How Do You Spell MIND?

Pronunciation: [mˈa͡ɪnd] (IPA)

The English word "mind" is spelled with four letters: M-I-N-D. In phonetic transcription, this word is represented as /maɪnd/. This means that the first sound is a "muh" sound, followed by a "ai" diphthong (similar to "eye"), and ending with a "nd" (or "n" sound followed by a "duh" sound). The correct spelling of "mind" is important in written communication as it can affect the meaning of a sentence.

MIND Meaning and Definition

  1. Mind is a complex and multifaceted term that encompasses various aspects related to consciousness, thought, perception, and cognition. It refers to the faculty of intellect, awareness, and reasoning possessed by humans and some other higher animals, typically characterized by its ability to think, understand, and comprehend.

    At its core, the mind can be defined as the entity responsible for experiencing sensations, emotions, and thoughts, as well as storing, processing, and retrieving information. It includes both the conscious and unconscious mental processes that shape an individual's perception and behavior.

    The mind can be further divided into different components or functions, such as memory, attention, imagination, reasoning, and problem-solving. It is through these functions that the mind processes and interprets stimuli from the external environment, forming perceptions and thoughts about the world.

    Moreover, the mind is not limited to the present moment; it also involves the ability to reflect on past experiences, anticipate future events, and engage in introspection. This reflective aspect of the mind contributes to self-awareness and the formation of personal beliefs, attitudes, and values.

    Furthermore, the mind is closely linked to the brain, as it is the physical organ that facilitates mental activities. While the brain plays a critical role in processing and coordinating mental functions, the mind encompasses the broader spectrum of conscious and unconscious mental processes.

  2. The organ or seat of consciousness, remembering, reasoning, and willing.

    A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.

  3. • Intelligent power; the understanding; the power by which we perceive, think, or reason; intention; choice; purpose; thoughts; opinions; remembrance; recollections.
    • To attend to; to regard with attention; to obey; to incline.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Etymology of MIND

The word "mind" originates from the Old English word "gemynd", which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic root "*ga-mundiz". This root combines "ga-" (meaning "with" or "together") and "*mundiz" (meaning "thought" or "memory"). The word evolved over time, transitioning from "gemynd" in Old English to "mind" in Middle English, before being established in its current spelling and pronunciation.

Idioms with the word MIND

  • speak your mind The idiom "speak your mind" means to express one's thoughts and opinions freely and honestly, without holding back or being influenced by others' opinions.
  • mind/watch your step The idiom "mind/watch your step" means to be cautious and careful about what you say or do in a given situation, typically to avoid causing problems, making mistakes, or getting into trouble. It suggests the need to be attentive and mindful of how one behaves or proceeds.
  • mind (you) The idiom "mind (you)" is mainly used as a qualifier or a reminder to pay close attention to what is being said. It is typically used before or after a statement to emphasize that the following information is essential and should not be disregarded. The phrase implies that the speaker is about to provide crucial information or clarification that should be kept in mind.
  • take sb's mind off sth The idiom "take sb's mind off sth" means to distract or divert someone's attention away from something that is troubling or causing them worry or stress. It implies providing a temporary relief or respite from the thoughts or concerns related to a particular subject or problem.
  • read sb's mind The idiom "read sb's mind" refers to the ability to accurately understand or anticipate someone's thoughts, feelings, or intentions without them explicitly expressing them. It suggests being perceptive, intuitive, or having a strong sense of empathy towards another person.
  • of one mind The idiom "of one mind" means to have a unanimous or shared opinion, agreement, or consensus among a group of people. It signifies that everyone in the group is thinking or feeling the same way about something.
  • set mind on The idiom "set one's mind on" means to be determined or highly motivated to achieve a particular goal or objective. It implies a strong focus and dedication towards a specific purpose.
  • slip mind The idiom "slip one's mind" means to forget or to fail to remember something that should not have been forgotten.
  • speak mind The idiom "speak one's mind" means to express one's thoughts, opinions, or feelings openly and honestly, without restraint or hesitation. It refers to sharing one's true perspective or viewpoint without holding back, even if it may be unpopular or controversial.
  • state of mind The idiom "state of mind" refers to an individual's current emotional, psychological, or mental condition or disposition at a particular point in time. It represents one's thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and overall mental state.
  • onetrack mind The idiom "onetrack mind" refers to a person who is overly preoccupied or obsessed with one particular thing or idea. It suggests that the person has difficulty focusing on or considering other topics, interests, or opinions.
  • read mind The idiom "read minds" refers to the ability or act of understanding or perceiving someone's thoughts, feelings, or intentions without them explicitly expressing them. It suggests that someone possesses an exceptional intuition or insight into another person's inner thoughts or emotions.
  • take mind off The idiom "take mind off" means to divert one's attention or thoughts away from something in order to temporarily forget or distract oneself from a particular issue, problem, or worry. It refers to the act of shifting focus onto something else to give mental relief or respite.
  • peace of mind The idiom "peace of mind" refers to a state of tranquility, calmness, and contentment in which a person experiences an absence of worry, anxiety, or mental unrest. It implies a sense of inner peace and a feeling of satisfaction and security in one's thoughts, emotions, and overall well-being.
  • open mind The idiom "open mind" refers to the quality of being receptive to new ideas, perspectives, or possibilities without being influenced by preconceived notions or biases. It implies a willingness to consider different viewpoints and to engage in constructive and objective thinking or decision-making processes.
  • on mind The idiom "on mind" is likely a mistranslation or a misunderstanding of the idiom "on one's mind." The correct idiom "on one's mind" means to be preoccupied or constantly thinking about something or someone. It refers to thoughts that dominate a person's thinking or occupy their mental space.
  • on someone's mind The idiom "on someone's mind" is used to describe something that is currently occupying someone's thoughts or is of concern to them. It implies that they are thinking about or worrying about a particular topic or issue.
  • set one's mind on The idiom "set one's mind on" means to be determined or resolved to achieve or obtain something. It implies having a strong focus or determination towards a specific goal or objective.
