How Do You Spell DIE?

Pronunciation: [dˈa͡ɪ] (IPA)

The word "die" is spelled with a combination of the letters "d" and "i." In IPA phonetic transcription, the word is spelled as /daɪ/. The symbol "d" represents the initial consonant sound of the word, which is a voiced alveolar stop. The symbol "aɪ" represents the diphthong sound that is heard in the second syllable of the word, which is a combination of the vowel sounds "ah" and "ee." The spelling of the word "die" reflects its pronunciation, as well as its etymology, which derives from the Old Norse verb "deyja."

DIE Meaning and Definition

Die is a verb that refers to the act of ceasing to live; it is the permanent termination of life in organisms. When someone dies, their bodily functions, such as breathing, circulation, and brain activity, come to a complete stop. It is an irreversible process that marks the end of a living being's existence. The exact moment of death can vary and may be determined by various factors, such as injury, illness, or old age.

Besides its use in biological terms, the term "die" can also have broader figurative meanings. It can denote the end or termination of something, such as a project, a relationship, or an idea. In this context, it signifies the conclusion or cessation of an activity or state. Additionally, "die" can be used to describe the failure or discontinuation of something, like a business or a practice.

The term "die" can be traced back to Old English, where it appeared as "dēag," meaning "death" or "dying." Over time, this word evolved to its current form, representing the act of dying. The verb "to die" is commonly used in discussions about mortality, funeral rites, and the concept of the afterlife, as well as in everyday conversations when discussing loss or discussing the end of something significant.

Top Common Misspellings for DIE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for DIE

Etymology of DIE

The word "die" comes from the Middle English word "dien", which evolved from the Old English word "dēag", both meaning "to die". These Old English and Middle English words derived from the Proto-Germanic word "dauȥaną", which also meant "to die". The Proto-Germanic word likely originated from the Common PIE (Proto-Indo-European) word "*dʰewgʰ-", meaning "to perish" or "to cease to exist".

