keep your eye on the clock" or "be watching the clock" means to continuously or frequently check the time or the clock, typically due to being eagerly or anxiously waiting for a certain event or deadline. It implies that the person is aware of the passing time and is actively focused on when something is expected to happen or end.
  • a cloud on the horizon The idiom "a cloud on the horizon" refers to a potential problem or difficulty that is anticipated or expected in the future. It implies a situation that may potentially cause trouble or disruptions, similar to how a cloud on the horizon can indicate an incoming storm.
  • come/follow hard/hot on the heels of sth The idiom "come/follow hard/hot on the heels of something" means to quickly follow or occur immediately after something, often implying that the events or actions are closely related or interconnected. It suggests a rapid succession or tight sequence of events.
  • be walking/floating on air The idiom "be walking/floating on air" means to have an overwhelming feeling of happiness, elation, or extreme satisfaction. It describes a state of being so joyful or content that it feels as if one is elevated or weightless, as if walking or floating without touching the ground.
  • have a corner on a market The idiom "have a corner on a market" refers to the situation when a person or business has exclusive control or monopoly over a particular product, service, or industry. It means they have secured a dominant position in the market, giving them significant influence or power over pricing, supply, and competition.
  • on/at every corner The idiom "on/at every corner" typically means that something is very common or frequently encountered, happening or appearing everywhere. It indicates that something is easily found or easily accessible in various locations or situations.
  • be on a collision course The idiom "be on a collision course" means that two individuals, groups, or things are heading towards a conflict or direct confrontation. It implies that their paths are set to intersect in a potentially harmful or destructive manner.
  • the curtain falls on sth The idiom "the curtain falls on sth" refers to the conclusion or end of something, typically an event or a period of time. It is often used metaphorically, drawing from the idea of a theater performance where the curtain is lowered to signal the end of the show.
  • on/about your person The idiom "on/about your person" refers to something that is physically present and carried with you. It implies belongings or objects that are currently in your immediate possession, typically such items that are on your body or within reach.
  • be on the right lines The idiom "be on the right lines" means to be on the correct or accurate path or approach towards achieving a goal or finding a solution. It implies that the person or group is making progress in the right direction.
  • on everyone's lips The idiom "on everyone's lips" is used to describe something that is widely discussed or talked about by many people. It refers to a topic, event, rumor, or news that has captured the attention and interest of a large group or the general public.
  • dance attendance on sb The idiom "dance attendance on sb" means to serve or obey someone diligently and attentively, often to the point of being excessive or obsequious. It implies a submissive or subservient attitude towards the person being attended to, as if constantly anticipating their needs and desires.
  • fall on deaf ears The idiom "fall on deaf ears" means when someone's words, advice, or plea are ignored or disregarded by others, typically because the audience is unresponsive or uninterested.
  • hang/hold on like grim death The idiom "hang/hold on like grim death" means to hold onto something tightly and desperately, often in a situation where one's life or survival is at stake. It implies a strong determination to not let go or give up, even in the face of extreme difficulty or danger.
  • on all fours The idiom "on all fours" means to be on hands and knees, typically used to describe someone or something that is crawling or creeping on the ground. It can also be used figuratively to suggest being in a position of subservience or vulnerability.
  • be on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "be on the horns of a dilemma" means to be faced with a difficult choice between two equally undesirable options or outcomes. It refers to being caught between a "rock and a hard place" or being in a predicament where any decision leads to a negative consequence.
  • fortune smiles on sb The idiom "fortune smiles on someone" means that good luck or favorable circumstances are benefiting or favoring that person. It implies that the person is experiencing a fortunate or prosperous period in their life.
  • on the rocks The idiom "on the rocks" typically means that something, often a relationship or a business, is experiencing difficulty or is in a troubled state. It suggests that problems or challenges have arisen, possibly leading to a potential downfall or breakup.
  • pin your hopes on sth/sb The idiom "pin your hopes on something/somebody" means to rely heavily or exclusively on something or someone for achieving a desired outcome or goal. It implies putting all of one's expectations, aspirations, or confidence in a particular thing or person. It often indicates a strong belief that the chosen thing or person will bring success or solve a problem.
  • it's swings and roundabouts, at what you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts The idiom "it's swings and roundabouts, at what you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts" is an expression used to describe a situation where the advantages and disadvantages are balanced, or where gains and losses are at an equilibrium. It implies that the outcome or result remains essentially the same, despite changes or trade-offs. It suggests that what is lost in one aspect or situation is compensated by a gain in another, thereby bringing a sense of equilibrium or balance overall.
  • do the dirty on sb The idiom "do the dirty on sb" means to betray or deceive someone, often in a sneaky or underhanded manner. It refers to engaging in dishonest or disloyal actions towards another person.
  • on the ropes The idiom "on the ropes" refers to someone or something being in a state of difficulty, weakness, or near defeat. It originated from the sport of boxing, where a boxer who is on the ropes is trapped against the ring ropes, vulnerable to their opponent's attacks and potentially close to being knocked out. In a broader context, it describes a person or situation that is struggling, under pressure, or on the verge of failure.
  • the smart money is on/says... The idiom "the smart money is on/says..." refers to a situation where knowledgeable or astute individuals are confident about a certain outcome or scenario. It implies that those who possess inside information or expertise believe something is highly likely to happen or be successful.
  • hard/hot on sb's heels The idiom "hard/hot on someone's heels" means to closely follow or pursue someone, usually with the intention of catching or closely observing them. It implies that someone is in close pursuit or tracking someone else's actions or progress.
  • be on the road to sth The idiom "be on the road to sth" typically means to be making progress or advancing towards a particular goal, destination, or outcome. It implies that someone or something is moving in the right direction and is likely to achieve the desired result. It suggests a sense of development, improvement, or success in a certain endeavor.
  • hit the nail on the head The idiom "hit the nail on the head" means to accurately or precisely describe or identify a problem, situation, or point. It suggests that someone has successfully pinpointed the main issue or gotten to the core of the matter.
  • the knock at/on the door The idiom "the knock at/on the door" typically refers to an unexpected or sudden event or situation that disrupts one's peace, tranquility, or normalcy. It often signifies an unwelcome or disruptive change, bringing potential problems or challenges.
  • at/on the double The idiom "at/on the double" means to hurry up or move quickly, typically in response to a command or urgent situation. It implies a sense of urgency and the need to act with speed and efficiency.
  • lie down on the job The idiom "lie down on the job" means to fail to do one's work or duties properly, or to be lazy and not fulfill one's responsibilities.
  • be a drag on sb/sth The idiom "be a drag on sb/sth" means to be a burden or hindrance to someone or something, causing them to slow down or become less successful. It implies that one's presence or actions are negatively affecting the progress, efficiency, or enjoyment of another person or situation.
  • that's a new one on me. The idiom "that's a new one on me" is used to express surprise or astonishment at something unknown or previously unheard of. It is often used when someone encounters a new or unusual situation, idea, or information that they had never encountered before. It conveys the idea of being unfamiliar with something or being caught off-guard.
  • harm a hair on sb's head The idiom "harm a hair on someone's head" means to cause any harm or injury to someone, usually emphasizing that one will protect them and ensure their safety. It is often used to convey the speaker's strong determination to prevent any harm from occurring to the person mentioned.
  • have nothing on sb or sth The idiom "have nothing on someone or something" means to have no evidence or information that incriminates or proves wrongdoing or guilt against a person or thing. It implies that there is no valid reason to accuse or criticize the subject.
  • easy on the eye/ear The idiom "easy on the eye/ear" is used to describe something or someone that is visually or audibly pleasing, attractive, or pleasant to look at or listen to. It suggests that the person or thing being described has a pleasing appearance or sound that is easy and enjoyable to experience.
  • like nothing (else) on earth The idiom "like nothing (else) on earth" means that something is extremely unique, extraordinary, or exceptional in comparison to anything else in existence. It emphasizes the incomparability or unparalleled nature of a person, thing, or experience.
  • hell on earth The idiom "hell on earth" is used to describe a situation or place that is extremely unpleasant, unbearable, or chaotic. It implies that the environment or circumstances resemble the torturous and tormenting conditions associated with hell. It expresses the idea of extreme suffering or turmoil.
  • like nothing on Earth The idiom "like nothing on Earth" is used to describe something or someone that is extraordinary, unique, or utterly incomparable to anything else. It emphasizes the unparalleled nature or quality of an object, experience, or individual.
  • on a razor edge The idiom "on a razor edge" means being in a very delicate or precarious situation, where even the slightest misstep or error could have severe or disastrous consequences. It implies a high level of risk or tension in a particular situation.
  • teeter on the brink/edge of sth The idiom "teeter on the brink/edge of something" means to be on the verge of a critical situation or a significant change, often with potential negative consequences. It implies being in a precarious position, where a small shift or mistake could lead to a dangerous or irreversible outcome.
  • egg on sb's face The idiom "egg on someone's face" means to cause someone to feel embarrassed, foolish, or humiliated due to their own actions, mistakes, or statements. It suggests that the individual has said or done something that has resulted in public embarrassment or a loss of credibility.
  • be at/on the receiving end The idiom "be at/on the receiving end" means to be the target or recipient of something, often referring to negative actions, treatment, or consequences. It implies being in a position where one is directly affected by the actions or words of others.
  • be etched on/in sb's memory The idiom "be etched on/in sb's memory" means that something, usually an event or experience, is firmly and indelibly imprinted in someone's mind, making it impossible to forget. It implies that the memory is vivid, lasting, and deeply ingrained.
  • on an even keel The idiom "on an even keel" means to be in a balanced or stable state, particularly in regard to emotions or circumstances. It suggests that a person, situation, or event is stable, steady, or in a state of equilibrium.
  • all eyes are on sb/sth The idiom "all eyes are on sb/sth" means that everyone is paying attention to or watching someone or something closely. It implies that the person or thing being observed is the center of attention or focus of a particular situation.
  • have your eye on sth To "have your eye on something" means to be interested in or focused on a particular thing or goal, often with the intention or desire of obtaining it or achieving it in the future. It suggests that you are actively paying attention to or watching something with a keen interest or desire.
  • keep your/an eye on sth/sb The idiom "keep your/an eye on something/somebody" means to monitor or watch something/somebody closely and attentively. It implies maintaining careful observation or staying alert to any changes, potential problems, or developments related to the subject at hand.
  • keep your eye on the ball The idiom "keep your eye on the ball" means to stay focused and attentive, especially in a situation that requires concentration or careful observation. It is often used metaphorically to remind someone to pay attention to what is important, avoid distractions, and remain focused on their goals or objectives.
  • eyes out on stalks The idiom "eyes out on stalks" refers to someone's eyes appearing wide open and protruding outwards due to astonishment, surprise, or shock. It typically indicates that someone is extremely amazed or captivated by something they have seen or heard.
  • feast your eyes on sth/sb The idiom "feast your eyes on sth/sb" means to enjoy or take great pleasure in looking at something or someone with delight and admiration. It suggests indulging in the visual pleasing aspect of something, appreciating its beauty or attractiveness.
  • on the face of it The idiom "on the face of it" means that when something is initially considered or observed, it appears a certain way or suggests a particular conclusion. However, upon further examination or analysis, the situation or outcome might be different or more complex than it initially seemed.
  • be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" means that something is extremely obvious or evident, to the point that it cannot be ignored or disputed. It refers to something that is so clearly and undeniably visible, just like the nose on a person's face, that no further explanation or analysis is necessary.
  • fall on stony ground The idiom "fall on stony ground" is used to describe an idea, suggestion, or plan that is met with resistance, lack of interest, or indifference from others. It implies that the concept or proposal does not find any receptive or supportive audience.
  • on the back of an envelope The idiom "on the back of an envelope" refers to a rough and informal calculation or proposal that is improvised or hastily written down without much thought or consideration. It implies that the idea or solution is not well-developed or thoroughly planned. The phrase originated from the practice of quickly jotting down notes or calculations on the back of an envelope due to lack of paper or time.
  • make an impression on sb The idiom "make an impression on somebody" means to create a memorable or lasting effect on someone's thoughts, feelings, or opinions, usually through one's actions, behavior, or appearance. It implies leaving a significant impact or influencing the person's perception.
  • have your finger on the trigger The idiom "have your finger on the trigger" means to be ready to take immediate action or make a crucial decision when the time is right. It refers to being in a position of control or responsibility, particularly in situations that require quick and decisive action.
  • lay a finger on sb The idiom "lay a finger on someone" means to physically harm or touch someone, often used to convey a threat or a warning. It implies the act of taking aggressive action towards someone, potentially resulting in physical violence or confrontation.
  • have/keep your finger on the pulse The idiom "have/keep your finger on the pulse" means to stay actively aware of the current situation or to remain well-informed about ongoing developments in a particular area, situation, or field. It implies being knowledgeable and up-to-date in order to make informed decisions or judgments.
  • get on like a house on fire The idiom "get on like a house on fire" means to have an extremely friendly and harmonious relationship with someone. It implies that two or more people quickly and easily establish a strong bond and enjoy each other's company tremendously.
  • on the firing line, at in the firing line The idiom "on the firing line" or "in the firing line" typically refers to being in a position of vulnerability or danger, especially in a situation where one is subject to criticism, attack, or scrutiny. It alludes to the military concept of being in the line of fire during combat, where one is most exposed and at risk. In a broader sense, it can also imply being directly involved or responsible for dealing with a challenging or difficult task or situation.
  • keep a firm hand on sth To "keep a firm hand on something" means to maintain control or authority over a particular situation or group of people. It implies having a strong and determined approach in order to ensure things are done or managed properly, without allowing any disruptions or deviations. It often refers to the act of exercising strict control or supervision to maintain order and discipline.
  • on the factory floor "On the factory floor" is an idiomatic expression that refers to being present or actively involved in the day-to-day operations, processes, or work activities of a factory or manufacturing facility. It implies being directly engaged in hands-on tasks, interacting with workers, monitoring production, or overseeing operations at the ground level.
  • pat sb on the back The idiom "pat sb on the back" means to provide praise, recognition, or approval to someone for their achievements or efforts. It typically refers to offering positive feedback or encouragement to another person.
  • a pat on the back The idiom "a pat on the back" is used to describe recognition or praise for someone's achievements or efforts. It is a figurative way of acknowledging someone's success or job well done.
  • be (as) plain as a pikestaff, at be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as a pikestaff" or "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is extremely obvious or clear. It describes a situation or fact that is easily noticeable without any effort, just like the plainness of a pikestaff (a long, thick, and unadorned wooden staff) or the nose on someone's face, which is a prominent and unmistakable feature.
  • get a move on The idiom "get a move on" means to hurry up or start moving quickly. It is often used to urge someone to act faster or be more efficient in completing a task or reaching a destination.
  • get on sb's tits The phrase "get on someone's tits" is a British slang idiom that means to annoy or irritate someone. It is considered a vulgar expression, typically used in informal or colloquial contexts.
  • get on sb's goat, at get sb's goat The idiom "get on someone's goat" or "get someone's goat" means to irritate, annoy, or bother someone. It refers to a situation where something or someone has the ability to provoke or frustrate a person, causing them to become angry or upset.
  • get your own back (on sb) The idiom "get your own back (on sb)" is defined as seeking revenge or retaliating against someone who has wronged or harmed you in some way. It implies taking action to bring harm or justice to the person who has caused you suffering or inconvenience.
  • get a line on sb The idiom "get a line on someone" refers to the act of gathering information or obtaining knowledge about someone or something. It typically implies finding out more details, background, or potentially hidden aspects of a person's life, character, or activities.
  • get on sb's wick The idiom "get on someone's wick" means to annoy or irritate someone persistently. It refers to constantly bothering or agitating someone to the point where they become frustrated or angry.
  • get on your soapbox The idiom "get on your soapbox" refers to a situation when someone begins to express their opinion or viewpoint passionately and publicly, often in a forceful or argumentative manner. It typically implies that the person is taking a stand or advocating for a particular cause, often in an enthusiastic or self-righteous manner.
  • get on your high horse The idiom "get on your high horse" means to act in a haughty, self-righteous, or arrogant manner, often with a sense of superiority or moral authority. It refers to someone adopting an attitude of superiority and pompousness, as if sitting high on a horse, looking down on others.
  • get a jump on sb/sth The idiom "get a jump on sb/sth" means to gain an advantage or head start over someone or something. It refers to being ahead in terms of progress, preparation, or competition before others. This idiom often implies taking early action or getting an early start in order to have an advantageous position.
  • on one level...on another level The idiom "on one level...on another level" is used to express two contrasting perspectives or interpretations of a situation or idea. It implies that there are multiple layers or depths to something and that it can be viewed or understood in different ways. This idiom suggests that while something may appear a certain way on the surface or from one perspective, there is also an alternative or deeper understanding or interpretation to be considered.
  • go on record The idiom "go on record" means to officially state or express one's opinions, beliefs, or intentions in a public or permanent manner, typically for documentation or future reference. It implies that the statement being made is recorded and can be attributed to the person making it.
  • not go much on sth The idiom "not go much on something" means to not have a strong liking or preference for something. It implies not having a high regard or interest in a particular thing or activity.
  • on the ground The idiom "on the ground" typically refers to being physically present or actively involved in a particular situation or location. It implies being at the actual scene or site of events, rather than observing or participating from a distance. It can also suggest having a first-hand perspective or knowledge of a situation, allowing for a more accurate understanding or assessment.
  • keep your hair on "Keep your hair on" is an idiomatic expression used to advise someone to remain calm, composed, or not get overly agitated or impatient in a particular situation. It suggests that one should maintain their self-control or not become overly emotional or upset.
  • keep your hair on, at keep your shirt on The idiom "keep your hair on" (or "keep your shirt on") is an expression used to tell someone to stay calm, composed, or patient in a frustrating or intense situation. It's often used to discourage anger, impatience, or unnecessary panic and to encourage someone to maintain a cool and collected demeanor.
  • on hand The idiom "on hand" refers to something that is readily available or easily accessible. It means having something immediately at one's disposal or within reach when it is needed or required.
  • lay a hand on sb The idiom "lay a hand on someone" means to physically harm, attack, or make physical contact with someone in an aggressive or violent manner. It can also imply causing harm or mistreatment towards someone.
  • have a strop on The idiom "have a strop on" is primarily used in British English and it refers to a state of anger, frustration, or annoyance. When someone "has a strop on", they are often displaying their frustration or annoyance through their behavior, which can include sulking, throwing a tantrum, or acting in an irritable manner. It is similar to having a short fuse or being in a bad mood.
  • have sth on your plate The idiom "have something on your plate" means to have responsibilities, tasks, or problems that need your attention or need to be dealt with. It refers to having a busy or full schedule with various commitments or obligations.
  • have sth on your mind The idiom "have something on your mind" means to be preoccupied or deeply troubled by a particular thought or concern. It suggests that someone is constantly and persistently thinking about something, making it difficult for them to focus on other things or causing them emotional distress.
  • have it on the highest authority The idiom "have it on the highest authority" means to have information or knowledge that is considered to be extremely reliable, credible, or authoritative. It implies that the information has been confirmed or obtained from a trustworthy and influential source.
  • have your head screwed on (the right way) The idiom "have your head screwed on (the right way)" means to be practical, sensible, and rational in one's thinking or decision-making. It refers to someone who is level-headed, able to think clearly, and possesses good judgment.
  • knock sth on the head The idiom "knock something on the head" means to put an end to or stop doing something. It often refers to abandoning an idea, an action, or a plan, especially if it is deemed unfeasible, impractical, or undesirable.
  • on your own head be it The idiom "on your own head be it" is an expression used to indicate that the responsibility and consequences of an action someone has taken rests solely on that person. It serves as a warning or disclaimer that if someone proceeds with a particular decision or course of action, they will have to face the resulting outcomes or consequences without any assistance or support.
  • live high on/off the hog The idiom "live high on/off the hog" means to live in a luxurious or extravagant manner, enjoying a comfortable and affluent lifestyle. It refers to indulging in the best or most expensive things, similar to how the choicest and most desirable cuts of meat, such as pork chops, are found higher on the pig, while the lower cuts are considered less desirable.
  • on high The idiom "on high" typically refers to being in a position of power, authority, or influence, often associated with a higher level or position. It implies someone being at a superior or topmost position within a hierarchy or organization. It can also convey a spiritual or divine meaning, suggesting someone or something is in a higher realm or plane of existence.
  • on the horizon The idiom "on the horizon" generally refers to something that is expected or likely to happen in the near future. It implies that something is approaching or becoming visible, much like a boat or ship appearing on the horizon when observed from a distance. It can be used to describe upcoming events, projects, opportunities, or changes that are imminent or anticipated.
  • on the house The definition of the idiom "on the house" is to receive something for free, usually in the context of a complimentary item or service provided by a business or establishment.
  • live (on) in the memory The idiom "live (on) in the memory" means to be remembered or to remain in one's thoughts for a long time. It refers to something or someone that has left a lasting impression, creating a significant and memorable impact on someone's mind or in history.
  • on the inside The idiom "on the inside" typically refers to someone's true or inner thoughts, feelings, or motives that are not easily noticeable or apparent to others. It implies a hidden or undisclosed aspect of a person's character or intentions, often suggesting that someone may have a different perspective or disposition than what is outwardly portrayed.
  • keep on trucking The idiom "keep on trucking" means to persevere or continue moving forward, despite challenges or difficulties. It encourages individuals to maintain their efforts and determination in order to achieve their goals. The phrase originated from the trucking industry in the 1960s and became popularized through the counterculture movement, symbolizing a resilient and persistent attitude.
  • keep the lid on sth The idiom "keep the lid on something" means to maintain control or containment of a situation, usually something that is potentially explosive, troublesome, or controversial. It implies the act of preventing information or events from becoming widely known or escalating further. It can also refer to managing emotions, preventing an outbreak of violence, or avoiding the disclosure of undesirable or scandalous information.
  • look kindly on sb/sth The idiom "look kindly on sb/sth" means to have a favorable or positive opinion of someone or something. It implies being understanding, sympathetic, or approving towards a person or thing.
  • a rap on/over the knuckles The idiom "a rap on/over the knuckles" means a reprimand, criticism, or punishment for a mistake or wrongdoing, typically delivered in a stern or authoritative manner. It refers to the act of lightly hitting or tapping someone's knuckles as a form of discipline or admonishment.
  • rest on your laurels The idiom "rest on your laurels" means to remain satisfied or complacent with one's past achievements, often resulting in a lack of motivation or effort to continue improving or striving for success.
  • lay sth on the line The idiom "lay something on the line" means to be frank, honest, or sincere about something, especially when it involves a risk or potential consequences. It typically implies revealing or confessing something important and significant, often expressing an opinion, belief, or intention with complete honesty and without reservation. It can also refer to putting oneself at risk or offering something valuable in pursuit of a goal or objective.
  • a new lease on life, at a new lease of life The idiom "a new lease on life" or "a new lease of life" refers to a fresh start or opportunity given to someone, usually after a difficult or challenging period. It indicates a renewed vitality, enthusiasm, and hopefulness towards life and its possibilities. It suggests that someone has been given a second chance or a positive change that allows them to improve their situation or outlook.
  • leave sb on the sidelines, at leave sb standing To "leave someone on the sidelines" or "leave someone standing" means to exclude or disregard someone, leaving them without a chance to participate or be involved in something that they should be a part of. It implies that the person is being neglected or ignored while others are given the opportunity or attention they deserve.
  • lift the lid on sth, at blow/take the lid off sth The idiom "lift the lid on something" or "blow/take the lid off something" means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden, secret, or confidential. It signifies the act of uncovering or disclosing information or truths that were unknown or kept private.
  • not on your life! The idiom "not on your life!" is an emphatic way of rejecting or refusing something. It expresses a strong and absolute denial.
  • on the loose The idiom "on the loose" refers to someone or something that is not under control or free from confinement. It is commonly used to describe a person or an animal that is roaming or causing trouble freely.
  • the low man on the totem pole The idiom "the low man on the totem pole" refers to someone who holds the lowest status or authority in a particular group or organization. It symbolizes being at the bottom of a hierarchy or ranking system, often implying less influence, power, or importance compared to others.
  • be bad luck on sb The idiom "be bad luck on sb" means to bring misfortune or bad luck to someone. It suggests that being around a particular person or having them involved in a situation is believed to bring negative outcomes or unfortunate events.
  • be down on your luck The idiom "be down on your luck" means to be experiencing a period of misfortune or having a string of bad luck. It implies that someone is going through a difficult or unfortunate time in their life, usually due to circumstances beyond their control.
  • on sb's account The idiom "on sb's account" typically means that something is done or happens because of someone else's actions, behavior, or interests. It can also refer to an action being done for the benefit, sake, or responsibility of a particular person.
  • be on pins and needles The idiom "be on pins and needles" means to be extremely anxious, nervously waiting for something or someone, or in a state of extreme anticipation.
  • ring the changes (on) The idiom "ring the changes (on)" means to make a series of variations or alterations in something, typically to provide diversity or avoid monotony. It refers to the act of substituting or altering different elements or aspects of something in order to introduce novelty or variety.
  • on the record The idiom "on the record" refers to something that is officially documented, stated publicly, or recorded in an official manner. It typically implies that the information or statement is intended to be a lasting and formal representation of a person's words or actions.
  • rain on sb's parade The idiom "rain on someone's parade" means to spoil or ruin someone's plans, joy, or excitement through negative comments, criticism, or unfavorable circumstances.
  • man on! The definition of the idiom "man on!" is an exclamation used in team sports, usually soccer or basketball, to alert a player that an opponent is approaching or marking them closely, urging them to be aware and take action.
  • on the back of sth The idiom "on the back of something" typically means that something is based or reliant on a particular situation or event. It implies that the success or occurrence of one thing is directly related to or dependent on another thing.
  • on the back of sb/sth The idiom "on the back of sb/sth" is typically used to describe something that is achieved or accomplished as a result of someone or something else. It means that the success, progress, or advancement is directly influenced or facilitated by someone or something in a supportive role.
  • be on a hiding to nothing The idiom "be on a hiding to nothing" means to be engaged in a futile or hopeless task that is likely to end in failure or disappointment. It implies that no matter what efforts or actions are taken, the desired outcome is unlikely to be achieved.
  • make a/your mark (on sth) The idiom "make a/your mark (on sth)" means to leave a lasting and significant impact or impression on something, such as a situation, field, or endeavor. It signifies making a notable contribution or achieving recognition in a particular area.
  • stamped on sb's memory The idiom "stamped on sb's memory" refers to a vivid, memorable experience or event that leaves a lasting, strong impression on someone's mind. It suggests that the memory is deeply ingrained and unlikely to be forgotten.
  • be engraved on sb's memory/mind The idiom "be engraved on sb's memory/mind" refers to a deeply memorable experience or information that is firmly impressed or etched into someone's memory. It signifies that the event or knowledge is so impactful, significant, or emotionally intense that it remains vivid and unforgettable for a long time.
  • your mind is on sth The idiom "your mind is on something" means that a person is preoccupied or deeply engrossed in certain thoughts or concerns, often to the point of distraction. It suggests that their focus and attention are primarily directed towards a particular topic or issue, keeping them mentally occupied.
  • prey on sb's mind The idiom "prey on someone's mind" means that something is troubling or worrying someone continuously and is occupying their thoughts. It refers to a persistent and often intrusive concern or anxiety that consumes a person's mental focus.
  • on paper The idiom "on paper" generally refers to a situation or plan that seems good or promising when described or imagined, but does not necessarily guarantee success or effectiveness in reality. It implies that something may look good in theory or on a written document, but its actual outcome may be different once put into practice.
  • on target The idiom "on target" means to be accurate or correct in one's aim, goal, or prediction. It signifies that something or someone is hitting or reaching the intended objective or expectation.
  • on stream The idiom "on stream" typically means that something is being broadcasted or live-streamed, particularly referring to events or activities happening in real time online or on a digital platform.
  • on deposit The idiom "on deposit" refers to the act of placing money, valuables, or assets into a bank or financial institution for safekeeping, usually with the intention of earning interest or preserving its value.
  • on autopilot The idiom "on autopilot" refers to performing a task or activity without conscious effort or thought. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is doing something automatically, without needing to think too much about it, typically due to familiarity or repetition.
  • on the booze The idiom "on the booze" means to be drinking alcohol excessively or regularly, often to the point of being drunk. It implies a state of indulgence or dependency on alcohol.
  • on the bounce The idiom "on the bounce" typically means to be successful or achieving consecutive wins or successes in a row. It can refer to winning multiple games or competitions without a break, or accomplishing a series of tasks or goals with continuous success.
  • on the quiet The idiom "on the quiet" means to do something secretly or discreetly, without others knowing about it or without attracting attention.
  • out on a limb The idiom "out on a limb" means to be in a vulnerable or risky position, often due to taking a controversial or unpopular stance, or supporting an unconventional idea or viewpoint. It suggests being isolated or unsupported, similar to a person venturing out on a weak, unsupported branch of a tree.
  • on the part of sb/on sb's part The idiom "on the part of sb/on sb's part" refers to something that is done or said by a particular person. It highlights and acknowledges the actions, behavior, or responsibility of someone in a particular situation.
  • not be a patch on sth The idiom "not be a patch on sth" means that something is inferior or vastly inferior in comparison to another thing. It describes a situation where one thing cannot even come close to matching the quality, skill, or excellence of the other thing being referenced.
  • pile on the agony The idiom "pile on the agony" means to exaggerate or emphasize one's suffering or distress, often for dramatic effect or to seek sympathy or attention. It refers to adding more emotional or physical pain to an already difficult or painful situation.
  • pour scorn on sb/sth The idiom "pour scorn on sb/sth" means to criticize or ridicule someone or something heavily and publicly. It involves expressing contempt, disdain, or mockery towards the individual or object in question.
  • on the back burner The idiom "on the back burner" refers to something that is being temporarily postponed or not given immediate attention, often because other issues or tasks are prioritized over it.
  • not able to go on The idiom "not able to go on" generally refers to a situation where someone is unable to continue or proceed due to exhaustion, physical limitations, emotional distress, or significant challenges. It indicates that someone has reached their breaking point or is unable to continue with a particular task, journey, or endeavor.
  • abut on sth The idiom "abut on sth" means to be adjacent to something or to be bordering or touching something directly. It refers to two things or areas that share a common boundary or meet at a common point.
  • accidentally on purpose The idiom "accidentally on purpose" refers to when someone intentionally does something under the guise of it being accidental. It implies that the action was deliberate and intentionally planned, but the person pretends that it happened unintentionally.
  • accompany sm on a musical instrument The idiom "accompany someone on a musical instrument" refers to the act of playing an instrument in support or harmony with someone who is singing or playing another instrument, enhancing and complementing their performance.
  • accompany sm on a journey The idiom "accompany someone on a journey" refers to going along with or joining someone as they travel from one place to another. It implies providing company, support, or assistance to the person during the journey.
  • on account of sth The idiom "on account of something" is used to indicate that a particular event or action is occurring or has occurred as a result of a specific reason or cause. It is often used to explain why something has happened or is happening.
  • on no account must/should sb do sth The idiom "on no account must/should sb do sth" is used to emphasize that someone should absolutely not do something under any circumstances. It implies a strong warning or prohibition against a particular action.
  • on your own account The idiom "on your own account" refers to doing something for one's own personal benefit or interest, rather than for someone else or at their request. It implies acting independently and taking responsibility for one's actions or decisions.
  • on any account The idiom "on any account" means under no circumstances or for no reason whatsoever. It implies a very strong determination or refusal to allow something to happen regardless of any circumstance or motive.
  • on account The idiom "on account" typically means due to or because of a particular reason or circumstance. It can also refer to making partial payment for something, usually with the intention of settling the balance later.
  • on sm's account The idiom "on someone's account" typically means doing something specifically for the benefit or concern of someone else. It implies that the action is motivated by a sense of duty, responsibility, or loyalty towards that person.
  • be on full alert The idiom "be on full alert" means to be extremely attentive, vigilant, and ready for any potential danger, threat, or unexpected situation. It implies being alert and responsive at all times, without letting one's guard down.
  • redound on sm The idiom "redound on someone" means that the consequences or effects of something will ultimately affect or impact that person negatively.
  • reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks do fall The idiom "reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks do fall" means that those who are flexible and adaptable in their approach to life can overcome obstacles and challenges, while those who are rigid and unwilling to change may face failure or downfall. It emphasizes the importance of being resilient and open to change in order to survive and thrive in various situations.
  • reflect on sth The idiom "reflect on something" means to think deeply or carefully about something, often to gain understanding or insight into it. It involves taking the time to contemplate, ponder, or give thought to a particular subject or situation.
  • reflect on sb/sth The idiom "reflect on sb/sth" means to think deeply or carefully about someone or something. It involves the act of contemplating or pondering upon a person or a situation, often with the objective of gaining insight or understanding.
  • reflect credit (up)on sm or sth The idiom "reflect credit (upon) someone or something" means to bring honor, praise, or positive regard to a person or thing. It implies that the actions, achievements, or qualities of the individual or object are noteworthy and deserving of admiration.
  • reflect (back) (up)on sm or sth The idiom "reflect (back) (up)on sm or sth" means to think carefully and deeply about someone or something, often in a nostalgic or contemplative manner. It involves taking time to ponder or consider past events, experiences, or memories in order to gain insight or understanding.
  • in on the act The idiom "in on the act" means to participate in an activity or endeavor, especially in a way that shares or competes for attention or credit with others. It refers to someone joining an action, event, or opportunity as an active participant or contributor.
  • get in on the act The idiom "get in on the act" means to become involved in a situation or activity that is already underway or in progress, often for personal benefit or to gain an advantage. It refers to joining in on something that others are already participating in or taking advantage of.
  • act on The definition of the idiom "act on" is to take action based on or in response to something, such as advice, information, or instructions. It implies implementing or carrying out a course of action prompted by a particular stimulus or suggestion.
  • act (up)on sth To "act (up)on something" means to take action based on a specific idea, information, or suggestion. It implies that someone is using the provided information or idea as a basis for making decisions, solving problems, or implementing certain actions. It often suggests a prompt and decisive response to a given situation.
  • take action on sm or sth The idiom "take action on someone or something" means to actively and decisively do something in response to a particular person or situation. It implies that one is not simply observing or discussing the issue but is instead taking concrete steps to address it.
  • on active duty The idiom "on active duty" refers to the status of an individual who is currently serving or working in their assigned position or job. It is commonly used to describe military personnel who are actively engaged in service and ready to perform their duties at any given time.
  • register on sth The idiom "register on something" means to notice, become aware or take note of something, usually a piece of information or a fact. It implies that the information has been acknowledged or understood.
  • pass judgment on sb/sth To "pass judgment on someone or something" means to form an opinion or make a critical evaluation about them/it, often in a negative or disapproving manner. It implies making a decision or expressing a verdict about the person or thing in question.
  • sit in judgment (up)on sm or sth The idiom "sit in judgment (up)on someone or something" means to make a critical evaluation or judgment of someone or something, often while presiding over a situation or passing a verdict. It implies having authority or responsibility to decide the worth, value, or outcome of someone or something.
  • pass judgment (on sm or sth) The idiom "pass judgment (on someone or something)" means to form or express an opinion or critical assessment about someone or something, typically in a negative or evaluative way. It implies making a judgment without fully understanding the circumstances or having sufficient information, typically from a position of superiority or authority.
  • rein back on sm or sth The idiom "rein back on something or someone" means to reduce or restrict the amount, intensity, or control of something or someone. It is often used to describe the act of pulling back on the reins of a horse to instruct it to slow down or stop. In a figurative sense, it implies exercising restraint, holding back, or scaling down one's actions or involvement in a particular situation or limiting the extent or intensity of something.
  • keep a tight rein on sm or sth The idiom "keep a tight rein on someone or something" means to exercise strict control or close supervision over someone or something, often to prevent any unwanted actions, behavior, or outcomes. It derives from the imagery of holding the reins tightly while riding a horse, ensuring that it stays on track and doesn't stray.
  • relax one's hold on sm or sth The idiom "relax one's hold on someone or something" means to loosen or reduce one's firm grip, control, or influence over a person or a situation. It can also imply letting go of one's power or authority over something, allowing it to be less restrained or controlled.
  • reliance on sm or sth The idiom "reliance on someone or something" refers to the act of depending or counting on a person or thing for support, assistance, or fulfillment of one's needs or goals. It implies a level of trust and confidence in the reliability and availability of that person or thing.
  • have sb on a string The idiom "have someone on a string" refers to having complete control or dominance over someone and being able to manipulate or influence their actions or decisions. It implies that the person being controlled is following the lead or direction of another person without questioning or asserting their own independence.
  • have sm on the string The idiom "have someone on the string" typically means to have control or influence over someone, often with manipulative intentions. It suggests that someone is in a position to easily manipulate or control another person's actions, decisions, or emotions.
  • rely (up)on sm or sth The idiom "rely (up)on someone or something" means to depend on or trust someone or something for support, assistance, or a particular outcome. It implies that the person or thing being relied upon plays a crucial role in ensuring the success, reliability, or completion of a task, situation, or goal.
  • on your guard The idiom "on your guard" means to be watchful, cautious, and prepared for possible danger or harm, particularly when one is in a vulnerable or risky situation. It implies a state of being alert and ready to defend oneself or take necessary precautions.
  • remain on The idiom "remain on" refers to staying vigilant or alert, typically in a specific situation or job, without relaxing or letting one's guard down. It involves the idea of being attentive, present, and committed to a task or responsibility.