  • take one's mind off The idiom "take one's mind off" refers to diverting one's attention or thoughts from a particular topic, problem, or situation in order to provide relief or distraction. It means to engage in activities or focus on something else that helps to temporarily forget or alleviate the subject of concern.
  • on your mind The idiom "on your mind" refers to something that is occupying a person's thoughts or preoccupying their attention. It implies that the person is thinking or worrying about a particular matter or issue.
  • slip your mind The definition of the idiom "slip your mind" is to forget something or to fail to remember something that was supposed to be recalled or done.
  • mind the shop The idiom "mind the shop" means to be in charge of something, especially temporarily, while the owner or usual manager is away or unable to fulfill their duties. It is often used to refer to taking responsibility and ensuring the smooth operation of a business or organization during someone's absence.
  • mind your backs! The idiom "mind your backs!" is often used as a warning or cautionary phrase, especially in crowded or busy situations. It is a reminder for people to be mindful of their surroundings and not to accidentally bump into someone or cause any harm. It can also convey the need to look out for potential dangers or hazards.
  • on one's mind The idiom "on one's mind" refers to something that constantly occupies a person's thoughts or preoccupies their mental attention.
  • mind of (one's) own The idiom "mind of one's own" refers to someone who has their own independent thoughts, opinions, desires, or actions, often disregarding the influence or expectations of others. It implies that the person is strong-willed, assertive, and prefers to make their own decisions rather than conforming to external pressure.
  • nothing could have been further from my mind/thoughts The idiom "nothing could have been further from my mind/thoughts" means that the particular thing or idea being mentioned was the least expected or considered, and was completely opposite or contrary to one's current thoughts or intentions.
  • change (someone's) mind The idiom "change (someone's) mind" means to persuade or convince someone to alter their opinion, belief, or decision about something.
  • be of unsound mind The idiom "be of unsound mind" refers to a person who is considered mentally unstable or insane. It suggests that the individual is not able to think or behave in a rational, logical, or balanced way. This phrase is often used to describe someone who lacks mental clarity or is unable to make sound judgments.
  • put in mind of The idiom "put in mind of" means to remind someone of something or bring something to their attention that they may not have thought about before.
  • cast your mind back The idiom "cast your mind back" means to deliberately recall or remember something, typically an event or experience from the past. It suggests mentally revisiting or reflecting on a particular moment or period.
  • put sb in mind of sb/sth The idiom "put somebody in mind of somebody/something" means to remind someone of someone or something else. It refers to triggering a memory or association with someone or something similar.
  • put somebody in mind of somebody/something The idiom "put somebody in mind of somebody/something" means to remind someone of someone or something else. It suggests that a person or thing being observed triggers a strong or clear memory or association with another person or thing.
  • push something to the back of your mind The idiom "push something to the back of your mind" refers to the act of intentionally ignoring or forgetting about something unpleasant, worrisome, or disturbing. It means to temporarily set aside or suppress thoughts or emotions related to a particular issue or concern, often in order to focus on or prioritize other things.
  • have the presence of mind to do sth The idiom "have the presence of mind to do something" means to be calm, focused, and alert enough to think quickly and make rational decisions in a stressful or unexpected situation. It suggests being able to think clearly and respond appropriately without panicking or becoming overwhelmed.
  • never mind The idiom "never mind" is used to dismiss or disregard something that was previously mentioned. It means to stop paying attention to or discussing a particular matter.
  • out of mind The idiom "out of mind" typically refers to someone or something that has been forgotten, neglected, or no longer a concern or priority to someone. It suggests a lack of consideration or attention towards a person or matter.
  • bored out of your mind The idiom "bored out of your mind" refers to a state of extreme boredom or lack of interest, where a person feels completely unengaged or unstimulated. It implies that someone is so uninterested in their surroundings or current situation that they feel as if their mind is being drained of any excitement or activity.
  • weigh on sm's mind The idiom "weigh on someone's mind" means to continuously bother or preoccupy someone's thoughts or conscience. It refers to a heavy or burdensome concern or worry that constantly occupies one's mental space and may cause distress or affect their ability to focus on other things.
  • bear in mind that The idiom "bear in mind that" means to always remember or keep something in consideration or to take something into account while thinking about or making a decision.
  • enter mind The idiom "enter mind" generally refers to a thought or an idea that comes to someone's mind, often unexpectedly or as a sudden realization. It implies that a particular thought or understanding becomes actively present in someone's thinking or perception.
  • come to mind The idiom "come to mind" refers to the act of suddenly or spontaneously thinking of something or remembering something. It means that a particular thought or idea surfaces in one's consciousness or is recalled without any conscious effort.
  • be a load off (one's) mind The definition of the idiom "be a load off (one's) mind" is to experience a great sense of relief or release from a burden or worry. It suggests the feeling of having a heavy weight lifted from one's thoughts or emotions, bringing a profound sense of ease and contentment.
  • (not) in your right mind The idiom "(not) in your right mind" is used to describe someone's mental state or judgment. It implies that someone is (not) thinking clearly or rationally, usually due to being influenced by emotions, stress, or illogical thoughts. This expression suggests that the person's actions or decisions may be unreasonable, irrational, or impractical.
  • get (someone or something) out of (one's) mind The idiom "get (someone or something) out of (one's) mind" means to try to stop thinking about someone or something completely. It implies that the person or thing is constantly on one's mind, causing distraction or emotional turmoil. The phrase indicates the desire or effort to remove all thoughts, memories, or concerns related to the person or thing.
  • never mind (about) (doing) something The idiom "never mind (about) (doing) something" is used to dismiss or indicate that something is no longer necessary or relevant. It conveys the idea of letting go or disregarding a previous intention or action.
  • mind goes blank The idiom "mind goes blank" refers to a state of sudden and temporary mental confusion or forgetfulness. It is when a person is unable to think clearly or recall information, often being unable to formulate thoughts or speak coherently. This can occur due to stress, shock, fatigue, or being overwhelmed with information.
  • a frame of mind The idiom "a frame of mind" refers to a person's mental or emotional state or condition at a particular time. It describes an individual's attitude, perspective, or mindset that influences their thoughts, feelings, and actions in a given situation.