Idioms with the word DIE

  • never say die The idiom "never say die" means to refuse to give up or be discouraged, even in the face of difficulties or failure. It is an expression of determination, resilience, and perseverance, emphasizing the refusal to surrender or admit defeat.
  • die of shame The idiom "die of shame" refers to an exaggerated expression used to indicate extreme embarrassment or humiliation that one perceives as unbearable or intolerable. It implies a figurative death due to intense remorse or disgrace in response to a certain action, event, or situation.
  • (as) straight as a die The idiom "(as) straight as a die" means to be completely honest, trustworthy, and reliable. It implies that someone or something is very straightforward and has a strong moral or ethical character. The phrase originates from the idea of a perfectly shaped and accurate die used in gambling, implying that there is no chance of deception or unfairness.
  • life's a bitch (and then you die) The idiom "life's a bitch (and then you die)" is a phrase commonly used to convey a pessimistic or cynical perspective on life. It suggests that life can be challenging, difficult, and filled with suffering, and ultimately leads to death. It highlights the notion that life is often harsh and unfulfilling, emphasizing the transient nature of human existence and the inevitability of death.
  • those whom the gods love die young The idiom "those whom the gods love die young" means that, often, individuals who are exceptionally talented, virtuous, or accomplished in some way, may die at a young age. It implies that these individuals are taken away by the gods or fate prematurely because they are beloved or favored by higher powers. This phrase suggests that an early death is a sign of divine favor or acknowledgement of greatness.
  • to die for The idiom "to die for" means something that is extremely desirable, valuable, or exceptional. It is used to convey intense admiration or enthusiasm for a particular thing or experience.
  • the die is cast The phrase "the die is cast" is an idiom derived from the Latin phrase "alea iacta est" attributed to Julius Caesar. It means that a decision or action has been taken which cannot be changed, and the consequences must now be faced, regardless of the outcome. It signifies a point of no return or irreversible course of events.
  • cross my heart (and hope to die) The idiom "cross my heart (and hope to die)" is a way to express sincere honesty or a promise. When someone says "cross my heart," they are making a solemn affirmation that what they are saying is true or that they will fulfill their promise. The addition of "hope to die" emphasizes the seriousness and commitment behind the statement. It is often used by children or among close friends.
  • could have died of sth, at almost/nearly die of sth The idiom "could have died of something" or "almost/nearly die of something" is often used to exaggerate a person's reaction to a situation. It implies that the person was extremely shocked, surprised, or frightened by something that happened or was said. While the person did not actually face a life-threatening situation, the idiom emphasizes the intensity of their emotional response.
  • die a/the death The idiom "die a/the death" means to experience failure or lose momentum, sometimes resulting in the end or termination of something. It can refer to the decline, dissolution, or demise of a person, organization, idea, concept, project, or any undertaking.
  • die a natural death, at die a/the death The idiom "die a natural death" means for something to end or fade away gradually or without any intervention or dramatic consequences. It refers to a situation or idea losing relevance or significance over time until it eventually disappears. On the other hand, "die a/the death" is a phrase used to emphasize the finality or seriousness of a situation. It can refer to the actual physical death of a person or the end of something, such as a project, relationship, or idea. It implies a definitive and irreversible termination.
  • almost/nearly die of sth The idiom "almost/nearly die of sth" means to come extremely close to death or experience a life-threatening situation due to a specific cause or circumstance. It emphasizes the severity or intensity of the situation, often used figuratively to describe a near-catastrophic event or a very intense experience.
  • die hard The idiom "die hard" refers to something or someone that is resistant to change or difficult to eradicate despite unfavorable circumstances or opposition. It suggests the persistence, endurance, or tenacity of a belief, habit, or characteristic that is unyielding or not easily overcome.
  • do or die The idiom "do or die" means that one must put forth their utmost effort or take decisive action in order to succeed or survive, with no other options or alternative courses of action available. It portrays a sense of urgency and determination in facing a challenging situation.
  • or die in the attempt The idiom "or die in the attempt" means being determined to achieve a particular goal or objective, even if it involves great risk or potentially fatal consequences. It emphasizes an unwavering commitment or dedication to the task at hand, indicating that one is willing to go to any lengths, even risking their life, in order to accomplish it.
  • curl up and die The idiom "curl up and die" refers to feeling extremely embarrassed, ashamed, or devastated by a particular event or situation. It denotes such a deep embarrassment or distress that one wishes to disappear or cease to exist because of the intensity of their emotional turmoil.
  • Whom the gods love die young The idiom "Whom the gods love die young" denotes that those who are greatly loved or favored by the gods, or fate, tend to have their lives cut short. This expression implies that a premature death is a consequence of being beloved by higher powers or having exceptional qualities.
  • die away The idiom "die away" means to gradually decrease or diminish in intensity or volume, often referring to sound, sensation, or a feeling slowly fading or becoming weaker over time.
  • You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die The idiom "You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die" means that everyone will inevitably face difficulties, setbacks, or endure unpleasant experiences throughout their life. It suggests that life is not always easy, and one must go through hardships before reaching the end. Essentially, it emphasizes the notion that challenges and adversity are an inseparable part of the human experience.
  • Cowards die many times before their death The idiom "Cowards die many times before their death" is a quote from William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar. It refers to the notion that those who lack bravery or are fearful tend to experience frequent mental distress or anxiety, as if they are repeatedly facing their own demise, even though they are alive. In essence, it suggests that the fear of death or failure can prevent individuals from truly living and taking risks.