  • remark (up)on sm or sth The idiom "remark (up)on someone or something" refers to making a comment or expressing an opinion about someone or something. It involves the act of stating a thought or observation, typically in response to an event, situation, behavior, or a specific aspect. It can be positive, negative, or neutral but signifies sharing one's thoughts or reflections about a person or thing.
  • advance (up)on sm or sth The idiom "advance (up)on someone or something" means to move forward or approach someone or something in a deliberate or determined manner, typically in a way that suggests aggression or hostility. It can also imply making progress or moving closer to achieving a desired outcome or goal.
  • renege on sth The idiom "renege on something" means to fail to fulfill or go back on a promise, agreement, or commitment. It refers to breaking a previously made commitment or reneging on one's word.
  • advise sm on sm or sth The idiom "advise someone on someone or something" means to provide guidance, suggestions, or recommendations to someone regarding a specific person or a particular matter. It implies offering counsel, opinions, or expertise to assist the person in making decisions or dealing with specific issues.
  • report (up)on sm or sth The idiom "report (up)on someone or something" refers to providing information or updates on a person or a thing. It implies the act of delivering a detailed account, assessment, or evaluation of the individual or subject in question. It often involves conveying findings, observations, or conclusions to a higher authority or providing an official summary on a specific matter.
  • repose (up)on sth The idiom "repose (up)on sth" means to rely or depend on something for support or guidance. It suggests trusting in or finding comfort in a particular thing or concept.
  • stake one's reputation on sm or sth To "stake one's reputation on something" means to risk one's good standing or credibility by being confident in the success, truth, or outcome of a particular thing or situation. It implies that someone is so sure of their belief, opinion, or prediction that they are willing to put their reputation and credibility on the line as collateral. It signifies a high level of confidence and conviction in one's assertions.
  • like a house on fire The idiom "like a house on fire" is an expression used to describe something that is developing or progressing quickly and enthusiastically. It implies that the subject or activity is going exceptionally well or with great speed and intensity.
  • walk on stage and off again The idiom "walk on stage and off again" typically means to briefly appear or make a brief appearance in a situation or event, without having a significant impact or leaving a lasting impression. It implies a quick entrance and exit, often without carrying any significant meaning or purpose.
  • set one on feet The idiom "set one on their feet" means to provide support or assistance to someone, often in order to help them regain their financial stability, find employment, or recover from a difficult situation. It refers to helping someone become self-sufficient and independent again.
  • on again, off again The idiom "on again, off again" refers to a relationship or a situation that experiences periods of breaking up or discontinuation followed by reunions or reinitiation. It describes a relationship or situation that is characterized by frequent temporary separations or interruptions.
  • go on for an age The idiom "go on for an age" means to continue or persist for a long period of time, often longer than expected or desired. It implies that something is taking a considerable amount of time to conclude or reach its end.
  • on the/sb's agenda The idiom "on the/sb's agenda" means that something is planned to be discussed, addressed, or dealt with by a person or a group of people. It suggests that the particular item or topic is a priority and will be given attention and consideration.
  • rest on laurels The idiom "rest on laurels" means to be satisfied with past achievements or successes and to become complacent or stop making efforts to achieve more.
  • rest on The idiom "rest on" typically means to rely on or depend on something or someone for support or assistance. It can also refer to finding reassurance or comfort in someone or something.
  • rest (up)on sth To rest (up)on something is an idiom that means to depend on or rely heavily on something. It refers to a situation where the success or outcome of a certain task, decision, or event is determined by a particular factor or condition. It implies that the achievement or resolution of a matter hinges on the presence, support, or influence of a specific element.
  • agree (up)on sm or sth The idiom "agree (up)on sm or sth" means to reach a consensus or come to a mutual understanding on a particular topic, idea, or decision through discussion and negotiation. It entails finding common ground or accepting a specific proposal or viewpoint. The "up" in "agree upon" is sometimes omitted, but both variations convey the same idea of reaching agreement.
  • retire on sth The idiom "retire on something" typically means to live off or rely on a particular source of income or asset during one's retirement. It suggests that the mentioned income or asset is sufficient enough to sustain a person's financial needs and support their lifestyle after they stop working.
  • run aground (on sth) The idiom "run aground (on sth)" typically means to encounter an obstacle or difficulty that hinders progress or success. It originates from a nautical term, where a ship running aground refers to it getting stuck on a sandbar or shallow area of water, making it unable to move forward. Figuratively, it implies being unable to proceed due to an unforeseen problem or setback.
  • press on The definition of the idiom "press on" refers to continuing or carrying on with determination, perseverance, or urgency despite difficulties or challenges. It indicates the act of pushing forward and not giving up, regardless of obstacles.
  • put on airs To "put on airs" means to behave in a pretentious or haughty manner, exhibiting an attitude of superiority or exaggerated importance. It refers to someone acting in a way that suggests they are more affluent, knowledgeable, or influential than they actually are, attempting to impress or intimidate others.
  • on the air The idiom "on the air" refers to something being broadcasted or transmitted, typically through radio or television. It signifies that a program, show, or communication is currently being aired or available for public listening or viewing.
  • float on air The idiom "float on air" means to feel an incredible sense of happiness, joy, or elation. It is used to describe a feeling of being extremely happy or ecstatic.
  • dance on air The idiom "dance on air" typically means to experience extreme joy or happiness, often to an unrealistic level. It implies a feeling of euphoria or elation that is beyond normal human expectations or reality.
  • revenge oneself (up)on sm or sth The idiom "revenge oneself (up)on someone or something" means to take action to retaliate or seek retribution against someone or something that has caused harm or wronged you. It implies the desire for payback or vindication.
  • go on a binge The idiom "go on a binge" refers to indulging excessively or uncontrollably in a particular activity, typically one that is considered pleasurable but possibly harmful or excessive. It often refers to excessive consumption of alcohol, but can also be used to describe excessive indulgence in food, shopping, or other activities.
  • lean on sb/sth The idiom "lean on sb/sth" means to rely or depend heavily on someone or something for support, guidance, assistance, or emotional help. It implies seeking help or support from someone or something in challenging or difficult situations.
  • lean on sm The idiom "lean on someone" means to rely on or depend heavily on someone for support, assistance, or guidance during challenging or difficult times. It implies seeking emotional, moral, or practical assistance from someone you trust and can count on.
  • lean on sm or sth The idiom "lean on someone or something" means to rely on or depend on someone or something for support, help, or assistance. It often suggests seeking emotional or physical support during difficult times or relying on someone's expertise or resources.
  • lean back (on sm or sth) The idiom "lean back (on someone or something)" means to rely or depend on someone, usually for support or assistance, or to depend on something for help or relief. It can also refer to trusting in someone or something to handle a particular situation or task. It implies finding comfort, reassurance, or security in someone or something.
  • on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "on the horns of a dilemma" refers to being trapped between two equally difficult or unpleasant choices or alternatives, where neither option seems desirable, and making a decision becomes challenging.
  • horn in (on sb/sth) The idiom "horn in (on sb/sth)" means to intrude or impose oneself on someone or a situation, often without being invited or welcomed. It refers to interfering or interrupting in a way that can be seen as pushy or aggressive.
  • horn in (on sth) The phrase "horn in (on sth)" means to intrude or interrupt someone else's business or activity without being invited or welcome. It implies inserting oneself or interfering in a situation where one does not belong.
  • blot on the landscape The idiom "blot on the landscape" refers to something that is visually unpleasant or unattractive, often standing out in a negative way within its surroundings. It is often used to describe a building, structure, or any other element that is deemed to spoil or mar the natural beauty or aesthetic appeal of its environment.
  • be on full/red alert The idiom "be on full/red alert" means to be in a state of heightened readiness or vigilance, typically in response to an imminent threat or danger. It implies being fully prepared and alert to potential risks or emergencies.
  • on the alert (for sm or sth) The idiom "on the alert for someone or something" means to be watchful, attentive, or vigilant for the presence or occurrence of a specific person or thing. It implies being ready and prepared to respond or take action if necessary.
  • alight (up)on sm or sth The idiom "alight (up)on someone or something" means to suddenly discover or come across someone or something, typically by chance or accident. It implies finding an answer, solution, or idea unexpectedly.
  • Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil The idiom "Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil" means that if someone who is inexperienced or lacking in moral values is given authority or power, they will often misuse or abuse it, leading to negative consequences for themselves and others. It highlights the idea that sudden elevation can corrupt individuals who are unprepared for such responsibilities.
  • ride on the back of The idiom "ride on the back of" typically means to take advantage of someone or something for personal gain, often without offering anything in return. It implies using another's resources, efforts, or ideas to achieve one's own objectives, without contributing or acknowledging the source of assistance.
  • ride on coattails The idiom "ride on coattails" means to gain success or benefit from someone else's achievements or popularity without making any significant effort or contribution oneself. It refers to the idea of someone metaphorically holding onto the coattails of another person and using their influence or accomplishments to attain personal gain or recognition.
  • ride on The idiom "ride on" refers to the act of capitalizing on or taking advantage of a current situation or trend for personal gain or benefit. It implies using the momentum or success of something to further one's own goals or objectives.
  • ride herd on The idiom "ride herd on" means to monitor or supervise closely, often in a strict manner, in order to keep control over a situation or group of people. It originates from the cowboy culture, where a rancher would ride on horseback to manage a herd of cattle. Thus, "ride herd on" is typically used figuratively to describe someone who is closely watching or overseeing a situation or individuals.
  • If two ride on a horse, one must ride behind The idiom "If two ride on a horse, one must ride behind" means that in any partnership or group, someone must take a subordinate or secondary role. It implies that in any endeavor involving multiple individuals, there must be a clear leader or dominant person who takes charge while others follow or support.
  • ride herd on sb/sth The idiom "ride herd on someone or something" means to keep close watch or strict control over someone or something, often in a supervisory or authoritative role. It implies maintaining close oversight, directing, or supervising the actions, behavior, or progress of individuals or a group. This phrase is often used in informal or colloquial language.
  • ride herd on sm or sth The idiom "ride herd on someone or something" means to closely supervise or manage someone or something with strict control or oversight. It conveys the idea of asserting authority or keeping a watchful eye to maintain order or discipline. The term originated from the practice of cowboys or ranchers using horses to keep a vigilant watch over a herd of cattle and direct them in the desired direction.
  • Right on! The idiom "Right on!" is an expression used to show enthusiastic agreement or approval with something that has been said or done. It can also be used to show support or encouragement.
  • right on time The idiom "right on time" refers to something or someone being punctual or arriving at the expected or agreed-upon time. It implies that the person or thing is neither early nor late but arrives precisely when it is planned or required.
  • on the right track The idiom "on the right track" means that someone is making progress or taking the correct steps towards achieving a goal or finding a solution. It suggests that the person is doing something correctly and is moving in the right direction.
  • on heels The idiom "on heels" refers to being closely and immediately following someone or something. It suggests being in close pursuit or closely following the actions or movements of someone or something.
  • off on the right foot To start something in a positive or successful way.
  • keep on the right side of To "keep on the right side of" someone means to maintain a positive and friendly relationship with them, usually by acting in a way that does not upset or antagonize them. It involves demonstrating courteous and respectful behavior to avoid causing any trouble or conflict with the person in question.
  • keep on the right side The idiom "keep on the right side" generally means to maintain a positive or cooperative relationship with someone or to stay in their good graces. It implies being courteous, considerate, and respectful in order to avoid conflict or disagreement.
  • I'll get right on it The idiom "I'll get right on it" means that a person will immediately start working on or addressing a task or request. It conveys a sense of urgency and commitment to completing the task promptly.
  • have head screwed on right The idiom "have their head screwed on right" means to be intelligent, rational, and sensible in one's thinking and decision-making. It implies that someone has good judgment and a clear understanding of things. It is often used to describe someone who is level-headed, practical, and capable of making smart choices.
  • get right on The idiom "get right on" means to promptly or immediately start working on a task or project, without delay or hesitation. It implies a sense of urgency and dedication to completing the task as soon as possible.
  • get off on the right foot The idiom "get off on the right foot" means to start a project, relationship, or endeavor in a positive or favorable manner. It suggests that the initial steps or actions taken will influence the future success or outcome.
  • turn on its ear The idiom "turn on its ear" means to completely overturn or radically change a situation or established belief in a surprising or unexpected way. It implies a disruption or upheaval that defies conventional expectations or norms.
  • throw out on ear The idiom "throw out on ear" refers to forcefully or suddenly ejecting someone from a place or situation, typically without warning or mercy. It implies being dismissed or evicted in a humiliating or abrupt manner, leaving the person feeling shocked, disoriented, or rejected.
  • have half an ear on The idiom "have half an ear on" means to be partially paying attention or listening to something while also being engaged or occupied with another task or situation. It implies that the person is only giving partial attention to the conversation or activity at hand.
  • falls on deaf ears The idiom "falls on deaf ears" means that someone's words or advice are ignored or not listened to by others. It refers to a situation where one's message or plea is disregarded and does not have any impact or influence on the intended audience.
  • can on ear
  • be out on ear The idiom "be out on ear" means to be forcefully and abruptly dismissed or fired from a job or position. It implies being expelled or removed with no chance of return or reconciliation.
  • be easy on the ear The idiom "be easy on the ear" means that something, typically music or sounds, is pleasing or enjoyable to listen to. It refers to something that is melodious, harmonious, or pleasant in its auditory quality.
  • rip on sm
  • think the sun rises and sets on The idiom "think the sun rises and sets on someone" refers to someone who holds an exaggeratedly high opinion of another person, considering them to be of supreme importance or believing that they are perfection itself. This idiom expresses idolization and adoration towards someone, often overlooking any flaws or shortcomings they may have.
  • on the rise The idiom "on the rise" typically refers to something that is experiencing growth, increase, or becoming more popular, successful, or influential.
  • risk sth on sm or sth The idiom "risk something on someone or something" means to put oneself or something in a potentially dangerous or uncertain situation based on the expectation or belief in someone or something. It implies taking a chance or gambling on the outcome, often with the possibility of losing or experiencing negative consequences.
  • Who's on the phone? The idiom "Who's on the phone?" is not a common English idiom. It is a simple question typically asked when someone wants to know who is currently speaking or calling on the phone.
  • put neck on the line The idiom "put neck on the line" means to take a significant risk or make oneself vulnerable by willingly putting one's reputation, career, or personal safety at stake. It suggests that someone is willing to go to great lengths or take bold actions, potentially facing negative consequences, in order to achieve a goal or prove a point.
  • put life on the line The idiom "put life on the line" means to willingly risk one's life or take a great personal risk to achieve a particular goal or outcome. It implies a high level of dedication, commitment, or bravery in a dangerous or life-threatening situation.
  • put it on the line The idiom "put it on the line" means taking a risk or being willing to face the consequences of one's actions or opinions. It implies being open, honest, and straightforward in expressing one's views or taking decisive action, even if it involves potential challenges or negative outcomes.
  • on the line The idiom "on the line" typically means that something is at stake or in a critical or vulnerable position, where there is a significant risk or consequences involved. It can also refer to being directly responsible or accountable for something.
  • on the front line of The idiom "on the front line of" refers to being in a position of immediate and direct involvement or responsibility in a significant or challenging situation, often implying being on the forefront or in a high-risk position. It is often used metaphorically to describe individuals or organizations that are at the forefront of an important issue, facing the most difficult or dangerous aspects of it.
  • on the firing line The idiom "on the firing line" typically means being in a position where one faces intense criticism, scrutiny, or challenges. It refers to being under pressure or being held accountable for something. It can also describe being at the forefront of a situation or task where there is a high level of responsibility or risk.
  • line up on The idiom "line up on" means to align or side with someone or something, usually in support, agreement, or cooperation. It can refer to physically standing in a single file or figuratively referring to supporting or endorsing a particular stance or viewpoint.
  • line on
  • lay sm sweet lines on The idiom "lay some sweet lines on" means to speak or write in a charming and flattering manner, often with the intention of seducing or impressing someone. It refers to using persuasive or romantic words to capture someone's attention or affection.
  • lay it on the line To "lay it on the line" means to speak honestly and directly, without holding back or sugarcoating the truth. It implies being straightforward and upfront about one's thoughts, feelings, or intentions, often in a clear and assertive manner. This idiom is often used when someone wants to express themselves honestly, without any ambiguity or deception.
  • get a line on The idiom "get a line on" means to gather information or acquire knowledge about something or someone. It often refers to finding out details or discovering important facts in order to gain an advantage or make a decision.
  • dead cat on the line
  • cash on the barrelhead The idiom "cash on the barrelhead" refers to the act of making an immediate payment or settling a debt in cash, without any delay or negotiation. It implies that the payment is made promptly, often at the time of purchase or completion of a transaction, with no credit or installment options. The term "barrelhead" refers to a flat wooden surface, often the top of a barrel, which symbolizes the immediate exchange of money.
  • butt is on the line The expression "butt is on the line" typically refers to a situation where someone is facing potential consequences or risks associated with a particular action or decision. It implies that if the person fails or makes a mistake, there may be negative outcomes or personal accountability at stake. It suggests a high level of responsibility and potential vulnerability for that individual.
  • ass is on the line The idiom "ass is on the line" is an informal expression used to convey that someone's reputation, job, or personal well-being is at stake, often in a high-pressure or risky situation. It implies that an individual's entire future or livelihood is in jeopardy and they must face potential consequences.
  • rivet one's gaze on sm or sth The idiom "rivet one's gaze on someone or something" means to fixate or concentrate one's attention completely on someone or something, often through intense or unwavering staring. It implies being completely absorbed or captivated by what one is looking at, implying a strong level of focus and concentration.
  • rivet sth on(to) sth The idiom "rivet something on(to) something" means to secure or fasten something very firmly or securely onto something else. It implies making something permanent or unmovable by using the same level of reliability as a rivet, which is a type of strong fastener.
  • on the road to recovery The idiom "on the road to recovery" refers to someone or something that is making progress towards healing, improvement, or recovery, usually from an illness, injury, setback, or difficult situation. It suggests that the person or thing is moving in a positive direction and shows signs of improvement and recovery.
  • on the road to The idiom "on the road to" typically refers to being in the process of achieving or progressing towards a specific goal, outcome, or state. It implies being actively involved or making steady progress in one's journey or endeavors.
  • on the road The idiom "on the road" typically refers to someone who is traveling or embarked on a journey, often for work or leisure purposes, often implying a continuous or frequent lifestyle of being away from home.
  • Let's get the show on the road The idiom "Let's get the show on the road" means to start or begin an activity or event, especially after delays or preparations. It is often used to express impatience or eagerness to get something started.
  • get the show on the road The idiom "get the show on the road" means to begin or start an event, activity, or project, often implying a sense of urgency or impatience to get things moving. It commonly refers to initiating action or progress after a period of preparation or planning.
  • get on The idiom "get on" generally means to have a harmonious or smooth relationship with someone, to interact well with others, or to make progress and be successful in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • get along on The idiom "get along on" means to manage, survive, or make do with a limited amount or without a specific thing. It refers to being able to function or cope despite lacking resources, support, or assistance.
  • pour cold water on sth The idiom "pour cold water on sth" means to discourage, dampen enthusiasm, or criticize someone's ideas, plans, or aspirations, typically by emphasizing the negative aspects or highlighting potential problems in an attempt to discourage or diminish their excitement or optimism.
  • be on everyone's lips When something is on everyone's lips, it means that it is a subject of widespread discussion or gossip. It refers to something that is being talked about by many people and has become a popular topic of conversation.
  • sacrifice sth on the altar of sth The idiom "sacrifice something on the altar of something" means to willingly give up or forgo something valuable or important for the sake of achieving or attaining another specific thing or goal. The phrase often implies making a significant sacrifice or enduring hardship in order to attain a desired outcome. It alludes to the act of offering or sacrificing something valuable on an altar, which historically held religious or symbolic significance.
  • like a shag on a rock The idiom "like a shag on a rock" is an Australian expression that means to stand out conspicuously or be in a very exposed or isolated position, often indicating a feeling of being alone or ignored. It refers to the behavior of a shag, which is a type of cormorant bird, perched on a rock, separated and away from the usual flock.
  • be on the rocks The idiom "be on the rocks" means that a relationship or situation is experiencing difficulties, usually referring to the imminent end of a romantic relationship or the decline of a business venture. It suggests that the situation is unstable, troubled, or likely to fail.
  • bread always falls on the buttered side The idiom "bread always falls on the buttered side" means that, in unfortunate situations, things tend to go wrong or turn against someone who is already experiencing good luck or advantage. It suggests that misfortune often affects those who are already in a favorable position.
  • roll on The idiomatic expression "roll on" typically means to look forward to or anticipate a future event with excitement or impatience. It is often used to express eagerness for something to happen or to pass.
  • on a roll The idiom "on a roll" means to be experiencing a period of consecutive successes or accomplishments, usually in a confident and unstoppable manner.
  • have a load on The idiom "have a load on" refers to someone being intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It implies that the person has consumed a significant amount of substances and is generally used to describe someone who is visibly impaired or behaving differently due to their intoxicated state.
  • romp on sm
  • be like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "be like a cat on a hot tin roof" refers to someone who is extremely restless, agitated, or nervous, unable to stay still or be at ease. It evokes an image of a cat in discomfort or distress, anxiously pacing back and forth on a hot, uncomfortable surface.
  • on the cutting room floor The idiom "on the cutting room floor" refers to something, such as a scene in a movie or a section of a written work, that has been deleted or removed during the editing process. It suggests that the removed part did not meet the necessary standards or did not contribute effectively to the final version.
  • on the hot seat The idiom "on the hot seat" refers to a situation where someone is under intense scrutiny, pressure, or facing highly demanding circumstances. It implies being in a position where one is held accountable and facing challenging questioning or criticism.
  • hot on the trail The idiom "hot on the trail" means to be actively pursuing or chasing someone or something in an effort to find or capture them. It implies being very close to discovering the truth or finding the desired target.
  • hot on heels The idiom "hot on heels" means pursuing or following closely behind someone or something with great determination or speed. It implies being very close to catching or reaching the person or thing being pursued.
  • hot on The idiom "hot on" typically means to be close behind someone or something, often with a sense of pursuing or chasing them diligently. It can also imply being actively involved or interested in something, giving it significant attention or focus.
  • hard on the heels of The idiom "hard on the heels of" means to closely follow or immediately come after something or someone. It implies that there is little or no delay between the two events or actions.
  • hard on heels The idiom "hard on heels" refers to someone or something closely following or pursuing another person or thing. It indicates a persistent or determined pursuit, often with the aim of catching up or overtaking.
  • be on the ropes The idiom "be on the ropes" is used to describe a situation where someone or something is in a vulnerable or weakened state, usually due to immense pressure or difficulties. It originates from the sport of boxing, where a fighter who is on the ropes is pinned against the ropes and in danger of being defeated. In a broader sense, the idiom refers to being in a difficult position, facing challenges, or being close to failure.
  • rotate on sth The idiom "rotate on something" refers to the action of periodically changing or alternating among a set of things in a specific sequence or order. It can also imply the act of taking turns or sharing responsibility among a group of individuals for a particular task or duty.
  • throw an amount of light on sm or sth The idiom "throw an amount of light on someone or something" means to provide clarification, insight, or understanding about a particular person or thing. It is used when information or details are given to shed light on a topic, making it clearer or more comprehensible.
  • put an amount of time in on sth The idiom "put an amount of time in on sth" means to devote or allocate a specific period of time to work on or engage in a particular task, activity, or project. It implies the act of investing or dedicating one's time and effort in order to achieve progress or completion in a specific endeavor.
  • live on an amount of money The idiom "live on an amount of money" typically means to manage or sustain one's daily expenses or lifestyle with a specific sum of money. It implies that an individual is able to meet their financial needs or get by using only the specified amount, without relying on additional income or resources. It encompasses the idea of budgeting, adjusting one's expenses, or making financial choices that align with the available funds.
  • rub off on The idiom "rub off on" means to have a gradual influence or effect on someone, causing them to adopt certain traits, habits, behaviors, or attitudes. It suggests that one person's characteristics or qualities are transferred or transmitted to another person by continuous interaction or prolonged association.
  • don't know whether to eat it or rub it on The idiom "don't know whether to eat it or rub it on" is used to express confusion or uncertainty about how to use or handle something. It implies that the person is uncertain if they should consume or apply a particular substance or item, metaphorically highlighting the dilemma of deciding the best course of action.
  • rub off (on sb) The idiom "rub off (on sb)" means to influence or have an impact on someone, typically resulting in them adopting certain behaviors, attitudes, or characteristics of the person or group they are around. This idiom suggests that qualities or traits can be transferred from one person to another through prolonged contact or interaction.
  • rub off (on sm) The idiom "rub off (on someone)" means to influence or be influenced by someone's behavior, attitudes, or characteristics through close association or observation. It suggests that traits or habits can be transferred from one person to another by spending time together or being in close proximity.
  • try on sth The idiom "try on something" typically means to put on, wear, or test out something, such as clothes or shoes, in order to see if it fits properly or looks good. It can also be used metaphorically to describe trying out or experimenting with an idea, approach, or solution before fully committing to it.
  • take off (on sth) The idiom "take off (on sth)" means to imitate, mimic, or replicate something in a humorous or exaggerated way. It can also refer to starting or becoming successful quickly or suddenly, especially in reference to a career or business.
  • slip on sth The idiom "slip on sth" means to easily or quickly put on clothing, footwear, or an object without much effort or difficulty. It suggests a smooth and effortless action of putting something on, typically referring to shoes or garments.
  • slip sth on The idiom "slip sth on" means to quickly and easily put on, wear, or don something, often referring to clothing or accessories. It implies a swift and effortless action of wearing something without much effort or thought.
  • let up (on sm or sth) The idiom "let up (on sm or sth)" means to reduce or relax one's effort, intensity, pressure, or punishment towards someone or something. It suggests easing up on someone or something, often due to a decrease in urgency or intensity.
  • follow up (on sth) The idiom "follow up (on sth)" means to take further action or continue a previous activity or investigation. It implies the act of pursuing or checking on something previously initiated to ensure completion, progress, or resolution.
  • write sth off (on one's taxes) The idiom "write something off (on one's taxes)" refers to the act of claiming a deduction on one's tax return for a particular expense. It means to legally exclude or deduct the cost of something from one's taxable income, thereby lowering the amount of tax owed. This deduction is typically allowed for certain business expenses or eligible personal expenses as permitted by tax laws.
  • go (out) on strike The idiom "go (out) on strike" refers to the act of a group of workers collectively refusing to work as a form of protest or to demand better working conditions, wages, or other benefits. It involves a deliberate cessation of work and can involve picketing, demonstrations, and other forms of industrial action.
  • cut sm in (on sth) The idiom "cut someone in (on something)" typically means to include or involve someone in a particular activity, sharing, or business venture, usually by granting them a portion of the profits or benefits.
  • follow through (on sth) The idiom "follow through (on sth)" means to complete or continue a task or plan until it reaches its intended outcome or resolution. It refers to taking actions or steps necessary to bring something to a successful conclusion, rather than leaving it unfinished or abandoned.
  • turn on sth The idiom "turn on something" typically means to activate, switch, or operate a device or system. It can also refer to becoming excited or enthusiastic about something or someone.
  • turn on sb The idiom "turn on someone" means to betray or act disloyally towards someone, often by revealing their secrets or causing harm to them. It can also refer to suddenly becoming angry or aggressive towards someone.
  • turn sb on The idiom "turn sb on" is often used to describe the action of sexually arousing someone or inciting their interest or excitement in a non-sexual context.
  • turn on sm
  • turn on The idiom "turn on" means to activate or start a particular device, appliance, or system. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone becoming interested, excited, or enthusiastic about something.
  • turn sth on To "turn something on" is an idiom that means to activate or start something, typically a machine, device, or system, by using a switch, button, or other means. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to igniting or stimulating someone's interest, excitement, or enthusiasm for something.
  • turn sm on The idiom "turn someone on" typically means to arouse or stimulate someone, often referring to creating strong interest or excitement in a person. It can be used in various contexts, such as referring to something that grabs someone's attention, captivates them, or sparks their enthusiasm or passion.
  • turn (up)on sm or sth The idiom "turn (up) on someone or something" means to suddenly feel anger or hostility towards someone or something, or to exhibit aggressive behavior towards them/it. It can also refer to a sudden change in attitude or opinion towards someone or something, often resulting in negative feelings.
  • draw/take a bead on sb/sth The idiom "draw/take a bead on someone/something" means to aim or target someone or something with great focus or precision, typically with the intention to shoot or harm them in some way. It originated from the practice of aligning the bead (a small, round marker) on the front sight of a firearm to accurately aim at a target. In a figurative sense, it can also refer to closely monitoring or identifying a specific person or object in a determined manner.
  • draw a bead on sm or sth The idiom "draw a bead on someone or something" means to take aim or focus on someone or something with precision, typically with the intention of achieving a goal or objective. It often refers to a figurative act of targeting or directing attention, effort, or resources towards a specific target or objective.
  • call sm on the carpet The idiom "call someone on the carpet" means to reprimand or confront someone regarding their behavior, actions, or mistakes. It typically involves a formal or serious discussion where the individual is held accountable for their actions and asked to explain or rectify the situation. This idiom often implies a sense of authority or hierarchy, where the person in a position of power or authority is addressing a subordinate.
  • fill sm in (on sm or sth) The idiom "fill someone in (on someone or something)" means to provide someone with all the necessary information or details about a person or thing. It implies giving someone a comprehensive update or explaining a situation thoroughly so that they are well-informed.
  • rule on sth The idiom "rule on sth" means to make a decision or judgment about something, typically in a formal or authoritative way. It generally refers to the act of a person or a governing body giving a verdict or issuing a ruling on a particular matter.
  • run on The idiom "run on" refers to a sentence or conversation that continues without pause or without proper structure, often resulting in a long, confusing, or incoherent passage of words.
  • write sm in (on sth) The idiom "write sm in (on sth)" means to inscribe or jot down something on a surface, typically with a writing instrument, such as a pen or a pencil. It refers to the act of putting words or information onto a tangible object, like paper, a whiteboard, or a document.
  • set sm down (on sth) The idiom "set (someone) down (on something)" typically means to physically place or position someone onto a surface or object. It can also be used metaphorically to mean assigning or establishing someone in a particular position or role.
  • rush on
  • run out on The idiom "run out on" means to abandon or desert someone or something, often abruptly and without warning or explanation. It implies leaving someone in a difficult or vulnerable situation.
  • run on all cylinders The idiom "run on all cylinders" means to operate or function at the highest level of efficiency, effectiveness, or capacity. It is often used to describe someone or something performing at their peak performance or optimal state. It is derived from the analogy of an engine running smoothly and powerfully when all its cylinders are in proper working order.
  • run a make on
  • have on the run The idiom "have on the run" typically means to be in a state of constantly moving or evading capture, either due to being pursued by someone or facing multiple challenges or issues that require constant attention and action. It implies a sense of being constantly on the move or actively dealing with difficulties.
  • pin sth up on(to) sth The idiom "pin sth up on(to) sth" means to fasten or attach something, such as a paper or document, onto a surface, usually using a pin or tack. It implies displaying or putting up the item in a visible or prominent location for others to see.
  • stick sth on (to) sm or sth To "stick something on (to) someone or something" means to attach or place something onto someone or something quickly and casually. It can refer to physically sticking something onto a surface, like a sticker or adhesive material, or metaphorically adding something to a person's or object's characteristics or attributes.
  • run low (on sth) The idiom "run low (on sth)" means to have very little or an insufficient amount of something remaining. It suggests that the quantity of a particular item is dwindling and may soon be exhausted.
  • run out (on sm) The idiom "run out on (someone)" means to abandon or leave someone without warning or explanation, usually in a time of need or during a difficult situation. It implies betrayal, irresponsibility, or neglecting one's duties or obligations towards another person.
  • do a job on sb/sth The idiom "do a job on sb/sth" typically refers to intentionally treating someone or something poorly, usually with the intention to harm or damage them physically, emotionally, or otherwise. It suggests that someone is attempting to have a negative impact on the target, potentially through manipulation, deception, or mistreatment.
  • do a job on sm or sth The idiom "do a job on someone or something" refers to the act of causing damage, harm, or destruction to a person, object, or situation. It implies that the actions taken have a negative or detrimental effect. It can also imply manipulation, deception, or sabotage.
  • the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder" refers to the initial, highest, or subsequent step in a series of achievements, advancements, or levels of progress towards a goal or success. It highlights the idea of starting at the bottom and gradually climbing upwards towards higher levels of attainment or accomplishment.
  • running on fumes The idiom "running on fumes" means to continue doing something or to keep going despite being exhausted, low on energy, or lacking resources. It refers to a situation where someone is barely able to continue due to being completely drained or depleted.
  • running on empty The idiom "running on empty" refers to the state when someone or something has expended all their resources, energy, or motivation, leaving them with very little or no reserve left. It can be used to describe a person who is physically or emotionally exhausted, a vehicle that has run out of fuel, or any situation where someone or something is operating with low or no energy.
  • rush on sth The idiom "rush on sth" refers to an intense or excessive enthusiasm or eagerness for something. It implies a strong desire to quickly attain, achieve, or obtain a particular thing, often without giving sufficient thought or consideration to the potential consequences.
  • sit in (on sth) The idiom "sit in (on sth)" means to attend or observe a meeting, class, or event without actively participating. It typically refers to someone joining a gathering as an observer or for informational purposes, without having an official role or contributing to the discussion or proceedings.
  • corner the market on sth The idiom "corner the market on something" refers to gaining a dominant or monopolistic position in a particular industry or market by having exclusive control over a product or service. It implies that a company or individual has acquired such a significant share of the market that they can control prices, supply, and demand, potentially leaving little or no room for competitors. It can also mean to have a complete or extensive knowledge or understanding of something.
  • on the side of the angels The idiom "on the side of the angels" refers to a person or group who is taking the morally right or just position in a situation or conflict. It implies that they are aligned with righteousness, goodness, and justice. It suggests that their actions or beliefs align with the morally superior side or with the principles of virtue and integrity.
  • put sth on the map To "put something on the map" is an idiom meaning to make something well-known or prominent, especially in a particular place or field. It is often used to describe the act of bringing attention or recognition to a location, business, person, or idea.
  • put swh/sth/sb on the map The idiom "put someone/something on the map" means to bring attention, recognition, or fame to a person, place, or thing. It implies that the person, place, or thing was previously unknown, insignificant, or unrecognized, and has now gained prominence or importance.
  • look like a saddle on a sow The idiom "look like a saddle on a sow" is a colorful way of describing something that appears completely out of place or absurd. It refers to something that does not fit or belong in its current context, similar to how a saddle would look odd and impractical on a pig. It emphasizes the mismatch or incongruity between two elements that are clearly incompatible.
  • to be on the safe side The idiom "to be on the safe side" means to take extra caution or precautionary measures in order to avoid potential risks or uncertainties. It implies the desire to ensure one's own safety, security, or to avoid any potential negative consequences. It is often used when someone wants to minimize potential risks, errors, or dangers.
  • on the safe side The idiom "on the safe side" means to take precautions or make choices that minimize risk or potential harm. It involves opting for a course of action that provides security or assurance, even if it may not be necessary. It signifies a person's desire to avoid any potential negative consequences by being overly cautious.
  • on sale The idiom "on sale" refers to a situation in which a product or item is available for purchase at a reduced price or with a discount. It typically implies that the item is being offered at a temporary or promotional price that is lower than its usual or original cost.
  • on the same wavelength The idiom "on the same wavelength" refers to two or more people who understand each other well, have similar ideas, opinions, or thoughts, and are able to communicate effectively without much effort or misunderstanding.
  • on the same page The idiom "on the same page" means to be in agreement or have a shared understanding with someone else regarding a particular topic or situation. It implies that all parties involved have the same information, knowledge, or perspective, and are working together towards a common goal.
  • be built on sand The idiom "be built on sand" means that something, such as a plan, idea, or foundation, is weak, unstable, or unreliable. It suggests that the underlying structure or basis of something is not solid or dependable, which could lead to potential problems or failure in the long run.
  • sit on its hands The idiom "sit on its hands" means to refrain from taking action or avoid doing something, typically out of passivity, indecision, or unwillingness to engage or interfere in a situation.
  • sit on hands The idiom "sit on hands" means to refrain from taking any action or to deliberately do nothing, usually when one should be intervening, participating, or helping in a certain situation. It implies a lack of involvement or passivity.
  • sit on ass The idiom "sit on ass" is a colloquial expression that refers to a person being inactive, lazy, or unproductive. It implies that someone is not actively engaging in any tasks or work, and instead, spends their time idly sitting and doing nothing.
  • sit on arse The idiom "sit on arse" is a figurative expression that means to be idle, lazy, or unproductive. It refers to the act of sitting down and doing nothing, often with a negative connotation of wasting time or avoiding work.
  • sit on The idiom "sit on" typically means to delay or not take action on something, often deliberately or intentionally. It can also suggest ignoring or disregarding a matter.
  • sit in judgment on The idiom "sit in judgment on" means to form an opinion or make a decision about someone or something, often in a critical or evaluative manner. It refers to the act of assessing or judging a person or situation.
  • sit down on The idiom "sit down on" typically means to abandon, ignore, or fail to support someone or something, especially when it is expected or needed. It implies a lack of assistance or backing in a situation when it is necessary.
  • on the fence The idiom "on the fence" means to be undecided or uncertain about a decision, opinion, or course of action. It refers to being in a state of indecisiveness or sitting on the boundary between two options without fully committing to either one.
  • on the sauce The idiom "on the sauce" refers to someone who is regularly drinking alcohol or intoxicated. It implies that the person frequently indulges in drinking or has developed a dependency on alcohol.