  • a practical, scientific, etc. turn of mind The idiom "a practical, scientific, etc. turn of mind" refers to someone who has a tendency or disposition to think and approach things in a pragmatic, logical, or analytical way, particularly in relation to practical matters, scientific endeavors, or other specific fields of knowledge. It implies a mindset that prioritizes practicality, reasoning, and evidence-based thinking.
  • have a mind of (one's)/its own The idiom "have a mind of (one's)/its own" refers to something or someone that acts or behaves independently, disregarding any outside influences or control. It suggests that the thing or person in question possesses a strong individuality or autonomy, often making decisions or taking actions that may not align with expectations or intentions.
  • put mind at ease The idiom "put one's mind at ease" means to alleviate or relieve someone's worries, concerns, or anxieties, making them feel calmer, more comfortable, and less stressed. It refers to taking actions or providing reassurance that help someone feel more secure and content.
  • have sm or sth in mind The idiom "have something or someone in mind" means to have a specific idea, person, or thing in one's thoughts or plans. It indicates that one has a particular preference or intention but might not have explicitly mentioned or revealed it.
  • bring to mind sb/sth The idiom "bring to mind sb/sth" means to remember or evoke thoughts, memories, or associations related to a specific person or thing. It implies triggering a mental recall or connection that is reminiscent or characteristic of someone or something.
  • You're out of your mind! The idiom "You're out of your mind!" is an expression used to convey that someone's words, actions, or ideas are extremely irrational, illogical, or crazy. It implies that the person being referred to lacks sound judgment or is behaving in an absurd or nonsensical manner.
  • know one's own mind The idiom "know one's own mind" means to be self-aware or have a clear understanding of one's own thoughts, opinions, desires, or intentions. It implies being confident and decisive about one's choices or decisions.
  • be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind" is used to emphasize extreme boredom, fear, anger, intoxication, or any other intense emotional or mental state. It suggests that the person is experiencing such a strong feeling or state that it seemingly overwhelms their mind or consciousness. The "out of your mind" part of the idiom reinforces the idea of being completely consumed or overwhelmed by the particular emotion or state.
  • put mind at rest The idiom "put mind at rest" means to alleviate worries or anxieties by providing reassurance or taking actions that calm one's concerns. It implies finding peace of mind or gaining a sense of assurance in a specific situation.
  • mind your back The idiom "mind your back" means to be cautious or vigilant about potential dangers or threats that might be present behind you or to look out for any harm that could come your way from someone or something you may not be aware of. It serves as a reminder to remain alert and attentive to your surroundings.
  • mind/watch your language The idiom "mind/watch your language" is an expression used to advise or remind someone to be cautious and careful about the words they use when speaking. It suggests that the person should avoid using offensive, vulgar, or inappropriate language, particularly in formal or sensitive situations.
  • have in mind The idiom "have in mind" means to have a specific plan, idea, or intention about something or someone. It refers to having a particular thought or concept in one's thoughts or considering something as a possible choice or option.
  • (one's) mind goes blank "(One's) mind goes blank" is an idiom that refers to a situation where a person suddenly loses the ability to think clearly or remember something that they should know or recall. It describes a state where one's mind becomes empty or devoid of thoughts, often resulting in a temporary inability to concentrate or articulate thoughts.
  • keep someone or something in mind To "keep someone or something in mind" means to remember or constantly consider someone or something when making decisions or taking action. It implies that the person or thing mentioned is of importance and should be taken into account throughout the process.
  • blow someone's mind The idiom "blow someone's mind" means to greatly astonish or impress someone, often by presenting them with new or unexpected information or experiences that they find difficult to comprehend or process.
  • frame of mind The idiom "frame of mind" refers to a person's mental or emotional disposition at a particular time. It describes the state of mind or attitude that someone has, which can influence their thoughts, feelings, decisions, and actions.
  • get a load off one’s mind The idiom "get a load off one’s mind" means to alleviate or relieve oneself from a burden or worry, usually by addressing or resolving the issue causing anxiety. It implies a feeling of relief after stress, doubt, or concern has been eliminated or lessened.
  • lose mind The idiom "lose mind" refers to a state of losing one's sanity or rationality. It implies a person becoming mentally unstable or irrational.
  • a load off (one's) mind The idiom "a load off (one’s) mind" means a feeling of relief or release from worry or burden. It refers to the sensation of having a weighty or bothersome issue or concern removed, resulting in a sense of liberation or relaxation.
  • have half a mind to do something The idiom "have half a mind to do something" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing something, often implying a strong inclination or desire to take action. It suggests that one is on the verge of making a decision or taking a certain course of action, although they may still have some reservations or doubts.
  • have a mind as sharp as a steel trap To "have a mind as sharp as a steel trap" means to possess exceptional mental acuity, intelligence, or quickness of thought. It implies having a highly perceptive and keen mind that can rapidly process information and make insightful judgments or observations. The idiom compares someone's mental sharpness to the swift and precise mechanism of a steel trap used for catching animals.
  • I don't mind telling you The idiom "I don't mind telling you" means that the speaker is willing or has no problem revealing or sharing something with the person they are speaking to. It is often used to emphasize sincerity or to convey that the speaker is about to disclose something personal or important.
  • keep in mind that The definition of the idiom "keep in mind that" means to remember or be aware of a particular piece of information or advice while considering or making judgments about a situation. It emphasizes the importance of not forgetting or overlooking the given information.
  • if you don't mind me saying The idiom "if you don't mind me saying" is a polite way to express an opinion or make a comment, typically when addressing someone. It signals that the speaker wants to offer their thoughts or perspective on a particular matter but is aware of the possibility of causing offense or appearing intrusive.
  • be of sound mind The idiom "be of sound mind" means to have a sane and rational mentality or mental state, implying that the person is mentally stable and capable of making sound judgments and decisions.
  • set sm's mind at ease (about sm or sth) The idiom "set someone's mind at ease (about something)" means to alleviate someone's worries, doubts, or concerns regarding a specific person or situation. It refers to calming someone down or providing reassurance to help them feel more relaxed and confident about a particular matter.
