How Do You Spell SHAKES?

Pronunciation: [ʃˈe͡ɪks] (IPA)

The word "shakes" is spelled with the letter combination "sh" representing the voiceless fricative consonant sound /ʃ/. The next two letters, "a" and "k", represent the short vowel sound /æ/ and the voiceless velar plosive consonant sound /k/, respectively. The final letter "es" represents the plural suffix /ɪz/. Overall, the IPA transcription of the word "shakes" is /ʃeɪks/ and it is used to describe rapid movements or trembling of something.

SHAKES Meaning and Definition

Shakes, as a noun, can refer to involuntary tremors or quivering movements of the body. It is often used to describe the repetitive shaking seen in certain medical conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Shakes can also describe the physical manifestation of fear, anxiety, or extreme nervousness, where the individual may feel their body twitch or tremble. Additionally, this term can refer to a feeling of uneasiness or weakness, often accompanied by sweating or a quickened pulse, as experienced during alcohol withdrawal or hangovers - as in "the shakes" or "DTs" (delirium tremens).

As a verb, "shakes" can have several meanings. It can indicate the action of causing something or someone to tremble or vibrate, such as when shaking a bottle before use. In the context of dice or similar objects, "to shake" refers to the act of agitating or rolling them before casting. Furthermore, "shakes" can denote the act of quivering or trembling with fear or excitement, as in "the sight of the lion had her shaking in her boots".

In summary, shakes can refer to involuntary trembling movements of the body, anxious or nervous movements, as well as feelings of uneasiness or weakness. It can also describe the action of causing something to tremble or vibrate and the act of quivering or trembling due to fear or excitement.

Top Common Misspellings for SHAKES *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for SHAKES

Etymology of SHAKES

The word "shakes" has multiple origins, with different meanings and etymologies. Here are two common interpretations:

1. Shake (noun) meaning "a trembling or shaking movement":

The noun "shake" is derived from the Middle English word "shake" or "schake", which originated from the Old English word "sceacan" meaning "to shake, vibrate, or agitate". This Old English word has Germanic roots and is related to words in other Germanic languages like Dutch "schokken" and German "schaukeln".

2. Shake (verb) meaning "to tremble or vibrate":

The verb form of "shake" also comes from the Middle English "shake", but it ultimately can be traced back to the Old English word "scacan", meaning "to move something quickly back and forth". This word shares the same Germanic roots as the noun form.

Idioms with the word SHAKES

  • in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" means performing a task quickly or completing something in a short period of time. It refers to the idea of something being done in just a few moments, as lambs are known to quickly shake their tails.
  • no great shakes The idiom "no great shakes" means to not be particularly impressive, outstanding, or exceptional in skill, ability, or quality. It suggests that the subject being referred to is average or ordinary, rather than remarkable or remarkable.
  • a couple of shakes, at in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "a couple of shakes" or "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" refers to a very short period of time or a quick action. It can be used to convey that something will be done or completed rapidly, implying that it will take no more than a few moments or "shakes" to accomplish. The idiom is often used in casual or informal conversations.
  • two shakes of a lamb's tail The idiom "two shakes of a lamb's tail" means doing something very quickly or in a short amount of time. It implies that the task or action will be completed in a swift and efficient manner, comparable to the quick movements of a lamb's tail.
  • in two shakes The idiom "in two shakes" means to do something very quickly or in a short amount of time. It implies that the action will be completed soon, often emphasizing efficiency or speed.
  • be no great shakes The idiom "be no great shakes" means to not be particularly impressive, exceptional, or remarkable in some way. It suggests that something or someone is neither outstanding nor noteworthy.
  • in a couple of shakes The idiom "in a couple of shakes" means "very quickly" or "in a short amount of time." It is usually used to express that something will happen or be completed soon or without much delay.
  • in a brace of shakes The idiom "in a brace of shakes" means doing something quickly or within a very short period of time. It suggests that the task or action will be completed or achieved in just a few moments or a very short duration.
  • give (someone) the shakes To "give someone the shakes" means to cause someone to feel nervous, anxious, or fearful. This idiom is often used to describe situations in which someone or something induces a feeling of unease or discomfort. It can also refer to situations that lead to physical symptoms such as trembling or shaking due to heightened emotions or anxiety.
  • get the shakes The idiom "get the shakes" is used to describe a situation when someone experiences trembling or shaking in their body, usually caused by anxiety, nervousness, fear, or withdrawal from a particular substance or addiction. It is commonly used to indicate a physical or emotional state of agitation or anxiety.
  • have the shakes The idiom "have the shakes" typically refers to a physical condition where a person's body experiences trembling or shaking uncontrollably, often as a result of nervousness, anxiety, fear, or withdrawal from a substance like alcohol or drugs.
  • two shakes of a lamb’s tail The idiom "two shakes of a lamb's tail" means an extremely short amount of time or very quickly.
  • brace of shakes The idiom "brace of shakes" means a very short amount of time, often used to refer to a very brief moment or a quick action. It can also be used to describe a small amount of time needed to complete a task.

Conjugate verb Shakes

CONDITIONAL

I would shake
we would shake
you would shake
he/she/it would shake
they would shake

FUTURE

I will shake
we will shake
you will shake
he/she/it will shake
they will shake

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have shaken
we will have shaken
you will have shaken
he/she/it will have shaken
they will have shaken

PAST

I shook
we shook
you shook
he/she/it shook
they shook

PAST PERFECT

I had shaken
we had shaken
you had shaken
he/she/it had shaken
they had shaken

PRESENT

I shake
we shake
you shake
he/she/it shakes
they shake

PRESENT PERFECT

I have shaken
we have shaken
you have shaken
he/she/it has shaken
they have shaken
I am shaking
we are shaking
you are shaking
he/she/it is shaking
they are shaking
I was shaking
we were shaking
you were shaking
he/she/it was shaking
they were shaking
I will be shaking
we will be shaking
you will be shaking
he/she/it will be shaking
they will be shaking
I have been shaking
we have been shaking
you have been shaking
he/she/it has been shaking
they have been shaking
I had been shaking
we had been shaking
you had been shaking
he/she/it had been shaking
they had been shaking
I will have been shaking
we will have been shaking
you will have been shaking
he/she/it will have been shaking
they will have been shaking
I would have shaken
we would have shaken
you would have shaken
he/she/it would have shaken
they would have shaken
I would be shaking
we would be shaking
you would be shaking
he/she/it would be shaking
they would be shaking
I would have been shaking
we would have been shaking
you would have been shaking
he/she/it would have been shaking
they would have been shaking

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