  • appear (up)on sth The idiom "appear (up)on sth" typically means to be seen or noticed on something, or to become visible or present in a particular situation or context. It can also refer to making an appearance or showing up at an event or on a specific platform.
  • append sth (on)to sth The idiom "append sth (on)to sth" means to attach or add something to the end of something else, usually in a sequential or chronological order. It implies extending or supplementing the existing item or information with additional content.
  • save on The idiom "save on" typically means to reduce or conserve the amount of something, especially in terms of money or expenses. It refers to taking actions or making choices that result in spending less or being more economical.
  • push (oneself) off (on sth) The idiom "push (oneself) off (on sth)" typically means to start or set off on a new endeavor or venture, often with determination and self-motivation. It signifies taking the initiative to begin something or initiate an action.
  • on sayso The idiom "on sayso" refers to trusting or relying on someone's word or statement without questioning or verifying it. It implies that one takes action or makes a judgment solely based on the assertion or declaration of another person.
  • on approval The idiom "on approval" refers to a situation where someone is allowed to try or assess something before deciding whether or not to purchase or accept it. It implies a trial period or temporary agreement, where the person has the opportunity to examine and evaluate the item or situation before making a final decision.
  • on the scene The idiom "on the scene" refers to someone being present at a particular location or event, often implying that they are actively involved or engaged in what is happening. It can also indicate being knowledgeable or informed about a specific situation or subject.
  • come on the scene The idiom "come on the scene" means to appear or arrive in a particular situation or setting, often implying a significant or noticeable entrance. It refers to the moment when someone or something becomes involved or visible.
  • burst (up)on the scene The idiom "burst (up)on the scene" refers to someone or something appearing suddenly and making a noticeable impact or gaining attention in a particular field or area. It implies a striking or impressive introduction, often accompanied by excitement, buzz, or surprise.
  • arrive (up)on the scene (of sth) The idiom "arrive (up)on the scene (of sth)" means to physically or figuratively appear or be present at the location or situation where something is happening or has just happened. It commonly refers to someone arriving at the place of an accident, crime, or any other significant event. It can also indicate the moment when someone becomes involved or aware of a particular situation.
  • on schedule The idiom "on schedule" refers to completing a task, event, or action according to the predetermined or planned timeline or timetable. It means that something is happening or being done punctually and without any significant delay.
  • scope (on) sm
  • put the arm on To "put the arm on" someone is an idiom that means to apply pressure or persuade someone, often forcefully, to do something, especially in the context of demanding or extorting money or favors. It implies using aggressive tactics to persuade or coerce someone into complying with one's requests.
  • on the scrap heap The idiom "on the scrap heap" means to be discarded or abandoned, typically in reference to people or things that are no longer useful, valuable, or relevant. It implies being rejected or cast aside as if being thrown onto a pile of scrap or waste material.
  • throw sb/sth on the scrap heap The idiom "throw sb/sth on the scrap heap" means to discard or get rid of someone or something because they are no longer useful or functional. It refers to the act of throwing something on a pile of discarded or useless items, like a scrap heap, suggesting that the person or thing is considered as worthless or obsolete.
  • scrape along (on sth) The idiom "scrape along (on sth)" means to barely manage or survive with the resources or circumstances available. It signifies a difficult or challenging situation where one is making do with limited or insufficient means. It can refer to financial situations, relationships, or any other aspect of life where one is just getting by.
  • scream down (on sm or sth) The idiom "scream down (on sm or sth)" refers to criticizing or scolding someone or something loudly and vehemently. It implies an intense and forceful expression of disapproval or anger towards a person or a particular matter.
  • tighten the screws on sb/sth The idiom "tighten the screws on sb/sth" means to increase pressure or insist on stricter control over someone or something. It implies enforcing stricter rules, regulations, requirements, or measures to regulate or control a person, group, situation, or system.
  • have your head screwed on right The idiom "have your head screwed on right" means to be intelligent, rational, or sensible in one's thinking and decision-making. It suggests that someone has a well-functioning mind and uses logic and reason to approach situations effectively.
  • put the screws on sb The idiom "put the screws on someone" means to apply pressure or force someone to do something, often using threats, coercion, or manipulation, in order to achieve a desired outcome or obtain information from them. It suggests the use of aggressive or intense tactics to achieve one's objective.
  • screw sth (on) (to sth) The idiom "screw sth (on) (to sth)" refers to the act of attaching or fastening something firmly to another object using screws, typically to make it secure and stable. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • put the heat on (sm) The idiom "put the heat on (sm)" means to apply pressure or intense scrutiny on someone in order to force them to take action or make a decision, often in a confrontational or coercive manner.
  • An army marches on its stomach. The idiom "An army marches on its stomach" means that the success and effectiveness of an army are reliant on the provision of adequate food and nourishment. It emphasizes the importance of catering to the basic needs and well-being of the soldiers in order to maintain their physical strength and mental resilience.
  • scrimp on sth The idiom "scrimp on something" means to be frugal or stingy when it comes to spending or allocating resources on that particular thing. It refers to cutting back or economizing, often resulting in a lower quality or lesser quantity than necessary.
  • What's going on? The idiom "What's going on?" is an informal way of asking someone about the current situation, events, or activities that are occurring or about to occur. It is often used to inquire about the state of affairs, to seek clarification, or to express curiosity about what is happening.
  • center on The idiom "center on" means to focus or revolve around something or someone. It refers to the act of giving particular attention or importance to a specific idea, concept, individual, or situation.
  • dead on arrival The idiom "dead on arrival" typically refers to something or someone that is completely unsuccessful, ineffective, or without a chance of success from the moment it is introduced or arrives. It can also imply that something or someone is lifeless, lacking energy, or doomed to fail.
  • arrive (smw) (up)on the stroke of sm time The idiom "arrive (smw) (up)on the stroke of sm time" means to arrive exactly at a specified time, without any delay or deviation. It suggests punctuality and precision in reaching a destination or completing a task.
  • put/set the seal on sth The idiom "put/set the seal on sth" means to finalize or complete something, usually by adding a final touch or making a decisive action that confirms or ensures its success or validity. It refers to the act of affixing a seal or stamp as a formal and official confirmation or endorsement. It can also imply the act of making something official, binding, or irreversible.
  • open season (on sb/sth) The idiom "open season (on sb/sth)" refers to a situation where someone or something becomes a target for attack or criticism without any restraints, restrictions, or consequences. It implies that any kind of action against the target is now allowed or encouraged, often suggesting a lack of fairness or mercy. This idiom is commonly used in contexts where people or things are under attack or facing intense scrutiny without any protective measures.
  • open season (on sm) "Open season (on sm)" is an idiom that refers to a situation where someone or something becomes an easy target for criticism, attacks, or mistreatment. It suggests that there are no restrictions or consequences for targeting and taking advantage of that person or thing.
  • keep you on the edge of your seat The idiom "keep you on the edge of your seat" means to be in a state of excitement, anticipation, or suspense, where one is fully engaged and intensely focused on something, often because it is thrilling, suspenseful, or captivating. It implies that the experience or situation is so engaging that it captures one's attention and keeps them physically or mentally leaning forward. It is commonly used to describe movies, books, sports events, or any situation that is incredibly engaging and captivating.
  • keep sb on the edge of their seat The idiom "keep sb on the edge of their seat" means to keep someone in a state of excitement, suspense, or anticipation, often by providing thrilling or captivating entertainment or information. It suggests that the person is so engrossed or engaged that they are figuratively sitting at the edge of their seat, eagerly waiting to see what will happen next.
  • on the edge of one's seat The idiom "on the edge of one's seat" refers to a state of intense anticipation, excitement, or suspense. It describes a person being fully engaged and eagerly waiting for an event or outcome to unfold, often with feelings of suspense or anxiety.
  • swear on a stack of Bibles The idiom "swear on a stack of Bibles" means to make a solemn and binding oath or promise, often in a highly assertive or convincing manner, by invoking the authority or significance of the Bible. It implies a strong assurance or guarantee of truthfulness and honesty.
  • on second thought The idiom "on second thought" refers to a change in one's opinion or decision after reconsidering the matter, often due to a new perspective, additional information, or a realization of the potential consequences. It suggests a shift in thinking or a revised judgment based on a deeper reflection.
  • cast aspersions on sb/sth The idiom "cast aspersions on sb/sth" means to criticize or disparage someone or something by making unfavorable or damaging remarks about their character, reputation, or credibility, often without any evidence or proof to support such claims. It involves making insinuations or spreading doubt about the person or thing in question to undermine their credibility or integrity.
  • cast aspersions on sm The idiom "cast aspersions on someone" means to criticize or make damaging remarks about someone's character, reputation, or actions in a way that undermines or tarnishes their reputation or credibility. It implies questioning the integrity, morality, or trustworthiness of the person being spoken about.
  • see the writing on the wall The idiom "see the writing on the wall" means to recognize or understand the signs or indications that something is about to happen, particularly something negative or undesirable. It suggests perceiving the inevitable outcome or conclusion of a situation, often implying that it is time to take appropriate action or make necessary changes. This expression is derived from the biblical story of Belshazzar's feast, where the appearance of mysterious writing on the palace wall was interpreted as a warning of the impending downfall of the Babylonian empire.
  • I've seen better heads on nickel beers. The idiom "I've seen better heads on nickel beers" is an expression used to emphasize that someone or something is extremely unimpressive, disappointing, or of very poor quality. It implies that the speaker has witnessed far superior examples of similar things, typically accompanied by a sense of ridicule or mockery. The phrase also suggests that even the foam (head) on a cheap five-cent beer would be more remarkable or impressive than what is being referred to.
  • seize (up)on sth The idiom "seize (up)on something" means to eagerly or quickly take advantage of an opportunity or idea. It implies a prompt and enthusiastic response to a situation or concept.
  • murder on sth The idiom "murder on something" typically means a very difficult or chaotic situation involving a particular thing or activity. It suggests that there is a high level of disorder, confusion, or challenges associated with the stated thing or situation.
  • muscle in on sth The idiom "muscle in on sth" refers to the act of intruding or forcing one's way into a situation or activity, usually with the intention of gaining an advantage or taking control. It implies assertiveness, dominance, and often disregarding others' rights or interests. It can also suggest using physical strength or influence to overshadow or outcompete others.
  • muscle in (on sm or sth) The idiom "muscle in (on someone or something)" refers to forcefully inserting oneself or interfering in someone's personal or professional affairs without any invitation or authorization. It conveys the idea of using one's physical, political, or influential power to gain control or take advantage of a situation that may not involve them originally.
  • sell sth on credit The idiom "sell something on credit" refers to the practice of allowing a customer to purchase a product or service and delay the payment for a specified period of time. It means extending credit to the buyer, based on trust, with an agreement that the payment will be made at a later date or in installments.
  • sell sm on sth The idiom "sell someone on something" means to persuade or convince someone to believe in or support something, often through the use of skillful or persuasive techniques. It involves presenting arguments or information in such a way that the person becomes convinced or interested in a particular idea, product, or concept, ultimately leading to them supporting or accepting it.
  • send on way
  • send on an errand The idiom "send on an errand" refers to assigning someone the task of completing a specific job or delivering a message on behalf of someone else. It implies that the person is entrusted with the responsibility to carry out the task efficiently and promptly.
  • send on a wildgoose chase The idiom "send on a wild goose chase" means to deliberately mislead or deceive someone by sending them on a futile or pointless quest or mission. It involves directing someone towards something that does not exist or is unattainable, leading to wasted time and effort.
  • send on a guilt trip The idiom "send on a guilt trip" means to intentionally make someone feel guilty or remorseful about something they have done or haven't done, typically to manipulate or control their behavior, by using emotional tactics or words.
  • send on The idiom "send on" typically refers to the act of forwarding or delivering something, such as a message, information, or a package, to another person or entity. It implies the action of passing or relaying something from one person to another.
  • send on sth The idiom "send on sth" typically means to forward or transfer something, such as a message, package, or information, to someone else or to another location. It involves passing along or relaying something that has been received to ensure it reaches its intended recipient.
  • send sb on sth The idiom "send somebody on something" typically means to cause or allow someone to go or participate in a particular event, task, or mission. It implies granting permission, directing, or facilitating someone's involvement in a specific activity or experience.
  • send sm or sth on (ahead) (of sm or sth) The idiom "send someone or something on (ahead) (of someone or something)" refers to the act of arranging for someone or something to depart or arrive before others in order to complete a task or prepare for a subsequent event. It involves instructing or dispatching someone or something in advance to a particular location or situation to ensure readiness.
  • pass sentence on sm The idiom "pass sentence on someone" means to pronounce or hand down a judgment or punishment on someone, typically in a legal context. It refers to the act of officially declaring someone's guilt and determining the appropriate consequence or penalty for their actions.
  • on the attack The idiom "on the attack" refers to taking an aggressive or offensive approach in a confrontation or situation. It implies actively or forcefully pursuing a particular goal or target with intensity and assertiveness.
  • serve on The idiom "serve on" means to participate or be a member of a committee, board, jury, or any similar organized group that meets regularly to perform specific tasks or make decisions. It implies actively contributing one's time, expertise, or resources towards a common purpose or goal within the group.
  • on a silver platter The idiom "on a silver platter" means to receive or obtain something easily or without effort, usually in a very convenient or advantageous manner. It implies that the thing desired is handed to someone like a valuable item served on a silver platter, signifying a luxurious or effortless acquisition.
  • strike out on own The idiom "strike out on own" means to start a new venture or pursue a path independently, typically without the assistance, support, or involvement of others. It involves taking a bold and courageous step to establish oneself or embark on a new journey without relying on external guidance or resources.
  • set the world on fire The idiom "set the world on fire" typically means to achieve great success or create a significant impact in a particular field, usually accompanied by extraordinary enthusiasm or innovation. It implies creating a remarkable change or revolutionizing something, often through exceptional accomplishments or influential actions.
  • set teeth on edge The idiom "set teeth on edge" means to cause a feeling of irritation, discomfort, or annoyance. It is often used to describe a noise, taste, or behavior that is unpleasant or grating.
  • set sights on To "set sights on" means to establish a clear objective or goal and focus all efforts towards achieving it. It implies having a specific target in mind and aiming to reach or attain it with determination and focus. It often relates to ambitious aspirations or personal aims that require dedicated actions and determination.
  • set one back on heels The idiom "set one back on their heels" means to surprise or shock someone, often in a way that causes them to lose their balance or composure. It refers to the suddenness or unexpected nature of the event or information that catches the person off guard, leaving them momentarily stunned or unsettled.
  • set on fire The idiom "set on fire" means to ignite or become intensely enthusiastic, excited, or passionate about something. It often refers to feeling a great deal of motivation or inspiration towards a particular goal or pursuit.
  • set on The idiom "set on" typically means to be determined or resolved to do something or achieve a particular goal, regardless of obstacles or hindrances. It signifies a strong intent or purpose to pursue a course of action.
  • set off on The idiom "set off on" means to begin a journey or undertaking. It implies starting a new adventure or embarking on a particular path or course of action.
  • set mind on The idiom "set one's mind on" means to be determined or highly motivated to achieve a particular goal or objective. It implies a strong focus and dedication towards a specific purpose.
  • set hopes on The idiom "set hopes on" means to have strong expectations or desires for a particular outcome or goal. It implies placing one's trust or belief in the achievement of something.
  • set heart on The idiom "set heart on" means to have a strong desire or determination for something, usually a goal or ambition. It implies being fully committed and devoted to achieving that goal.
  • set forth on The idiom "set forth on" means to begin a journey, undertaking, or mission. It implies embarking on a specific path or course of action with a clear intention or purpose. It often refers to starting a new venture or pursuing a goal.
  • set eyes on The idiom "set eyes on" means to see or lay one's eyes on someone or something for the first time, often implying a sense of anticipation, excitement, or significance.
  • put the seal on The idiom "put the seal on" means to finalize, confirm, or complete something, often in a decisive or irrevocable manner. It implies that the action being taken is the final step that ensures an outcome or solidifies a deal.
  • one's heart is set on The idiom "one's heart is set on" means having a strong desire or determination to obtain or achieve a particular goal or outcome. It suggests that one's emotions and passions are fully invested in something, and they are committed to pursuing it with unwavering dedication.
  • on your mark, get set, go The idiom "on your mark, get set, go" is a phrase typically used to start a race or competition. It symbolizes the beginning of an activity or event, with 'on your mark' representing the participants getting ready, 'get set' indicating the final preparations, and 'go' giving the signal to start. This phrase can also be used metaphorically to denote the start of any endeavor or action.
  • lay eyes on The idiom "lay eyes on" means to see or perceive something for the first time, often with a sense of wonder, admiration, or surprise. It refers to the act of setting one's eyes upon something or someone that is new or unfamiliar.
  • have heart set on The idiom "have heart set on" means to have a strong desire or fixed intention to obtain or achieve something specific. It denotes a strong determination or ambition towards a particular goal or outcome.
  • set sth (up)on sth The idiom "set sth (up) on sth" typically means placing or arranging something on top of another thing or surface.
  • set (sm or an animal) on (sm or an animal) The idiom "set (someone or an animal) on (someone or an animal)" typically means to cause or enable one person or animal to attack or pursue another person or animal. It implies instigating or commanding someone or something to take aggressive or confrontational action against another.
  • set sm on fire
  • set out (on sth) The idiom "set out" typically means to begin a journey, task, or endeavor, often with a specific goal or purpose in mind. It implies the act of starting or embarking on something.
  • settle on sth The idiom "settle on something" means to choose or decide on a particular option or course of action after considering various possibilities or alternatives. It implies making a final decision or reaching an agreement.
  • have it on good authority The idiom "have it on good authority" means to believe or trust something because it is coming from a reliable or trustworthy source. It implies that the information or news being received is credible and can be trusted without any doubt.
  • on a slippery slope The idiom "on a slippery slope" refers to a situation where initial actions or decisions, which may seem harmless or insignificant, gradually lead to increasingly negative or dangerous consequences. It implies that engaging in certain actions or making specific choices has started a sequence of events that will likely result in unfavorable outcomes.
  • on automatic pilot The idiom "on automatic pilot" refers to a state or condition where someone is acting or behaving without conscious thought or effort. It implies that the person is engaging in actions or tasks out of habit or routine, without actively thinking or being fully present.
  • shake on The idiom "shake on" refers to the action of shaking hands as a gesture of agreement or confirmation, typically used to seal a deal or make a formal agreement. It indicates that both parties involved have reached a mutual understanding and are committed to follow through with the arrangement discussed.
  • Let's shake on it The idiom "Let's shake on it" means to make an agreement or finalize a deal by shaking hands, symbolizing mutual understanding and commitment. It implies a mutual agreement and trust between individuals involved in a business or personal negotiation.
  • on pins and needles The idiom "on pins and needles" refers to a state or feeling of extreme nervousness, anxiety, or anticipation. It suggests being in a state of constant tension or uneasiness, eagerly awaiting something or feeling very anxious about an upcoming event or situation.
  • on shaky ground The idiom "on shaky ground" means being in a precarious or unstable situation, often referring to a person's position, argument, or idea that lacks a solid foundation or is not firmly established. It suggests that the circumstances or supporting evidence are weak, uncertain, or unreliable, making it vulnerable to criticism, doubt, or failure.
  • avenge oneself (on sm or sth) (for sth) The idiom "avenge oneself (on someone or something) (for something)" means to seek revenge or retribution for a perceived wrong or harm that has been done. It refers to taking action to inflict harm or punishment in response to an offense or wrongdoing suffered.
  • shame on you The idiom "shame on you" is a phrase used to express disapproval or reprimand someone for their actions or behavior, implying that they should feel ashamed or remorseful for their wrongdoings.
  • Fool me once, shame on you fool me twice, shame on me. The idiom "Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me" is a warning or proverb that highlights the importance of learning from one's mistakes. It implies that if someone deceives or takes advantage of you once, it is their fault and they are to blame (shame on them). However, if you allow the same person to deceive or take advantage of you a second time, it is your own fault for not being cautious or learning from your previous experience (shame on you). In essence, the idiom emphasizes the need to be vigilant and not make the same mistake repeatedly.
  • on the average "On the average" is an idiom that means considering the typical or usual situation or outcome, taking into account the average or normal circumstances. It refers to looking at the typical results or typical behavior rather than focusing on individual cases or outliers.
  • throw away on To "throw away on" is an idiomatic expression used to mean wasting time, effort, or resources on something or someone that is not worthy or deserving. It implies that the action or investment is being spent in a frivolous or unproductive manner.
  • shed light on sth To shed light on something means to provide clarification, explanation, or understanding about a particular topic or situation. It refers to the act of revealing or illuminating facts or information that were previously unknown or unclear.
  • shed/throw light on sth The idiom "shed/throw light on something" means to provide information or insight that clarifies or illuminates a topic or situation. It refers to the act of offering knowledge or understanding that helps to make something clearer or better understood.
  • shed (sm) light on sth The idiom "shed (sm) light on sth" means to provide clarification or understanding about a particular issue or topic. It refers to the act of revealing or uncovering information that was previously unknown or unclear.
  • put sth on the shelf To put something on the shelf means to postpone or delay a project, plan, or idea for a later time, without completely abandoning it. It suggests that the item or concept is not currently being pursued or actively worked on, but is still being kept in reserve or view for possible future use or consideration.
  • put sb on the shelf The idiom "put someone on the shelf" refers to the act of setting aside or relegating someone to a position of lesser importance or inactivity. It suggests that the person is no longer being actively involved or utilized in a particular role or situation.
  • on the shelf The idiom "on the shelf" refers to something or someone that is not actively being used, pursued, or considered at the present moment. It can describe a person who is unmarried and without a romantic partner, or an object or idea that is not currently being utilized or implemented. It implies that the person or thing is temporarily or indefinitely dormant or idle.
  • Happy is the bride that the sun shines on. The idiom "Happy is the bride that the sun shines on" means that good fortune and luck are more likely to accompany a wedding that takes place on a sunny day. It suggests that a wedding held under pleasant weather conditions is more likely to be successful and result in a happy marriage.
  • backfire on sm The idiom "backfire on someone" refers to a situation where someone's plan or action has unintended negative consequences or results, often harming the person who initiated it. It suggests that the original intention or expectation has failed and instead, the outcome has worked against them.
  • keep one's shirt on The idiom "keep one's shirt on" means to remain calm, patient, or composed in a situation that might provoke anger, frustration, or impatience. It suggests that a person should not become agitated or lose control.
  • the shoe is on the other foot The idiom "the shoe is on the other foot" means the situation has reversed or someone is experiencing the opposite of what they have previously imposed on others. It refers to a shift in circumstances where the roles or positions of those involved have switched.
  • the boot is on the other foot The idiom "the boot is on the other foot" means that the situation has reversed or the roles have been reversed. It suggests that someone who was previously in a position of inferiority or disadvantage is now in a position of superiority or advantage, while the person who was previously in a position of superiority or advantage is now in a position of inferiority or disadvantage.
  • shoe is on the other foot The idiom "the shoe is on the other foot" typically means that a situation has reversed, and the roles or circumstances have changed from what they once were. It signifies a role reversal or a shift in power dynamics, where the person who was previously at a disadvantage or the recipient of a certain treatment now has the upper hand or the advantage.
  • have the shoe on the other foot The idiom "have the shoe on the other foot" means to be in a situation where one is experiencing the same treatment or circumstances that they previously inflicted upon others. It implies that someone who was once in a dominant position or the one meting out consequences is now in a vulnerable or subordinate position themselves. It suggests a reversal of roles or a shift in power dynamics.
  • on a shoestring The idiom "on a shoestring" is used to describe doing something with very little money or on a tight budget. It implies that you are being resourceful and making the most out of limited financial resources.
  • off on the wrong foot The idiom "off on the wrong foot" means to start a relationship or interaction in a negative or unfortunate manner, often resulting in further difficulties, misunderstandings, or disagreements. It implies that the initial introduction or beginning was not favorable or successful, hampering progress or positive outcomes.
  • put the feed bag on The idiom "put the feed bag on" is an informal expression that means to eat a meal. It is often used humorously or colloquially to refer to someone who is about to have a large or hearty meal.
  • bag on The idiom "bag on" refers to criticizing, making negative comments, or complaining about someone or something. It implies continuously finding fault or expressing disapproval.
  • short on one end The idiom "short on one end" typically means having a deficiency or lacking something specific. It suggests a situation where there is an insufficient amount or inadequate quality of something necessary or expected.
  • short on The idiom "short on" typically means lacking or deficient in something, usually referring to a shortage of a particular quality, resource, or attribute. It implies that there is not enough of something necessary or desired in a given situation.
  • on short notice The idiom "on short notice" means to do something or make arrangements in a very short amount of time, typically without much advance warning or preparation.
  • long on and short on The idiom "long on and short on" refers to a situation where one possesses an abundance or surplus of certain qualities, assets, or characteristics (long on) while lacking or having a shortage of others (short on). It implies an imbalance or discrepancy between the excess and deficiency of these attributes.
  • keep on a tight leash The idiom "keep on a tight leash" means to closely monitor, control, or supervise someone or something, typically in a strict or restrictive manner. It implies having a strong hold over someone's actions or behavior, exerting authority, and ensuring they stay well-regulated or disciplined.
  • have on a short leash The idiom "have on a short leash" means to have strict control or tight supervision over someone or something, typically to limit their freedom of action or choices. It implies keeping someone or something under close scrutiny and not allowing much independence or autonomy.
  • out on bail The idiom "out on bail" typically refers to someone who has been released from custody temporarily by posting bail, which is a sum of money or property used as a guarantee that they will appear in court for their trial. It suggests that the person is no longer in jail or detention, but their ultimate fate or outcome is still uncertain.
  • on shoulders
  • have the cares of the world on shoulders The idiom "have the cares of the world on shoulders" means to feel burdened or overwhelmed by various worries, responsibilities, or problems. It suggests carrying a heavy load of concerns, often implying a feeling of stress or pressure caused by a multitude of issues.
  • have a good head on shoulders The idiom "have a good head on your shoulders" means to be intelligent, level-headed, and wise in making decisions or solving problems. It refers to someone who is rational and possesses good judgment.
  • have a chip on shoulder The idiomatic expression "have a chip on one's shoulder" means to harbor a grudge or a feeling of resentment, usually due to a perceived unfair treatment or past grievances. It refers to someone who is easily provoked, always ready for an argument or confrontation, and constantly looking for opportunities to express their anger or discontent. Such individuals may feel a sense of victimization, which often leads to an aggressive or confrontational attitude.
  • chip on shoulder The idiom "chip on shoulder" refers to a person who harbors a grudge or has a sense of resentment or inferiority that often leads them to be easily provoked or offended. It implies that a person carries an imaginary chip or burden on their shoulder, symbolizing their readiness to engage in a confrontation or argument.
  • carry the weight of the world on shoulders The idiom "carry the weight of the world on shoulders" refers to feeling an immense or excessive amount of pressure, responsibility, or burden on oneself. It symbolizes the feeling of being overwhelmed or having to handle more than one can bear, similar to the mythological Atlas who was depicted as carrying the entire world on his shoulders.
  • an old head on young shoulders The idiom "an old head on young shoulders" refers to someone who possesses wisdom, maturity, or a level of responsibility beyond their years. It implies that the individual demonstrates qualities typically associated with older, more experienced individuals, despite being relatively young or lacking in experience.
  • a chip on shoulder The idiom "a chip on the shoulder" is used to describe someone who holds a grudge or feels a sense of resentment or inferiority, often due to a perceived wrong or injustice done to them in the past. It refers to someone who is easily provoked or always ready to take offense. The chip refers to the imagined weight carried on one's shoulder, symbolizing a readiness to engage in conflict or argument.
  • on balance The idiom "on balance" refers to considering all aspects or factors of a situation or issue in order to reach a fair and objective judgment or conclusion. It suggests an evaluation or assessment done by taking into account the pros and cons, advantages and disadvantages, or positive and negative aspects involved, ultimately providing a viewpoint that considers the overall outcome or result.
  • put balls on
  • on the ball The idiom "on the ball" refers to someone who is attentive, alert, and pays close attention to details; someone who is efficient, reliable, and quick to respond or act.
  • keep eye on the ball To "keep an eye on the ball" means to stay attentive, focused, and vigilant on the task at hand or the goal you are aiming to achieve. It is often used figuratively, suggesting the need to concentrate, remain alert, and not get distracted or lose sight of the main objective.
  • have on the ball The idiom "have on the ball" means to be alert, intelligent, knowledgeable, or highly competent in a specific task or situation. It refers to someone who is capable, resourceful, and able to think quickly and make good decisions.
  • shut the door on The idiom "shut the door on" means to close off an opportunity, end a possibility, or make a definitive decision that prevents further consideration or action. It suggests that the chance or option is no longer available or has been intentionally rejected.
  • close the door on The idiom "close the door on" means to put an end to something or to eliminate the possibility of a particular outcome or opportunity.
  • sic sb/sth on sb The idiom "sic sb/sth on sb" means to incite, provoke, or encourage someone or something to attack or confront another person or thing. It implies enabling or urging someone or something to take action or engage in a hostile or aggressive manner towards someone else.
  • jump on the bandwagon The idiom "jump on the bandwagon" means to join or support a popular trend or cause, usually when it has already gained a significant following. It refers to the act of suddenly embracing or endorsing something just because it is popular or fashionable at the moment.
  • get/jump/leap on the bandwagon The idiom "get/jump/leap on the bandwagon" means to join or support a popular trend, movement, or opinion, especially when it becomes widely accepted or successful. It implies that someone is adopting a popular belief or trend merely because it is fashionable or to avoid being left out, rather than forming an independent judgment.
  • bang on The idiom "bang on" has a few different meanings depending on the context, but it generally refers to being correct, accurate, or precise in one's assessment, prediction, or judgment. It implies that someone's opinion or statement is spot-on and perfectly aligned with the truth or reality of a situation.
  • bank on sth The idiom "bank on sth" means to rely or depend on something to happen or be true, often with a high level of confidence. It suggests putting your trust or expectations in a particular outcome or event.
  • time is on side The idiom "time is on your side" means that you have plenty of time or that time is working in your favor. It suggests that there is no rush or pressure to hurry, and that a favorable outcome or solution is likely due to the luxury of time.
  • The grass is always greener on the other side The idiom "The grass is always greener on the other side" refers to the perception that things or situations appear better or more desirable when viewed from a distance, often leading to dissatisfaction or discontentment with one's current situation. It suggests that people tend to believe that what others have is preferable to their own, without fully understanding or appreciating their own circumstances.
  • pass by on the other side The idiom "pass by on the other side" means to ignore or avoid a problem or situation rather than taking action or getting involved. It originates from a biblical parable known as the Good Samaritan, where two individuals pass by a wounded man on the road without offering any assistance, choosing to pass by on the other side.
  • on the wrong side of the law The idiom "on the wrong side of the law" refers to engaging in illegal or criminal activities, being in violation of the law, or finding oneself on the opposing side of law enforcement. It implies that somebody is involved in unlawful behavior or actions, acting against the established legal system.
  • on the wrong side of The idiom "on the wrong side of" typically means being in a disadvantageous position, going against prevailing opinions or norms, or being older than a certain age. It can also imply being on the negative side of a situation or decision.
  • on the good side of To be on the good side of someone means to have a positive and favorable relationship with that person. It suggests that the person holds a favorable opinion of you, trusts you, or has a generally positive perception of your character. It often signifies being in good terms with someone and enjoying their favor or approval.
  • on the bright side The idiom "on the bright side" is a phrase used to refer to finding a positive or optimistic aspect in a situation that is generally perceived as negative or unfavorable. It is about focusing on the positive or encouraging elements rather than the negatives.
  • on side The idiom "on side" typically refers to being supportive, in agreement, or aligned with someone or a particular group. It means being on the same side as someone and working together towards a shared goal or objective.
  • on good side The idiom "on good side" typically refers to being on friendly or favorable terms with someone. It suggests having a positive or cordial relationship with the person in question.
  • know which side bread is buttered on The idiom "know which side bread is buttered on" means to understand one's own interests and to act accordingly in order to maintain a favorable or advantageous position. It refers to knowing who or what provides benefits or advantages and being mindful not to jeopardize that relationship or situation.
  • keep on the left side The idiom "keep on the left side" refers to the practice of maintaining a position or direction to the left. It is commonly used in contexts related to driving or any situation where a specific side or direction needs to be followed consistently.
  • have time on side The idiom "have time on side" means that someone has an advantage because they have plenty of time to accomplish something or make a decision, and therefore they can proceed calmly and without feeling rushed.
  • get up on the wrong side of bed The idiom "get up on the wrong side of bed" refers to someone starting their day in a grumpy, irritable, or ill-tempered manner, causing them to be in a negative or unpleasant mood throughout the day. It implies that the person's bad mood originated from the moment they woke up, as if they literally got out of bed on the wrong side.
  • get on the wrong side of the law The idiom "get on the wrong side of the law" means to behave or act in a way that breaks the law or to engage in activities that are considered illegal or unlawful. It implies getting involved with illegal activities that may lead to legal consequences, trouble, or problems with law enforcement.
  • err on the side of The definition of the idiom "err on the side of" is to choose or act in a cautious or slightly excessive way in order to avoid making a mistake or causing harm. It means to prioritize safety, caution, or the avoidance of negative consequences, even if it means taking more measures or being overly careful.
  • come down on the side of The idiom "come down on the side of" means to take a position, make a choice, or express a preference for one side or option over another in a debate, argument, or decision. It implies making a decision or showing support for a particular viewpoint or stance.
  • born on the wrong side of the blanket The idiom "born on the wrong side of the blanket" refers to someone who is illegitimate or born out of wedlock. It suggests that the person's parents were not married at the time of their birth, which may have carried social stigma or unfavorable consequences in certain cultures or historical contexts.
  • be on the expensive etc. side The idiom "be on the expensive side" refers to something that is relatively costly or on the pricier end of the scale. It implies that the item or service in question tends to be more expensive than average or surpasses one's expectations in terms of cost.
  • be laughing on the other side of face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of the face" is similar in meaning to "having the last laugh" or "getting one's comeuppance." It refers to a situation where someone is currently delighted or confident, but is expected to face disappointment, embarrassment, or a turn of events that will reverse their fortune and make them feel foolish or regretful.
  • on the sidelines The idiom "on the sidelines" refers to being in a position of observing or not actively participating in a particular activity, discussion, or event. It often implies being uninvolved or not taking an active role.
  • train sights on The idiom "train sights on" means to focus one's attention, efforts, or aim on a specific target or goal. It often conveys a deliberate and determined intention to pursue or achieve something.
  • on sight The definition of the idiom "on sight" is to recognize or identify someone or something immediately upon seeing them, usually because of a previous encounter or knowledge. It suggests a quick and easy recognition without any need for further introduction or explanation.
  • sign off (on sth) The idiom "sign off (on sth)" means to approve or agree formally on a decision, document, or plan. It denotes the act of granting final authorization or giving one's official endorsement to something.
  • sign on (with sm or sth) (as sth) The idiom "sign on (with someone or something) (as something)" refers to when a person formally commits, agrees, or registers to be a part of someone or something as a specific role or position. It often implies joining a company, organization, team, or project by signing a contract or agreement.
  • sign on The phrase "sign on" typically means to agree to work for or join a particular organization or company. It can also refer to enlisting or committing oneself to participate in a venture or activity.
  • sign sm on
  • take on a new significance The idiom "take on a new significance" refers to the situation when something acquires or assumes a different or deeper meaning or importance, often due to a change in the context, perception, or understanding of it.
  • base one's opinion on sth The idiom "base one's opinion on sth" means to form or establish one's viewpoint or judgment on a particular matter or issue by considering or relying on certain facts, evidence, or information. It implies that one's opinion is derived from a solid foundation or understanding of the subject matter rather than being arbitrary or unfounded.
  • base sth (up)on sm or sth The idiom "base something (up)on someone or something" means to establish or build something on a particular person, object, or concept as a foundation or starting point. It signifies using someone or something as a reference or source of inspiration for creating or developing something new.
  • on the money The idiom "on the money" means to be exactly correct or accurate in a statement, prediction, or estimation. It refers to something being exact and precise, often relating to financial matters or measurements.
  • take a bath (on sth) When someone "takes a bath (on something)", it means that they have experienced a significant financial loss or have suffered a financial setback. It can refer to losing a large amount of money in a business venture, investment, or gamble. This idiom is often used to describe situations where someone has suffered a substantial financial defeat.
  • be sitting on a goldmine The idiom "be sitting on a goldmine" means that someone or something possesses a valuable resource or opportunity that could lead to great financial or personal gain. It implies that the person or thing in question is unaware of or underestimating the true worth and potential of their situation.
  • sitting on a powder keg The idiom "sitting on a powder keg" refers to being in a highly volatile or dangerous situation, where even a small spark or trigger could cause a catastrophic or explosive outcome. It implies that the situation is extremely tense, unstable, and potentially explosive, with the potential for chaos or disaster at any moment.
  • sitting on a gold mine The idiom "sitting on a gold mine" refers to a situation where someone possesses something extremely valuable or has access to a great opportunity but is unaware or not taking advantage of it. It typically implies that one is overlooking or neglecting their potential for significant success or wealth.
  • try sth (on) for size The idiom "try something (on) for size" means to attempt or experience something in order to determine if it fits, suits, or is suitable for one's needs or preferences. It often refers to trying out a new or unfamiliar idea, belief, job, situation, or role to see if it is a good fit or a comfortable match for oneself.
  • not be the only pebble on the beach The idiom "not be the only pebble on the beach" means that someone or something is not unique or exceptional in a particular situation. It suggests that there are many other similar options, alternatives, or individuals available, diminishing the significance or importance of the person or thing being referred to.