  • change your/somebody’s mind The idiom "change your/somebody’s mind" means to persuade or influence someone to alter their opinion, belief, or decision about something. It refers to the act of convincing someone to think differently or reconsider their viewpoint.
  • go over (something) in (one's) mind The idiom "go over (something) in (one's) mind" refers to the act of thinking or reflecting on a particular situation, event, or topic. It implies mentally reviewing the details, options, or consequences of something in order to gain clarity or a better understanding.
  • set your mind on something The idiom "set your mind on something" means to be determined or focused on achieving a certain goal or objective. It implies having a strong conviction or resolution to pursue and attain a particular outcome.
  • leap to (someone's) mind The idiom "leap to (someone's) mind" means to think of something or someone immediately, without needing to make an effort or take any time to remember or recall. It typically refers to ideas, memories, or thoughts that come to one's mind quickly and naturally.
  • one's mind went blank The idiom "one's mind went blank" refers to a situation where someone suddenly forgets or is unable to remember something, leading to a temporary loss of thoughts or mental clarity. It implies a state of mental confusion or the inability to think clearly due to a sudden and unexpected lapse in memory or concentration.
  • of a mind to The idiom "of a mind to" is used to indicate that someone is strongly inclined or determined to do something. It implies that the person has a certain mindset or intention regarding a particular action or decision.
  • out of your mind The idiom "out of your mind" means to be irrational, crazy, or insane. It implies that someone's thoughts or actions are illogical or not in line with commonly accepted norms or reasoning.
  • make mind up The idiom "make up one's mind" means to reach a decision or come to a conclusion about something.
  • if you don’t mind The idiom "if you don't mind" is used to politely check or confirm whether something is acceptable or agreeable to the other person. It implies asking for permission or approval before proceeding with an action or request.
  • have a mind of own The idiom "have a mind of its own" means that something or someone behaves or functions independently, often contrary to what is expected or desired. It implies that the thing or person has autonomy or independent thinking, making decisions or acting in ways that may not be predictable or controllable.
  • recall to mind "Recall to mind" is an idiom that means to remember or bring something back into one's thoughts or memory. It refers to the act of retrieving or recollecting information, events, or experiences that had previously been forgotten or not actively remembered.
  • if you've a mind to do The idiom "if you've a mind to do" means if you have the intention or inclination to do something. It suggests that the decision or action is entirely up to the person's own desire or willingness.
  • mind your Ps and Qs The idiom "mind your Ps and Qs" means to be cautious and conscious of one's behavior or manners. It implies being polite, well-behaved, and mindful of one's words and actions. The origin of this idiom is uncertain, but it likely comes from the practice of emphasizing the letters "P" and "Q" when teaching children to write, to remind them to be careful and attentive in their handwriting.
  • drive (one) out of (one's) mind The idiom "drive (one) out of (one's) mind" refers to an action or situation that causes extreme annoyance, frustration, or irritability, to the point where a person feels as if they are losing their sanity or becoming mentally overwhelmed. It implies a great disturbance or preoccupation that disrupts one's ability to concentrate, think clearly, or maintain stability.
  • a mind is a terrible thing to waste The idiom "a mind is a terrible thing to waste" means that it is tragic or unfortunate when someone with great potential or intelligence does not have the opportunity to develop and utilize their abilities. It emphasizes the importance of ensuring that everyone is given the chance to learn and grow intellectually.
  • one's frame of mind The idiom "one's frame of mind" refers to a person's mental or emotional state or condition at a specific moment or in general. It describes the attitude, perspective, or mindset that someone has, which influences their thoughts, behavior, and overall outlook on life or particular situations.
  • Do you mind! The idiom "Do you mind!" is an expression used to convey irritation or annoyance in response to someone's actions or behavior. It is often used to communicate that the speaker finds a particular action disrespectful, intrusive, or bothersome.
  • have someone or something in mind The idiom "have someone or something in mind" means to have someone or something specifically in one's thoughts or to have a particular person or thing in consideration for a specific purpose or role.
  • bear (someone or something) in mind The idiom "bear (someone or something) in mind" means to remember or keep someone or something in one's thoughts or consideration while making decisions or taking actions. It implies being aware of a particular factor or circumstance and taking it into account.
  • have a one-track mind The idiom "have a one-track mind" means to be overly focused or obsessed with one particular idea, topic, or goal, and to be unable or unwilling to think about anything else. It implies that the person's thoughts and interests are limited and narrow, often leading to an inability to engage in other conversations or consider alternative perspectives.
  • have a mind of your own The idiom "have a mind of your own" refers to someone's ability to think independently and make decisions based on their own thoughts and beliefs, rather than being easily influenced or controlled by others. It implies a level of autonomy and self-determination.
  • be etched on your heart/memory/mind The idiom "be etched on your heart/memory/mind" is used to describe something that is deeply engraved or permanently impressed upon one's emotions, recollections, or thoughts. It refers to a powerful and lasting memory or experience that leaves a strong and indelible impact on a person's consciousness.
  • be in one's right mind The idiom "be in one's right mind" refers to the state of being mentally sound, rational, and sane. It suggests that an individual is thinking clearly without any mental confusion, impairment, or insanity.
  • call to mind The idiom "call to mind" means to cause something to be remembered or recalled; to make someone think of something or someone.
  • open your/somebody’s mind to something The idiom "open your/somebody’s mind to something" means to make someone willing to consider or accept new ideas, perspectives, or possibilities, especially those that were previously unfamiliar or outside of their comfort zone. It refers to broadening one's thinking and being receptive to different viewpoints or experiences.
  • changed my mind The idiom "changed my mind" is used to describe the act of altering a previously held opinion, decision, or intention. It indicates a shift in one's thinking or stance on a particular matter.
  • give somebody a piece of your mind The idiom "give somebody a piece of your mind" means to express one's dissatisfaction, anger, or annoyance towards someone openly and forcefully. It suggests confronting the person and sharing one's strong opinions or feelings, often in a blunt or confrontational manner.