  • die behind the wheel The idiom "die behind the wheel" refers to dying while driving a vehicle, usually due to a sudden or unexpected event causing a fatal accident. It implies that one's death occurs while still actively engaged in an activity or pursuit.
  • die with your boots on The idiom "die with your boots on" refers to someone dying while actively engaged in their work or while in the midst of pursuing their passion or purpose in life. It implies that the individual remained committed and dedicated to their responsibilities until their very last breath. The idiom is often used to commend individuals who lived a life characterized by hard work, determination, and steadfastness.
  • die in one's boots The idiom "die in one's boots" refers to dying while actively engaged in one's work or chosen occupation. It implies passing away while still giving one's best effort or remaining determined until the very end, without surrendering or giving up. It emphasizes the idea of facing death or any challenge with unwavering commitment and resilience.
  • die of boredom The idiom "die of boredom" means to be extremely bored or to feel so uninterested or deprived of mental stimulation that it figuratively feels like a slow, painful death. It implies a feeling of extreme monotony and lack of excitement, often associated with a dull or unengaging situation.
  • die of a broken heart The idiom "die of a broken heart" refers to an extreme emotional state where someone experiences such overwhelming grief, sadness, or loss that it negatively affects their physical health, potentially leading to severe illness or even death. It is often used figuratively to describe the profound impact of emotional trauma on an individual, emphasizing the intensity of their emotional pain.
  • be as straight as a die The idiom "be as straight as a die" means to be completely honest, trustworthy, and reliable. It refers to someone who always tells the truth and can be relied upon without any doubt or suspicion. The phrase is derived from the idea that dice are perfectly straight and symmetrical, representing fairness and integrity.
  • Young men may die, but old men must die
  • Live by the sword, die by the sword. "Live by the sword, die by the sword" is an idiom that means if someone chooses to use violence or aggression as their primary means of solving problems or achieving their goals, they are also likely to experience the same kind of violence or aggression, often leading to their downfall or demise. It implies that those who engage in violent actions should expect to face the consequences in a similar manner.
  • die is cast The idiom "die is cast" refers to a situation where a decision or action has been made that cannot be changed or reversed. It is derived from a Latin phrase, "alea iacta est," which was famously uttered by Julius Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon River, indicating that he had committed to a course of action with significant consequences. Therefore, "die is cast" implies that the outcome or fate of something has been sealed and cannot be altered.
  • die of throat trouble
  • die of curiosity The idiom "die of curiosity" refers to a strong desire or excessive eagerness to know or discover something, to the point that it feels unbearable or as if it could cause extreme distress or even literal death if the information or answer is not obtained.
  • Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die. The idiom "Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die" typically means to enjoy life and indulge in pleasure without worrying about the future, as our time on earth is limited. It implies the importance of living in the present and savoring every moment.
  • Cowards die many times before their death(s). The idiom "Cowards die many times before their death(s)" means that people who are constantly afraid or lack courage experience immense fear and anxiety throughout their lives, even without any real threat or danger. They often worry excessively and are frequently consumed by their fears. This idiom highlights how a coward's internal fear can cause them to suffer emotionally, even if they are not facing any immediate physical harm or death.
  • want to curl up and die The idiom "want to curl up and die" refers to a state of extreme embarrassment, shame, or humiliation where one feels so overwhelmed that they desire to withdraw or disappear completely, as if wishing they could physically curl up in a small space and cease to exist.
  • die a natural death The idiom "die a natural death" means for something to come to an end or fade away without any intervention, force, or external influence. It refers to a situation or issue resolving itself without any interference or disturbance.
  • die a death The idiom "die a death" refers to the complete or rapid failure, demise, or end of something, often with a negative or unfortunate outcome. It is typically used to describe a situation, idea, project, or goal that comes to an unsuccessful or unsatisfactory conclusion.
  • Old habits die hard The idiom "Old habits die hard" means that it is difficult to change or get rid of long-standing behaviors or routines, particularly those that have become deeply ingrained over time.
  • it's do or die The idiom "it's do or die" means that one must put forth their utmost effort and determination in order to succeed or achieve their goal. It conveys a sense of urgency and the idea that there is no other option but to try and succeed, as failure is not an acceptable outcome.
  • good die young The idiom "good die young" is a poetic expression that implies that virtuous or exceptional individuals often pass away prematurely or at a young age. It suggests that individuals who possess qualities such as goodness, talent, or moral excellence are more prone to early demise compared to those who do not possess these qualities.
  • die with boots on The idiom "die with boots on" typically refers to the act of dying while actively engaged in one's occupation, profession, or passion. It implies that the person in question did not retire or step away from their work before passing away, but rather continued working until their final moments. It often indicates a dedication to one's craft or a desire to live life to the fullest until the end.
  • die out The idiom "die out" means to become extinct or disappear completely over time. It is often used to describe the gradual decline or elimination of a species, population, tradition, custom, or idea.
  • die on
  • die off The idiom "die off" refers to a significant decrease or extinction of a population or group of living organisms. It implies a gradual or sudden decline in numbers, often due to factors such as disease, natural disasters, habitat loss, or other adverse circumstances.
  • die of The idiom "die of" is used to describe the cause of a person's death. It means that someone dies as a result of a specific illness, condition, or circumstance. For example, if someone says "he died of old age," they mean that the person passed away due to the natural process of aging.
  • die laughing The idiom "die laughing" is used to describe a situation or something that is extremely funny, and it implies that someone may laugh so hard that they could potentially die from laughter, although it is not to be taken literally.