  • Get your skates on! "Get your skates on!" is an idiomatic expression that means to hurry up or to do something quickly. It implies the need for speed or urgency in order to complete a task or to arrive at a destination in a timely manner. The idiom originates from the world of ice skating, where putting on skates allows one to move swiftly across ice, creating the association of speed with the phrase.
  • skate on thin ice The idiom "skate on thin ice" means to be in a risky or dangerous situation, often with potential consequences or negative outcomes. It implies that someone is treading carefully, pushing the limits, or engaging in behavior that could lead to trouble or failure.
  • skate on sth The idiom "skate on something" typically refers to getting away with something or avoiding punishment, consequences, or accountability for one's actions or behavior. It suggests that someone is able to avoid or evade the negative outcomes that would normally be associated with a particular situation or behavior.
  • have your beady eye on sth/sb The idiom "have your beady eye on something/somebody" means to watch or observe something or someone closely, often with suspicion or scrutiny. It implies being vigilant or keeping a careful eye on a particular situation or person. The phrase "beady eye" refers to someone's gaze being sharp and focused, like the eyes of a bird of prey, such as a bird with small shiny beads for eyes.
  • on the beam The idiom "on the beam" typically means to be on the right track or to be focused and performing at one's best. It is often used to describe someone who is working efficiently and effectively.
  • bear on The idiom "bear on" means to be relevant or applicable to a certain situation or matter. It refers to something having a direct influence or impact on a particular issue or topic.
  • bear down (on sb/sth) The idiom "bear down (on sb/sth)" is often used to describe a purposeful or intense effort towards something or someone. It means to focus all one's energy, strength, or attention in order to confront or overcome a challenge or obstacle. It can also imply applying immense pressure to a particular person or situation.
  • bear down (on sm or sth) The idiom "bear down (on someone or something)" typically means to focus or concentrate on a particular person or thing with great intensity or effort. It implies applying pressure, exerting force, or making a determined effort towards achieving a goal or overcoming an obstacle.
  • be on the skids The idiom "be on the skids" refers to a situation or a person's life, career, or business being in a state of decline, deterioration, or failure. It suggests that someone or something is experiencing a downward spiral or facing significant problems and is struggling to recover or regain stability.
  • put the skids on (sth) The idiom "put the skids on (sth)" means to halt or prevent the progress or success of something, often by creating obstacles or difficulties. It implies bringing something to a sudden halt or causing its downfall.
  • bear (up)on sth The idiom "bear (up)on sth" means to have an influence or impact on something, to be relevant or related to a particular matter or situation. It suggests that something has a bearing or significance in relation to something else.
  • skimp on sth The idiom "skimp on something" means to be frugal or stingy with something, usually referring to not spending enough money, time, or effort on it. It implies cutting corners or being reluctant to provide what is necessary or expected.
  • have (sm) bearing on sth The idiom "have (sm) bearing on sth" means to have relevance or significance in relation to a particular matter. It suggests that something is connected or has an impact on a specific situation or outcome.
  • beat up on The idiom "beat up on" typically means to unfairly criticize or physically harm someone, often repeatedly and aggressively. It can also refer to continuously putting pressure or blame on someone.
  • beat on The idiom "beat on" typically means to strike or hit repeatedly, either with one's fists, an object, or generally using physical force. It can also be used metaphorically to describe persistent or relentless criticism, pressure, or harassment towards someone or something.
  • beat down on The idiom "beat down on" refers to an action of intense or relentless pressure, usually in reference to the sun or weather. It means to shine or be intense in a way that is overwhelming or oppressive.
  • beat down (on sm or sth) The idiom "beat down (on someone or something)" means to continuously criticize, berate, or nag someone or something. It expresses the idea of someone verbally "beating" or relentlessly hammering another person or object with negativity or complaints.
  • skip out (on sth) The expression "skip out (on sth)" means to leave or abandon something hastily or without permission, especially to avoid responsibilities or obligations. It implies evading or avoiding a commitment, duty, or debt without providing a sufficient explanation or justification.
  • skip out (on sb) The idiom "skip out (on sb)" means to leave or abandon someone, especially in a dishonest or irresponsible manner, often without providing any explanation or warning. It implies that someone avoids fulfilling their obligations, commitments, or responsibilities towards another person.
  • skip out (on sm or sth) The idiom "skip out (on sm or sth)" means to leave or escape from a situation, commitment, or responsibility without permission, often in a sneaky or dishonest way.
  • As you make your bed, so you must lie on it The idiom "As you make your bed, so you must lie on it" means that one must face the consequences of their own actions or decisions. It suggests that once a choice is made or a situation is created, one is responsible for dealing with the outcomes, whether positive or negative.
  • slack up (on sth) The idiom "slack up on (something)" means to reduce or lessen one's effort, intensity, or strictness related to a particular task, responsibility, or obligation. It implies becoming more relaxed or less vigilant towards something, often resulting in a decrease in performance, productivity, or adherence to standards.
  • slam the brakes on The idiom "slam the brakes on" refers to suddenly and forcefully stopping or slowing down, often in a figurative sense. It suggests the act of abruptly halting or putting an end to something, such as progress, plans, or momentum.
  • slam sth down (on sth) The idiom "slam sth down (on sth)" refers to forcefully and abruptly placing or throwing something onto a surface with great force to express anger, frustration, or emphasis.
  • slap sth on sm The idiom "slap something on someone or something" typically means to apply or attach something quickly, haphazardly, or without much thought or care. It can imply doing something in a rush or without proper attention to detail.
  • slap sth on The idiom "slap sth on" means to apply or put something on quickly, carelessly, or without much thought or consideration. It often implies a rushed or haphazard approach to doing something.
  • slap sm on sth The idiom "slap [someone or something] on [something]" generally means to quickly or carelessly apply or attach someone or something to a surface or object. It carries the connotation of doing so with little thought, effort, or precision.
  • a slap on the wrist The idiom "a slap on the wrist" refers to a mild or lenient punishment or reprimand for someone who has done something wrong or committed a minor offense. It implies that the consequence is not severe enough to deter the person from repeating the behavior.
  • a slap on the back The idiom "a slap on the back" typically refers to a gesture of congratulations or praise that is informal and enthusiastic. It implies showing appreciation or approval towards someone's achievements or actions by giving a figurative or literal friendly pat on their back.
  • slap sm on the wrist To "slap someone on the wrist" is an idiomatic expression that means to give someone a mild or symbolic punishment or reprimand for their actions, often when the offense committed is not very serious. It implies a gentle reminder or warning rather than a severe consequence.
  • pour oil on troubled water(s) The idiom "pour oil on troubled water(s)" means to calm or pacify a tense or difficult situation by adding diplomacy, kindness, or conciliation. It refers to the act of using soothing words or actions to reduce conflicts or ease tensions in order to achieve a peaceful resolution.
  • sleep on it The idiom "sleep on it" means to postpone making a decision or taking action until the following day, after having had a night's sleep to think it over or consider it more thoroughly. This implies that a fresh perspective or clarity may be gained after a period of rest and reflection.
  • sleep on The idiom "sleep on" means to postpone making a decision or taking action until the following day, usually to give oneself more time to think or reflect on the matter at hand.
  • wear sth on your sleeve To "wear something on your sleeve" means to openly display or express one's emotions, thoughts, or interests without hiding them. It refers to someone who is transparent and doesn't conceal their feelings or beliefs.
  • wear one's heart on one's sleeve The idiom "wear one's heart on one's sleeve" means openly displaying or expressing one's emotions, without hiding or concealing them. It refers to someone who is transparent or vulnerable in showcasing their feelings for others to see.
  • go on before The idiom "go on before" means to take action or proceed to do something ahead of others or in advance. It suggests being proactive and taking the lead in a particular situation or task.
  • beg off (on sth) The idiom "beg off (on sth)" means to decline or excuse oneself from doing something, typically by offering apologies or giving reasons for being unable to participate or fulfill a commitment. It implies politely backing out or avoiding a specific responsibility, request, or engagement.
  • on the verge (of doing sth) The idiom "on the verge (of doing something)" means being about to take a particular action or be on the brink of a significant change or event. It suggests being very close to doing something or reaching a certain point, often implying that the action or change is imminent.
  • on behalf of sb "On behalf of sb" is an idiomatic expression that means representing or acting in the interests or on the behalf of someone else. It commonly implies speaking, acting, or making decisions for another person or a group of people, often when they are not able to do so themselves.
  • on your best behavior The idiom "on your best behavior" refers to the act of behaving in a polite, respectful, and well-mannered way, especially in a formal or important situation. It implies being on one's utmost best conduct and showing good etiquette.
  • on one's best behavior When someone is "on their best behavior," it means they are behaving extremely well or in an exceptionally polite and well-mannered manner in a particular situation or around certain people. They are making a conscious effort to be on their most exemplary conduct, usually to create a positive impression or to conform to certain expectations.
  • slip up on The idiom "slip up on" means to approach or come upon someone or something unexpectedly or without being noticed, often with the intention of surprising or catching them off guard.
  • slip over on
  • slip on The idiom "slip on" refers to the act of quickly and easily putting on a piece of clothing or footwear, usually without any difficulty or effort. It implies that the item can be effortlessly worn without the need for assistance or fastening.
  • slop sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "slop something on(to) someone or something" means to apply or spread something, such as a liquid or sauce, in a careless or hasty manner onto someone or something. It suggests a lack of precision or care in the application, often resulting in a messy or haphazard result.
  • with bells on (one's toes) The phrase "with bells on" means to be eager or enthusiastic about participating in an event or activity. It implies a sense of anticipation and excitement. The addition of "on one's toes" further emphasizes the readiness and enthusiasm. It suggests being fully prepared and engaged in whatever is about to happen.
  • slosh sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "slosh something on(to) someone or something" means to pour or spill a liquid clumsily or carelessly onto someone or something. It implies a lack of precision or control in handling the liquid, resulting in its haphazard application.
  • slow on the uptake The idiom "slow on the uptake" refers to someone who is late to understand or comprehend something. It describes a person who takes a longer time than others to grasp or comprehend information, ideas, or jokes. It suggests a lack of quickness or alertness in understanding or processing new concepts.
  • be slow on the uptake The idiom "be slow on the uptake" means to be slow in understanding or grasping something, to be delayed or sluggish in comprehending information or recognizing the meaning or significance of a situation. It implies that someone takes longer than expected to comprehend something that is generally considered simple or obvious to others.
  • slow on the draw The idiom "slow on the draw" typically refers to someone who is slow to react or respond, especially in competitive situations or quick decision-making scenarios. It originates from the Old West, where quick draw skills were essential for survival and success. Therefore, being "slow on the draw" implies a lack of quickness or readiness in action or response.
  • on the sly The idiom "on the sly" means to do something secretly or discreetly, without others' knowledge or awareness. It typically refers to actions that are done in a sneaky or covert manner.
  • smack sth down (on sth) The idiom "smack something down (on something)" typically means to forcefully or decisively put an end to or dismiss something. It can also refer to firmly and assertively expressing one's viewpoint, often in a confrontational or authoritative manner.
  • on the bench The idiom "on the bench" typically refers to someone who is currently not actively participating or involved in a particular activity or task. It often implies being sidelined or temporarily inactive, specifically in the context of sports or legal professions.
  • on bended knee The idiom "on bended knee" means to plead, beg, or make a request in a humble and submissive manner. It refers to the act of going down on one's knees, which traditionally symbolizes subservience or supplication.
  • on bended knee/knees The idiom "on bended knee/knees" refers to the act of making a humble or earnest request, plea, or proposal, usually with great sincerity and desperation. It implies a display of reverence, submission, or supplication, often in a metaphorical sense, rather than a literal action of physically being on one's knees.
  • smear sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "smear something on(to) someone or something" refers to the act of applying a substance, often in a hasty or careless manner, onto someone or something. It implies a messy or uneven application, generally done quickly or without careful consideration.
  • smile on sm or sth The idiom "smile on someone or something" means to show favor or bring good fortune to someone or something. It implies that luck or success is shining upon the person or thing mentioned, resulting in a positive and fortunate outcome.
  • smile (up)on sm or sth The idiom "smile (up)on someone or something" means to look favorably or show approval toward someone or something. It implies that the person or thing being smiled upon is being granted good fortune or favorable circumstances.
  • put a smile on sm's face The idiom "put a smile on someone's face" means to bring enjoyment, happiness, or pleasure to someone, often by doing or saying something that brings them joy or by acting in a way that brightens their mood.
  • bent on sth The idiom "bent on something" means being determined, resolute, or having a strong inclination towards achieving or pursuing a particular goal or course of action. It implies being completely focused and committed to achieving something, often without considering other alternatives or obstacles.
  • be hellbent on sth/doing sth The idiom "be hellbent on sth/doing sth" means to be completely determined or resolved to achieve or do something, often with a strong and unwavering commitment, regardless of obstacles, risks, or opposition. It implies a single-minded focus and a refusal to be deterred or dissuaded from pursuing a goal.
  • bent on doing sth The idiom "bent on doing something" means being fully committed, determined, or resolved to accomplish a particular task or objective. It implies a strong and unwavering intention or purpose to achieve a specific goal, often despite obstacles, challenges, or opposition.
  • snap back (on sm or sth) The idiom "snap back on someone or something" typically refers to a sudden, forceful, or unexpected reaction or response towards someone or something after a period of restraint, tolerance, or submission. It often implies a shift from being passive or accommodating to becoming assertive, critical, or confrontational.
  • snap sth on The idiom "snap something on" typically refers to fastening or attaching something forcefully and quickly. It often implies a firm and secure attachment, suggesting that an object or part has been affixed firmly and in a straightforward manner without any complexity or difficulty.
  • on best behavior The idiom "on best behavior" refers to behaving in the most polite, courteous, or well-mannered way, usually in order to make a good impression on others or in a formal setting. It involves making a conscious effort to behave in a way that is considerate, respectful, and appropriate for the situation.
  • be on best behaviour The idiom "be on best behavior" means to act in a polite, well-mannered, and controlled way, especially in a formal or important situation. It implies making every effort to avoid any wrongdoing, presenting oneself in the best possible light, and adhering to societal expectations of good behavior.
  • sneak up on sm or sth The idiom "sneak up on someone or something" means to approach or gain on someone or something quietly and without being noticed or detected in order to surprise them. It can be used both in a literal sense, where someone physically approaches silently, as well as in a figurative sense, where something unexpected or surprising occurs unexpectedly.
  • bestow sth on sm The idiom "bestow something on someone" means to present or give someone (usually a gift, honor, or privilege) in a gracious or generous manner. It signifies granting something to someone as a sign of esteem or recognition.
  • wouldn't bet on it The idiom "wouldn't bet on it" means that you do not believe something is likely to happen or do not have confidence in a particular outcome. It suggests that you would not risk or wager money on the stated outcome because you don't consider it probable.
  • bet on it The expression "bet on it" means to have a strong belief in something, often with a sense of confidence or certainty. It is an assurance or promise that what is stated will definitely occur or happen. It is often used to emphasize one's conviction or determination regarding a particular outcome or course of action.
  • bet on The idiom "bet on" refers to having faith or confidence in something or someone. It is often used to express a belief that someone or something will succeed or perform well in a given situation. It can also imply making a prediction about the outcome of a future event and placing one's trust or money on that prediction.
  • bet on sm or sth The idiom "bet on someone or something" typically means to have confidence in someone or something, or to place a wager on the outcome of a particular event or situation. It implies having trust or belief in a person's abilities or the likelihood of a specific outcome.
  • bet sth on sm or sth The idiomatic phrase "bet something on someone or something" means to place a wager or to risk something valuable, such as money or personal belongings, on the prediction or outcome of someone or something. It implies a willingness to gamble or take a chance on the anticipated result.
  • sneeze on sm or sth The idiom "sneeze on someone or something" refers to intentionally infecting or contaminating someone or something with a disease, illness, or negative influence. It conveys the idea of deliberately causing harm or spreading negativity to a person or thing.
  • go on to a better land The idiom "go on to a better land" typically refers to someone passing away or dying and moving on to a more peaceful or desirable place, usually referring to the afterlife or heaven. It implies that the person's current life or situation is difficult or unsatisfactory, but their passing brings the hope of a better existence.
  • better get on my horse The idiom "better get on my horse" typically means that it is time to take action or make a move. It conveys a sense of urgency or the need to get things done promptly. Similar to the phrase "get going" or "get moving".
  • snitch on sm The idiom "snitch on someone" means to report, betray, or reveal the wrongful or secret activities of someone to authority figures or others who may be affected or interested. It implies disclosing information that could lead to negative consequences or punishment for the person being snitched on.
  • on the bias The idiom "on the bias" refers to having a particular inclination or prejudice towards a specific viewpoint or opinion. It suggests that a person is not impartial or objective in their thinking and tends to approach a subject with a predetermined bias or preference.
  • big on The idiom "big on" means to be enthusiastic or passionate about something, to possess a strong liking or preference for it. It implies a person having a deep interest or belief in a particular activity, idea, or concept.
  • big man on campus The idiom "big man on campus" refers to a person, typically a male, who is popular, influential, and highly respected within a particular community or social context, often a school or university. This individual usually possesses a high level of confidence, dominance, and prominence, and is regarded as a leader or prominent figure by their peers. They may excel in various areas such as academics, sports, or social activities, and are often well-known and admired by the campus community.
  • be big on The idiomatic expression "be big on" means to have great enthusiasm or a strong liking for something. It implies that someone has a particular interest or preference for a particular thing, activity, or idea.
  • overdose (sm) (on sth) The idiom "overdose (on sth)" refers to consuming or engaging in something excessively, beyond what is considered normal or healthy. It can be used in both a literal and figurative sense. In a literal sense, it refers to consuming an excessive amount of a substance, such as drugs or medication, which can have harmful or fatal consequences. In a figurative sense, it can refer to engaging excessively in an activity, habit, or emotion, often to the point of negative effects or becoming overwhelmed.
  • soft on sth The idiom "soft on something" refers to a person or an entity being lenient, tolerant, or sympathetic towards a particular issue, especially when it comes to policies or actions. It implies a lack of strictness or severity in dealing with that issue.
  • soften one's stance (on sm or sth) The idiom "soften one's stance (on sm or sth)" means to become more flexible or lenient in one's position, especially in relation to a particular issue or viewpoint. It implies a willingness to compromise or consider alternative perspectives, often with the intention of improving relations or finding a solution.
  • sold on sm or sth The idiom "sold on sm or sth" means to be convinced or persuaded about the value or appeal of someone or something. It refers to being fully persuaded or convinced about the merits of a person, idea, or thing and being eager to support or endorse it.
  • soldier on The idiom "soldier on" means to persist or continue with determination, resilience, or dedication despite facing difficulties, challenges, or setbacks. It conveys the idea of showing perseverance and fighting spirit in the face of adversity. It is often used to encourage someone to keep going or to describe someone who does not give up easily.
  • on the bird The idiom "on the bird" commonly refers to someone being imprisoned or in jail. It implies that the person is "on the move" or "on the inside," metaphorically likening their confinement to being on a bird, unable to fly and limited in their freedom.
  • put weight on sm part of the body The idiom "put weight on (someone's) part of the body" typically refers to applying pressure, burden, or responsibility on a specific person or aspect of their life. It is figurative and does not necessarily refer to the physical act of adding pounds to a body part.
  • arrive on the stroke of sm time The idiom "arrive on the stroke of sm time" means to arrive exactly at the specified time without any delay or deviation. It suggests punctuality and precision in reaching a specific destination or meeting.
  • carry on smhow The idiom "carry on somehow" typically means to continue or persist in a difficult or challenging situation using various methods or means, despite obstacles or without a clear solution. It implies pushing forward, making do with available resources, and finding a way to proceed despite adversity or uncertainty.
  • be on song The idiom "be on song" means to perform exceptionally well or in perfect harmony, usually in reference to a team, group, or individual's performance. It suggests that everything is flowing smoothly, efforts are coordinated, and the desired outcome is being achieved easily and effectively.
  • put the bite on The idiom "put the bite on" means to ask or demand for money, typically in a forceful or persistent manner, often by imposing pressure or intimidation.
  • bite on The idiom "bite on" typically means to firmly grip or clench one's teeth together, often as a reaction to pain, stress, or frustration. It can also refer to a determined effort or struggle to overcome a difficult situation or accomplish a challenging task.
  • Soup's on! The idiom "Soup's on!" is an informal expression used to announce that a meal, particularly a hot and nourishing soup, is ready to be served or is being served. It is often used in a literal sense when calling people to come and eat, conveying a sense of anticipation and excitement about enjoying a hearty meal together.
  • lay the blame on sb/sth The idiom "lay the blame on somebody/something" means to assign responsibility or fault to someone or something for a certain problem, mistake, or wrongdoing. It involves attributing the cause or guilt to a specific person or thing.
  • put the blame on sm or sth The idiom "put the blame on someone or something" means to hold someone or something responsible for a mistake or fault, often unfairly or without proper justification. It implies shifting the responsibility or accusation onto another person or thing to avoid taking responsibility oneself.
  • place the blame on sm or sth (for sth) The idiom "place the blame on someone or something (for something)" means to hold someone or something responsible or accountable for a particular situation, problem, or mistake. It refers to assigning fault or responsibility to someone or something as the cause of a negative outcome or error.
  • lay the blame (for sth) on sm The idiom "lay the blame (for sth) on sm" means to assign responsibility or fault for something to someone else, typically in a critical or accusatory manner. It implies holding someone accountable for a mistake, problem, or negative outcome.
  • blame sth on sm The idiom "blame something on someone" means to hold someone responsible or accountable for a mistake, problem, or wrongdoing, usually without justification or evidence. It implies shifting the blame onto someone else rather than accepting one's own responsibility.
  • blaze down (on sm or sth) The idiom "blaze down on someone or something" means to look at or examine someone or something with intense, penetrating, or judgmental eyes or glare. It implies a strong, direct, and often critical observation or scrutiny.
  • on the bleeding edge The idiom "on the bleeding edge" refers to being at the forefront or leading edge of technological or innovative advancements. It implies being on the cutting edge of progress or development, often associated with being on the forefront of new ideas, methods, or technologies before they become widely known or implemented.
  • blight on the land The idiom "blight on the land" refers to something that causes considerable harm or damage to an area or a community. It implies that the thing or situation being discussed is detrimental, unsightly, or destructive, and often referred to in terms of its negative impact on the environment, society, or a specific location.
  • have blinders on The definition of the idiom "have blinders on" refers to someone who is excessively focused on their own perspective or goals and is unwilling or unable to consider alternative views, opinions, or information. This idiom often implies a narrow-minded or close-minded approach to a particular situation or issue.
  • on the fritz The idiom "on the fritz" means that something is not working properly or is in a state of disrepair. It is often used to describe malfunctioning or broken machines, devices, or systems.
  • be on the blink The idiom "be on the blink" refers to something that is not functioning properly or is not working as expected. It commonly describes the state of a machine, device, or system that is experiencing mechanical or electrical problems.
  • paste sth on sm The idiom "paste something on someone" typically means to blame or accuse someone of a wrongdoing or mistake, often falsely or unfairly. It is a figurative expression that suggests forcefully attaching or assigning responsibility for something negative onto someone.
  • on the block The idiom "on the block" typically refers to something that is being put up for sale or auction. It is often used to describe a property, item, or even a company that is available for purchase by interested buyers.
  • put your head/neck on the block To "put your head/neck on the block" means to take a considerable risk or make a bold decision that could result in serious consequences or criticism. This idiom often implies that someone is willing to take responsibility for their actions, even if it might lead to negative outcomes or personal jeopardy.
  • put one's head on the block (for sm or sth) The idiom "put one's head on the block (for someone or something)" means to take a significant risk or make a personal sacrifice for someone or something, often involving one's reputation, safety, or livelihood. It suggests being willing to take responsibility, bear the consequences, or make a bold assertion of support or defense, despite potential adverse outcomes.
  • new kid on the block The idiom "new kid on the block" refers to a person who is new to a particular place, group, or industry, implying that they are inexperienced or unfamiliar with the established practices or dynamics of that context.
  • spit sth on(to) sth The idiom "spit sth on(to) sth" refers to the act of forcefully and quickly placing or throwing something onto something else. It implies a rapid or forceful action, resembling the force with which someone spits.
  • spit (up)on sm or sth The idiom "spit (up) on someone or something" refers to showing disdain, contempt, or disrespect towards a person or an object. It symbolizes an act of deliberately insulting or mistreating someone or something, often through words or actions that degrade their value or worth.
  • spatter on sm or sth The idiom "spatter on sm or sth" refers to the act of causing small droplets or particles of a liquid or substance to scatter or distribute randomly on someone or something. It implies the creation of small splashes or scattered marks resulting from the forceful impact or application of a liquid or substance.
  • spatter sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "spatter sth on(to) sm or sth" means to sprinkle, scatter, or distribute something in small droplets or splashes onto someone or something unintentionally or haphazardly. It typically refers to accidentally or carelessly throwing or splattering a liquid or substance onto a surface or person.
  • have blood on hands The idiom "have blood on hands" typically means to be responsible for someone's injury, suffering, or death. It is often used to suggest guilt or moral culpability for a harmful or tragic event, either directly or indirectly.
  • speak on
  • on speaking terms The idiom "on speaking terms" refers to having a relationship or level of communication wherein two or more people are able to speak to each other politely and without animosity or conflict. It implies that there is a mutual understanding and willingness to engage in conversation, even if the relationship may not be close or intimate.
  • on speaking terms (with sm) The idiom "on speaking terms (with someone)" means that two individuals have a civil and friendly relationship, allowing them to communicate with each other despite any previous conflicts or disagreements. It implies that they can converse without any animosity or tension.
  • on spec The idiom "on spec" refers to doing something or producing something without a specific request or guarantee of payment. It typically implies doing or making something as a speculative effort or investment, on the chance that it might be successful or accepted.
  • blow the whistle on The idiom "blow the whistle on" typically means to expose or bring attention to illicit or unethical actions, especially in a professional setting. It refers to the act of revealing or reporting wrongdoing, often done by an insider or someone with firsthand knowledge of the improper activities.
  • Blow on it! The idiom "Blow on it!" typically means to try to fix or solve a problem by using a quick, unconventional, or experimental approach, often without a clear plan or strategy. It implies taking a chance or attempting something despite the risk of failure, in the hope that it might produce a positive outcome. The expression draws from the action of blowing air onto a flame, which can either extinguish it or make it burn brighter.
  • blow on The idiom "blow on" typically refers to the act of exhaling or breathing forcefully onto something or someone. It can also metaphorically mean to criticize, expose, or disgrace someone or something.
  • speculate on sth The idiom "speculate on something" means to form an opinion or make a guess about something without having definite knowledge or evidence. It typically involves contemplating or thinking about a particular subject or event and making assumptions or conjectures about its possible outcomes or explanations.
  • spend sth on sm or sth The idiom "spend something on someone or something" means to use or devote a certain amount of money, time, effort, or resources to purchase or acquire something for the benefit or enjoyment of someone or something.
  • stomp on sm The idiom "stomp on someone" is used to describe someone who aggressively and mercilessly crushes, dominates, or defeats another person (often figuratively, not literally) without any regard for the other person's feelings, welfare, or aspirations. It signifies an act of forcefully overpowering or intentionally causing harm to someone in a disrespectful or derogatory manner.
  • take on board sth The idiom "take on board something" means to accept, consider, or understand something, especially a point of view or suggestion. It implies that one is open to acknowledging and incorporating new information or ideas into their thinking or decision-making process.
  • spill over on(to) sm or sth The idiom "spill over on(to) someone or something" is used to describe the spread or extension of something, such as emotions, actions, or effects, beyond its intended or initial boundaries. It implies that whatever is happening or occurring cannot be contained and begins to affect or impact others or additional things.
  • put a spin on sth To "put a spin on something" means to present or describe something in a particular way in order to influence opinions, perceptions, or reactions. It involves providing a unique or biased perspective on a matter in order to shape how it is perceived by others. This idiom is often used in the context of media, public relations, or marketing, where stories or information can be manipulated or twisted to favor a certain viewpoint or agenda.
  • perch on sth The idiom "perch on something" means to sit or rest on something, usually on a small elevated surface. It typically describes a bird or small animal finding a temporary spot to settle or balance on. In a figurative sense, it can also imply someone maintaining a precarious position or being hesitant and indecisive about something.
  • perch sm or sth on sth The idiom "perch sm or sth on sth" means to place or position something or someone on top of or in a specific location or object, often for a temporary period. It conveys the idea of balancing or resting something lightly on a surface or object.
  • on the boil The idiom "on the boil" typically means to be in a state of active or intense activity or progress. It refers to a situation where things are happening quickly or with great energy. The phrase often implies a sense of urgency or excitement associated with completing a task or achieving a goal.
  • splash on sm or sth To "splash on someone or something" means to apply or use something, such as a liquid, in a generous or excessive manner. It often implies the action of using or applying the substance with energy or enthusiasm.
  • splash sth on(to) sm or sth To "splash something on(to) someone or something" means to quickly and forcefully throw or put liquid on someone or something, often in an abrupt or careless manner. It implies the action of scattering or splattering the liquid, usually resulting in a messy or wet outcome.
  • splurge on sm or sth The idiom "splurge on something" means to indulge or spend a significant amount of money on someone or something, typically in a lavish or extravagant manner. It implies the act of treating oneself or others to a more expensive or luxurious item or experience than usual.
  • wrote the book on The idiom "wrote the book on" means to be an expert or have comprehensive knowledge or experience about a particular subject or activity. It implies that someone is considered the authority or authority figure in their field.
  • on the books The idiom "on the books" generally refers to something that is officially recorded or documented. It implies that an action, agreement, or regulation is legally established and recognized. It can be used to describe laws, policies, regulations, contracts, or any other formalized agreements or records.
  • on record The idiom "on record" means that something is officially documented or stated, and can be referred to as evidence or proof in the future. It refers to information that has been recorded, documented, or officially acknowledged in some way.
  • make book on The idiom "make book on" refers to the act of placing a bet or predicting the outcome of an event. It is often used to indicate someone's confidence in the prediction or willingness to bet on the outcome.
  • close the books on The idiom "close the books on" means to finalize or conclude something, especially a task or a project. It refers to the action of completing all necessary actions or procedures and bringing something to a conclusive end.
  • book on The idiom "book on" typically refers to the act of reserving or securing a place or appointment in a schedule or agenda. It can also imply the act of registering for a certain event, class, or service.
  • on the spot The idiom "on the spot" means to be put in a situation where one is expected to respond or perform immediately, without any prior preparation or delay. It implies being in a position of being observed or judged at that particular moment.
  • put sm on the spot To put someone on the spot means to place them in a difficult or challenging situation, often by demanding answers or making them feel uncomfortable or embarrassed.
  • put a spotlight on sb/sth The idiom "put a spotlight on someone/something" means to draw attention to someone or something, usually in a positive or prominent way. It suggests highlighting or focusing on a particular individual, issue, or situation, often in order to raise awareness, give recognition, or emphasize importance.
  • lower the boom on sm The idiom "lower the boom on someone" means to impose strict punishment or consequences on someone for their actions or behavior. It refers to taking severe and decisive action against someone, often in a forceful or unexpected manner.
  • die with your boots on The idiom "die with your boots on" refers to someone dying while actively engaged in their work or while in the midst of pursuing their passion or purpose in life. It implies that the individual remained committed and dedicated to their responsibilities until their very last breath. The idiom is often used to commend individuals who lived a life characterized by hard work, determination, and steadfastness.
  • couldn't pour water out of a boot (if there was instructions on the heel) The idiom "couldn't pour water out of a boot (if there was instructions on the heel)" is a humorous expression that is used to portray someone as extremely incompetent or lacking basic skills. It suggests that the person is so unintelligent or inept that they would struggle with even the simplest tasks, such as pouring water out of a boot, even if clear instructions were given. Essentially, it highlights a person's extreme inability or incompetence.
  • lay it on thick The idiom "lay it on thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, often in a very dramatic or excessive manner. It refers to adding an excessive amount of praise, flattery, emotions, or intensity to a statement or situation.
  • spread sth on thick The idiom "spread sth on thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, usually in a way that is insincere or meant to flatter or impress someone. It refers to the act of piling on excessive praise, flattery, or compliments.
  • spring sth on sm To "spring something on someone" means to surprise or unexpectedly present something to them, especially an idea, information, or task. It implies catching the person off guard with something they were not prepared for or expecting.
  • spring (up)on (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "spring (up) on (someone/something/ an animal)" generally means to unexpectedly or suddenly approach or confront someone, something, or an animal, often with aggression or force. It implies surprising or catching the person or entity off-guard.
  • border on sth The idiom "border on something" means to be very close to or nearly reaching a particular quality, condition, or state. It implies that something is very similar to or closely resembles another thing, often implying a negative or undesirable quality.
  • border (up)on sth The idiom "border (up)on sth" means that something is very close to reaching or being a particular quality, condition, or state. It implies that the subject is almost on the verge of something or is close to crossing a certain threshold.
  • on the borderline The idiom "on the borderline" refers to a situation or condition that is almost at the extreme limit or point of differentiation between two opposing things or categories. It often implies a state of uncertainty, ambiguity, or potential change.
  • sprinkle sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "sprinkle something on(to) someone or something" means to scatter or disperse small amounts of something onto someone or something, usually in a light and gentle manner.
  • on borrowed time The idiom "on borrowed time" means that someone is living or continuing to exist beyond the expected or allotted time. It can be used to describe a situation where someone or something is running out of time or is in a precarious position, and their demise or end is imminent.
  • living on borrowed time The idiom "living on borrowed time" means to be or continue to exist beyond the expected or allotted period, often referring to someone who is surviving despite a serious illness or imminent danger. It implies that one's existence or situation is temporary and can end abruptly or sooner than anticipated.
  • spur sb/sth on The idiom "spur sb/sth on" means to motivate or encourage someone or something to take action or make progress. It involves providing the necessary push or inspiration to propel someone or something forward in achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • spur sm on The idiom "spur someone on" means to motivate, encourage, or inspire someone to take action, achieve a goal, or perform at their best. It involves pushing or stimulating someone to move forward or do something by providing support, emphasizing their potential, or fueling their determination.
  • keep your/both feet on the ground The idiom "keep your/both feet on the ground" means to remain practical, realistic, and level-headed in one's thinking and actions. It suggests staying grounded and not getting carried away with unrealistic or impractical ideas or expectations.
  • land (up)on both feet The idiom "land (up)on both feet" means to successfully recover from a difficult or challenging situation, often referring to a person's ability to quickly adapt and find stability after facing adversity or unexpected circumstances. It implies being resourceful, resilient, and able to thrive despite obstacles.
  • keep one's feet on the ground The idiom "keep one's feet on the ground" means to remain practical, realistic, or down-to-earth in one's thinking or behavior, rather than having unrealistic expectations or indulging in flights of fancy. It implies staying humble, level-headed, and not getting carried away by imagination or excessive optimism.
  • spy (up)on sm or sth The idiom "spy (up)on someone or something" means to secretly observe or gather information on someone or something without their knowledge or consent. It implies a covert or stealthy approach to surveillance or monitoring.
  • Not on your nelly! The idiom "Not on your nelly!" is an informal expression used to strongly reject or decline a suggestion, request, or proposition. It is similar to saying "no way" or "absolutely not." The phrase often conveys a sense of disbelief, resistance, or defiance. The origin of the idiom is unclear, but it is commonly used in British English.
  • squander sth on sm or sth The idiom "squander sth on sm or sth" means to waste or spend something, such as money or resources, recklessly or foolishly on someone or something that is not worth the investment. It implies that the valuable thing is being used unwisely and without gaining any significant benefits or returns.
  • Every tub must stand on its own bottom The idiom "Every tub must stand on its own bottom" is a metaphorical expression that means every individual or entity is responsible for their own success or financial stability. It suggests that each person or organization should be self-sufficient and not rely on others for support or assistance.
  • be on the square "Be on the square" is an idiom that means to be honest, fair, and trustworthy in one's actions and dealings. It suggests being sincere and transparent in one's intentions and behaviors.
  • squeal (on sm) (to sm) The idiom "squeal (on someone) (to someone)" refers to the act of informing or revealing secret or confidential information about someone to another person, usually as an act of betrayal or in order to avoid punishment oneself. It is often used when someone discloses information that leads to the identification or apprehension of a wrongdoer or reveals someone's involvement in a prohibited or illegal activity. The term "squeal" is often associated with the sound of a pig's cry, implying that the person informing is betraying others in a similar manner.
  • put the squeeze on sb/sth The idiom "put the squeeze on someone/something" means to apply pressure or force in order to obtain a certain outcome or advantage. It refers to exerting influence or coercion on a person or situation to achieve a desired result.
  • put the squeeze on sm To "put the squeeze on someone" means to exert pressure or make someone feel cornered or uncomfortable, typically in order to achieve a specific outcome or gain an advantage over them. This expression conveys the idea of applying force or applying tactics that restrict or limit someone's options.
  • boxed on the table
  • have one's brain on a leash
  • sb's eyes are out on stalks The idiom "sb's eyes are out on stalks" is used to describe when someone's eyes are wide open, often due to surprise, amazement, or excitement. It implies that the person is intensely focused and attentive, as if their eyes are protruding from their head on long stalks to better observe something.
  • fit/write sth on the back of a postage stamp The idiom "fit/write something on the back of a postage stamp" is used to describe a situation or information that is extremely concise, brief, or limited. It implies that the content being discussed can be summarized or explained within a very small space, just like the limited space on the back of a postage stamp.