  • mind the gap The idiom "mind the gap" is typically used as a warning phrase to advise someone to be cautious or alert to a potential danger or discrepancy. It originated from the audio warning played in the London Underground transportation system, reminding passengers to be aware of the gap between the platform and the train when boarding or disembarking. However, figuratively, it can be applied to various situations where one should be mindful and watchful for any potential risks or differences.
  • bring/call sth to mind The idiom "bring/call something to mind" means to cause someone to remember or think about something. It refers to when something reminds a person of a particular situation, person, or memory, bringing it back into their thoughts or awareness.
  • mind how you go The idiom "mind how you go" means to be careful or cautious. It is often used as a farewell or parting remark, reminding someone to take care of themselves and be mindful of their actions.
  • contented mind is a perpetual feast The idiom "a contented mind is a perpetual feast" means that having a satisfied or happy mindset is a source of continuous pleasure or contentment. It suggests that a person who is mentally at peace and appreciative of what they have will always find joy and satisfaction in their life, regardless of external circumstances.
  • memory/mind like a sieve The idiom "memory/mind like a sieve" is used to describe someone who has a poor or unreliable memory. It suggests that information or memories easily pass through their mind, just like water passes through the holes of a sieve, leaving no lasting impression.
  • half a mind The idiom "half a mind" refers to being on the verge of making a decision or taking a certain action, often implying that someone is strongly inclined or has the intention to do something, but has not fully committed to it yet. It suggests that one is considering or contemplating an action and is expressing a significant level of determination or desire to carry it out.
  • in the back of mind The idiom "in the back of one's mind" refers to a thought or idea that is not in the forefront of one's thoughts, but still present or lingering in one's subconscious. It suggests that even though something may not be actively thought about, it remains a lingering concern or consideration.
  • head/mind is whirling The idiom "head/mind is whirling" refers to a state of confusion, disarray, or overwhelm, where one's thoughts or ideas are spinning or moving quickly and uncontrollably within their mind. It implies a state of mental chaos or excessive mental activity that makes it difficult to think or make clear decisions.
  • a change of mind The idiom "a change of mind" refers to a situation where a person alters or revises their opinion, decision, or attitude about something. It implies a shift in perspective or a reversal of one's initial thought or intention.
  • cross (one's) mind The idiom "cross one's mind" means to briefly think about or consider something. It refers to a passing thought or idea that enters one's mind briefly and then disappears.
  • enter one's mind The idiom "enter one's mind" refers to a thought or idea that comes to someone's consciousness or the act of considering or contemplating something. It suggests that a particular thought or concept has been acknowledged or considered by an individual.
  • take a load off mind The idiom "take a load off your mind" means to relieve oneself of worries, concerns, or mental burdens. It implies finding a way to relax, let go of stress, or alleviate anxiety about a particular issue or situation.
  • boggle mind The idiom "boggle mind" refers to a state of extreme confusion, astonishment, or bewilderment caused by something unexpected or difficult to understand. It indicates a mental or cognitive overload, where the mind feels overwhelmed and unable to process or comprehend the situation or information at hand.
  • I don't mind admitting, telling you..., etc. The idiom "I don't mind admitting/telling you..." is used to preface a statement or confession that the speaker is about to make. It implies that the speaker is willing and comfortable to openly express a personal opinion, feeling, or fact, without any reservations or hesitation.
  • have one's mind in the gutter The idiom "have one's mind in the gutter" refers to someone who interprets innocent or ordinary statements or situations in a vulgar or inappropriate way. It suggests that the person's thoughts are fixated on lewd or obscene subjects, often disregarding the intended meaning or context of a conversation.
  • be out of (one's) mind with (something) The idiom "be out of (one's) mind with (something)" means to be extremely preoccupied or obsessed with something to the point of being irrational, irrational, or mentally unstable. It implies that someone is completely consumed by a particular thought, feeling, or situation, often leading to erratic behavior or irrational actions.
  • a mind of its own The idiom "a mind of its own" refers to behavior or actions that are independent, unpredictable, or contrary to what was intended or expected. It implies that something has its own internal reasoning or desires, often implying a lack of control or influence over its actions.
  • have a good mind to The idiom "have a good mind to" means to strongly consider or be strongly inclined to do something, typically expressing a desire or intention to take action. It implies that the speaker is seriously contemplating an action and may actually follow through with it.
  • flash through mind The idiom "flash through mind" refers to a sudden and brief occurrence where a thought or memory quickly appears in one's mind. It often describes an instance when a person experiences a momentary recollection or realization of something.
  • in right mind The idiom "in right mind" means to be mentally sound, rational, and thinking logically. It refers to someone who is mentally stable and able to make sensible decisions.
  • something boggles the mind The idiom "something boggles the mind" means that something is difficult or impossible to comprehend, understand, or believe. It implies that whatever is being discussed is so astonishing, perplexing, or beyond normal expectations that it challenges the limits of one's understanding.
  • bear/keep sth in mind The idiom "bear/keep something in mind" means to remember or to keep something in one's thoughts or to take something into consideration while making decisions or taking action.
  • a legend in (one's) own mind The idiom "a legend in one's own mind" refers to someone who exaggerates or overestimates their own abilities, accomplishments, or importance. It suggests that the person sees themselves as more impressive or significant than others perceive them to be.
  • I don't mind telling you (sth). The idiom "I don't mind telling you (sth)" means that the speaker is willingly or freely sharing a piece of information or opinion with the listener. It indicates that the speaker doesn't feel hesitant, secretive, or reluctant to disclose or express something.
  • bring sth/sb to mind The idiom "bring something/someone to mind" means to cause someone to remember or think about something or someone, often by reminding them of a similar or related thing or person.
  • give a piece of mind To "give a piece of mind" means to express one's true thoughts or feelings honestly and forcefully, especially when disagreeing with someone or when feeling irritated or angry. It is often used when someone wants to confront or criticize another person bluntly, in order to make them aware of their actions or behavior and express their disapproval or frustration.
  • boggle sm's mind The idiom "boggle someone's mind" means to greatly confuse or bewilder someone, often by presenting them with something unexpected or difficult to comprehend. It suggests that something is so extraordinary or unbelievable that it challenges the person's ability to understand or process it.