  • die in boots The idiom "die in boots" refers to dying while still active and engaged in one's work or passion. It implies that the person is unwilling to stop or retire from their pursuits and wishes to continue until their very last moments.
  • die in The idiom "die in" refers to a form of protest or demonstration where participants feign or simulate their death, often as a way to draw attention to a particular cause or issue. During a die-in, individuals lie on the ground, symbolizing their solidarity and emphasizing the consequences or urgency of the matter being protested.
  • die for The idiom "die for" means to have an intense desire or strong craving for something or to consider something highly valuable or desirable. It emphasizes an extreme level of appreciation or longing for someone or something.
  • die down The idiom "die down" refers to a gradual decrease in intensity, force, or volume of something, such as noise, activity, or an emotion. It means to calm down, subside, or become less pronounced over time.
  • die by own hand The idiom "die by own hand" refers to an act of suicide or the act of intentionally causing one's own death, typically by using one's hands or any means within one's control. It implies that the person is responsible for their own demise and takes deliberate action to end their life.
  • die by The idiom "die by" typically means to meet one's demise through a particular method, cause, or circumstance. It implies that the person or subject being discussed will experience death as a result of a specific action or event.
  • die back The idiom "die back" typically refers to the gradual decline or regression of a plant, often characterized by the death of the branches or leaves, usually due to disease, lack of nutrients, or environmental stress. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation or entity that is gradually diminishing or losing vitality.
  • (The) good die young. The idiom "(The) good die young" implies the belief or observation that virtuous or morally upright individuals often die at a young age. It suggests that individuals who possess admirable qualities or lead exemplary lives are more likely to experience an untimely death compared to those who are less noble.
  • die with one's boots on The idiom "die with one's boots on" typically means to die while actively engaged in one's work or while fully involved in something until the very end, rather than retiring or quitting beforehand. It implies a sense of dedication, commitment, and a desire to continue working until the end of one's life.
  • die game The definition of the idiom "die game" is to face a challenging or difficult situation with courage, determination, or grace, even if the outcome may be unfavorable or inevitable. It refers to accepting one's fate or circumstances without giving up or complaining.
  • die in harness The idiom "die in harness" refers to the act of dying while still actively engaged in one's work or profession. It suggests a strong dedication and commitment to one's responsibilities, implying that a person remains involved in their job until their very last moments.
  • die in your bed The idiom "die in your bed" refers to dying peacefully or naturally in a comfortable and familiar environment, typically in one's own bed.
  • die/fall/drop like flies The idiom "die/fall/drop like flies" means to quickly and frequently succumb to an illness, injury, or other adverse circumstances. It implies a large number of people or things being affected or affected rapidly and often in a negative way.
  • old habits, traditions, etc. die hard The idiom "old habits, traditions, etc. die hard" means that deeply ingrained habits, customs, or practices are difficult to change or give up, even when they are outdated or no longer beneficial. It suggests that people often cling to familiar patterns or behaviors, even when there may be better alternatives available.
  • the die has been cast The idiom "the die has been cast" means that a decisive action or decision has been made, and its consequences are unavoidable. It is based on the historical act of casting dice, where once the dice are thrown, their outcome cannot be changed or altered. Therefore, when someone says "the die has been cast," they communicate that a course of action has been chosen, and there is no turning back from the resulting consequences.
  • die by (one's) own hand The idiom "die by (one's) own hand" refers to intentionally causing one's own death, usually through suicide or self-harm. It implies that the person responsible for their own demise acted deliberately and intentionally.
  • die by (something) The idiom "die by (something)" typically means to suffer or experience a certain fate or outcome due to a specific cause or action. It suggests that the mentioned cause or action leads to one's downfall, demise, or negative consequences.
  • die is cast, the The idiom "the die is cast" refers to a situation where a decision or action has been taken that cannot be changed or reversed. It means that a crucial choice has been made, and the outcome is now predetermined. The idiom originates from a Latin phrase "alea iacta est," which Julius Caesar is said to have uttered when he crossed the Rubicon River in 49 BCE, essentially starting a civil war in Rome. Thus, "the die is cast" implies that a pivotal event has occurred, setting in motion a chain of events that cannot be undone.
  • Life’s a bitch, then you die The idiom "Life's a bitch, then you die" is often used to express a pessimistic view on life, emphasizing the hardships and challenges faced throughout one's lifetime, only to ultimately face death. It suggests that life can be difficult and unforgiving, and death is an inevitable part of the human experience.
  • (just) curl up and die The idiom "(just) curl up and die" typically means to feel extreme embarrassment, shame, or humiliation due to a situation or one's actions. It implies the desire to disappear or cease to exist temporarily or permanently as a result of the overwhelming negative emotions experienced.
  • what did your last slave die of The idiom "what did your last slave die of?" is a sarcastic and confrontational response to someone who complains excessively or acts entitled. It is typically used to mock their exaggerated grievances. The phrase implies that the complaining person has no valid reason for their complaints and that their grievances are trivial compared to someone who would have faced significant hardships or difficulties.
  • die for (someone or something) The idiom "die for (someone or something)" means to have an intense devotion or willingness to sacrifice oneself on behalf of someone or something. It conveys a strong sense of loyalty, selflessness, or commitment towards someone or a cause to the extent of being willing to give up one's own life if necessary.
  • die for want of lobster sauce
  • die in (something) The idiom "die in (something)" means to figuratively or metaphorically be completely absorbed or engrossed in a particular activity, idea, or cause. It signifies a strong passion, dedication, or commitment towards that specific thing. It implies that the person is so deeply involved and invested in it that they would be willing to "die" or sacrifice everything for it.