  • stamp on sm or sth The idiom "stamp on someone or something" typically means to forcefully and deliberately step or press on someone or something with one's foot. It implies exerting physical pressure as an act of dominance or aggression. It can also metaphorically refer to suppressing or overpowering someone or something with authority or force.
  • stamp sth (up)on sm or sth The idiom "stamp sth (up)on sm or sth" means to forcefully or aggressively impose or impress something upon someone or something. It implies forcefully asserting dominance, influence, or authority over the person or thing involved.
  • put the brakes on sb/sth The idiom "put the brakes on someone/something" means to slow down, halt or stop the progress, growth, or momentum of someone or something. It implies the act of applying controls or limitations to reduce the speed or intensity of a situation, action, or person's behavior.
  • put the brakes on The idiom "put the brakes on" means to slow down or halt the progress or development of something. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of putting a stop or control on a situation, action, or process.
  • put the brakes on sth The idiom "put the brakes on something" means to slow down or stop something from progressing or advancing further. It often refers to halting or slowing down a process, plan, or activity that is moving too quickly or in an undesirable direction.
  • put the brakes on sm The idiom "put the brakes on" means to slow down or halt the progress or development of something. It can also refer to taking action to prevent or control a situation from getting worse.
  • jam the brakes on The idiom "jam the brakes on" refers to the action of suddenly and forcefully applying the brakes of a vehicle, usually to stop or slow down abruptly. It is often used figuratively to indicate a sudden and complete halt or interruption of a process, plan, or action.
  • stand pat (on sth) The idiom "stand pat (on sth)" refers to maintaining one's current position or stance without making any changes or concessions. It often implies a stubborn or unyielding approach, resisting any form of alteration or compromise. This idiom can be used in various contexts, such as in negotiations, decision-making, or opinions.
  • on standby The idiom "on standby" means to be ready or in a state of preparedness, typically to take immediate action or to be available when needed. It often implies being on call or waiting to be called upon for a specific task or duty.
  • turn on its head The idiom "turn on its head" refers to a radical or dramatic change in a situation or perspective, usually resulting in the complete reversal of its initial meaning, significance, or understanding.
  • take a stand on The idiom "take a stand on" means to express a clear and firm opinion or position on a particular issue or topic. It often implies not remaining neutral or indifferent, but actively voicing one's beliefs or motives regarding the matter.
  • stand on two feet The idiom "stand on two feet" typically means to be self-sufficient or independent, both financially and emotionally. It refers to someone's ability to support themselves and manage their own affairs without relying on others.
  • stand on own two feet The idiom "stand on one's own two feet" means to be self-reliant and independent, able to handle one's own responsibilities and make decisions without relying on others for support or assistance. It implies having personal strength, confidence, and the ability to support oneself both emotionally and financially.
  • stand on own feet The idiom "stand on own feet" means to be self-reliant, independent, and able to take care of oneself without assistance or relying on others. It refers to someone who is capable of making their own decisions, supporting themselves financially, and facing life's challenges without constant support or guidance from others.
  • stand on its head The idiom "stand on its head" means to completely overturn or reverse a situation or concept. It suggests a drastic change where the usual order is inverted or altered.
  • stand on head The idiom "stand on head" means to go to great lengths or make an extraordinary effort to achieve or accomplish something. It implies doing something extremely difficult or uncommon, often in order to impress or please someone.
  • stand on dignity The idiom "stand on dignity" refers to one's ability to maintain their self-respect and assert their principles or values, especially in challenging or compromising situations. It implies refusing to compromise one's integrity or self-worth.
  • stand on The idiom "stand on" typically means to base one's argument, opinion, or action on a particular principle, belief, or set of values. It refers to firmly holding or relying on a specific stance or viewpoint in a given situation.
  • on the stand The idiom "on the stand" typically refers to the act of being in a witness position while testifying in a court of law. It implies that the person is under oath and is being questioned or cross-examined by lawyers or attorneys.
  • make hair stand on end The idiom "make hair stand on end" is used to describe something that is extremely shocking, frightening, or disturbing, causing a person's hair to literally stand on end due to a strong emotional reaction.
  • have a leg to stand on The idiom "have a leg to stand on" means to have valid or convincing evidence, arguments, or basis for one's beliefs, claims, or actions. It refers to having a strong enough position or justification to support one's stance or viewpoint.
  • could do sth standing on your head The idiom "could do something standing on your head" means that a person can easily accomplish or perform a task without much effort, skill, or difficulty. It implies that the action or task is so effortless or second nature to the person that they could do it even in a more complex or challenging situation.
  • put a brave face/front on sth The idiom "put a brave face/front on something" means to act or appear optimistic, confident, or courageous in a difficult or challenging situation, despite feeling scared, anxious, or uncertain inside. It involves hiding one's true emotions or fears and presenting a positive or brave demeanor to others.
  • swap notes (on sm or sth) The idiom "swap notes (on sm or sth)" means to exchange information, ideas, or opinions about a specific topic, often to gain knowledge or insights. It is commonly used when referring to sharing information with someone, usually in a casual or informal setting.
  • start on The idiom "start on" typically means to begin working or focusing on a particular task, project, or activity. It implies the initiation or commencement of an action or endeavor.
  • start off on the wrong foot The idiom "start off on the wrong foot" means to begin a relationship or task in a negative or unfavorable manner, often due to an initial mistake or misunderstanding. It signifies a less-than-ideal start that may create difficulties or obstacles going forward.
  • start in on The definition of the idiom "start in on" is to begin doing or speaking about something, typically in a critical or harmful manner. It refers to the act of initiating or engaging in something, often with an aggressive or confrontational approach.
  • make a start on The idiom "make a start on" means to begin or initiate a task or activity. It implies taking the first steps towards accomplishing something or commencing a project.
  • get started on The idiom "get started on" means to begin or initiate a particular activity, project, or task. It implies taking the first step or commencing an endeavor.
  • get off on the wrong foot The idiom "get off on the wrong foot" means to start a relationship or situation in a negative or problematic way. It refers to beginning an interaction, project, or acquaintance in a manner that is unfavorable, causing misunderstandings or difficulties right from the start.
  • get off off on the wrong foot The idiom "get off on the wrong foot" is used to describe when an initial interaction, relationship, or situation begins poorly or unfavorably, often leading to negative consequences or misunderstandings. It implies that the first impression or start was not ideal or unsuccessful.
  • know which side one's bread is buttered on The idiom "know which side one's bread is buttered on" means to understand and prioritize one's own best interests or advantageous position in a certain situation. It signifies being aware of the people, circumstances, or opportunities that are beneficial and align with one's goals or well-being.
  • start out (on sth) The idiom "start out (on sth)" means to begin a journey, progress, or endeavor, especially with a particular plan or goal in mind. It often refers to the initial stages of an activity or the beginning of a process.
  • be/live on the breadline The idiom "be/live on the breadline" refers to living in extreme poverty, with only enough money to buy the basic necessities for survival, specifically food. It means to be in a financial situation where one's income just covers their essential needs, leaving very little or no room for discretionary spending or savings. The term "breadline" historically referred to the queue of people waiting for free or heavily discounted bread during times of economic hardship.
  • break on The idiom "break on" typically means to interrupt or pause an activity or event, often unexpectedly or abruptly. It can also refer to the act of stopping or discontinuing something temporarily or permanently.
  • breathe (up)on sm or sth The idiom "breathe (up)on someone or something" typically refers to an action or influence that is detrimental or harmful. It suggests that someone or something has a negative impact on the person or thing mentioned. This can be used metaphorically to describe situations where someone's presence or influence negatively affects a person or situation.
  • stay on top of The idiom "stay on top of" means to remain informed about or be in control of a situation by actively monitoring or managing it. It implies staying updated, organized, and proactive in order to stay ahead or be well-prepared.
  • stay on The idiom "stay on" generally refers to remaining in a particular position, job, or situation for an extended period of time, rather than leaving or moving elsewhere. It can imply dedication, commitment, or persistence in staying with something or someone despite difficulties or challenges.
  • on toes The idiom "on toes" means to be alert, attentive, and ready to react quickly to any situation. It conveys the idea of being prepared and responsive, usually in a vigilant or cautious manner.
  • on course The idiom "on course" means to be progressing or moving in the intended direction or towards the intended goal. It suggests that someone or something is on the right or desired path and is following the planned trajectory.
  • on a diet The idiom "on a diet" refers to the act of intentionally restricting one's food intake or adjusting their eating habits in order to lose weight, maintain a specific weight, or improve their overall health and well-being.
  • linger on The idiom "linger on" means to stay or remain in a place or situation for a longer time than necessary or expected, usually implying a reluctance to leave. It can also refer to the act of extending or continuing beyond the usual or expected duration.
  • a firm/steady hand on the tiller The idiom "a firm/steady hand on the tiller" refers to someone who possesses strong leadership skills, stability, and control in managing a situation or organization. It implies that the person is able to guide and steer things in the right direction, ensuring smooth operations and preventing any potential issues or crises.
  • steal a march on sb/sth To "steal a march on someone/something" means to gain an advantage or take action before others in order to achieve a particular goal or outcome. It suggests being sneaky or getting ahead by surprise. This idiom is derived from military tactics, where "marching" signifies progress or strategic movement.
  • steal up on sm or sth The idiom "steal up on someone or something" typically means to approach or advance upon someone or something in a secretive or sneaky manner, often without being noticed. It implies a quiet, gradual, or stealthy movement towards a target.
  • steal a march on sm or sth The idiom "steal a march on someone or something" means to gain an advantage over someone or something by acting or progressing secretly or before them. It suggests the notion of seizing an opportunity or making progress in a manner that puts one ahead of others.
  • be/come down on sb like a ton of bricks The idiomatic expression "be/come down on someone like a ton of bricks" means to reprimand, criticize, or punish someone severely or harshly for something they have done wrong or for their actions or behavior. It implies a strong, intense, and unforgiving reaction to the person's actions, often resulting in serious consequences.
  • bring up on
  • bring on oneself The idiom "bring on oneself" means to cause or invite trouble, harm, or negative consequences through one's own actions or choices. It implies that someone is responsible for or has brought upon themselves the difficulties or problems they are experiencing.
  • bring on The idiom "bring on" means to cause or initiate something, usually with enthusiasm or eagerness. It implies a willingness to face or confront a situation or challenge.
  • bring it on The idiom "bring it on" is an expression used to convey eagerness, confidence, or defiance when faced with a challenge or threat. It signifies the individual's willingness and readiness to face and overcome any obstacle or opposition that comes their way.
  • bring down on The idiom "bring down on" refers to causing trouble, difficulty, or punishment to befall someone or something. It implies the act of invoking negative consequences or harmful outcomes upon the subject in question.
  • bring sth down (on sb) The idiom "bring something down (on somebody)" typically means to cause trouble or impose blame or punishment on someone.
  • bring sm in (on sth) The idiom "bring someone in (on something)" typically means to involve or include someone in a particular situation, event, or discussion. It refers to the action of bringing someone into the loop, sharing information, or seeking their participation or input regarding a specific matter.
  • bring on sth The idiom "bring on something" means to cause, initiate, or provoke the occurrence or arrival of something, usually something challenging, difficult, or undesirable. It can also refer to inviting or welcoming something eagerly or with enthusiasm.
  • bring sth on sm The idiom "bring something on someone" means to provoke or incite a person to confront or handle a particular situation or challenge. It suggests that someone willingly or intentionally causes another person to deal with difficulties, problems, or consequences associated with a specific action or event.
  • bring sth on The idiom "bring something on" means to intentionally cause or invite a particular situation, usually negative or challenging, by one's actions or behavior. It suggests that someone is willing to face the consequences or challenges that may arise from their actions.
  • bring sm on The idiom "bring sm on" typically means to intentionally invite or provoke a certain consequence or outcome, often despite potential negative consequences. It implies knowingly initiating or encouraging something, whether good or bad, to happen.
  • bring sm out (on sth) The idiom "bring (something) out (on something)" generally means to cause or provoke a particular quality, emotion, or reaction in someone or something. It can refer to the act of eliciting or bringing forth a specific behavior, characteristic, or result in a person or object. It often implies that the stated thing was already present but hidden or not overtly expressed before it was "brought out."
  • on the brink of sth The idiom "on the brink of something" is used to describe a situation where one is very close to reaching or experiencing something significant or significant change, usually implying that the situation is at a critical point and could go either way. It signifies being on the verge, threshold, or edge of something, typically referencing a crucial or decisive moment.
  • be on the brink of doing sth The idiom "be on the brink of doing something" means to be very close or near to doing something, usually implying that one is about to take a decisive action or make a significant change. It suggests being at the point where a particular outcome or action is imminent, and a slight push or catalyst is all that is needed to make it happen.
  • on the brink (of doing sth) The idiom "on the brink (of doing sth)" refers to a situation where someone is very close to doing or experiencing something significant, usually with the implication that they are at a critical point or about to reach a decisive moment. It suggests being right on the edge or threshold of an action or event.
  • step on toes The idiom "step on toes" refers to unintentionally or purposefully causing offense, annoyance, or interference in someone else's affairs or territory. It implies intruding upon another person's domain, disregarding their boundaries, or meddling in their personal or professional matters.
  • step on the gas The idiom "step on the gas" means to accelerate or increase speed, often referring to a vehicle. It can also be used metaphorically to encourage someone to move faster or take action more urgently.
  • step on The idiom "step on" typically means to anger, offend, or upset someone. It can also mean to interfere or intrude upon someone's territory or domain.
  • step back on
  • step on sm or sth The idiom "step on someone or something" means to accidentally or intentionally put weight or pressure on someone or something with your foot. It can be used both literally, such as when physically standing on someone or something, and figuratively to imply interfering with or hindering someone's progress or success.
  • step out (on sm) The idiom "step out (on sm)" typically means to betray or cheat on someone, usually in a romantic or committed relationship. It refers to a person engaging in a clandestine affair or being unfaithful to their partner.
  • plant sth on sm The idiom "plant something on someone" means to deliberately place or hide something, often incriminating or compromising, on someone without their knowledge or consent in order to deceive or frame them. It is typically used when someone is falsely accused or blamed for something they did not do.
  • on Broadway The idiom "on Broadway" typically refers to something that is happening or performing in the theater district of New York City known as Broadway. It often signifies a high level of professionalism, quality, or success, as Broadway is renowned for its theatrical productions and talented performers.
  • on steroids The idiom "on steroids" is used to describe something or someone that is greatly intensified or enhanced, often in terms of size, strength, intensity, power, or effectiveness. It implies that the subject is exaggerated or pushed to extreme levels beyond the normal or expected state. The phrase is derived from the medical use of steroids to amplify physical qualities, and it now represents an exaggerated or intensified version of something.
  • stick on The idiom "stick on" generally refers to the act of affixing or attaching something to a surface using an adhesive or other means. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who remains persistent or devoted to a task, idea, or person.
  • on the stick The phrase "on the stick" generally means being alert, attentive, and on top of things. It implies being proactive, efficient, and organized in dealing with tasks or responsibilities.
  • get on the stick The idiom "get on the stick" means to start working, get busy, or act quickly and efficiently. It implies the need for someone to be more productive, focused, or attentive to a task or situation.
  • be (batting) on a sticky wicket The idiom "be (batting) on a sticky wicket" means to be in a difficult or precarious situation, often due to unforeseen circumstances or unfavorable conditions. It originated from the sport of cricket, where a "sticky wicket" refers to a pitch that is damp, making it challenging for the batsman to play shots and score runs. Thus, being on a sticky wicket metaphorically implies being confronted with obstacles or challenges that hinder progress or success.
  • jury is still out (on sm or sth) The expression "jury is still out on something or someone" means that a decision or conclusion has not been reached regarding a particular matter. It implies that there is still uncertainty or debate surrounding the issue and that further evidence or evaluation is required before a final judgment can be made.
  • There's many a good tune played on an old fiddle The idiom "There's many a good tune played on an old fiddle" means that even though something or someone may be old or outdated, they can still be useful or productive. It suggests that age or appearance does not necessarily reflect one's abilities or potential.
  • play tricks on The idiom "play tricks on" means to deceive or play pranks on someone in order to mislead or confuse them. It involves engaging in activities or behaviors that purposely manipulate or trick someone for amusement or to achieve a desired outcome.
  • play on heartstrings The idiom "play on heartstrings" refers to a deliberate attempt to elicit strong emotions, especially sympathy or sadness, from someone. It is often used to describe manipulative tactics used by someone to evoke deep feelings in order to get a desired reaction or response.
  • play on The idiom "play on" typically refers to the act of continuing or prolonging a situation, especially in a way that benefits oneself or undermines another person or group. It can also refer to exploiting or taking advantage of a particular circumstance or condition.
  • play a trick on The idiomatic expression "play a trick on" means to deceive, deceive, or fool someone for entertainment or amusement purposes, usually in a playful or light-hearted manner.
  • play a joke on The idiom "play a joke on" means to trick or deceive someone in a playful manner for amusement or entertainment. It involves playing a humorous prank or practical joke on someone with the intention of making them laugh or providing amusement.
  • a play on words The idiom "a play on words" refers to the clever and humorous manipulation or manipulation of language, often involving wordplay or puns, to create a clever or witty effect.
  • stink on ice The idiom "stink on ice" is an informal expression used to describe something that is incredibly bad, awful, or rotten. It signifies a situation or an object that is absolutely undesirable and unpleasant.
  • browse on sth To "browse on something" means to casually look at or explore items, information, or options available on a specific platform or medium, often without a specific purpose or goal in mind. It typically refers to using the internet to casually view or search through websites, web pages, or digital content. This action of browsing can involve reading articles, looking at images, watching videos, or exploring various links without a specific intention to purchase or engage deeply with the content.
  • not have a stitch of clothes (on) The idiom "not have a stitch of clothes (on)" means that someone is completely naked or not wearing a single garment. It implies that the person is exposed and vulnerable in their state of undress.
  • brush up (on sth) The idiom "brush up (on sth)" means to review or refresh one's knowledge, skills, or understanding of something in order to improve or become more proficient in that particular area.
  • stock up (on sth) The idiom "stock up (on sth)" means to buy or gather a large quantity or supply of something in order to have enough for future use or preparation. It often implies the intention to accumulate enough of a particular item to last for an extended period or to avoid running out of it.
  • on the bubble The idiom "on the bubble" refers to a tense or uncertain situation where someone is on the brink of success or failure. It describes being in a state where one's position or outcome is uncertain and could go either way. Often used in contexts like sports or competitions, it implies being in a borderline or ambiguous position, typically referring to being close to qualifying for a certain level, team, or opportunity, but not yet guaranteed.
  • stool (on sm)
  • stop on a dime The idiom "stop on a dime" means to come to a sudden stop or halt with great precision and control, often indicating the ability to react quickly to a situation or change direction effortlessly. It conveys the idea of being able to stop abruptly and precisely, as if one could stop their motion or progress as easily as a coin landing on the edge of a dime.
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  • build on sth The idiom "build on something" means to further develop or expand upon an existing idea, concept, or foundation. It refers to the act of adding new elements or making improvements to something that already exists, in order to enhance its overall strength, quality, or success. It implies a process of growth and progress by leveraging existing resources or achievements.
  • build one's hopes on sm or sth The idiom "build one's hopes on someone or something" means to have optimistic expectations or place a lot of faith in a particular person or thing. It implies that someone is relying heavily on someone or something for achieving a desired outcome or fulfilling their aspirations. However, it also suggests that this reliance may be risky or uncertain, as the hopes may be easily shattered or disappointed.
  • build on(to) sth The idiom "build on(to) something" refers to the act of enhancing or developing an existing idea, concept, or foundation. It usually suggests adding new information, insights, or improvements to build upon a previous work or understanding. It can also imply making progress or increasing success by using a solid base as a starting point.
  • build sth on(to) sth The idiom "build sth on(to) sth" means to develop or construct something by starting with a particular foundation, premise, or existing idea. It implies the act of adding or expanding upon a base or framework to create something new or more advanced.
  • build sth (up)on sth The idiom "build something (up) on something" means to create or develop something based on a specific foundation, idea, or starting point. It implies using existing knowledge, resources, or principles to construct or expand upon something. This idiom suggests the process of gradually adding layers or levels to something to make it stronger or more substantial.
  • build (up)on sth The idiom "build (up) on something" refers to the act of using a particular idea, concept, or foundation as a starting point and then adding on to it or developing it further. It implies the process of expanding or improving upon an existing aspect to create something more substantial or advanced. This idiom is often used in the context of progress or growth in various fields such as science, technology, or personal development.
  • put a strain on sm or sth The idiom "put a strain on someone or something" means to cause stress, pressure, or excessive demands that can be overwhelming or challenging. It refers to a situation or action that burdens or stretches someone or something beyond their normal capacity, causing difficulties or negative consequences.
  • place a strain on sm or sth The idiom "place a strain on someone or something" means to create pressure, stress, or difficulty for someone or something. It suggests that a demanding or burdensome situation is putting excessive tension or pressure on someone or something, resulting in challenges or negative consequences.
  • strand sm on sth The idiom "strand someone on something" means to leave or abandon someone in a difficult or unpleasant situation, typically involving a problem or challenge that they are unable to resolve themselves. It can also refer to leaving someone in a remote or isolated place, often without a means of transportation or communication.
  • strap sth on to sm or sth The idiom "strap something on to someone or something" typically means to attach or secure something firmly to someone or something else using straps. It often refers to physically connecting or fastening an object or equipment to a person or an object to ensure it stays in place during movement or use.
  • like a bump on a log The idiom "like a bump on a log" means to be inactive, unresponsive, or doing nothing in a situation where one should be engaged, active, or contributing. It implies someone's lack of involvement or contribution and suggests a passive or unengaged attitude.
  • not go a bundle on sth The idiom "not go a bundle on sth" means to not be particularly enthusiastic or interested in something. It implies a lack of enthusiasm or enjoyment towards a specific thing or activity.
  • save a bundle (on sth) The idiom "save a bundle (on sth)" means to save a significant amount of money on something. It refers to obtaining a large discount or paying a lower price than expected for a particular item or service.
  • drop a bundle (on sth) The idiom "drop a bundle (on sth)" refers to spending a large amount of money on something, usually implying that the amount spent is excessive or extravagant. It suggests a significant financial investment or expense.
  • stream down (on sm or sth) The idiom "stream down (on someone or something)" means to come down or flow down quickly and abundantly, usually referring to tears, rain, or any other liquid substance. It implies a continuous and heavy flow that is difficult to control or stop.
  • the woman on the street
  • the man on the street The idiom "the man on the street" refers to the average person or ordinary individual in society. It is often used to indicate the perspective or opinions of everyday citizens. It emphasizes the idea of taking into account the views and experiences of common people in discussions or decision-making processes.
  • put sth on the street The idiom "put something on the street" typically refers to the act of making something available for sale or offering something to the public for purchase or use. It often implies the release or introduction of a product, service, or information into the market or public domain.
  • on the street The idiom "on the street" refers to something or someone who is actively engaged or involved in a particular field, profession, or activity, often implying firsthand knowledge, experience, or awareness of the current state or trends related to it. It can also refer to someone who is homeless or living in poverty.
  • lay emphasis on sth The idiom "lay emphasis on sth" means to give something special attention or focus on it in order to signify its importance or significance. It implies intensifying the emphasis or highlighting a particular aspect or element of a subject or issue.
  • strew sth on sm or sth The idiom "strew something on someone or something" means to scatter or spread something, usually in a careless or random manner, over someone or something. It implies a lack of organization or intentionality with which something is dispersed.
  • on the front burner The idiom "on the front burner" means that something is currently receiving immediate attention and is being given high priority. It suggests that an issue or task is actively being worked on or pursued.
  • be on the back burner The idiom "be on the back burner" means to be placed or held in a position of lesser importance or priority, usually temporarily, while attention and focus are directed towards other more pressing matters or tasks. It implies that something is temporarily set aside or postponed, but not forgotten.
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  • go on strike The idiom "go on strike" refers to the act of workers collectively refusing to work, usually as a form of protest or negotiation. It involves a temporary cessation of work or a decision to stop working altogether until certain demands or grievances are met by the employer.
  • burst on the scene The idiom "burst on the scene" means to suddenly appear or emerge prominently and quickly in a particular situation or environment, often with a strong impact. It refers to someone or something that becomes widely noticed or recognized in a short period, making a powerful entrance or debut that captures attention.
  • burst on The idiom "burst on" refers to the rapid and forceful entry or appearance of something or someone into a specific situation or scene. It implies a sudden and noticeable arrival that often catches others by surprise.
  • come on strong The idiom "come on strong" means to act or speak with great intensity, confidence, or force in order to make an impression or convince someone. It refers to exhibiting a very assertive or aggressive approach in one's behavior, often to assert dominance or influence.
  • The lights are on but nobody'sone's home The idiom "The lights are on but nobody's home" is used to describe someone who appears physically present but is not mentally or emotionally engaged or aware. It implies that the person lacks intelligence, understanding, or responsiveness in a given situation.
  • struggle on with sth The idiom "struggle on with something" means to persist in dealing with a situation or task despite facing difficulties or obstacles. It implies continuing with determination and perseverance despite challenges or hardships one may encounter along the way.
  • strum sth on sth The idiom "strum sth on sth" typically refers to playing or strumming a musical instrument, such as a guitar or ukulele, by running one's fingers or a pick across the strings in a rhythmic or melodic manner. It implies the action of producing sound or music by plucking or strumming the strings, usually against a surface such as the instrument's body or a fretboard.
  • sb's butt is on the line The idiom "sb's butt is on the line" means that someone is in a situation where they are at risk of facing negative consequences or punishment for their actions or decisions. It implies that someone's reputation, job, or wellbeing is in jeopardy.
  • butt in (on sm or sth) The idiom "butt in (on someone or something)" means to interrupt or intrude upon a conversation, situation, or activity without being invited or welcomed. It implies interfering or involving oneself in matters that do not concern them. Additionally, in a more literal sense, "butt in" can refer to physically inserting oneself into a space or position that is already occupied by someone else.
  • stuck on sth The idiom "stuck on something" typically means to be obsessively fixated or infatuated with someone or something, unable to move on or let go. It implies being emotionally attached, often to the point of being unable to see flaws or make rational decisions.
  • study up on sm or sth The idiom "study up on sm or sth" means to engage in focused and intentional learning or research on a specific subject or topic in order to gain knowledge and understanding. It implies putting effort into thorough preparation or acquiring expertise in a particular area.
  • on the button The idiom "on the button" means to do something precisely or exactly at the right time, or to be punctual.
  • have a/your finger on the button The idiom "have a/your finger on the button" means to be in a position of control or authority, ready to take action or make a decision at any moment. It typically refers to someone who is in charge and capable of initiating important actions or changes.
  • stumble on sm or sth The idiom "stumble on someone or something" means to come across or find someone or something unexpectedly, often by accident or without actively searching for it. It can be used both in a literal sense, such as physically tripping over something, or in a figurative sense, like discovering information or stumbling upon a solution to a problem unexpectedly.
  • on the stump The idiom "on the stump" refers to someone who is actively campaigning or making political speeches, particularly during an election. It originates from the practice of a politician standing on a wooden stump or platform while giving public speeches or rallying supporters.
  • pull a stunt (on sm) The idiom "pull a stunt (on someone)" refers to the act of playing a trick or practical joke on someone, often in a surprising or unexpected manner. It implies the intention to deceive, mislead, or surprise someone for amusement or to achieve a specific outcome.
  • buy on time The idiom "buy on time" refers to purchasing goods or services on credit, with the understanding that the payment will be made at a later specified date, usually through installments.
  • buy on credit "Buy on credit" is an idiom that refers to the act of purchasing goods or services with the promise to pay for them at a later date. It involves using credit or borrowing money from a lender or supplier, rather than paying upfront with cash.
  • have a buzz on The idiom "have a buzz on" refers to being under the influence of alcohol or drugs, typically experiencing a feeling of intoxication or mild euphoria. It suggests that someone has been drinking or using substances to the point of achieving a noticeable level of intoxication.
  • icing on the cake The idiom "icing on the cake" refers to something additional or extra that is added to an already good or positive situation, making it even better or more satisfying. It symbolizes the final enhancement or finishing touch that contributes to the overall enjoyment or success of something.
  • put a price (tag) on sth The idiom "put a price (tag) on sth" means to assign a value or monetary cost to something. It refers to determining the worth or cost of something, often in terms of its market value or importance.
  • calculate on sth The idiom "calculate on sth" means to plan or hypothesize based on certain assumptions or expectations. It refers to making predictions, estimations, or projections about a particular situation or outcome.
  • subsist on sth The idiom "subsist on sth" means to survive or sustain oneself by consuming or relying on a particular thing or resource, usually in limited quantities or under difficult circumstances. It implies that the person or entity is able to barely meet their basic needs using that specific thing.
  • pay a call on The idiom "pay a call on" means to visit someone, usually for a short period of time, often with the purpose of socializing or offering greetings. It typically involves going to someone's house or place of work to spend some time with them or check in on their well-being.
  • have first call on The idiom "have first call on" means to have the privilege or priority to be chosen or selected before others. It refers to being the first choice or having the first opportunity to do or receive something.
  • call on the carpet The idiom "call on the carpet" is used to describe a situation where someone is summoned or brought in for a formal reprimand or scolding, usually by a person in authority. It suggests that the person being reprimanded is in a position of having to explain or justify their actions. The term originated from the practice of having individuals summoned to the carpet in front of their superiors or higher-ranking officials to address their mistakes or misconduct.
  • call on The idiom "call on" has multiple definitions and can vary depending on the context in which it is used. Here are a few common interpretations: 1) To visit or pay a short visit to someone: This definition often refers to seeking someone's company, typically by going to their home or workplace. For example, "I decided to call on my friend John to see how he was doing." 2) To ask or request someone to speak or contribute: This meaning pertains to inviting someone to express their opinion or share their thoughts in a discussion or meeting. For instance, "During the meeting, the chairperson called on each participant to provide their input." 3) To appeal to a higher authority for assistance or intervention: In this sense,
  • call on sb The idiom "call on sb" means to visit or request someone to speak or perform a particular action.
  • call on sth "Call on something" is an idiomatic expression that means to make use of or rely on something, such as a skill, knowledge, or resource when needed. It refers to accessing or utilizing a particular attribute, ability, or tool to achieve a desired outcome or solve a problem.
  • call on sm The idiom "call on someone" means to visit or request someone's attention for a specific purpose or reason.
  • call (up)on sm (to do sth) The idiom "call (up)on someone to do something" means to ask or request someone to perform a certain task or action. It implies a sense of authority or expectation for the person being called upon to take action or fulfill a responsibility.
  • call (up)on sm The idiom "call (up)on someone" means to ask or request someone to do something or to take action.
  • on campus The idiom "on campus" refers to being physically present or engaging in activities within the boundaries or premises of a college or university. It typically signifies that someone is participating in the academic, social, or extracurricular aspects of campus life.
  • could standing on head
  • superimpose sth on (to) sm or sth The idiom "superimpose something on (to) someone or something" means to overlay or place one object or concept on top of another, often in a graphic or symbolic manner. It can also refer to the act of imposing an idea, belief, or characteristic onto someone or something, without their consent or naturally occurring. This idiom is commonly used in the context of images, graphics, or ideas being visually combined or imposed on top of each other.
  • put one's thinking cap on The idiom "put one's thinking cap on" means to start thinking carefully and attentively in order to solve a problem or come up with creative ideas. It implies the need to focus and engage in intellectual effort.
  • put a cap on sth The idiom "put a cap on something" means to set a limit or restriction on something. It refers to taking action to control or limit a specific situation, often concerning spending, quantities, or other measures.
  • pull a fast one (on sb) The idiom "pull a fast one (on sb)" means to deceive or trick someone in a clever or sneaky way, often with the intent to gain an advantage or benefit at their expense. It implies an act of cunning or dishonesty to outsmart or swindle someone.
  • on the fast track The idiom "on the fast track" refers to someone or something that is progressing rapidly or quickly towards success or advancement. It implies being on a path that allows for rapid growth, promotion, or achievement.
  • capitalize on sth The idiom "capitalize on something" means to take advantage of or make the most out of an opportunity or situation in order to gain a benefit or advantage.
  • swear (up)on sm or sth To "swear (up)on someone or something" means to make a solemn vow or promise, often in a legal or official context, by invoking the name or significance of a particular person or thing. It implies an assertion of the truthfulness or sincerity of one's statement, as if testifying under oath. The phrase is commonly used to emphasize the seriousness or authenticity of a claim or statement, as if calling upon a higher power or authority for validation.
  • sweep down on sm or sth The idiom "sweep down on someone or something" generally means to approach or attack quickly and forcefully, often with a sense of surprise or overwhelming force.
  • lay sm sweet lines on sm The idiom "lay some sweet lines on someone" means to use flattering or charming words to impress or seduce someone, often in a romantic or flirtatious manner. It implies the act of speaking in a smooth, persuasive, or affectionate way to gain someone's attention or affection.
  • put cards on the table The idiom "put cards on the table" means to be honest and open about one's intentions, ideas, or plans, typically in a discussion or negotiation. It refers to revealing all relevant information or sharing one's true position to promote transparency and clarity in the conversation.
  • lay cards on the table The idiom "lay cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent in revealing one's thoughts, intentions, or information. It signifies openly sharing information or discussing a situation without hiding anything.
  • switched on The idiom "switched on" means someone is attentive, alert, or fully engaged in a task or situation. It implies a state of being mentally sharp or aware.
  • switch on The idiom "switch on" refers to the action of turning on or activating something, typically an electrical device or a mechanism. It implies starting or initiating a process or function.
  • switch sth on To "switch something on" means to activate or turn on a device or appliance, typically by using a switch or button. It is often used in reference to electrical or electronic devices such as lights, televisions, or computers.
  • your finger on the pulse (of sth) The idiom "your finger on the pulse (of something)" means to be aware of and well-informed about the current trends, developments, or important aspects of a particular situation or subject. It implies being knowledgeable and having a good understanding of what is happening or popular in a given field or context.
  • have your finger on the pulse The idiom "have your finger on the pulse" means to be well-informed and aware of the current trends, developments, or opinions in a particular situation or field. It suggests being in touch with the latest information and having a good understanding of the prevailing dynamics or changes.
  • keep one's finger on the pulse of sth The idiom "keep one's finger on the pulse of something" means to stay knowledgeable and updated about a particular subject, issue, or situation. It refers to being aware of the current trends, developments, or changes related to that specific matter. It implies actively monitoring and staying connected with the ongoing events or advancements to maintain an informed and up-to-date understanding.
  • swoop down (up)on sm or sth The idiom "swoop down (up) on someone or something" means to approach or arrive suddenly, quickly, and often aggressively or unexpectedly towards someone or something. It often implies a sudden and forceful action or movement, similar to a bird of prey swiftly descending or ascending.
  • fall on one's sword To "fall on one's sword" is an idiom used to describe someone taking the blame or accepting responsibility for a situation or mistake, often resulting in their own downfall or sacrifice. It originates from ancient Roman times when soldiers would commit suicide by falling on their own swords to avoid defeat or capture in battle. In a modern context, it refers to willingly accepting consequences for one's actions, even if it leads to personal harm or loss.
  • quick on the trigger The idiom "quick on the trigger" refers to someone who is quick to react or respond to a situation, often implying that they are impulsive or eager to take action, especially in a confrontational or aggressive manner.
  • quick on the draw The idiom "quick on the draw" refers to someone who is extremely fast in reacting or responding to a situation, often referring to their ability to immediately answer a question or make a decision. It can also describe someone who is skilled or adept at taking action swiftly. The idiom originates from the Wild West, where being quick on the draw referred to a gunslinger's ability to quickly and accurately draw their weapon from its holster.
  • get the draw on The idiom "get the draw on" typically refers to gaining an advantage or gaining the upper hand in a specific situation or competition, especially in terms of speed or initiative. It originates from the world of gunslingers and drawing a firearm quickly during a confrontation.
  • draw on The idiom "draw on" means to use or rely on a reserve of knowledge, skills, or resources to complete a task or handle a situation effectively. It refers to tapping into one's inner reserves or previous experiences to accomplish something.
  • draw a bead on The idiom "draw a bead on" means to take careful aim at someone or something, often with the intent of attacking or capturing them. It originates from the act of aligning the targeting bead of a firearm or weapon with the target, indicating a focused and precise aim. This idiom is commonly used in contexts where someone is figuratively targeting or focusing on achieving a specific goal or objective.
  • be quick on the draw The idiom "be quick on the draw" means to have a quick or rapid response or reaction to a situation, often implying being prepared or ready to take action without hesitation. It originates from the American Old West, where it referred to a person who could draw a gun from its holster swiftly and efficiently.
  • on the carpet The idiom "on the carpet" means to be reprimanded or called to account for one's actions, typically by a superior or authority figure. It refers to a situation where someone is summoned to a formal meeting or encounter, often held in an office or conference room with a carpeted floor, to discuss or receive criticism regarding their behavior, performance, or decisions.
  • tie one on The idiom "tie one on" means to consume a large amount of alcoholic beverages, often to the point of becoming intoxicated.
  • carry on without The idiom "carry on without" means to continue or proceed with an activity or task in the absence of someone or something that was expected to be involved or present. It implies moving forward despite the absence or lack of support from a person or thing.
  • carry on The idiom "carry on" means to continue doing something, often used in the context of persisting in the face of difficulties or challenges. It implies determination, resilience, and the ability to persevere despite obstacles. It can also indicate continuing with one's normal activities or routines.