  • be not in your right mind The idiom "be not in your right mind" refers to a state where someone is not thinking or behaving rationally or logically. It implies that the person is mentally confused, deranged, or lacking sound judgment.
  • at the back of your mind The idiom "at the back of your mind" refers to something that is not immediately occupying your thoughts, but remains consciously or subconsciously known or remembered. It suggests that despite being in the background, the thought or idea still influences your thinking or behavior in some way.
  • be all in the/ mind The idiom "be all in the mind" means that something is based on one's perception or imagination rather than on reality. It suggests that the issue or experience is primarily psychological rather than an actual or tangible occurrence.
  • have one’s mind in the gutter The idiom "have one’s mind in the gutter" refers to a situation where someone's thoughts, conversations, or behavior are focused on inappropriate, lewd, or lascivious ideas. It implies a fixation or preoccupation with sexual or vulgar matters, often at an inappropriate time or in contexts where such thoughts or actions are deemed improper or offensive.
  • have half a mind The idiom "have half a mind" means to be strongly inclined or seriously considering doing something. It implies that someone is contemplating a particular action or decision but has not fully committed to it yet.
  • blow mind To "blow someone's mind" means to astonish or amaze someone greatly. It refers to an overwhelming or intense experience that leaves a deep and lasting impact on a person, often beyond their expectations. It can describe something that is profound, mind-boggling, or simply awe-inspiring.
  • I don’t mind if I do The idiom "I don’t mind if I do" is a polite way of expressing one's willingness or acceptance to do something or have something offered to them. It indicates a favorable or positive response to an invitation, offer, or suggestion. It is often used to convey a sense of enthusiasm or eagerness in accepting an opportunity.
  • in the back of (one's) mind The idiom "in the back of one's mind" refers to something that is continuously present as a thought or preoccupation, even when it is not at the forefront of one's conscious thoughts. It implies that the idea or concern lingers in the subconscious or secondary part of one's thinking.
  • get mind around The idiom "get mind around" means to comprehend or understand something, often when it is difficult or challenging to do so. It implies trying to mentally grasp or make sense of a complex idea or concept.
  • at the back of (one's) mind The idiom "at the back of (one's) mind" refers to thoughts, concerns, or ideas that are present in one's consciousness, although not at the forefront or immediately focused upon. It implies that these thoughts or concerns may not be actively acknowledged or addressed, but are still present in one's subconscious or underlying thought process.
  • have sth in mind The idiom "have something in mind" means to have a specific idea, plan, or intention in one's thoughts. It implies that someone has a particular concept or goal that they are considering or are ready to share with others.
  • have a mind to (do something) The idiom "have a mind to (do something)" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing a particular action. It implies a strong desire or intention to carry out the mentioned action.
  • have half a mind/a good mind to do sth The idiom "have half a mind/a good mind to do something" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing a particular action, often implying a strong inclination or desire to carry it out. It indicates that the person is seriously thinking about doing something and might be on the verge of taking action.
  • have it in mind to do something The idiom "have it in mind to do something" means to have the intention or plan to do something. It refers to having a specific idea or goal in one's thoughts or intentions and being determined to accomplish it.
  • never mind sth The idiom "never mind something" is used to indicate that something is not important or relevant and should be disregarded or forgotten. It is often used to dismiss or downplay a particular topic or issue.
  • put mind to it The idiom "put mind to it" means to focus and apply one's mental efforts in order to accomplish a goal or task. It refers to the act of dedicating one's thoughts and concentration towards a particular objective.
  • read sb's thoughts, at read sb's mind The idiom "read sb's thoughts" or "read sb's mind" refers to the ability to understand or anticipate someone else's thoughts or feelings without them explicitly expressing them. It implies an intuitive or perceptive understanding of another person's inner thoughts, desires, or intentions.
  • bear/keep somebody/something in mind The idiom "bear/keep somebody/something in mind" means to remember or consider someone or something, typically in relation to a future decision or action. It implies being aware of and not forgetting the importance or relevance of a person or information while making decisions or plans.
  • be of like mind The idiom "be of like mind" means to have similar thoughts, opinions, or beliefs about a particular topic. It suggests that there is agreement or a shared mindset among a group of people.
  • be engraved in (one's) mind The idiom "be engraved in (one's) mind" means that something has made a lasting and indelible impression in someone's memory or consciousness. It suggests that the person cannot forget the experience, image, or information, as if it has permanently been etched in their mind.
  • a weight off (one's) mind The idiom "a weight off (one's) mind" refers to a sense of relief or the feeling of having a burden removed. It is commonly used to describe the feeling of being free from worry or stress, as if a heavy weight that was on one's mind has been lifted.
  • keep one's mind on someone or something The idiom "keep one's mind on someone or something" means to stay focused, attentive, or preoccupied with a particular person, task, or subject. It implies giving undivided attention or holding thoughts and concentration on the mentioned individual or matter.
  • give (one's) mind to (something) The idiom "give one's mind to something" means to concentrate or focus one's thoughts, attention, or mental energy on a particular task, activity, or issue. It implies dedicating one's cognitive abilities and becoming deeply engaged or involved in the subject at hand.
  • cast mind back The idiom "cast mind back" means to take a moment to remember or recall something from the past, usually a specific event, memory, or information. It refers to actively using one's memory to retrieve a specific piece of knowledge or experience.
  • pissed out of your head/mind/skull The idiom "pissed out of your head/mind/skull" is a colloquial expression that means being extremely intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of being completely under the influence of alcohol, to the point where one's mental faculties or cognitive abilities are significantly impaired.
  • have the presence of mind to do The idiom "have the presence of mind to do" means to be able to think quickly and clearly in a situation, allowing one to calmly make the right decision or take appropriate action. It refers to being mentally aware and composed, despite being in a potentially stressful or challenging circumstance.
  • have a good mind to do something The idiom "have a good mind to do something" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing something, typically when feeling strongly inclined or motivated to do so. It reflects a person's firm intention or desire to take a particular action.
  • make up your mind The definition of the idiom "make up your mind" is to reach a decision or to make a choice, especially when someone has been indecisive or hesitant.