  • die in the last ditch The idiom "die in the last ditch" refers to being willing to sacrifice everything, including one's life, in the pursuit of a cause or defending one's beliefs. It implies a steadfast determination to stand up for what one believes in, even in the face of extreme adversity or imminent defeat. The phrase derives from the image of someone fighting until their "last ditch," referring to the final desperate effort or last line of defense.
  • die like a dog The idiom "die like a dog" typically means to die in a pitiful, undignified, or miserable manner. It often implies a death that is painful, unworthy, or lacking honor.
  • die like flies The idiom "die like flies" refers to a situation where a large number of people or things are perishing rapidly or in great numbers. It implies a high mortality rate or a significant loss of life, often associated with a sudden or widespread event.
  • die like Roland The idiom "die like Roland" refers to dying with honor and courage, often in a heroic and valiant manner. It originates from the legend of Roland, a knight who fought bravely and died a heroic death in the Battle of Roncevaux Pass. Hence, when someone is said to "die like Roland," it means they met their end displaying unwavering bravery and upholding noble qualities.
  • die of (something) The idiom "die of (something)" is used to describe the cause of someone's death. It implies that the person died due to a specific illness, condition, or cause. It is often used figuratively to express a strong emotional response or intense feeling towards something, suggesting that it has a powerful impact on the person.
  • die on (someone or something) The idiom "die on (someone or something)" typically means to experience failure, disappointment, or defeat because of someone or something else. It refers to a situation where someone's success or outcome is heavily dependent on another person or factor, and if that person or factor fails, it leads to their own failure or downfall.
  • die on someone The idiom "die on someone" typically means to leave someone at a crucial or difficult moment, often when they need your support, guidance, or assistance the most. It suggests that the person has abandoned or deserted another individual when they were counting on their presence or help.
  • die on the vine The idiom "die on the vine" means to fail or end without achieving success or completion. It typically refers to a project, plan, idea, or endeavor that fails to progress, develop, or gain momentum and ultimately comes to an unsuccessful conclusion. The phrase draws its analogy from grapes that wither and deteriorate while still on the vine, signaling their failure to ripen or reach their full potential.
  • die on your feet The idiom "die on your feet" means to face adversity or death with courage, dignity, or bravery, rather than surrendering or succumbing passively. It implies refusing to give up or yield to challenges, regardless of the outcome.
  • die to
  • die/drop/fall like flies The idiom "die/drop/fall like flies" is used to describe a situation where a large number of people or things are dying, dropping, or declining rapidly and frequently. It implies a high rate of casualties, failures, or losses.
  • fixing to die The idiom "fixing to die" generally refers to someone appearing or demonstrating clear signs or indications that they are near death. It is often used to describe a person who is seriously ill or in a precarious physical condition, suggesting that their demise may be imminent.
  • hill to die on The idiom "hill to die on" refers to a strongly held conviction or principle that someone is willing to defend or fight for, even if it involves great risks or consequences. It represents a metaphorical hill that one is willing to make a final stand on, refusing to compromise their beliefs or values.
  • it's to die The idiom "it's to die" refers to something that is exceptionally good, impressive, or enjoyable. It conveys the idea that the experience or quality of something is so remarkable that it could evoke extreme emotion, such as overwhelming delight or awe.
  • lay down and die The idiom "lay down and die" is used to describe a state of extreme resignation or defeat, meaning to give up or succumb to a difficult or hopeless situation without putting up a fight or making any effort to overcome it.
  • lie down and die The idiom "lie down and die" is an expression used to convey a feeling of extreme defeat or resignation. It implies giving up or surrendering completely without attempting to overcome a difficult situation or challenge. It figuratively suggests surrendering to defeat and accepting the negative outcome without putting up any further resistance.
  • only the good die young The idiom "only the good die young" refers to the notion that virtuous or morally upright individuals often die prematurely or at a young age. It suggests that those who lead exemplary lives and are considered to be good people are more susceptible to an untimely death, while individuals who are less virtuous may live longer. This phrase is often used to express the tragic loss of someone who was seen as kind, generous, or righteous.
  • ride or die The idiom "ride or die" refers to unwavering loyalty and commitment towards someone or something. It implies that a person is willing to stick by the side of another person through thick and thin, no matter the circumstances or consequences. It signifies being willing to go to extreme lengths or even risk one's own safety for the sake of loyalty and support.
  • straight as a die The idiom "straight as a die" usually means completely honest, truthful, and trustworthy. It suggests that a person is morally upright and would not engage in any deceitful or dishonest behavior.
  • those who live by the sword, die by the sword The idiom "those who live by the sword, die by the sword" means that those who resort to violence or harm others will eventually face a similar fate themselves. It suggests that a person's actions and choices often have consequences that come back to affect them in a similar way. This phrase is often used to warn against using violence or harmful methods to achieve goals, as it can lead to repercussions or downfall.
  • bad habits die hard The idiom "bad habits die hard" means that it is difficult to overcome or break free from unhealthy or undesirable behaviors or actions that have been practiced for a long time. It suggests that these habits are deeply ingrained and can be challenging to change or abandon.
  • old traditions die hard The idiom "old traditions die hard" means that deeply ingrained customs or habits are difficult to change or let go of, even if they are outdated or no longer serve a practical purpose. It implies that people often have a strong attachment to long-standing practices, making it challenging to abandon them in favor of something new.
  • die on (something's) feet The idiomatic expression "die on (something's) feet" typically refers to someone or something that fails or comes to an end while still active, rather than becoming obsolete or unsuccessful gradually or without public attention. It implies that the person or thing remains determined and strong until the very end.