  • carry on (with sth) The idiom "carry on (with sth)" means to continue or persist with an activity, task, or plan, despite difficulties, interruptions, or opposition. It implies a sense of determination and resilience in the face of challenges, often used in a positive or encouraging manner.
  • carry sth on The idiom "carry sth on" means to continue doing or engaging in an activity or action without interruption or stopping. It implies persisting with something or maintaining a certain behavior or course of action.
  • on the case The idiom "on the case" typically means someone is actively and diligently investigating or working on a particular task or problem. It refers to being fully engaged, committed, and focused in order to find a solution or accomplish a goal.
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  • get on case The idiom "get on someone's case" means to closely monitor, criticize, or nag someone continuously about something. It refers to a situation where someone repeatedly reminds or questions another person about their actions, behavior, or responsibilities. It often implies that the person being monitored or criticized feels annoyed or bothered by the constant attention or interference.
  • cash in (on sth) The idiom "cash in (on sth)" means to take advantage of or profit from a situation, often in a selfish or opportunistic manner. It refers to exploiting an opportunity to make money or gain an advantage.
  • keep tabs on sb/sth The idiom "keep tabs on sb/sth" means to monitor or keep a close watch on someone or something, often to ensure they are behaving or progressing as expected. It involves staying updated and informed about their actions, whereabouts, or developments.
  • keep tab(s) (on sm or sth) The idiom "keep tab(s) (on someone or something)" means to closely monitor or keep a record of someone or something, typically for the purpose of staying updated or informed about their actions, progress, or whereabouts. It implies maintaining vigilant observation or careful control over a person or situation.
  • wait (on) tables The idiom "wait (on) tables" refers to the act of serving food and drinks to customers as a waiter or waitress in a restaurant or café. It involves taking orders, delivering meals, and providing a pleasant dining experience to guests.
  • turn the tables (on sb/sth) The idiom "turn the tables (on someone/ something)" means to reverse a situation, usually in one's favor, by shifting power dynamics or gaining advantage over someone or something that previously had the upper hand. It implies a dramatic change or a role reversal.
  • put (all) your cards on the table The idiom "put (all) your cards on the table" means to be completely honest and open about your thoughts, feelings, or intentions. It refers to revealing all relevant information or sharing everything you know on a particular topic, leaving nothing hidden or undisclosed. It implies transparency and a willingness to discuss things openly without any hidden agendas or deceit.
  • lay/put your cards on the table To "lay/put your cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent about your intentions, opinions, or plans. It refers to the act of revealing all relevant information or expressing your true thoughts without any deceit or ambiguity. This idiom is often used in discussions, negotiations, or personal relationships when one wants to promote trust and create a level playing field for all parties involved.
  • turn the tables (on sm) The idiom "turn the tables (on someone)" means to reverse a situation in one's favor or to change the outcome of a situation by suddenly gaining an advantage over an opponent or an adversary. It refers to a scenario where someone who was initially in a disadvantaged position or facing a challenge suddenly takes control or gains the upper hand in some way.
  • lay one's cards on the table To "lay one's cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent about one's thoughts, intentions, or feelings, usually in a discussion or negotiation. It suggests revealing one's true opinions or motivations without holding back any information or secrets.
  • tack on sth The idiom "tack on something" typically means to add or attach something to an existing item, plan, or situation, often without thorough consideration or planning. It can also refer to adding an additional cost or fee to something.
  • cast doubt on The idiom "cast doubt on" means to raise uncertainty or skepticism about something, typically by presenting evidence or arguments that challenge its credibility, reliability, or truthfulness. It implies creating suspicion or making others question the validity or accuracy of a statement, claim, or belief.
  • cast aspersions on The idiom "cast aspersions on" means to criticize, discredit, or make negative remarks about someone or their reputation, often without any evidence or solid basis for the criticism. It implies questioning someone's integrity or character in a derogatory manner.
  • cast a pall on The idiom "cast a pall on" means to create an atmosphere of sadness, gloom, or negativity that affects a situation or the people involved, making it less enjoyable or happy. It refers to something or someone causing a general feeling of darkness or heaviness, similar to the way a pall (a cloth spread over a coffin) would symbolize mourning or sadness.
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  • on coattails The idiom "on coattails" refers to riding on the success, popularity, or achievements of someone else in order to gain recognition, advancement, or benefits without much effort or merit of your own. It implies taking advantage of the accomplishments or influence of another person to secure personal gains.
  • be on tail
  • hang a few on The idiom "hang a few on" refers to having multiple alcoholic drinks in a short period of time or getting drunk.
  • cut down (on sth) The idiom "cut down (on sth)" means to reduce or decrease the amount or frequency of something, usually a habit or an action. It implies taking measures to consume or use less of a particular thing. It can be related to various aspects such as food, expenses, time, or behaviors that are deemed excessive or harmful.
  • catch up on The idiom "catch up on" means to reach a level or status equivalent to others by advancing, progressing, or updating oneself in terms of information, knowledge, work, or tasks that have been missed or fallen behind on.
  • catch on the hop The idiom "catch on the hop" means to surprise or catch someone off guard, usually by taking advantage of their unpreparedness or lack of attention. It can refer to situations where someone is caught unaware or unable to react quickly to something unexpected.
  • catch on The idiom "catch on" means to understand, comprehend, or grasp something, typically a new concept or idea, after a period of confusion or initial difficulty. It can also refer to the widespread adoption or popularity of something.
  • catch on (with sm) The idiom "catch on (with sm)" means for something to become popular, well-received, or understood by someone or a group of people. It refers to the process of gaining acceptance, popularity, or recognition.
  • catch sth on sth The idiom "catch on something" typically means to become entangled or snagged on an object, resulting in difficulty or hindrance.
  • do a takeoff on sm or sth The idiom "do a takeoff on sm or sth" refers to creating a humorous or satirical imitation or parody of someone or something. It involves reproducing or imitating the mannerisms, style, or characteristics of a person, concept, or object in a comical or exaggerated way. It usually aims to provide entertainment or amusement by mocking or poking fun at the original subject.
  • talk on The idiom "talk on" refers to continuing a conversation or discussion, typically in a lengthy or uninterrupted manner. It implies that someone is engaging in a conversation extensively or at great length without considering other people's opinions or the need for a pause.
  • rat on sm The idiom "rat on someone" means to inform or betray someone by revealing their secret or wrongdoing to someone else, typically an authority figure. It implies covertly providing information that could get the person in trouble.
  • (off) on a tangent The idiom "(off) on a tangent" refers to someone deviating or veering off from the main or original topic of conversation or thought. It describes a situation where a person drifts away onto a different, unrelated subject, often without warning or reason.
  • go off on a tangent The idiom "go off on a tangent" means to suddenly and unexpectedly steer the course of a conversation, discussion, or thought process into a completely unrelated or divergent topic. It refers to when someone digresses or veers away from the main subject or point of focus, often to the point of losing relevance or causing confusion.
  • tank up on sth The idiom "tank up on something" means to consume a large amount of a particular food or beverage, often with the intention of feeling energized or satisfied. It can also refer to refueling a vehicle, such as filling a tank with petrol or gas.
  • on tap The definition of the idiom "on tap" is that something is readily available or prepared to be used or accessed when needed. It originated from the practice of having kegs or barrels of beverages with taps available for immediate pouring or serving. It is often used metaphorically to indicate that something is easily obtainable or at one's disposal.
  • What's on tap for today? The idiom "What's on tap for today?" typically means "What is planned or scheduled for today?" It is often used as a casual way to ask about someone's agenda or what activities or tasks are scheduled for the day.
  • tap on sth The idiom "tap on something" typically refers to lightly or gently touching or hitting an object or surface, often to gain attention or gather information. It can also imply a slight or subtle action taken to access or utilize something.
  • tap sm or sth on sth The idiom "tap sm or sth on sth" typically refers to the act of lightly touching or making contact with something or someone in a gentle or rhythmic manner. It can also indicate the action of inputting or adding information or data onto a device or system.
  • record sth on sth The idiom "record sth on sth" refers to the act of documenting or capturing something using a particular medium or device. It implies the process of storing information, data, or an event on a designated platform such as a tape, digital memory, or any other recording medium.
  • (right) on target The idiom "(right) on target" means to be precisely accurate, exact, or correct in terms of aim, goal, objective, or prediction. It refers to something being achieved or accomplished exactly as planned or expected.
  • cement sth on(to) sth The idiom "cement sth on(to) sth" means to firmly establish or secure something onto something else, often in a non-literal sense. It implies making something immovable or permanent by ensuring a strong and unchanging connection. This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe actions or decisions that are difficult to change or reverse.
  • the curtain comes down on The idiom "the curtain comes down on" means that something is ending or concluding, particularly in a dramatic or final way, just like how a theater curtain comes down at the end of a performance. It signifies the closure of a chapter, event, or era.
  • in on The idiom "in on" commonly means to be involved in or have knowledge of a certain situation or secret. It implies being privy to information or participating in a specific activity.
  • come out on top The idiom "come out on top" means to emerge as the winner or achieve success in a particular situation or competition. It implies being victorious or overcoming obstacles to attain a favorable outcome.
  • come out on The idiom "come out on" typically means to emerge from a difficult or challenging situation in a favorable or successful way. It implies overcoming a problem or obstacle and achieving a positive outcome.
  • come on top of The idiom "come on top of" means to emerge as the winner or to overcome a situation or challenge successfully. It implies that someone or something prevails, typically in a competitive or difficult scenario. It can also refer to achieving success or victory despite facing obstacles or adversity.
  • come on to The idiom "come on to" typically means to make sexual or romantic advances towards someone, often with the intention of seducing or flirting with them. It can also refer to the act of aggressively pursuing someone in a romantic or sexual manner.
  • come on like gangbusters The idiom "come on like gangbusters" means to start or proceed with great intensity, enthusiasm, or force. It implies a vigorous, dynamic, or aggressive approach to a particular activity or situation.
  • Come on in, the water's fine! The idiom "Come on in, the water's fine!" is an expression used to encourage someone to participate in or join a particular activity or situation because it is enjoyable, safe, or successful. It is often used to persuade someone to take a risk or venture into something new with the assurance that there are no negative consequences. The phrase originated from the idea of inviting someone to swim in water that is warm and pleasant.
  • come on as The idiom "come on as" refers to someone assuming a particular role, position, or demeanor. It implies that a person presents or presents themselves in a specific way, typically with the intention of influencing or impressing others. This expression often implies a deliberate act of adopting a particular attitude, appearance, or behavior for a specific purpose.
  • come on The idiom "come on" is an informal expression that can have several meanings depending on the context. Some possible definitions of this idiom include: 1. Encouragement or urging someone to continue or make progress in a certain task or situation. Example: "Come on, you can do it! Don't give up now." 2. Expressing disbelief or skepticism towards something that is hard to believe or understand. Example: "Come on, that story sounds too good to be true!" 3. Inviting or persuading someone to do something or join in an activity. Example: "Come on, let's go for a walk together." 4. Expressing impatience or frustration with someone or their behavior. Example: "Come on
  • come down on The idiom "come down on" means to criticize or reprimand someone harshly or firmly. It typically refers to someone in authority delivering a stern judgment or punishment.
  • be down on like a ton of bricks The idiom "be down on like a ton of bricks" means to strongly criticize, condemn, or punish someone severely and swiftly. It implies that the person will face intense scrutiny, disapproval, or consequences for their actions.
  • He wears a tendollar hat on a fivecent head. The idiom "He wears a tendollar hat on a fivecent head" is a figurative expression used to describe someone who may be outwardly flashy or extravagant, but lacks intelligence or substance. It implies that a person places more importance on their appearance or material possessions rather than developing their intellect or knowledge. The phrase suggests a mismatch between someone's outward appearance and their true capabilities or intelligence.
  • tattle (on sm) (to sm) The idiom "tattle (on someone) (to someone)" means to inform, often in a childish or petty manner, of someone else's misbehavior, mistakes, or secrets, in order to get them into trouble. It involves reporting someone's wrongdoing to an authority figure or an individual in a position of power.
  • center on sb/sth To "center on sb/sth" means to focus or revolve around someone or something as the central point or main subject of attention, concern, or interest. It typically implies that the person or thing mentioned is at the core or center of a particular situation, event, discussion, or narrative.
  • on dead center The idiom "on dead center" typically refers to a situation where there is no progress or movement, as if one's efforts or plans are stuck at a standstill. It can imply being at a point where further action or advancement is difficult or impossible, often causing frustration or delay.
  • center on sm or sth The idiom "center on someone or something" means to focus, revolve, or be based primarily on a particular person, thing, or topic. It implies that the main attention, importance, or emphasis is directed towards that specific individual or subject.
  • center sth on sm or sth The idiom "center something on someone or something" means to focus or revolve an action or discussion primarily around a particular person or thing. It implies that the subject being centered upon holds a central or crucial role in the situation.
  • commit oneself on sth The idiom "commit oneself on sth" means to dedicate oneself or take a firm and decisive position on a particular matter. It implies making a serious commitment or standing firmly for something, often involving personal values, beliefs, or responsibilities.
  • compare notes on sm or sth The idiom "compare notes on sm or sth" means to discuss or exchange information, experiences, or observations with others regarding a specific subject or topic. It implies sharing and comparing one's knowledge or understanding to gather insights or reach a common conclusion.
  • step on (sb's) toes The idiom "step on (sb's) toes" means to accidentally or unintentionally interfere with or harm someone's interests, plans, or feelings. It typically implies invading someone's personal space, encroaching on their responsibilities, or crossing boundaries without permission or courtesy.
  • step/tread on sb's toes The idiom "step/tread on sb's toes" means to unintentionally offend or infringe upon someone's territory, rights, or responsibilities, usually by interfering in their affairs or making decisions without consulting them. It refers to figuratively stepping on someone's feet, which is uncomfortable and intrusive.
  • keep sb on their toes The idiom "keep sb on their toes" means to keep someone alert, attentive, or prepared by creating a sense of challenge, uncertainty, or surprise. It implies staying vigilant and ready for any unexpected circumstances or situations.
  • toing and froing (on sth) The idiom "toing and froing (on sth)" refers to the constant back-and-forth movement or indecisiveness regarding a particular matter or decision. It denotes the act of continuously deliberating, vacillating, or changing one's mind about something without reaching a final conclusion or making a firm commitment. It suggests a lack of decisiveness or the inability to settle on a specific course of action.
  • step on sm's toes The idiom "step on someone's toes" means to interfere with or infringe upon someone's rights, boundaries, or responsibilities, often causing offense or annoyance to them. It suggests overstepping one's own boundaries or encroaching on another person's domain.
  • tear on The idiom "tear on" refers to the act of moving quickly and forcefully, usually in a chaotic or disorderly manner. It implies a state of continuing or relentless activity, often with a sense of urgency or haste.
  • compromise on sm or sth (with sm) The idiom "compromise on something (with someone)" means to reach an agreement or settlement by making concessions or finding a middle ground between different parties involved. It typically involves each party giving up some of their demands or desires in order to find a mutually acceptable solution.
  • concentrate sth on sm or sth To "concentrate something on someone or something" means to focus one's attention, effort, or resources on a particular person or thing. It implies directing all of one's energy or attention to achieve a specific outcome or create an impact in a specific area.
  • concentrate (up)on sm or sth The idiom "concentrate (up)on sm or sth" means to focus one's attention, effort, or energy on someone or something with great intensity and dedication. It implies giving full attention and directing mental or physical abilities toward a specific individual or object. The idiom often suggests the need for heightened concentration or a deliberate effort to disregard distractions in order to achieve a particular goal.
  • the first etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first rung on the ladder" refers to the initial step or level of progress in a particular field, career, or pursuit. It signifies the beginning or starting point of a process or the first stage of advancement towards a goal. It emphasizes the importance of taking that initial step in order to achieve further success or climb higher on the figurative ladder of achievement.
  • on a firstname basis The idiom "on a firstname basis" refers to a situation where individuals have a close, informal relationship with each other, such that they are comfortable addressing each other by their first names rather than using formal titles or last names. It implies a certain level of familiarity, camaraderie, and informality in the relationship.
  • tell on The idiom "tell on" means to inform or report something to an authority figure about someone's wrongdoings or misbehavior, often with the intention of getting the person in trouble or receiving retribution.
  • tell on sb The idiom "tell on sb" means to reveal or disclose someone's wrongdoing or secrets to an authority figure or to someone who has the power to take action or enforce discipline.
  • tell on sm The idiom "tell on someone" means to reveal or disclose someone's secret or wrongdoing to an authority figure or someone in a position of higher authority. It is often used in a context where someone informs others about someone's actions or behavior that may be inappropriate or in violation of rules or norms.
  • tell sm on sm The idiom "tell someone on someone" means to report or inform someone who has the authority or ability to take action about another person's unacceptable behavior or actions. It implies seeking assistance or resolution from an authoritative figure to address a problem or issue caused by someone else.
  • challenge sm on sth To "challenge someone on something" means to question or dispute someone's statement, opinion, or belief. It involves confronting the person and engaging in a debate or argument to express disagreement or raise doubts about the validity or accuracy of their claim. The aim is often to provoke critical thinking and encourage further discussion or reevaluation of the subject at hand.
  • take a chance on The idiom "take a chance on" means to take a risk or gamble on someone or something that may have an uncertain outcome or may not be completely known or proven. It implies being willing to give someone or something a opportunity despite the potential for failure or disappointment.
  • on the offchance The idiom "on the off chance" refers to doing something or taking a course of action with a slim probability of success or a low likelihood of occurrence. It means to undertake a particular action or make an effort despite it being unlikely to yield the desired outcome, often due to its unpredictability or uncertainty.
  • on the off chance The idiom "on the off chance" refers to taking action or pursuing something with the hope that a particular outcome or opportunity may arise, even if it is unlikely or uncertain. It suggests engaging in a course of action or making an effort in the slight possibility that it will lead to a positive result.
  • chance on The idiom "chance on" or "chance upon" means to find or discover something or someone unexpectedly or by luck. It refers to the act of coming across or encountering something unintentionally without actively seeking it.
  • chance (up)on sm or sth The idiom "chance (up)on someone or something" means to unexpectedly encounter or come across someone or something by coincidence or happenstance. It implies discovering or finding someone or something unintentionally and often suggests a degree of surprise or luck in the encounter.
  • console sm on sth The idiom "console someone on something" refers to providing comfort, solace, or emotional support to someone who is experiencing distress, grief, or disappointment regarding a specific situation or event. It involves offering sympathy, empathy, or kind words to help alleviate their pain or sadness.
  • charge down on sm or sth To "charge down on someone or something" means to rush or move quickly towards someone or something in an assertive or aggressive manner. It often implies a forceful movement or attack with determination or intensity.
  • charge sth on sth The idiom "charge something on something" typically means to put a particular expense or cost onto a specified form of payment or account. It often refers to making a purchase using a credit card or charging it to an existing account. For example, if someone says, "I charged the new laptop on my credit card," it means that they used their credit card to purchase the laptop.
  • on tenterhooks The idiom "on tenterhooks" means to be in a state of uneasiness, anxiety, or suspense, usually because of anticipating or awaiting an important event or outcome.
  • keep sm on tenterhooks The idiom "keep someone on tenterhooks" refers to leaving someone in a state of suspense, anticipation, or uncertainty. It means to keep someone waiting eagerly for an outcome or information, often with a sense of anxiety or nervousness.
  • on good terms (with sb) The idiom "on good terms (with someone)" refers to having a positive or friendly relationship with someone. It suggests that the individuals involved are amicable, respectful, and do not have any interpersonal conflicts or issues that affect their relationship.
  • be on good terms with sb The idiom "be on good terms with sb" means to have a positive and amicable relationship with someone. It implies that there is no animosity or conflict between the individuals involved and that they get along well.
  • on good terms (with sm) The idiom "on good terms (with someone)" means having a positive and friendly relationship with someone. It implies that there is harmony, understanding, and mutual respect between individuals involved.
  • put a contract out on sm The idiom "put a contract out on someone" is a colloquial expression that refers to the act of hiring or arranging for someone to be killed or harmed by a hitman or assassin.
  • send sm on a wildgoose chase To "send someone on a wild goose chase" means to deceive or mislead someone by sending them on a futile or pointless mission or task. It implies wasting someone's time and effort by directing them towards something that does not actually exist or cannot be achieved.
  • lead sm on a merry chase "Lead someone on a merry chase" is an idiom that means to intentionally mislead or deceive someone by creating a confusing or unpredictable situation, often resulting in a pursuit or quest that is thrilling, exciting, or challenging. It suggests that the person being led is chasing after something or someone, but is being driven in various directions or prevented from achieving their goal.
  • on the contrary The idiom "on the contrary" is used to introduce a statement that contradicts or opposes what has been previously stated or believed. It indicates that the opposite of what has been said is true or that a different perspective should be considered.
  • on the cheap The idiom "on the cheap" means to do or obtain something in a frugal or cost-effective manner, typically by spending as little money as possible. It refers to finding a more affordable or economical solution, often sacrificing quality or luxury in the process.
  • cheat on sb The idiom "cheat on sb" refers to being unfaithful or disloyal in a romantic or committed relationship. It means engaging in romantic or sexual activities with someone other than one's partner, betraying their trust and breaking the commitment.
  • cheat on sm The idiom "cheat on someone" means to engage in a secret romantic or sexual relationship with someone other than one's partner or spouse, typically without their knowledge or consent. It implies betrayal and dishonesty within a committed relationship.
  • check up on The idiom "check up on" means to inquire about or investigate someone or something to ensure they are in good condition or are performing as expected. It often implies a sense of scrutiny or supervision.
  • check on The idiom "check on" means to verify or investigate the status or condition of someone or something. It involves making sure that everything is okay or seeing if there are any problems or changes that need attention.
  • check up on sb The idiom "check up on someone" means to verify or determine someone's current status or well-being by making sure they are doing what they are supposed to be doing or investigating their actions.
  • cheer sm or sth on To "cheer someone or something on" means to encourage or support them enthusiastically, especially during a competition, challenge, or difficult task. It involves expressing excitement, offering words of encouragement, or applauding their efforts to boost their morale and motivate them to do their best.
  • put hair(s) on your chest The idiom "put hair(s) on your chest" typically means to do or consume something that is believed to make one stronger, more resilient, or more courageous. It is often used in reference to food or drinks that are strong or potent, implying that consuming them will toughen a person up.
  • put hair on sm's chest The idiom "put hair on someone's chest" is a figurative expression used to describe something that is believed to make a person stronger, braver, or more resilient. It implies that the experience or action being referred to will aid in the individual's personal growth and development, as if growing hair on their chest is a sign of nearing adulthood or becoming more mature.
  • hell on wheels The idiom "hell on wheels" is used to describe a situation, event, or person that is intensely chaotic, unpredictable, rowdy, or difficult to control. It typically refers to a turbulent or out-of-control situation, often characterized by a high level of energy and potential for trouble.
  • hell on a holiday The idiom "hell on a holiday" typically refers to a situation or experience that is extremely chaotic, unpleasant, or problematic, especially when it occurs on what is supposed to be a peaceful or enjoyable occasion. It implies a stark contrast between the expectations of a relaxing and enjoyable holiday and the reality of a distressing or difficult situation.
  • be hellbent on The idiom "be hellbent on" means to be extremely determined to achieve or accomplish something, often disregarding any obstacles or consequences. It refers to someone having a strong, unwavering resolve to pursue a specific goal or objective, regardless of the challenges involved.
  • chew on sm or sth The idiom "chew on something" means to carefully and thoughtfully consider or contemplate something. It refers to the act of chewing food, where our jaws move slowly and deliberately to process and understand what we are eating. Similarly, when we "chew on something" metaphorically, we are taking the time to fully understand, analyze, and think deeply about a specific idea, concept, or situation.
  • chicken out on sm The idiom "chicken out on sm" means to back out or retreat from a situation out of fear, nervousness, or a lack of courage. It implies that someone may have initially showed interest or made a commitment, but then becomes timid or withdraws when faced with the actual task or challenge.
  • theorize on sth The idiom "theorize on something" generally means to speculate or form hypotheses about something, often based on limited information or evidence. It refers to the act of creating and discussing various theories or explanations for a specific subject or situation.
  • put the chill on sm The idiom "put the chill on someone" means to create an atmosphere or behavior that causes discomfort, unease, or a distancing effect towards the person. It implies that the individual is being purposefully ignored, excluded, or made to feel unwelcome.
  • take sth on the chin "Take something on the chin" is an idiomatic expression that means to accept or endure something difficult, unpleasant, or challenging without complaining or showing any signs of defeat. It implies the ability to handle adversity with dignity and resilience. It is often used to describe a person's ability to accept criticism, failure, or setbacks in a stoic and resolute manner.
  • fob sth off on sb To "fob something off on someone" means to deceive or trick someone into accepting or dealing with something that they do not want or that is of low quality or importance. It is often used when someone gives someone else a task, responsibility, or problem that they don't want to deal with themselves.
  • fob sm or sth off (on or onto sm) The idiom "fob sm or sth off (on or onto sm)" means to deceive or mislead someone by giving them a false or inadequate explanation, excuse, or substandard item. It implies dismissing or disregarding something by passing it on to someone else, often as a means of avoiding responsibility.
  • count on The idiom "count on" means to rely on or trust someone or something to always be there or to do something as expected.
  • can count on the fingers of one hand The idiom "can count on the fingers of one hand" means that there is a very small number or easily identifiable list of something. It suggests that the quantity or quality being described is limited, typically less than five, and can be counted using only one hand's fingers.
  • focus on sm or sth The idiom "focus on sm or sth" means to direct one's attention, effort, or concentration on a specific person, thing, task, or objective, with the intention of giving it special consideration or priority. It implies giving undivided attention and dedicating one's energy towards understanding, achieving, or improving something.
  • focus sth on sm or sth The idiom "focus something on someone or something" means to direct attention, effort, or resources specifically towards a particular person or thing. It implies giving priority to an individual or an object by concentrating on their needs, goals, or attributes.
  • a chip on your shoulder The idiom "a chip on your shoulder" means that someone is harboring resentment or holding a grudge, often due to perceived unfair treatment or a sense of inferiority. It implies that a person is easily provoked or looking for an opportunity to engage in conflict or prove themselves.
  • chip in (with sth) (on sth) (for sm) The idiom "chip in (with sth) (on sth) (for sm)" means to contribute or donate something, typically money, effort, or resources, towards a particular cause or goal. It implies the act of collaborating and collectively pooling resources to achieve a shared objective or help someone in need.
  • walk on eggs The idiom "walk on eggs" typically means to proceed very carefully or cautiously in order to avoid offending or upsetting someone or to avoid a delicate or precarious situation.
  • thin on top The idiom "thin on top" is commonly used to describe someone who is bald or starting to lose their hair, particularly on the crown or top of their head.
  • on thin ice The idiom "on thin ice" means to be in a risky or dangerous situation where one false move or mistake could have serious consequences or lead to trouble.
  • be on thin ice The idiom "be on thin ice" means to be in a risky or uncertain position where one's actions or decisions could have serious consequences. It refers to the feeling of walking on a frozen lake or pond where the ice may be thin and could break at any moment.
  • think on feet The idiom "think on one's feet" means to think quickly and effectively in a situation that requires immediate decision-making or problem-solving, often without much preparation or time for deliberation. It refers to the ability to make sensible choices or come up with clever solutions in a fast-paced or unexpected circumstance.
  • think on The idiom "think on" means to consider or reflect upon something carefully before making a decision or taking any action. It suggests taking time to ponder and contemplate the situation at hand, deepening one's thoughts and deliberations.
  • be on course for sth The idiom "be on course for sth" means to be heading in the right direction or making progress towards achieving something. It implies being on track or having a high likelihood of reaching a particular outcome or goal.
  • chisel in (on sm or sth) The idiom "chisel in (on someone or something)" is used to describe the act of intruding or interrupting in a situation where one is not welcomed or invited. It typically implies interfering in someone's conversation, plans, or business dealings without permission or invitation.
  • choke on sth The idiom "choke on something" refers to the act of having difficulty or being unable to swallow or breathe properly due to something blocking the throat. It is also used figuratively to describe a situation where someone is overwhelmed, unable to handle or process something emotionally or intellectually, or find themselves in a difficult or uncomfortable position.
  • on earth The idiom "on earth" is used to emphasize a question or statement, typically in a rhetorical manner. It expresses surprise, confusion, or disbelief regarding a situation or occurrence. It is often used to emphasize the extremity or implausibility of something.
  • on credit The idiom "on credit" refers to the act of purchasing or obtaining goods or services without making an immediate payment, with the agreement to pay for them at a later date. It typically involves using credit or obtaining a loan from a lender or seller.
  • buy sth on credit The idiom "buy something on credit" means to purchase something without paying for it immediately, but instead agreeing to pay for it at a later specified date or over a certain period of time. This usually involves obtaining a loan or credit from a seller, a financial institution, or a credit provider, with an agreement to pay back the borrowed amount plus any applicable interest or fees.
  • try out on The idiom "try out on" means to test or experiment with someone or something in order to evaluate their abilities, skills, or compatibility. It can refer to trying out a new method, technique, or invention on someone to gauge their reaction or effectiveness. It can also apply to trying out a potential romantic partner, employee, or a product to see if they meet one's expectations or requirements.
  • try on with
  • try on The idiom "try on" typically means to put on or wear something, usually clothes or accessories, in order to see how it looks or fits.
  • on the threshold of sth The idiom "on the threshold of something" refers to being at the beginning or very close to the start of a particular event, milestone, or significant change. It signifies the point at which one is about to enter or experience something new or important.
  • be on the threshold of sth The idiom "be on the threshold of something" means to be at the point or verge of experiencing or starting something significant. It signifies being on the cusp of a new phase or opportunity and suggests that one is about to cross a figurative threshold into a new situation or stage in life or work.
  • be on the threshold of doing sth The idiom "be on the threshold of doing something" means to be very close to beginning or starting to do something significant or important. It indicates being at the point where one is about to take action or embark on a new endeavor.
  • thrive (up)on sth The idiom "thrive (up)on sth" means to flourish or succeed by benefiting greatly from something, often referring to a particular situation, environment, or circumstance that brings about growth or success. It suggests that the person or entity not only survives but thrives and prospers due to the specific condition mentioned.
  • on the throne The idiom "on the throne" typically refers to a person being in a position of power or authority, especially as a ruler or monarch. It is often used to describe someone who is currently holding a high-ranking position or in charge of a particular situation.
  • hear on the grapevine The idiom "hear on the grapevine" means to hear rumors or unofficial information from informal or indirect sources. It refers to the dissemination of information through word of mouth or gossip channels.
  • throw on the scrap heap The idiom "throw on the scrap heap" means to discard or dismiss something or someone as useless, obsolete, or no longer valuable or relevant. It typically refers to getting rid of or abandoning an object or idea that is considered no longer practical or functional, similar to discarding a piece of scrap or garbage.
  • throw on mercy
  • throw on The idiom "throw on" refers to putting on clothing or accessories in a casual or hasty manner, or without giving careful consideration to one's appearance. It expresses the act of quickly or casually getting dressed without putting much effort into one's outfit.
  • throw cold water on The idiom "throw cold water on" means to discourage or dampen enthusiasm, excitement, or optimism about something. It refers to the act of extinguishing a fire or suppressing a heated situation by pouring cold water on it.
  • throw an amount of light on The idiom "throw an amount of light on" means to provide clarification, information, or insight on a particular topic or issue. It refers to shedding light or revealing details that help others better understand or comprehend something.
  • shed light on The idiom "shed light on" means to provide clarification, understanding, or insight on a particular topic or issue. It refers to bringing forth information or explanations that help to clarify and make something clearer.
  • pour cold water on The idiom "pour cold water on" means to discourage or dampen enthusiasm, excitement, or optimism about something. It implies undermining or criticizing someone's ideas, plans, or hopes, preventing them from being successful or achieving their goals.
  • turn thumbs up (on sm or sth) The idiom "turn thumbs up (on sm or sth)" typically means to give approval or show support for someone or something. It refers to the gesture of giving a thumbs-up, which universally signifies agreement, approval, or positivity. So when someone says they "turn thumbs up" on something, it implies that they are expressing a favorable opinion or showing their endorsement.
  • turn thumbs down (on sm or sth) The idiom "turn thumbs down (on someone or something)" means to reject or disapprove of someone or something. It originates from ancient Roman gladiatorial matches where the audience used a thumbs-down gesture to signal their disapproval for a defeated gladiator, who would then be put to death. In modern usage, it refers to expressing a negative judgment or rejecting a proposal, idea, or person.
  • thump on sm or sth The idiom "thump on someone or something" usually means to hit or strike forcefully, often resulting in a loud thud sound. It can be a physical action where someone uses their fist or an object to deliver a powerful blow. Additionally, it can also be used metaphorically to describe strong criticism or reprimand towards someone or something.
  • thump sth out (on the piano) The idiom "thump sth out (on the piano)" means to play a piece of music on the piano with forceful or heavy-handed strokes, usually lacking finesse or delicacy.
  • crowd in (on sm or sth) The idiom "crowd in (on someone or something)" refers to a situation where many people gather around or encroach upon someone or something, usually causing difficulty or making it crowded. It implies that there is limited space, resources, or attention, and the excessive presence of others creates a sense of congestion or intrusion.
  • keep sb on a tight leash The idiom "keep someone on a tight leash" means to closely monitor or control someone's actions, behavior, or activities, typically in a strict or restrictive manner. It implies that the person being monitored or controlled has limited freedom or independence and is closely supervised.
  • have/keep sb on a short/tight leash The idiom "have/keep somebody on a short/tight leash" means to exert strict control or supervision over someone, often limiting their freedom or autonomy. It implies that the person is closely monitored and kept under strict authority or supervision, similar to how a dog would be kept on a short leash to restrict its movements.
  • on a tight leash The idiom "on a tight leash" means to have strict control or supervision over someone or something, allowing them very little freedom or independence. It often implies a situation where someone is closely monitored and restricted in their actions or decision-making.
  • keep a firm grip on sm or sth The idiom "keep a firm grip on something" means to maintain control or hold firmly onto a person, situation, or object, both physically and metaphorically. It suggests the need to exert strength and stability in order to prevent it from slipping away or losing control. It can also imply ensuring one's dominance or influence over something or someone.
  • tighten sth on(to) sth The idiom "tighten something on(to) something" means to fasten or secure an object firmly onto another object by using force or making it harder to move or remove. It can be used both in a literal sense, referring to physically fastening or securing something, and in a figurative sense, referring to making an already existing situation more restrictive or controlled.
  • time on hands The idiom "time on hands" typically refers to having an excessive or idle amount of free time without anything specific to do. It suggests having leisure or unused time that may lead to boredom or restlessness.
  • Time hangs heavy on hands The idiom "Time hangs heavy on hands" means feeling bored or a sense of restlessness due to having too much free time and not knowing how to occupy oneself or pass the time.
  • put an amount of time in on The idiom "put an amount of time in on" means to spend a specific duration of time or make an effort to work on or devote to a task, project, or activity. It implies investing time and effort to complete or make progress on something.
  • on time The idiom "on time" refers to being punctual or arriving at the scheduled time for an event or appointment.
  • on own time The idiom "on own time" typically refers to any activity or task that is done outside of one's regular working hours or designated time for official responsibilities. It implies that the person is willingly undertaking the activity without being compelled or obligated to do so by their job or any external factors.
  • He puts his pants on one leg at a time The idiom "He puts his pants on one leg at a time" means that a person is just like everyone else and is not exceptional or superior in any way. It implies that the person being referred to is not privileged or possesses any extraordinary abilities or qualities.
  • have time on hands The idiom "have time on hands" means to have an excess amount of free time or to have nothing important or urgent to occupy one's time. It implies having extra time available due to lack of commitments or responsibilities.
  • the curtain comes down on sth The idiom "the curtain comes down on sth" is typically used in a metaphorical sense to signify the end or conclusion of something, like an event, era, or particular situation. It originates from the act of closing the final curtain on a stage performance, which symbolizes the end of the show. Therefore, when the curtain comes down on something, it means that it has reached its conclusion or has come to an end.
  • on the tip of your tongue The idiom "on the tip of your tongue" refers to the sensation of knowing or remembering something, such as a word or piece of information, but temporarily being unable to recall or articulate it. It suggests that the answer or phrase is just about to be remembered or said.
  • on tiptoe The idiom "on tiptoe" refers to walking or moving quietly and delicately in order to avoid making noise, typically by walking on the balls of one's feet. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a state of anticipation, excitement, or eagerness.
  • clamp down on sth The idiom "clamp down on sth" means to take strict measures or enforce stronger regulations or controls to suppress or limit a particular activity, behavior, or problem. It refers to the act of exerting more stringent authority or tightening restrictions to gain better control or containment of something.
  • put the clamps on sm or sth The idiom "put the clamps on someone or something" refers to taking strict measures or imposing controls on someone or something to prevent or stop their actions or activities. It signifies the act of bringing something under control or inhibiting its progress.
  • clamp down (on sm or sth) The idiom "clamp down (on someone or something)" refers to taking strict and forceful measures to control or suppress a particular activity or behavior. It implies imposing more restrictions, rules, or regulations to address a situation or prevent certain actions from occurring.
  • clamp sth on(to) sth The idiom "clamp something on(to) something" means to secure or fasten something tightly onto something else, typically using a clamp or similar device. It indicates attaching or fixing something firmly to another object.