  • not pay someone any mind The idiom "not pay someone any mind" means to ignore or disregard someone, their presence, or their words. It implies not giving any attention, importance, or consideration to someone.
  • make up mind The idiom "make up mind" means to reach a decision or come to a conclusion about something. It refers to the act of making a firm choice or resolve after considering different options or possibilities.
  • if you don't mind my saying (so) The idiom "if you don't mind my saying (so)" is often used as a polite disclaimer before offering an opinion or criticism. It is a way of expressing that the speaker wishes to express their viewpoint, even if it may not be welcomed or may come across as impolite. It is a phrase that seeks permission or understanding from the listener before providing feedback or making a statement.
  • be out of your mind with boredom/fear/worry etc. The idiom "be out of your mind with boredom/fear/worry etc." means to be extremely overwhelmed or consumed by a particular emotion or feeling. It implies that the person is experiencing an intense level of that emotion, to the point that they feel as if they have lost control of their thoughts or sanity.
  • call sth to mind The idiom "call something to mind" means to remember or to bring something to one's attention again. It is used when something reminds someone of a particular memory, thought, or idea that they had previously forgotten or not actively thought about.
  • set mind at ease The idiom "set mind at ease" means to alleviate someone's concerns or worries, providing reassurance or peace of mind. It implies creating a feeling of calm and contentment by resolving uncertainties or doubts.
  • put sm in mind of sm or sth The idiom "put someone in mind of someone or something" means to remind someone of a person, thing, or situation. It suggests that seeing or experiencing something triggers a memory or association with someone or something else.
  • cast (one's) mind back The idiom "cast one's mind back" means to make an effort to remember or recall something from the past. It refers to the act of mentally going back in time to retrieve specific memories or thoughts.
  • of unsound mind The idiom "of unsound mind" refers to someone who is mentally or psychologically unstable or impaired, making them incapable of thinking rationally or making sound judgments. It implies a lack of mental health or stability.
  • fuck someone’s mind up The idiom "fuck someone's mind up" is a colloquial expression meaning to significantly disturb or confuse someone mentally or emotionally. It implies causing profound psychological or cognitive distress, often resulting in a state of disorientation, confusion, or even trauma.
  • poison sb's mind To "poison someone's mind" means to deliberately influence or manipulate someone's thoughts or beliefs in a negative or harmful way. It refers to a malicious act of causing someone to have distorted or biased perceptions, often with the intention of turning them against someone or something.
  • be of one mind, at be of the same mind The idiom "be of one mind" or "be of the same mind" means to agree or have the same opinion on a particular matter. It implies that multiple individuals or a group have a unified perspective or thinking on a specific topic, sharing common thoughts and ideas.
  • your mind is on sth The idiom "your mind is on something" means that your thoughts and attention are primarily focused on a particular thing or topic. It suggests that you are preoccupied or constantly thinking about that specific thing and may have difficulty concentrating on other matters.
  • be out of mind with boredom etc. The idiom "be out of mind with boredom etc." means to be extremely bored, irritated, or restless. It expresses a state of mind where one is overwhelmed or consumed by boredom, causing a sense of mental distress or restlessness.
  • be of one/the same mind (about somebody/something) The idiom "be of one/the same mind (about somebody/something)" means to have the same opinion or agreement with someone else regarding a particular person or thing. It implies shared thoughts, unity or consensus on a particular subject or individual.
  • a load off your mind The idiom "a load off your mind" means a feeling of relief or a release from worry or stress. It refers to the sensation of having a burden or concern removed, providing a sense of freedom and peace of mind.
  • be of the same mind The idiom "be of the same mind" means to agree with someone or have the same opinion, viewpoint, or belief as another person. It implies that two or more individuals share a common perspective or are in harmony with each other's thoughts.
  • your mind is a blank/goes blank The idiom "your mind is a blank/goes blank" refers to a state of mental emptiness or an inability to think or recall information. It implies that your mind is temporarily devoid of any thoughts or ideas, resulting in a lack of understanding or clarity in a given situation.
  • your mind’s eye The idiom "your mind's eye" refers to a person's ability to visualize or imagine something in their mind. It is the inner vision or imagination that allows someone to mentally perceive and create images, memories, or ideas without relying on external sensory input.
  • set/put sb's mind at rest/ease The idiom "set/put sb's mind at rest/ease" means to calm someone down or alleviate their worries or concerns. It involves providing reassurance or addressing their anxieties in order to help them feel more relaxed and confident.
  • put out of mind To put out of mind means to deliberately or consciously forget about something, to suppress or ignore certain thoughts or memories, or to not allow something to occupy one's thoughts or attention. It refers to intentionally pushing aside or disregarding certain thoughts, feelings, or concerns.
  • mind the store The idiom "mind the store" is used to convey the idea of taking care of or overseeing something, typically a business or a project, in someone's absence. It implies the responsibility of looking after or managing a specific situation or task until the authorized person returns.
  • a load off mind The idiom "a load off one's mind" means to experience a great sense of relief or release from worry or burden. It signifies the feeling of having a problem resolved or a responsibility lifted, resulting in a lighter state of mind.
  • have something in mind The idiom "have something in mind" means to have a specific idea, plan, or thought about something, often implying that the person has thought it over and has a clear intention or purpose in what they are thinking about.
  • I don’t mind admitting, telling you…, etc. The idiom "I don't mind admitting, telling you..." is used to introduce a statement or piece of information that may be personal, surprising, or embarrassing. It implies that the speaker is open and honest about revealing the following fact.
  • don't mind if I do The idiom "don't mind if I do" is an informal expression commonly used to politely accept an offer or invitation. It suggests that the speaker has no objection or hesitation in accepting something being offered, whether it's a favor, a treat, or an opportunity.
  • flash through one's mind The idiom "flash through one's mind" refers to a rapid and fleeting thought or image that briefly appears in one's thoughts. It describes a momentary mental occurrence that is quick and occurs without deliberate intention.
  • be of like/one mind The idiom "be of like/one mind" means that two or more people share the same opinion or have the same perspective on a particular matter. It suggests a high level of agreement and unity of thought between individuals.