Similar spelling words for DIE

Plural form of DIE is DIES

Conjugate verb Die

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have died
you would have died
he/she/it would have died
we would have died
they would have died
I would have die
you would have die
he/she/it would have die
we would have die
they would have die

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been dying
you would have been dying
he/she/it would have been dying
we would have been dying
they would have been dying

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would die
you would die
he/she/it would die
we would die
they would die

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be dying
you would be dying
he/she/it would be dying
we would be dying
they would be dying

FUTURE

I will die
you will die
he/she/it will die
we will die
they will die

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be dying
you will be dying
he/she/it will be dying
we will be dying
they will be dying

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have died
you will have died
he/she/it will have died
we will have died
they will have died

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been dying
you will have been dying
he/she/it will have been dying
we will have been dying
they will have been dying

IMPERATIVE

you die
we let´s die

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to die

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was dying
you were dying
he/she/it was dying
we were dying
they were dying

PAST PARTICIPLE

died

PAST PERFECT

I had died
you had died
he/she/it had died
we had died
they had died

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been dying
you had been dying
he/she/it had been dying
we had been dying
they had been dying

PRESENT

I die
you die
he/she/it dies
we die
they die

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am dying
you are dying
he/she/it is dying
we are dying
they are dying

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

dying

PRESENT PERFECT

I have died
you have died
he/she/it has died
we have died
they have died

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been dying
you have been dying
he/she/it has been dying
we have been dying
they have been dying

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it die

SIMPLE PAST

I died
you died
he/she/it died
we died
they died

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