  • be like rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic The idiom "be like rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic" means engaging in futile or pointless actions that are unlikely to have any significant impact or change the outcome of a situation. It refers to an ineffective or superficial attempt to improve or fix a problem that is already destined for failure or disaster. The phrase derives from the historical event of rearranging deckchairs on the sinking RMS Titanic, where such an action would be rendered useless and inconsequential given the imminent catastrophe.
  • lay eyes on sb/sth The idiom "lay eyes on sb/sth" means to see someone or something for the first time or after a long period of time. It often implies a sense of surprise, fascination, or admiration upon seeing the person or thing.
  • lay/set eyes on sb/sth The idiom "lay/set eyes on someone/something" means to see someone or something for the first time.
  • clap eyes on sm or sth The idiom "clap eyes on someone or something" means to finally see or have a first glimpse of someone or something, often implying a sense of surprise, wonder, or amazement at the sight.
  • clap sth on(to) sth The idiom "clap something on (to) something" typically means to hastily or forcefully attach or fix something onto something else. It implies a quick and often careless act of attaching or adding something onto an object or surface.
  • pop sth on(to) sth The idiom "pop sth on (to) sth" means to quickly put something onto or onto something else, often in a casual or hasty manner. It implies a swift and effortless action, typically without much consideration or effort.
  • pop sm (on sth) The idiom "pop sm (on sth)" generally means to quickly or suddenly place or apply something onto something else. It is often used when referring to putting a small amount of a substance onto a surface. The word "pop" in this context implies a swift or casual action.
  • on your tod The idiom "on your tod" means to be alone or by oneself, often implying being without any companions or assistance from others.
  • clean up (on sth) The idiom "clean up on (something)" means to make a large profit or to achieve great success, typically in a business or financial context. It implies a significant financial gain or a high level of success in a particular endeavor.
  • take (quite) a toll (on sm or sth) The idiom "take (quite) a toll (on sm or sth)" means to have a significant negative impact or effect on someone or something, often causing them to suffer physical or emotional damage. It suggests that the specific person or thing has undergone a considerable amount of stress, hardship, or deterioration due to certain circumstances or events. It implies that the situation has taken a heavy toll and has resulted in noticeable consequences.
  • on the tip of tongue The idiom "on the tip of the tongue" refers to the feeling of almost being able to remember or say something, but just falling short of doing so. It describes a situation where a person can sense the information they are trying to recall or express, but it remains momentarily out of their immediate reach.
  • be on the tip of tongue The idiom "to be on the tip of one's tongue" means that someone is aware that they know or can remember something, but they are unable to recall it at that moment. It refers to the feeling of having the answer or information right there and almost ready to be spoken, but it eludes the person momentarily.
  • climb/get on your high horse The idiom "climb/get on your high horse" means to act in a superior, arrogant, or condescending manner, often holding oneself in high esteem and looking down upon others. It implies that someone has become haughty or excessively proud and is behaving in a self-righteous or pompous manner.
  • climb on(to) sth The idiom "climb on(to) something" refers to physically getting onto an object or ascending to a higher level using steps or support. It can also be used metaphorically to mean taking advantage of or exploiting a situation or opportunity.
  • pound on sm or sth The idiom "pound on someone or something" means to hit or strike someone or something repeatedly with force. It can also be used figuratively to indicate persistently criticizing, verbally attacking, or pressuring someone or something intensely.
  • pound sth on sm or sth The idiom "pound something on someone or something" means to forcefully or vigorously strike or hit something onto someone or something. It can also be used metaphorically to describe forcefully expressing a particular idea or viewpoint on someone or something.
  • pour out on To "pour out on" typically means to express one's emotions, thoughts, or feelings openly and freely. It can refer to sharing one's deep feelings, often in an intense and unrestricted manner, with someone else or in a particular situation. This idiom suggests a sense of catharsis or release, as if pouring out the contents of one's heart or mind.
  • pour on The idiomatic phrase "pour on" typically means to intensify or increase something, often in a fast or excessive manner. It can refer to increasing efforts, enthusiasm, emotions, or the amount of something.
  • pour oil on troubled water The idiom "pour oil on troubled water" means to calm or resolve a tense or difficult situation by trying to make people less angry or upset. It refers to the act of metaphorically pouring oil on turbulent waters to calm the waves and restore tranquility.
  • cling on/hang on by your fingertips The idiom "cling on/hang on by your fingertips" means to remain in a precarious or desperate situation, barely holding on or barely achieving success. It implies that one's grip or control over a situation is extremely tenuous and could easily slip away.
  • cling on/hang on by your fingernails The idiom "cling on/hang on by your fingernails" refers to a situation where someone is barely holding on or just managing to survive in a challenging or difficult situation. It implies that the person is desperately trying to maintain their position or avoid failure despite the odds being against them.
  • pox on sm or sth The idiom "pox on someone or something" is used to express a strong feeling of anger, disapproval, or curse towards a person or thing. It derives from the word "pox," which refers to an infectious and often disfiguring disease, and is used metaphorically to convey a wish or desire for misfortune or harm upon the subject.
  • practice (up)on sm or sth The idiom "practice (up)on someone or something" means to repeatedly perform or rehearse a specific skill or activity, usually with the intention of improving or perfecting it. It involves dedicating time and effort to gain proficiency in a particular area by practicing regularly.
  • on top of that The idiom "on top of that" is used to refer to an additional or extra matter or situation that is added to an existing situation or list. It implies that something is being added to something else that has already been mentioned or discussed. It often conveys the idea of something being added on, increasing the workload, complexity, or challenges.
  • on top of The idiom "on top of" means to be in control or knowledgeable about a particular situation, staying informed and updated, or managing multiple tasks efficiently.
  • keep on top The idiom "keep on top" means to stay informed or up-to-date about a particular subject or situation. It suggests the need to remain knowledgeable and well-informed in order to effectively handle or manage something.
  • get on top of The idiom "get on top of" typically means to gain control or mastery over a situation or problem. It refers to the act of successfully managing or handling a particular task or issue.
  • feel on top of the world The idiom "feel on top of the world" means to feel extremely happy, joyful, or elated, as if one is experiencing complete success, achievement, or contentment in life. It signifies a state of great euphoria or satisfaction.
  • be on top of the world The idiom "be on top of the world" means to feel extremely happy, excited, or elated. It refers to a state of great joy or contentment, as if one is at the highest point of success or achievement.
  • clip sth on(to) sm or sth The idiom "clip something on(to) someone or something" means to attach or fasten an object, typically with a clip or clasp, onto a person or thing. It can refer to physically attaching an item or figuratively referring to adding or affixing something.
  • keep close watch on The idiom "keep close watch on" means to be observant and vigilant, maintaining careful surveillance or monitoring of someone or something. It implies being alert and attentive to avoid missing any important information, changes, or developments.
  • keep a tight rein on The idiom "keep a tight rein on" means to maintain strict control or oversight over someone or something. It originates from horseback riding, where a tight rein indicates the rider's ability to control the horse's movements and actions.
  • keep a close watch on The idiom "keep a close watch on" means to monitor or observe someone or something carefully and attentively, usually with the intention of ensuring their safety, well-being, or progress. It implies being vigilant, attentive, and not letting anything important go unnoticed.
  • close on The idiom "close on" typically refers to the act of finalizing a deal, agreement, or transaction. It means to reach the final stages of negotiation and come to a final resolution or decision. It is often used in the context of business or real estate transactions, where parties are in the process of completing a formal agreement or signing a contract.
  • on cloud nine The idiom "on cloud nine" means to be extremely happy, elated, or overjoyed. It refers to a state of great excitement and contentment, as if being on a metaphorical cloud floating above the world.
  • low on the totem pole The idiom "low on the totem pole" is used to describe a person or thing that holds a lower rank or position within a hierarchical system or organization. It implies that the individual or object has less authority, influence, or importance compared to others. The phrase originates from the totem poles created by Native American tribes, where the higher a figure is placed on the pole, the more significance it holds.
  • low man on the totem pole The idiom "low man on the totem pole" refers to a person who holds the lowest position in a group or organization, usually indicating that they have the least authority, influence, or prestige. It suggests that this individual has the least power and is often assigned the most undesirable or menial tasks. The idiom originates from the totem poles, which are artistic structures in some Native American cultures that depict a hierarchy of clan or family members, with the highest-ranking individuals positioned at the top.
  • high man on the totem pole The idiom "high man on the totem pole" refers to someone who holds a position of high authority or importance within a group or organization. It originated from the Native American totem poles, where the figure at the top represents the most significant or respected individual. Therefore, being the "high man on the totem pole" implies being in a position of power or prestige.
  • touch on The idiom "touch on" means to briefly mention or discuss a particular topic without going into great detail. It refers to a casual or cursory reference to a subject or a shallow exploration of a matter.
  • touch on sth The idiom "touch on something" means to briefly mention or discuss a topic without going into great detail. It refers to a superficial or cursory mention of something, without delving deeply into the subject matter.
  • touch (up)on sth The idiom "touch (up)on sth" means to briefly mention or discuss a topic without going into great detail. It implies a superficial or cursory reference to something, usually as part of a broader conversation or presentation.
  • clue sm in (on sth) The idiom "clue someone in (on something)" means to provide someone with information or knowledge about something that they were previously unaware of. It involves sharing details or insights to help someone understand a situation or topic better.
  • tough on The idiom "tough on" means to be strict, severe, or rigorous in dealing with someone or something. It implies a firm and uncompromising approach towards a particular matter, often involving strict rules, regulations, or actions.
  • on tour The idiom "on tour" refers to the activity of traveling and performing or exhibiting in various places, often as part of a planned series of events. It usually applies to artists, musicians, performers, athletes, or other individuals or groups who travel from one location to another to showcase their talents, skills, or products to different audiences or markets.
  • go on tour The idiom "go on tour" is typically used to describe an event or activity where a group or individual travels to different locations or venues to showcase their talents, skills, or performances. It often refers to musicians, actors, athletes, or artists who travel from place to place to present their work to a variety of audiences. Going on tour implies a series of scheduled performances or appearances that take place in various cities, countries, or regions for a specific duration of time.
  • go to town (on sth) The idiom "go to town (on sth)" means to tackle, enjoy, or perform something with great enthusiasm, intensity, or thoroughness. It implies putting in a lot of effort or making the most of something without holding back.
  • be/go out on the town The idiom "be/go out on the town" means to socialize or enjoy oneself by participating in various activities or going to different places, especially at night. It often implies engaging in leisure and entertainment outside one's usual routine, such as going to parties, concerts, clubs, restaurants, or bars.
  • out on the town The idiom "out on the town" refers to someone going out and enjoying themselves, usually in the evening or at night, for entertainment or socializing purposes, often by attending events, visiting restaurants, bars, clubs, or other places of leisure or amusement.
  • night on the town The idiom "night on the town" refers to an evening spent outside of one's home or usual surroundings, typically for socializing, entertainment, or celebration. It often implies a lively and enjoyable experience, such as going to restaurants, bars, clubs, or engaging in various recreational activities.
  • put a premium on sth To "put a premium on something" means to place a high value or importance on it. It suggests that the particular thing has a significant worth or significance. It can be used to describe situations where something is highly valued or prioritized over other things.
  • on sb's coattails The idiom "on someone's coattails" refers to a person benefiting, gaining success, or riding the wave of another person's achievements or influence. It suggests that the person is simply following or imitating someone else's lead rather than making independent efforts or contributions.
  • ride on sm's coattails The idiom "ride on someone's coattails" means to achieve success or gain advantages by relying on or exploiting the efforts, accomplishments, or reputation of another person, usually someone more successful or influential. It implies that the person benefiting from the association is not contributing or accomplishing anything on their own but rather relying on the achievements of another.
  • on the wrong track The idiom "on the wrong track" means that someone is pursuing a mistaken or incorrect course of action or thinking. This phrase is often used to suggest that the person's efforts or approach are not effective or will not lead to a successful outcome.
  • on the trail The idiom "on the trail" is commonly used to mean actively searching for or pursuing someone or something, often in a detective or investigative sense. It suggests a continuous and determined effort to gather information or evidence in order to find or achieve a particular objective.
  • keep on track The idiom "keep on track" means to stay focused and continue to make progress toward achieving a goal or staying on course with a particular plan or agenda. It implies maintaining a steady and determined approach without getting distracted or deviating from the intended path.
  • be on the wrong track The idiom "be on the wrong track" means to be pursuing a course of action or thinking in a way that is incorrect, misguided, or unlikely to lead to the desired outcome. It implies that one's approach or perspective is flawed or mistaken.
  • back on track The idiom "back on track" means to return to the original or desired path, course, or plan after experiencing difficulties, setbacks, or distractions. It refers to regaining focus or making progress again in order to achieve a goal or objective.
  • trade on sth The idiom "trade on sth" means to benefit or gain an advantage by using or leveraging something, typically a particular quality, characteristic, or reputation of someone or something. It refers to the act of utilizing or exploiting something, especially for personal gain or success.
  • presume (up)on sm or sth The phrase "presume (up)on someone or something" means to take advantage of or impose on someone's kindness, generosity, or resources without their permission or approval. It refers to an act of assuming or presuming authority or entitlement over someone or something, often in a negative or rude manner.
  • hot on the trail (of sm, sm creature, or sth) The idiom "hot on the trail" refers to someone actively pursuing or tracking someone or something. It suggests that the person is very close to finding or capturing the target and is following a series of clues or evidence to reach their objective.
  • train one's sights on sth "Train one's sights on something" is an idiomatic expression that means to focus one's attention, ambition, or intention toward a specific goal, target, or objective. It often implies a determined effort to achieve or attain something.
  • train sth on (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "train something on someone/something" means to focus or direct something such as one's attention, aim, or sights on a particular person, thing, or animal. It implies a deliberate act of aiming or pointing something towards a specific target, either literally or metaphorically.
  • train sm on sth The idiom "train someone on something" means to provide instruction or education to someone regarding a specific subject, skill, or task. It refers to the act of teaching and familiarizing someone with the necessary knowledge, techniques, or procedures involved in a particular area.
  • prevail on sb (to do sth) The idiom "prevail on someone (to do something)" means to successfully persuade or convince someone to do something, often through persistence, reasoning, or emotional appeal. It implies being able to influence or overcome someone's reluctance or initial refusal.
  • prevail (up)on sm or sth (to do sth) The idiom "prevail (up)on sm or sth (to do sth)" means to convince or persuade someone or something to do something, usually by using persistent or emphatic means of persuasion. It refers to the act of exerting influence or pressure in order to convince someone or something to comply with a particular request or suggestion.
  • prey on sth The idiom "prey on sth" means to exploit or take advantage of something or someone, often in a dishonest or harmful manner. It refers to the act of targeting or victimizing someone or something weaker in order to gain an unfair advantage or benefit for oneself.
  • prey on sb To "prey on someone" means to take advantage of or exploit another person, usually in a harmful or deceptive manner. It implies that the person being preyed upon is vulnerable or unsuspecting, and the predator takes advantage of this weakness or innocence for their own gain.
  • prey (up)on sm or sth The idiom "prey (up)on someone or something" means to exploit, take advantage of, or victimize someone or something, typically for personal gain or satisfaction. It implies the act of preying upon someone weaker or vulnerable, like a predator hunting its prey.
  • trample (up)on sm or sth The idiom "trample (up)on someone or something" refers to the act of treating or disrespecting someone or something with disregard or excessive force. It implies metaphorically crushing or stomping over an individual or a notion, often indicating a lack of empathy or consideration.
  • pride yourself on sth The idiom "pride yourself on something" means to take great satisfaction and feeling of personal accomplishment in a specific skill, quality, or accomplishment. It implies that the person takes pride or feels proud about their abilities or achievements in that particular area.
  • cogitate on sth The idiom "cogitate on sth" means to think deeply, reflect, or consider something carefully before coming to a conclusion or making a decision. It implies engaging in thorough mental deliberation or contemplation.
  • on principle The idiom "on principle" refers to doing something based on a personal or moral belief or value, rather than considering the situation or circumstance. It means acting or making decisions based on a set of ethics or beliefs, and sticking to them regardless of the circumstances.
  • collect on sth The idiom "collect on something" means to demand or receive payment or repayment for a debt or obligation. It refers to the act of pursuing or claiming what someone owes you, typically in terms of money.
  • travel on sth The idiom "travel on sth" typically means to make progress in a journey or venture, typically with the aid or support of something. It implies that one relies on or benefits from the specified thing in order to move forward or succeed in their endeavors.
  • be walking/treading on eggshells The idiom "walking/treading on eggshells" means to be extremely cautious, careful, or fragile in one's words, actions, or behavior around someone or in a particular situation, due to the fear of causing offense, conflict, or tension.
  • tread (up)on sm or sth The idiom "tread (up)on someone or something" means to step or walk heavily on someone or something, often unintentionally causing harm, damage, or offense. It can also refer to encroaching upon someone's rights, boundaries, or feelings without consideration.
  • not grow on trees The idiom "not grow on trees" means that something is not readily available or abundant, implying that it is difficult to obtain or acquire. It suggests that valuable or desirable things cannot be easily found, and one must work hard or make a special effort to obtain them.
  • Money does not grow on trees. The idiom "Money does not grow on trees" means that money is not easily or readily available and must be earned through hard work and effort. It emphasizes the idea that financial resources are limited and should be managed and used wisely.
  • trespass (up)on sth The idiom "trespass (up)on something" is used to describe intruding or encroaching on someone else's property, boundaries, or territory without permission. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to invading someone's privacy or personal space without invitation.
  • on trial The idiom "on trial" refers to a person or a situation being subjected to examination, evaluation, or testing, often within a legal context. It suggests that a person's actions, behavior, or the validity of a claim or belief system are under scrutiny, and a judgement or verdict is being sought. It entails a period of questioning, investigation, and presentation of evidence to determine the truth or guilt.
  • Come (on) in. The idiom "Come (on) in" is an invitation for someone to enter a place or a room.
  • play tricks on sm The idiom "play tricks on someone" means to deceive or manipulate someone in a mischievous or playful manner. It involves engaging in cunning or playful behavior to trick or tease someone without causing harm or distress. It typically involves engaging in pranks or practical jokes in a lighthearted or humorous way.
  • play a trick on sm The idiom "play a trick on someone" means to deceive or deceive someone for amusement or to catch them off guard in a playful or mischievous way. It involves setting up a practical joke or engaging in pranks to surprise or fool another person.
  • trifle sth away (on sm or sth) The idiom "trifle sth away (on sm or sth)" means to waste or spend something, such as time, money, or resources, in a frivolous or careless manner, often on insignificant or unimportant things. It implies squandering or using something irresponsibly without thought or consideration.
  • on the prowl The idiom "on the prowl" typically refers to someone who is actively seeking or searching for something, often with the intention of finding a romantic or sexual partner. It can also be used to describe someone who is in pursuit of prey, as in the behavior of a predatory animal.
  • send sb on a guilt trip The idiom "send someone on a guilt trip" refers to manipulating or making someone feel guilty about something they have done or not done. It involves intentionally using emotional pressure or tactics to make someone feel remorseful or guilty for their actions, decisions, or behavior. This could be done to influence their future actions or to gain a sense of control or power over them.
  • trip on sm or sth The phrase "trip on something" is an idiom that means to stumble over or have difficulty with something, either physically or metaphorically. It can refer to losing one's balance and stumbling physically, or encountering difficulties or challenges in dealing with a specific situation or problem.
  • lay a (heavy) trip on sm The idiom "lay a (heavy) trip on someone" refers to the act of causing emotional or psychological distress to someone by burdening them with guilt, blame, or by subjecting them to pressure or criticism. It often involves manipulating someone's emotions or thoughts in a negative and burdensome way.
  • all hands on deck The idiom "all hands on deck" means that everyone is needed or involved in a particular task or situation. It originated from nautical language, where it referred to the need for all crew members to help sail a ship during challenging or critical moments. However, its usage has extended beyond sailing and is now commonly used in various contexts to emphasize the importance of collective effort and participation.
  • punch sm on sth To "punch someone's name on something" is an idiom that means to record or register someone's name or information on a document, list, or database, typically by physically typing it in. It often refers to the act of entering someone's name or details on a digital device or computer.
  • on purpose The idiom "on purpose" refers to doing something intentionally or deliberately, with a clear intention or motive behind one's actions. It is often used to imply that someone did something with a specific goal or motive in mind, as opposed to by accident or coincidence.
  • push up on The idiom "push up on" typically means to exert pressure or force on someone or something in order to move it upwards. It can also refer to making advances or attempts to gain an advantage or influence over someone or something.
  • push on To "push on" means to continue or persevere despite difficulties or obstacles. It implies not giving up in the face of challenges and remaining determined to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • push off on The idiom "push off on" has a few different potential meanings, depending on the context: 1. To depart or leave: This meaning suggests that "push off on" is used to indicate someone or something leaving a particular place or location. Example: "We should push off on our vacation before it gets too late." 2. To impose or burden someone with a responsibility or task: In this sense, "push off on" is used to describe the act of forcing someone to take on a task or responsibility that they may not want or be prepared for. Example: "Don't push off on me your work; I have enough to handle already." 3. To initiate or start something forcefully: This interpretation implies that "push off on
  • push down on The idiom "push down on" refers to the act of exerting pressure or force in a downward direction. It is commonly used to describe the physical action of pressing or pushing something downwards, often to create stability, hold something in place, or minimize movement. It can also be used metaphorically to describe exerting control or influence over someone or a situation, typically in a forceful or overpowering manner.
  • take sth on trust The idiom "take something on trust" means to believe or accept something without questioning or verifying its accuracy. It refers to relying on the honesty, reliability, or credibility of someone or something.
  • Keep (on) trying. The idiom "Keep (on) trying" means to continue making efforts, even when faced with difficulties or failures, in order to achieve a goal or overcome an obstacle. It emphasizes the notion of perseverance, persistence, and not giving up.
  • compliment sm on sth The idiom "compliment someone on something" means to praise or express admiration for a particular quality, achievement, or action of someone. It involves offering words of appreciation or acknowledgment for their specific attribute or accomplishment.
  • Turn on, tune in, drop out. The idiom "Turn on, tune in, drop out" is a famous countercultural slogan that emerged in the 1960s. It originated from the American psychologist and writer Timothy Leary, who advocated for the use of psychedelic drugs as a means of expanding consciousness and escaping societal norms. The phrase signifies a call to reject traditional values, conformism, and materialism, and instead, embrace alternative lifestyles, spiritual exploration, and personal freedom. "Turn on" refers to the idea of using hallucinogenic drugs to open one's mind, "tune in" means to become more aware of oneself and the surrounding world, and "drop out" refers to withdrawing from mainstream society and institutions. The phrase encapsulates the countercultural
  • Whatever turns you on The idiom "Whatever turns you on" is a colloquial expression used to convey that someone is free to pursue or enjoy whatever interests or excites them, regardless of whether it is personally appealing to the speaker or others. It is often used to express tolerance and acceptance of individual preferences.
  • Whatever turns on The phrase "Whatever turns you on" is an idiom that is often used in a conversational context to express a nonjudgmental and accepting attitude towards someone's preferences or interests. It implies that individuals have different things that excite or interest them, and it is up to each person to pursue what brings them joy or satisfaction, even if it might seem unusual or unconventional to others.
  • turn the tables on The idiom "turn the tables on" means to completely reverse a situation or shift the dynamics in one's favor, typically by using an unexpected or clever tactic. It involves changing a disadvantageous or losing position to an advantageous or winning one, often surprising others involved.
  • turn on heel The idiom "turn on heel" means to abruptly change direction or reverse course, typically in a sudden or hasty manner. It often implies a quick and decisive change of mind or action.
  • turn on a dime The definition of the idiom "turn on a dime" means to change direction or take a new course quickly and effortlessly, often implying the ability to navigate tight spaces or adapt to unexpected situations without difficulty. It suggests a high level of agility, flexibility, or responsiveness.
  • turn in on oneself To "turn in on oneself" is an idiom that means to become excessively introspective or self-absorbed. It refers to a mental or emotional state where a person becomes preoccupied with their own thoughts, feelings, or problems, often to the point of isolation or neglecting external realities and relationships. This idiom suggests a withdrawal from social interaction or a tendency to focus solely on one's own concerns.
  • turn back on The idiom "turn back on" refers to the act of abandoning or renouncing something or someone that was previously supported or relied upon. It means to disassociate oneself from a person, situation, or belief, often due to a change in opinion, disappointment, or betrayal.
  • turn up the heat (on sm or sth) The idiom "turn up the heat (on sm or sth)" means to increase pressure, intensity, or the level of difficulty in a situation or towards someone or something. It often implies applying more force, effort, or scrutiny to achieve a desired outcome or to push someone to act or respond in a specific way.
  • concur on sm or sth (with sm) The idiom "concur on something (with someone)" means to agree or have the same opinion about something with someone else. It indicates that two or more people have a similar viewpoint or are in alignment regarding a particular matter.
  • confer on sm or sth (with sm) The idiom "confer on someone or something (with someone)" means to have a discussion or consult with someone about a particular person or topic in order to exchange ideas, opinions, or make a decision. It often involves seeking advice, guidance, or input from another person or group.
  • confer sth (up)on sm The idiom "confer something (up)on someone" means to grant or bestow something upon someone, especially an honor, privilege, or authority.
  • congratulate sm (up)on sth The idiom "congratulate someone (up)on something" means to express joy, admiration, or recognition to someone for their achievement, success, or milestone. It is a way of showing appreciation and acknowledging someone's accomplishments or good fortune.
  • conjecture on sth The idiom "conjecture on sth" means to speculate, guess, or hypothesize about something without having definite evidence or proof. It involves forming an opinion or making an assumption based on limited information or incomplete understanding of a situation.
  • put out a warrant (on sm) The idiom "put out a warrant (on sm)" generally refers to the act of a legal authority issuing an official document that authorizes law enforcement officials to apprehend and arrest someone who is suspected of committing a crime. It means to formally request and initiate a search for an individual to bring them into custody for questioning or trial.
  • on consignment The idiom "on consignment" refers to a business arrangement in which goods or products are placed with another party, typically a retailer, for sale, but the ownership of the goods remains with the original owner until they are sold. The seller (consignor) retains ownership of the items until they are sold, at which point the retailer (consignee) pays the consignor a share of the sale price as agreed upon.
  • converge (up)on sm or sth The idiom "converge (up)on someone or something" means that a large number of people or things come together or gather in one place or towards one particular person or thing. It suggests a gathering or movement toward a common point or objective.
  • be cooking on gas The idiom "be cooking on gas" generally means that someone or something is functioning or progressing exceptionally well. It implies that everything is going smoothly and efficiently, often used in a context where tasks or plans are being executed successfully.
  • cooperate with sm (on sth) The idiom "cooperate with someone (on something)" means to work together with another person or entity to achieve a common goal or to complete a specific task or project. It involves sharing ideas, resources, and effort in a collaborative manner for mutual benefit.
  • dish the dirt (on sb/sth) The idiom "dish the dirt (on sb/sth)" means to provide or share information or gossip, especially negative or scandalous, about someone or something. It involves revealing secrets or personal details that may be embarrassing or damaging to the reputation of the individual or subject being discussed.
  • dig up (sm) dirt (on sb) The idiom "dig up (someone's) dirt (on somebody)" refers to the act of uncovering or discovering negative or incriminating information about someone, often with the intention of tarnishing their reputation or using it against them. It implies the act of conducting a thorough investigation or research to find embarrassing or damaging details about a person's past or present.
  • dig sm dirt up (on sm) The idiom "dig up dirt (on someone)" means to gather or uncover damaging or incriminating information about someone, often with the intention to harm or discredit them. It is often used to describe thorough investigations or research aimed at finding personal secrets or scandalous details about someone's past.
  • cotton (on)to sm or sth The idiom "cotton (on) to sm or sth" means to begin to understand or comprehend something. It refers to someone gradually grasping a concept, idea, or situation after initially being uncertain or unaware.
  • on the double The idiom "on the double" means to do something quickly or immediately, without delay.
  • double back (on sm or sth) The idiom "double back (on someone or something)" means to reverse direction or backtrack on a decision, commitment, or statement. It often implies going back on one's word or betraying trust.
  • count on sth The idiom "count on something" means to rely or depend on something, whether it be a person, an object, or a situation, with the expectation that it will provide support, assistance, or a desired outcome.
  • count on sb The idiom "count on someone" means to rely or depend on someone to fulfill a promise, perform a task, or provide support when needed. It implies trust and confidence in the person's reliability and ability to be dependable.
  • count on sm or sth The idiom "count on someone or something" means to rely or trust someone or something to do as expected or promised, and to be there for support or assistance when needed. It implies having confidence or a belief in the dependability and reliability of the person or thing in question.
  • count (up)on sm or sth The idiom "count (up)on someone or something" refers to relying or depending on someone or something to provide support, assistance, or fulfill a certain expectation. It suggests having confidence and trust in that person or thing to be reliable and dependable in a particular situation.
  • unleash sm or sth (up)on sm or sth The idiom "unleash something (up)on someone or something" means to release or allow something powerful, intense, or negative to be directed towards someone or something. It implies setting something free or initiating an uncontrollable force upon a person, an object, a situation, or a group. This phrase suggests an action that cannot be easily controlled or stopped once it's initiated. It can be used metaphorically to describe a situation where someone or something has been let loose without any restrictions or limitations.
  • unload sm or sth on (to) sm The idiom "unload sm or sth on (to) sm" is typically used to describe the act of burdening or imposing something on someone else. It means to transfer or place the responsibility, problem, or task onto another individual, often without their consent or willingness to take it on.
  • couple sth (on)to sth The idiom "couple something (on) to something" generally means to connect or combine two things together. It implies linking or attaching one thing to another, usually in a physical or figurative sense. It can be used to describe joining two objects, ideas, concepts, or actions in a coherent or coordinated manner.
  • gone on The idiom "gone on" typically refers to someone having developed strong feelings or affections towards someone or something. It implies a strong liking, attraction, or infatuation for someone or something.
  • crack down (on sb/sth) The idiom "crack down (on sb/sth)" means to take strict or forceful measures to control or suppress a particular person, group, or activity. It implies a strong and determined effort to enforce rules, regulations, or laws in order to prevent or stop certain behaviors or actions that are considered undesirable or illegal.
  • crack down (on sm or sth) The idiom "crack down (on someone or something)" means to take strict and decisive measures to actively enforce rules, laws, or regulations in order to suppress or eliminate a particular behavior or activity that is considered illegal, inappropriate, or undesirable.
  • crap out (of sth) (on sm) The idiom "crap out (of sth) (on sm)" means to suddenly quit or abandon something, often without warning or good reason. It can also refer to failing or giving up on a task or responsibility. This phrase is informal and can be considered slightly vulgar.
  • wear heart on sleeve To "wear your heart on your sleeve" means to openly and visibly display one's emotions, thoughts, or vulnerabilities without reservation or hiding them. It refers to expressing one's feelings and emotions without hesitation, often making them easily perceptible to others.
  • put hand on heart The idiom "put hand on heart" is an expression used to describe someone claiming or affirming that what they are saying is completely true, sincere, or genuine. It signifies honesty, integrity, and a willingness to be trustworthy.
  • be on the crest of a wave The idiom "be on the crest of a wave" means to be at the peak or pinnacle of success, popularity, or fortune, usually in a particular field or endeavor. It suggests being in a position of great achievement, momentum, or influence.
  • think the sun rises and sets on sm The idiom "think the sun rises and sets on someone" refers to the excessive admiration or belief in someone's abilities, qualities, or importance. It implies that the person is seen as nearly perfect or infallible, as if their presence alone brings light and significance to every situation, just like the rising and setting of the sun.
  • on land The idiom "on land" typically refers to being physically present or situated on the ground or a solid surface, usually contrasting with being in the water or air. It implies being in a stable and secure position rather than being in a risky or precarious situation.
  • land on feet The idiom "land on one's feet" means to successfully or confidently recover from a difficult or challenging situation, often making the best of it. When someone "lands on their feet," they are able to adapt and find a positive outcome despite facing adversity or unexpected circumstances.
  • land on both feet The idiom "land on both feet" means to handle a situation or adapt successfully, especially after a difficult or challenging experience. It implies resilience, resourcefulness, and the ability to come out unscathed or in a good position despite adversity.
  • land on The idiom "land on" typically means to choose or settle upon a decision or conclusion. It suggests making a final choice or reaching a resolution after considering various options or alternatives.
  • be (down) on your uppers The idiom "be (down) on your uppers" means to be in a state of poverty or financial hardship. It implies that a person has little or no money or resources, and is struggling to make ends meet.
  • quick on the uptake The idiom "quick on the uptake" means unusually fast in understanding or grasping something, often used to describe someone who quickly comprehends new information or ideas.
  • urge sth (up)on sm To "urge something (up)on someone" means to strongly encourage or persuade them to accept or take something, usually when they may not necessarily want or need it. It can imply a persistence or forcefulness in trying to convince or convince someone to accept or adopt something.
  • (right) on cue The idiom "(right) on cue" means precisely at the expected or desired moment; exactly when anticipated or planned. It refers to something happening or being said just in time or perfectly timed, usually in line with a predetermined arrangement or script.
  • put sth on the cuff The idiom "put something on the cuff" refers to the act of buying something on credit or without immediate payment. It means to make a purchase and have the payment recorded to be settled later. This phrase is often used in informal or colloquial settings to describe a transaction where the buyer is allowed to carry a debt for a period of time.
  • on vacation The idiom "on vacation" refers to a state of being away from one's usual work or daily routine, usually for leisure or relaxation purposes. It implies being on a break from regular responsibilities and enjoying time off.
  • on the cusp (of sth) The idiom "on the cusp of something" refers to being at the point of experiencing or achieving something significant. It implies being on the threshold or verge of a particular situation, event, or breakthrough.
  • cut oneself on The idiom "cut oneself on" refers to encountering or dealing with something that is potentially harmful or dangerous, often resulting in personal injury or negative consequences. It implies that interacting with the subject matter can be tricky, requiring caution and care.
  • cut on
  • cut eyeteeth on The idiom "cut eyeteeth on" means to gain experience or expertise in a particular field or skill through firsthand, often challenging, practice or involvement. It suggests that someone has acquired a level of knowledge or capability after a significant period of learning and growth. It refers to the idea of the literal process of a baby cutting their first set of canine teeth, which typically occurs around the age of six to eight months, symbolizing a milestone in personal development.
  • cut back (on sth) The idiom "cut back (on sth)" means to reduce or decrease the amount, size, intensity, or frequency of something. It refers to making a conscious effort to consume or engage in something less in order to save money, resources, or improve well-being.
  • on the cutting edge (of sth) The idiom "on the cutting edge (of sth)" means being at the forefront or leading position in a particular area or field. It implies being innovative, progressive, and using the latest advancements or techniques. It suggests being ahead of others and pushing boundaries in order to stay up to date with new developments.
  • at/on the cutting edge The idiom "at/on the cutting edge" refers to something or someone that is at the forefront of innovation, advancement, or development, particularly in technology, industry, or any field that involves progress and modernization. It suggests being ahead of others in terms of ideas, knowledge, techniques, or products.
  • on the cutting edge The idiom "on the cutting edge" refers to being at the forefront or leading position of innovation, progress, or technology in a particular field or industry. It implies being ahead of others in terms of ideas, techniques, or practices.
  • firing on all cylinders The idiom "firing on all cylinders" means operating or functioning at full capacity or maximum efficiency. It is often used to describe someone or something that is performing exceptionally well and making the most of their abilities.
  • put head on the block The idiom "put head on the block" refers to taking a significant risk or to willingly subject oneself to potential criticism or consequences for a particular action or decision. It often implies putting one's reputation, job, or personal well-being at stake for a specific cause or belief.
  • on head be it The idiom "on head be it" means taking full responsibility or bearing the consequences of one's actions or decisions. It implies that the individual is accepting the accountability or ownership of a certain matter, regardless of the outcome or potential negative consequences.
  • on head The idiom "on one's head" refers to taking responsibility or blame for something. It suggests that someone is fully accountable for the consequences or outcome of a particular situation or decision.
  • knock on the head The idiom "knock on the head" means to put an end to something or to stop it abruptly. It is usually used to refer to a plan, idea, or action that is considered impractical, unrealistic, or unproductive and needs to be rejected or discontinued.
  • head on a plate The idiom "head on a plate" refers to a situation where someone is demanded or expected to take full responsibility for a failure or mistake, often resulting in public humiliation or punishment. It suggests that the person's reputation or career could be sacrificed as a consequence.
  • head on The idiom "head on" generally means to confront or deal with a situation directly and without hesitation. It refers to facing challenges or problems directly, without avoidance or delay.
  • have head screwed on The idiom "have head screwed on" is used to describe someone who is intelligent, sensible, and rational in their thinking and decision-making. It refers to an individual who has a good understanding of reality, is level-headed, and makes well-informed choices.
  • harm a hair on head The idiom "harm a hair on (someone's) head" is an expression used to convey the idea of causing harm or injury to someone. It implies physically hurting someone, often suggesting that the person using the idiom will fiercely protect and defend the person in question.
  • eyes are out on stalks The idiom "eyes are out on stalks" is an expression used to describe someone who is extremely surprised or amazed by something they see. It implies that the person's eyes are wide open and protruding, as if they were on long stalks, emphasizing their astonishment.
  • a price on head The idiom "a price on one's head" refers to a situation in which someone is being sought after, usually for capture or harm. It originated from the practice of placing a monetary reward for turning in or providing information about a wanted criminal.
  • dab sth on(to) sth The idiom "dab sth on(to) sth" typically means to apply or place a small amount of something gently onto a surface. It often refers to using a small, quick, and light touch to spread or distribute a substance in a controlled manner. This phrase is commonly used when talking about applying cosmetics, ointments, or other substances.
  • wreak vengeance (up)on sm or sth The idiom "wreak vengeance on someone or something" means to seek revenge or inflict punishment or harm upon a person or thing as an act of retaliation for a perceived wrong or injustice. It implies seeking retribution for a perceived offense or injury by causing harm or damage in return.
  • vent sth (up)on sm or sth To "vent something (up)on someone or something" means to unleash or release anger, frustration, or annoyance upon them. It often implies expressing these negative feelings in an intense or prolonged manner, often in an unfair or unreasonable way.
  • venture (up)on sm or sth The idiom "venture (up)on someone or something" means to embark on or undertake something, often with some degree of uncertainty or risk. It implies taking a bold step or making a daring move, often involving unfamiliar territory or situations. It can also suggest a sense of bravery or curiosity in trying something new or taking a calculated risk.
  • verge (up)on sth The idiom "verge (up)on sth" means to be very close to a particular state, condition, or quality. It implies being at the brink or edge of something, almost reaching a certain point or threshold. It can be used to convey the idea of approaching or bordering on a specific situation or characteristic.
  • on dangerous ground The idiom "on dangerous ground" typically refers to being in a risky or precarious situation, often involving potential harm or trouble. It can imply being in a situation where one's actions or decisions may have negative consequences or where there is a high level of uncertainty or danger present.
  • It has name on it The idiom "It has your name on it" means that something is specifically intended or predetermined for a particular person. It suggests that the person has an exclusive claim or ownership over something, emphasizing the connection between the person and the object.
  • bring sm uptodate (on sm or sth) The idiom "bring someone up to date (on someone or something)" means to inform or educate someone about the recent developments, information, or events related to a particular person or topic. It implies providing the person with the most current and relevant information so that they are well-informed.
  • daub sth on(to) sth The idiom "daub sth on/to sth" means to apply or spread something, usually in a rough or careless manner, onto something else, typically a surface or object. It implies a hasty or sloppy application of paint, substance, or any form of material onto a particular area.
  • dawn on you The idiom "dawn on you" means to suddenly realize or understand something. It refers to the moment when a realization gradually becomes clear or becomes fully comprehended.
  • dawn (up)on sm The idiom "dawn (up)on someone" means that someone suddenly realizes or understands something. It implies that something previously unknown or unclear becomes clear or evident to the person.
  • from this day on The idiom "from this day on" means starting from the current moment or occasion, and continuing into the future. It signifies a commitment or decision to initiate a new course of action or a significant change in one's behavior or attitude.
  • days/months/weeks etc. on end The phrase "days/months/weeks etc. on end" is an idiom that means continuously or without interruption for a long period of time. It implies that the activity or action mentioned in the context has been happening for an extended duration without any breaks or pauses.
  • for days on end The idiom "for days on end" means continuously or consistently for a long period of time without interruption, often used to emphasize the duration of an event or occurrence.
  • on view The idiom "on view" commonly refers to something that is being displayed or exhibited for public observation or scrutiny. It implies that an object, artwork, or entity is available for people to look at, examine, or review.
  • dead on feet
  • dead on The idiom "dead on" is typically used to describe something that is completely accurate, precise, or correct. It means that someone has hit the mark perfectly or made an extremely accurate assessment or prediction.
  • be dead on feet The idiom "be dead on feet" means to be extremely exhausted or physically drained to the point of extreme fatigue, where one can hardly continue or function.
  • sth falls on deaf ears The idiom "something falls on deaf ears" means that someone is not willing or unable to listen or pay attention to what is being said or suggested. It refers to a situation where someone's words or advice is being ignored or disregarded.
  • hold on for dear life The idiom "hold on for dear life" means to grip or cling tightly to something, usually in a desperate or desperate situation, as if one's life depended on it. It expresses a strong, urgent, and determined effort to maintain control or stability in challenging circumstances.
  • hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life The idiom "hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life" means to cling tightly or hold tightly to something or someone in a perilous or life-threatening situation. It implies extreme desperation and the strong desire to survive or protect someone/something.
  • hang on for dear life The idiom "hang on for dear life" means to hold on tightly and desperately, typically to a physical object or a situation, in order to prevent oneself from falling, losing control, or being separated from it. It conveys the idea of extreme and determined efforts to maintain balance, safety, or stability.
  • on pain of death The idiom "on pain of death" refers to a strict and severe consequence or punishment that one will face if they fail to comply with a particular order or rule. It signifies that the consequences for disobedience or failure are so severe that they may result in death.
  • hang on like grim death The idiom "hang on like grim death" means to hold tightly and persistently to someone or something, as if one's life depended on it. It suggests a strong and desperate grip, often used to describe a situation where one refuses to let go, regardless of the circumstances. It conveys a sense of determination, tenacity, and the refusal to give up.
  • death on The idiom "death on" means to have an intense or strong dislike or aversion towards something or someone. It implies having a strong resentment or hostility.
  • wither on the vine The idiom "wither on the vine" means to gradually deteriorate or fail due to lack of attention, support, or resources. It refers to something that is left neglected and eventually becomes ineffective or useless. Just like a fruit withering on a vine when not harvested, the idiom metaphorically describes the decline or loss of potential when something is not given the necessary care or nurturing.
  • on one's deathbed The idiom "on one's deathbed" refers to the state or condition of being very close to death or nearing the end of one's life. It implies that someone is facing a terminal illness, injury, or old age, and is expected to not survive much longer.
  • debate on sth The idiom "debate on sth" refers to a deliberation or discussion focused on a specific topic or issue. It implies the exchange of arguments, viewpoints, and opinions among individuals or groups with the goal of reaching a conclusion or making a decision.
  • be on the fritz The idiom "be on the fritz" means that something is not working properly or is malfunctioning.
  • gain ground on sb/sth The idiom "gain ground on someone/something" means to make progress or approach closer to catching up with someone or something. It refers to gradually reducing the distance or difference between oneself and another person or target.
  • gain on sm or sth The idiom "gain on someone or something" means to gradually catch up with or get closer to someone or something, either in a literal or figurative sense. It implies making progress or improvements in relation to a specific person or object.
  • decide (up)on sm or sth The idiom "decide (up)on sm or sth" means to make a choice or reach a conclusion about someone or something. It refers to the act of considering different options and ultimately settling on one particular person or thing.
  • on deck The idiomatic expression "on deck" refers to being next in line or next to perform a specific task or duty. It originated from baseball terminology, where a player waiting to bat is referred to as being "on deck." Similarly, in a broader sense, it can be used to describe someone who is prepared or ready to take on a specific role or responsibility.
  • visit sth (up)on sm The idiom "visit something (up)on someone" means to impose or force something upon someone, typically without their consent or desire. It implies that the action or consequence is unexpected or unwelcome to the person it is being imposed upon.
  • default on sth The idiom "default on sth" means to fail to meet a financial obligation or contractual agreement. It refers to a situation where someone is unable or unwilling to fulfill their responsibility of paying back a loan, debt, or meeting the terms of an agreement or contract, such as a mortgage, loan repayment, or regular payments.
  • jar on sm or sth The idiom "jar on someone or something" means to cause irritation, discomfort, or a feeling of incongruity. It refers to something that does not fit well or seems out of place in a particular situation, resulting in a jarring or discordant effect.
  • on the defensive The idiom "on the defensive" refers to being in a position where one must protect oneself, often due to feeling criticized, attacked, or under pressure. It commonly implies a reactive stance in which a person or group is focused on defending their actions, beliefs, or statements rather than being open or receptive.
  • defer to sm or sth (on sth) The idiom "defer to someone or something (on something)" means to submit or yield to the authority, expertise, or judgment of someone or something regarding a specific matter or decision. It implies showing respect, trust, and reliance on the opinion or knowledge of another person or entity.
  • vote sm on(to sth)
  • vote (up)on sm or sth The idiom "vote (up)on someone or something" refers to the act of expressing an opinion or making a decision regarding someone or something by casting a vote. It implies a formal process of gathering input or making a collective choice through voting.
  • on demand The idiom "on demand" refers to the ability to receive or access something immediately or when needed, without any delay or waiting period. It typically implies a service or product that can be obtained at any time, according to the user's request or preference.
  • wager on sm or sth The idiom "wager on someone or something" means to make a bet or gamble on the outcome or success of someone or something. It often implies taking a risk by putting money or other valuables at stake in the hopes of winning or gaining something in return.
  • wager sth on sm or sth The idiom "wager something on someone or something" means to risk or bet something valuable or important on a particular outcome or person. It can refer to placing a monetary bet or simply taking a chance on the success or failure of a specific situation.
  • be on the wagon The idiom "be on the wagon" means to abstain from drinking alcohol, typically in reference to someone who has previously had issues with alcoholism or excessive drinking. It implies that the person is currently committed to sobriety or has temporarily stopped consuming alcohol.
  • wait on sb hand and foot The idiom "wait on sb hand and foot" means to serve or attend to someone's every need or desire without any hesitation or complaint. It implies complete and extravagant care.
  • wait on sb To "wait on someone" means to serve or attend to someone's needs or requests. It usually implies taking orders, bringing items, or providing assistance to someone in a subordinate role, such as a waiter waiting on customers in a restaurant or a personal assistant waiting on their employer.
  • wait on sm hand and foot The idiom "wait on someone hand and foot" means to serve or attend to someone's every need or desire in a very attentive and submissive manner. It implies providing a high level of care, attention, and assistance to someone, almost like being at their beck and call.
  • wait (up)on sm The idiom "wait (up)on someone" means to serve, attend to, or provide assistance to someone. It refers to the act of being attentive or available to fulfill someone's needs, requests, or desires. It can also imply showing respect, deference, or obedience towards that person.
  • on the waiting list The idiom "on the waiting list" refers to being in a position where one has been added to a list of people awaiting their turn or opportunity to receive or participate in something. It indicates that the individual is not immediately granted access or availability but is instead awaiting their turn at a later time.
  • get up on the wrong side of (the) bed The idiom "get up on the wrong side of (the) bed" means to start the day in a bad mood or having a negative attitude right from the beginning. It implies that someone woke up feeling irritable, grumpy, or easily annoyed, which can affect their behavior and interactions throughout the day.
  • worship the ground walks on The idiom "worship the ground (someone) walks on" means to admire or adore someone so much that you show unquestioning devotion or admiration, often believing that person can do no wrong. It signifies an intense level of admiration and reverence for someone, considering them to be almost god-like or infallible.
  • walk out on The idiom "walk out on" means to abruptly leave or abandon someone, usually in a situation where one has a responsibility or obligation to remain. It implies a sense of betrayal or abandonment by simply walking away without any explanation or consideration for the other person involved.
  • walk on eggshells The idiom "walk on eggshells" means to tread carefully or cautiously in order to avoid upsetting someone or causing a conflict. It implies being overly cautious or hypersensitive when dealing with a particular person or situation.
  • walk on The idiom "walk on" has multiple meanings, depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To leave or exit a situation or environment, typically referring to someone leaving a performance, a meeting, or a conversation. Example: After his performance, the actor took a bow and walked on. 2. To continue despite difficulties, setbacks, or challenges. Example: Despite facing numerous obstacles, she had the determination to walk on and succeed in her goals. 3. To pretend or act as if a problem or issue does not bother you or does not exist. Example: He tried to walk on and ignore the criticism that came his way. 4. In sports, specifically football (soccer), it refers to a player who
  • walk in on The idiom "walk in on" means to unintentionally interrupt or unexpectedly enter a situation, particularly when someone is engaged in a private or personal activity. It generally implies catching someone off guard or witnessing something that was not intended to be seen.
  • walk out (on sth) The idiom "walk out (on sth)" means to abruptly leave a situation or to abandon someone or something. It implies a sudden and often deliberate act of departing from a place, relationship, or responsibility. This can be in response to dissatisfaction, disagreement, or simply a decision to no longer be a part of something.
  • be floating/walking on air The idiom "be floating/walking on air" refers to a state of extreme happiness, joy, or elation. It implies feeling light, like walking or floating effortlessly above the ground, often as a result of a positive experience or a highly gratifying event.
  • the writing on the wall The idiom "the writing on the wall" refers to a clear warning or indication of a future event or outcome, typically a negative one. It stems from an ancient biblical story that describes a supernatural occurrence where a hand wrote on a wall, delivering a message of doom or impending disaster. Thus, "the writing on the wall" metaphorically alludes to an unmistakable sign that something unfavorable is about to occur, serving as a forewarning to take appropriate action or prepare for the consequences.
  • read the handwriting on the wall The idiom "read the handwriting on the wall" means to understand or interpret the signs or signals that suggest a forthcoming disaster, downfall, or change. It implies the ability to perceive and comprehend the obvious indications or warnings about an unavoidable outcome or event. The phrase originates from the biblical story in the book of Daniel, where a disembodied hand writes a prophetic message on a wall that only the protagonist can understand.
  • a fly on the wall The idiom "a fly on the wall" refers to a person who is observing a situation or conversation secretly and inconspicuously, typically with the intention of gaining insider knowledge or understanding. It indicates a desire to be present but unnoticed, just like a fly on a wall.
  • on the wane The idiom "on the wane" means that something is declining, diminishing, or decreasing in importance, power, influence, or popularity. It suggests a gradual decline or weakening of a particular condition, state, or situation.
  • depend (up)on sm or sth The idiom "depend (up)on someone or something" means relying on or needing someone or something in order to achieve a certain outcome or to function properly. It signifies that the success or fulfillment of a particular situation or task is closely tied to the involvement or support of a specific person or thing.
  • on the warpath The idiom "on the warpath" means to be angry, hostile, or seeking revenge. It is often used to describe someone who is determined to confront and fight against something or someone they feel has wronged them.
  • be on the warpath The idiom "be on the warpath" refers to someone being angry, aggressive, or determined to confront and challenge someone or something, often with a desire for revenge or retribution. It can also imply being in a state of intense preparation for a confrontation or battle.
  • rain on sm's parade The idiom "rain on someone's parade" typically means to spoil or ruin someone's plans, celebrations, or mood by saying or doing something negative or discouraging.
  • rain in on sm or sth The idiom "rain in on someone or something" means to spoil or disrupt a person or a situation, often by imposing restrictions, limitations, or unwanted interference. It refers to the act of putting a damper on someone's plans, ideas, or enjoyment.
  • rain down on sm or sth The idiom "rain down on someone or something" means to come or fall upon someone or something in great amounts or with intensity. It is often used metaphorically to describe a large quantity of something being delivered or absorbed rapidly.
  • rain check (on sth) The idiom "rain check (on sth)" typically means to postpone or reschedule a plan or offer that was previously made. It is often used when someone cannot fulfill an invitation or opportunity at the present moment but would like to accept or participate at a later time. The phrase originates from the practice of issuing a voucher or ticket to a baseball game that was cancelled due to rain, allowing the holder to attend a future game instead.
  • rain sth down (on sm or sth) The idiom "rain something down (on someone or something)" means to cause something to fall or descend heavily and abundantly on someone or something. It is often used metaphorically to describe a rapid and copious occurrence or bestowal of something, such as praise, criticism, or an overwhelming amount of objects or substances.
  • rain (up)on sm or sth The idiom "rain (up)on someone or something" means to spoil or ruin a person's or thing's plans, enjoyment, or success. It refers to the act of bringing negative or unfortunate circumstances upon someone or something.
  • waste sth on sb The idiom "waste something on somebody" refers to the act of using or giving something to someone who is unlikely to value or appreciate it properly. It implies that the effort or resources put into that particular thing were not utilized effectively because the person or group did not fully appreciate or understand its importance or significance.
  • waste sth on sm or sth The idiom "waste something on someone or something" refers to an action of spending or using something, such as time, effort, or resources, in a manner that is futile, unappreciated, or unsuitable for the intended purpose or recipient. It implies that the efforts or resources are not utilized effectively or do not yield desired results.
  • on watch The idiom "on watch" typically refers to a person being attentive, vigilant, or actively observing a particular situation or condition. It often implies being in a position of responsibility or duty, keeping a lookout, and being prepared to respond or take action if necessary. This phrase often originates from nautical or military contexts, where a designated person is assigned the task of monitoring and safeguarding the surroundings.
  • on the watch The idiom "on the watch" refers to someone being alert, vigilant, and observant, typically for a specific purpose or to prevent potential harm or danger. It implies actively monitoring a situation or keeping a close eye on someone or something.
  • keep watch on The idiom "keep watch on" means to monitor or observe something or someone closely and attentively in order to ensure safety, security, or to gather information. It implies being vigilant and on guard.
  • descend (up)on sm or sth The idiom "descend (up)on someone or something" means to arrive, often in a large or overwhelming manner. It can imply the act of swarming, pouncing, or rapidly converging upon someone or something. It usually suggests a sudden and forceful approach, often with a negative connotation.
  • have designs on sth The idiom "have designs on something" refers to having a plan or intention to obtain or achieve something, usually with a sense of ambition or purpose. It implies that someone has a specific goal or desire they are actively working towards.
  • have designs on sb The idiom "have designs on someone" means to have romantic or amorous intentions toward a specific person. It implies harboring an attraction or desire for establishing a romantic relationship with someone.
  • have designs on sm or sth The idiom "have designs on someone or something" means to have ambitious or ulterior motives or intentions towards someone or something. It implies having a specific plan or goal in mind, often with the intention of gaining some advantage or benefit from the person or thing in question.
  • ride (on) a/the wave The idiom "ride (on) a/the wave" refers to taking advantage of a particular trend or situation that is characterized by success, popularity, or positive momentum. It involves benefiting from a current favorable circumstance or enjoying the advantages of being associated with a certain movement or development. It often implies going along with the flow and capitalizing on the momentum to achieve success or gain influence.
  • wave sm or sth on The idiom "wave someone or something on" means to signal or gesture for someone or something to continue moving or progressing, usually by making a waving motion with the hand or arm. It is often used by a person in a position of authority or control, such as a traffic controller, to give permission or clearance for someone or something to proceed.
  • on way
  • on the way The idiom "on the way" typically means that something is in the process of happening or being completed, or that someone is in the process of going to a certain destination.
  • hurry one on way The idiom "hurry one on their way" means to encourage or prompt someone to leave or move quickly. It implies a sense of urgency or impatience in getting someone to depart from a particular place or situation.
  • wear on sleeve To "wear on one's sleeve" means to openly display or show one's emotions, thoughts, or beliefs. It implies that a person does not hesitate to express their feelings or make their opinions known to others, often lacking a filter or a desire to hide their emotions. The idiom suggests that someone who wears their heart on their sleeve is transparent and genuine in expressing themselves and does not attempt to conceal their true feelings.
  • wear on The idiom "wear on" means to gradually become tiresome, bothersome, or irritating over time. It refers to a situation or experience that starts off tolerable but eventually becomes burdensome or wearisome.
  • put wear on
  • wear and tear (on sth) The idiom "wear and tear (on sth)" refers to the damage or deterioration caused by regular use or continuous strain on something over time. It describes the normal or expected erosion that occurs due to the natural aging process or consistent usage of a particular object or system.
  • wear on sm The idiom "wear on someone" means to gradually cause annoyance, frustration, or fatigue to someone over time. It refers to the cumulative effect of a situation or person becoming increasingly tiring or bothersome.
  • wear on (for a period of time) The idiom "wear on" means to pass or go by after enduring or experiencing something for a period of time. It often implies that the experience has become tiresome, burdensome, or difficult as time goes on.
  • wear sth (up)on sth The idiom "wear something (up)on something" typically means to display, show, or reveal one's emotions, feelings, or thoughts through their appearance, actions, or behavior. It suggests that the person's true emotions or intentions are evident or visible to others, often unintentionally.
  • wear (up)on sth The idiom "wear (up)on sth" refers to the gradual and increasing impact or influence of something on someone's emotions, thoughts, or patience over time. It implies that as time goes on, the impact or influence of the mentioned thing becomes more prominent or noticeable.
  • wear (up)on sm The idiom "wear (up) on someone" means to gradually annoy or irritate someone over time. It refers to a situation where a person's actions, behavior, or presence becomes increasingly bothersome or tiresome to someone else as time goes on.
  • keep a weather eye on sth/sb The idiom "keep a weather eye on sth/sb" means to pay close attention to and remain vigilant about something or someone, monitoring for any changes, developments, or potential problems. It suggests being alert and observant, just like a sailor keeping a lookout for changes in weather conditions at sea to ensure safety.
  • devolve (up)on sm or sth The idiom "devolve upon someone or something" means to transfer or pass responsibility, duty, or authority onto someone or something else. It implies the delegation of a task or obligation to another person or entity.
  • weigh on sth To "weigh on something" means to be a burden or cause a heavy feeling or worry about a certain issue or situation. It refers to the feeling of being mentally or emotionally impacted by a particular matter that constantly occupies one's thoughts and causes stress or anxiety.
  • weigh on sb The idiom "weigh on sb" means to cause someone to feel burdened, anxious, or troubled due to a particular situation or issue. It implies that the person's thoughts or emotions are heavy and persistent, creating a sense of pressure or distress.
  • weigh on sm's mind The idiom "weigh on someone's mind" means to cause someone to feel anxious, preoccupied, or troubled by concerns or worries. It refers to a persistent or burdensome thought or problem that occupies someone's thoughts, affecting their mental well-being.
  • weigh (up)on sm To "weigh (up)on someone" means to cause someone to feel burdened, worried, or stressed by a particular issue or situation. It suggests that the concern or problem is causing mental or emotional weight or pressure on an individual.
  • have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders" means to feel burdened and overwhelmed by numerous worries, responsibilities, or problems. It implies carrying an immense amount of stress and pressure, as if one is personally responsible for solving all the problems in the world.
  • put weight on The idiom "put weight on" means to gain or increase in physical weight, typically referring to one's body weight. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate the addition or increase of importance, influence, or significance to something.
  • put on weight The idiom "put on weight" refers to the action of gaining or increasing one's body mass or becoming heavier. It typically implies a gradual increase in body fat or overall size due to factors such as excessive food intake, a sedentary lifestyle, or certain medical conditions.
  • carry the weight of the world on one's shoulders The idiom "carry the weight of the world on one's shoulders" means to bear a heavy burden or responsibility, often feeling overwhelmed by problems or worries. It suggests a feeling of immense pressure similar to Atlas, a character from Greek mythology who was condemned to hold the world on his shoulders. This idiom is often used to describe someone who feels weighed down by various challenges or difficulties in their life.
  • be well up on The idiom "be well up on" means to possess a comprehensive and extensive knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or topic. It suggests a high level of familiarity and expertise in the area.
  • welsh on sth (with sm) The idiom "welsh on something (with someone)" is considered offensive and derogatory. It is derived from a stereotype and is based on the assumption that the Welsh people are unreliable or dishonest. It is commonly used to describe someone who fails to honor an agreement or breaks a promise. However, it is important to note that using this idiom perpetuates harmful stereotypes, and it is recommended to avoid its usage.
  • welsh on sm The idiom "welsh on" (also spelled "welch on") implies failing to fulfill a promise, agreement, or debt. It carries a negative connotation and is commonly used to describe someone who breaks their word or does not follow through with their obligations. This idiom is derived from a stereotype that Welsh people were untrustworthy and prone to deception, although it is important to note that this stereotype is outdated and offensive. It is recommended to use this idiom with caution, as it can be disrespectful and perpetuate harmful stereotypes.
  • from here on The idiom "from here on" means starting at this point or going forward. It implies a transition or change in a situation or course of action.
  • die with boots on The idiom "die with boots on" typically refers to the act of dying while actively engaged in one's occupation, profession, or passion. It implies that the person in question did not retire or step away from their work before passing away, but rather continued working until their final moments. It often indicates a dedication to one's craft or a desire to live life to the fullest until the end.
  • die on
  • stand on one's dignity The idiom "stand on one's dignity" means to firmly maintain one's self-respect and honor, often in the face of adversity or disrespect from others. It implies refusing to lower oneself or compromise one's principles and values.
  • dilate on sth
  • on a dime The idiom "on a dime" is typically used to describe someone or something's ability to change direction or movement very quickly and precisely. It refers to the notion of being able to turn around or stop abruptly within a very limited space, as if on the small surface area of a dime coin.
  • whip back (on sm) The idiom "whip back (on sm)" typically refers to a sudden and forceful return or reaction to a situation or a person. It often implies that someone's attitude, behavior, or emotions rapidly shift back to a previous state, whether it be positive or negative.
  • whip sm or sth on The idiom "whip (someone) or (something) on" typically means to urge or encourage someone or something to move quickly or with greater speed. It can also imply pushing someone or something towards completion or making progress at a faster pace.
  • dine on sth The idiom "dine on sth" means to have a meal that primarily consists of a particular type of food. It implies indulging in or enjoying a specific dish or ingredient during a meal.
  • do the dirty on To "do the dirty on" someone means to betray or deceive them, often by acting unfairly or dishonestly towards them. It refers to the act of acting disloyally or treacherously towards someone, typically going against an agreement, trust or friendship.
  • dis(s) (on) sm The idiom "dis(s) (on) sm" typically means to criticize or speak negatively about someone or something, usually in a disrespectful or derogatory manner. It involves expressing disapproval, contempt, or belittlement towards the person or thing being discussed.
  • discourse (up)on The idiom "discourse (up)on" means to express one's thoughts or opinions on a particular topic or subject in a lengthy or detailed manner. It implies engaging in a lengthy discussion, analysis, or explanation about something.
  • dish on sm The idiom "dish on someone" means to share or reveal secrets, private information, or gossip about someone. It implies providing inside or intimate details about a person, often in a negative or revealing manner.
  • on the wing The idiom "on the wing" commonly refers to something that is in motion or flying. It is often used to describe birds or aircraft in flight. However, figuratively, it can also be used to indicate that someone or something is constantly on the move or traveling.
  • be on the wing The idiom "be on the wing" means to be flying or in the air, typically referring to birds or insects in flight. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate that someone or something is constantly moving or busy.
  • wipe sth (off) (on sth) The idiom "wipe sth (off) (on sth)" refers to the act of removing or getting rid of something by rubbing it onto something else. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • I would not wish sth on sb The idiom "I would not wish something on someone" means that one would not want something unfortunate or unpleasant to happen to another person. It denotes a sincere reluctance or refusal to inflict harm, trouble, or a negative experience on someone else.
  • I/You wouldn't wish sth on my/your worst enemy. The idiom "I/You wouldn't wish something on my/your worst enemy" means that something is so terrible, painful, or undesirable that even if you have great animosity towards someone, you would not want them to experience it. It emphasizes the extreme level of distress or harm associated with the situation being described.
  • wish sm or sth (off) on sm The idiom "wish something (off) on someone" means to impose or burden someone with something undesirable or unwanted, often by hoping or expecting that they will take responsibility for it. It suggests an act of forcing or thrusting a problem, task, or responsibility onto someone without their consent.
  • I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy. The idiom "I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy" means that the situation or experience being referred to is so terrible, undesirable, or painful that the speaker wouldn't want anyone, not even their most detested enemy, to go through it. It emphasizes the severity or negativity of the situation.
  • live by/on your wits The idiom "live by/on your wits" means to rely on one's intelligence, resourcefulness, and quick thinking in order to survive or succeed in challenging situations, often without much external assistance or support. It implies the ability to navigate difficult circumstances through cleverness and adaptability.
  • divided on The idiom "divided on" is usually used to describe a situation where people have different opinions or are in disagreement about a specific subject or issue. It means that there is a lack of consensus or agreement among a group of people regarding a particular matter.
  • not be a patch on sb/sth The idiom "not be a patch on sb/sth" means that someone or something is not as good, skillful, accomplished, or impressive as another person or thing. It implies a significant inferiority or a notable difference in quality or ability.
  • on the verge The idiom "on the verge" refers to being very close to a particular state or situation, often one of change, beginning, or achievement. It describes being on the cusp of something significant or about to happen.
  • on the point of doing The idiom "on the point of doing" means being very close or near to doing something, often implying that the action is about to happen imminently.
  • keen on doing The idiom "keen on doing" means to have a strong enthusiasm or interest in doing something. It indicates a strong inclination or eagerness towards participating in or pursuing a particular activity.
  • intent on doing The idiom "intent on doing" means being fully focused, determined, and committed to achieving a particular goal or objective. It describes someone who is unwavering in their determination and puts all their effort into accomplishing something.
  • go on with The idiom "go on with" means to continue doing something or to proceed with a task or activity despite difficulties, interruptions, or distractions. It implies perseverance, determination, and refusing to give up or be deterred.
  • figure on doing The idiom "figure on doing" means to anticipate or expect to do something, to make plans or calculations based on a certain assumption or expectation.
  • bent on doing The idiom "bent on doing" means to be determined or fully committed to doing something, usually with a strong resolve or intention. It implies that the individual's focus and determination are unwavering in achieving a specific goal or undertaking a particular action.
  • on the dole The idiom "on the dole" refers to being dependent on government welfare or unemployment benefits for financial support. It typically implies that a person is receiving assistance without actively seeking or engaging in work or self-sufficiency.
  • put the make on The idiom "put the make on" means to flirt with or make romantic advances towards someone. It is used to describe someone's attempts to attract another person's attention or pursue a romantic or sexual relationship.
  • hang on every word The idiom "hang on every word" means to pay close attention and listen attentively to someone, often with great interest or fascination. It suggests being wholly engrossed in what someone is saying, eagerly waiting for every single word they utter.
  • go back on word The idiom "go back on one's word" means to break a promise or fail to fulfill a commitment or agreement. It refers to retracting or reneging on one's stated intention or statement.
  • work on The idiom "work on" means to exert effort or make an effort to improve or achieve something, often by dedicating time and energy to it. It can also refer to trying to persuade or influence someone towards a particular course of action.
  • pile the work on The idiom "pile the work on" means to assign or give an excessive amount of work or tasks to someone. It implies overloading someone with a heavy workload or burdening them with more than they can handle.
  • work on sth The idiom "work on something" refers to the act of dedicating time, effort, or energy towards improving or completing a task, project, or goal. It implies actively engaging in an activity to achieve a desired outcome.
  • work on sm The idiom "work on sm" typically refers to actively pursuing or making efforts to improve or fix something or someone. It implies the dedication and perseverance in trying to develop and enhance a particular aspect, quality, skill, or relationship.
  • work (up)on sth The idiom "work (up)on sth" means to exert efforts towards improving or making progress on something. It implies dedicating time, energy, and focus to a specific task or project.
  • lay the blame on The idiom "lay the blame on" means to assign responsibility or fault to someone or something for a particular event, mistake, or problem. It refers to placing the burden of guilt or accusation on a specific person or entity.
  • on your doorstep The idiom "on your doorstep" refers to something that is very close or near to a particular place or person. It implies that an event or situation is happening right at the location or directly involving the individual.
  • on sb's doorstep The idiom "on somebody's doorstep" refers to something that is very close or easily accessible to someone, typically in relation to their home or vicinity. It suggests that something is nearby or directly in front of someone, often implying convenience or proximity.
  • dote on sb/sth The idiom "dote on sb/sth" means to love or admire someone or something excessively or to be highly fond of and shower with affection and attention.
  • worship the ground sm walks on The idiom "worship the ground someone walks on" means to have an immense or extreme admiration and adoration for someone. It implies that the person is deeply infatuated or idolizes the individual, considering them to be flawless or perfect in every way.
  • not worth the paper it's written on The idiom "not worth the paper it's written on" refers to something, typically a written or printed document, that lacks value, credibility, or enforceability. It implies that the content or promises presented are unreliable, untrustworthy, or meaningless.
  • not worth the paper is printed on The idiom "not worth the paper it's printed on" is used to describe something or someone that has no value or is completely useless. It implies that the written or printed material, such as a contract, document, or promise, holds no weight or validity.
  • be worth the paper it's're printed on The idiom "be worth the paper it's printed on" means that something is considered to be entirely worthless or lacking value, often involving a document or agreement that holds no credibility or significance.
  • wreak sth (up)on sm or sth The idiom "wreak something (up)on someone or something" means to cause harm, damage, or destruction to someone or something. It implies inflicting something negative or unpleasant upon a person or object.
  • cast doubt on sth The idiom "cast doubt on something" means to raise uncertainty or skepticism about a particular idea, statement, or claim. It suggests creating suspicion or questioning the validity, accuracy, or truthfulness of something.
  • cast doubt(s) (on sm or sth) The idiom "cast doubt(s) (on someone or something)" means to raise uncertainty or question the truth, reliability, or accuracy of someone or something. It implies causing skepticism or suspicion about a person, idea, statement, or situation.
  • write on and on The idiom "write on and on" refers to the act of writing continuously or at great length, often without any specific direction or purpose. It suggests a continuous flow of ideas or thoughts being expressed through written words without any pause or conclusion.
  • write (up)on sm or sth The idiom "write (up)on someone or something" refers to the act of providing a detailed description, analysis, or assessment of someone or something. It implies the act of thoroughly documenting or recording information about a particular person or subject. People often use this idiom in contexts such as reporting, research, journalism, or academic writing.
  • see the (hand)writing on the wall The idiom "see the (hand)writing on the wall" means to understand or anticipate the inevitable or unfavorable outcome of a situation. It comes from the story in the Bible's Book of Daniel where King Belshazzar sees a message written on the wall by a mysterious hand, and Daniel interprets it as a prophecy of the kingdom's downfall. Therefore, the idiom implies someone recognizing clear signs or signals that indicate a future event or outcome that cannot be avoided.
  • have a downer on sb The idiom "have a downer on sb" means to have a strong dislike, negative attitude, or prejudice towards someone. It implies having a consistently critical or unfavorable opinion of the person in question.
  • not worth the paper sth is printed on The idiom "not worth the paper something is printed on" refers to something that has no value or significance, despite being documented or written in some form. It implies that the item is worthless and not deserving of attention or consideration.
  • not be worth the paper it's/they're printed/written on The idiom "not be worth the paper it's/they're printed/written on" is used to express that something, such as a document, contract, agreement, or guarantee, has no real or practical value or use. It implies that the item is not sufficiently reliable or trustworthy to be considered valuable or trustworthy, even though it may appear authoritative on the surface.
  • be on the wrong end of To be on the wrong end of an situation means to be at a disadvantageous position, to suffer negative consequences, or to experience an unfavorable outcome. It suggests being on the receiving end of something undesirable or being at a disadvantage in a particular scenario.
  • Dream on! The idiom "Dream on!" is a dismissive or sarcastic response to someone's aspirations, hopes, or desires, implying that what they desire is unlikely or unrealistic.
  • get the drop on The idiom "get the drop on" refers to gaining an advantage or upper hand over someone, usually by taking them by surprise or being in a more advantageous position. It often implies having a positional advantage or greater control in a specific situation, allowing one to act before the other person can react.
  • drop on The idiom "drop on" refers to unexpectedly confront or inform someone about something, often revealing sensitive or incriminating information that was previously unknown to them. It typically suggests surprising someone with unexpected news, details, or evidence.
  • embark on sth The idiom "embark on something" means to start or begin a new project, venture, or journey. It refers to the act of taking the initial steps towards a specific goal or undertaking.
  • yank on sth The idiom "yank on sth" typically means to forcefully and abruptly pull or tug at something with a quick and sudden motion.
  • put years on The idiom "put years on" means to make someone look or feel older, typically due to physical or emotional stress, hard work, or difficult experiences. It implies that the person's appearance or behavior has been significantly affected, resembling someone older than their actual age.
  • getting on in years The idiom "getting on in years" refers to the process of aging or growing old. It suggests that a person is advancing in age or becoming older, usually implying that they are no longer young or in their prime.
  • to put too fine a point on it The idiom "to put too fine a point on it" means to be excessively specific, precise, or detailed when expressing something, often to the point of being blunt or insensitive. It implies that the speaker is being overly meticulous or pedantic in their explanation, perhaps disregarding the nuances or emotions involved.
  • put too fine a point on The idiom "put too fine a point on" means to be excessively precise or detailed about something, often to the point of causing discomfort or offending others. It suggests that someone is being overly specific or explicit, potentially lacking tact or sensitivity in their communication.
  • not to put too fine a point on it The idiom "not to put too fine a point on it" means to state something directly or clearly without using excessive or unnecessary details. It suggests that the speaker wants to be precise or blunt in their statement without being overly graphic or elaborate.
  • drive on The idiom "drive on" generally means to continue moving forward or to keep going despite obstacles, challenges, or distractions. It signifies perseverance, determination, and resilience in the face of adversity or setbacks.
  • drive back on
  • ease off (on sm or sth) The idiom "ease off (on sm or sth)" means to reduce or lessen the intensity, pressure, or speed of something. It suggests the idea of relaxing or slowing down from a previously intense or demanding activity or situation.
  • ease sm (on) out The idiom "ease (someone) out" means to gradually or gently remove someone from a position of power, authority, or involvement. It typically implies a non-confrontational approach, allowing the person to transition out without causing discomfort or disruption.
  • ease (on) out The idiom "ease (on) out" means to exit or depart from a place gradually, smoothly, and without causing any disruption or disturbance. It can also refer to easing out of a situation or relationship with caution and delicacy.
  • drone on (about sm or sth) The idiom "drone on (about something or someone)" refers to speaking tediously, continuously, or in a monotonous manner about a particular topic or subject, often without regard for the interest or attention of others. It suggests that the person is being long-winded, repetitive, and oblivious to the fact that their speech may be boring or tiresome to those listening.
  • drop in (on sm) The idiom "drop in (on someone)" refers to the act of unexpectedly or casually visiting someone without prior notice or invitation. It implies that the visitor shows up at someone's location without making any prior arrangement or appointment.
  • lighten up (on