  • have somebody/something in mind (for something) The idiom "have somebody/something in mind (for something)" means to have a specific person or thing in consideration or as a possibility for a particular purpose or role. It indicates having a particular individual or item in one's thoughts as a potential choice or solution for a given situation.
  • put/get something out of your mind The idiom "put/get something out of your mind" means to consciously stop thinking about or dwelling on a particular thought, idea, worry, or concern. It refers to the act of intentionally dismissing or forgetting about something in order to focus on other things or to relieve one's mind from unnecessary stress or preoccupation.
  • out of one's mind The idiom "out of one's mind" refers to someone being mentally unstable or irrational. It suggests that the person's thoughts or actions are illogical or disconnected from reality.
  • bored out of (one's) mind The idiom "bored out of (one's) mind" means to be extremely bored to the point of being mentally or emotionally exhausted. It suggests a deep and intense level of boredom that leaves someone feeling restless, uninterested, and uninspired.
  • close your mind The idiom "close your mind" refers to the act of refusing to consider new ideas, perspectives, or information. It implies a stubborn or inflexible attitude towards accepting or entertaining alternative thoughts or opinions.
  • slip sb's memory/mind The idiom "slip someone's memory/mind" means to forget or have a lapse in memory about something. It refers to the unintentional act of failing to remember or recall a particular piece of information or an event.
  • put/set somebody’s mind at ease/rest The idiom "put/set somebody’s mind at ease/rest" means to alleviate someone's worries or concerns. It refers to the act of reassuring or comforting someone, making them feel less anxious or troubled about a situation.
  • put/set somebody's mind at ease/rest The idiom "put/set somebody's mind at ease/rest" means to alleviate someone's worries, anxieties, or concerns by providing reassurance or calming their mind. It involves making someone feel relaxed, less troubled, or more confident in a particular situation.
  • your mind goes blank The idiom "your mind goes blank" refers to a situation when someone is unable to think clearly or remember something, experiencing a sudden loss of thoughts or ideas. It describes a momentary mental lapse or inability to recall information due to distraction, stress, or any other reason.
  • be all in (one's/the) mind The idiom "be all in one's mind" means that something exists only in one's imagination, perception, or thoughts, and does not have any basis in reality. It refers to situations where someone's ideas, beliefs, or concerns are not based on actual facts or evidence, but rather on their own subjective interpretation.
  • never mind that The idiom "never mind that" is used to dismiss or disregard something that has been mentioned or brought up, implying that it is not important or relevant to the current situation or discussion.
  • be out of (one's) mind The idiom "be out of (one's) mind" means to be crazy, insane, or behaving in a completely irrational or illogical manner. It indicates that someone's thoughts, actions, or behaviors are not within the bounds of sanity or reason.
  • prey on somebody’s mind The idiom "prey on somebody's mind" means to cause constant worry, anxiety, or obsession in someone's thoughts. It refers to a situation or concern that consistently occupies a person's thinking, often causing distress or mental burden.
  • flash into mind The idiom "flash into mind" refers to a sudden and vivid recollection or thought that enters one's consciousness swiftly and unexpectedly. It describes the instant emergence of a memory or idea, typically coming to mind without any prior conscious effort.
  • cross somebody's mind The idiom "cross somebody's mind" refers to the occurrence of a passing thought or idea in someone's mind. It signifies a brief moment of consideration or recognition of something, often without much deeper contemplation or significant attention given to it.
  • boggle (one's/the) mind The idiom "boggle (one's/the) mind" means to shock, bewilder, or astonish someone. It refers to an experience or information that is so surprising or difficult to comprehend that it overwhelms the person's thoughts or understanding.
  • have a mind like a steel trap The idiom "have a mind like a steel trap" refers to someone who has an exceptionally sharp and quick-thinking mind. It implies that they have a remarkable ability to grasp and retain information, make connections, and analyze situations swiftly and accurately, similar to a trap that snaps shut instantly.
  • mind like a steel trap, have a The idiom "mind like a steel trap" means to have an exceptionally sharp and quick-thinking mind that is able to recall and retain information accurately. It refers to someone who has a strong memory and is intellectually quick and focused.
  • It blows my mind! The idiom "It blows my mind!" means that something is so amazing, surprising, or mind-boggling that it leaves you in a state of shock or overwhelming awe.
  • change your mind The idiom "change your mind" means to alter or revise one's opinion, decision, or belief about a certain matter or course of action. It refers to the act of reconsidering or thinking differently than one did previously.
  • be/take a weight off your mind The idiom "be/take a weight off your mind" means to feel relieved or more relaxed after resolving a problem, worry, or burden that was causing stress or anxiety. It refers to the figurative feeling of a heavy weight being lifted or removed from one's mind, allowing them to experience a sense of mental or emotional relief.
  • I wouldn’t mind something/doing something The idiom "I wouldn't mind something/doing something" is used to express that one is willing, accepting, or open to something. It indicates that someone has no objection or difficulty with a particular situation or action.
  • at the back of mind The idiom "at the back of mind" refers to something that is constantly present in one's thoughts or awareness, although it may not be at the forefront of their mind. It suggests that the person is subconsciously or unconsciously thinking about or considering something.
  • have (someone or something) on (one's) mind The idiom "have (someone or something) on (one's) mind" means to be constantly thinking about or preoccupied with a particular person or thing.
  • give someone a piece of your mind The idiom "give someone a piece of your mind" means to express one's thoughts or opinions to someone in a frank, direct, and often confrontational manner. It implies that the speaker is expressing their dissatisfaction, anger, or frustration with the person's actions or behavior without holding back.
  • have an open mind The idiom "have an open mind" means to be receptive to new information, ideas, perspectives, or experiences without any preconceived notions, biases, or prejudices. It involves being willing to consider different viewpoints and to consider possibilities beyond one's initial beliefs or opinions. Having an open mind encourages curiosity, flexibility, and a willingness to learn and grow.
  • have/keep an open mind The idiom "have/keep an open mind" means to be willing to consider or accept new ideas, opinions, or information without being influenced by preconceived notions or biases. It suggests that one should approach a situation or topic without judgment or preconception and be receptive to different perspectives.
  • be a load off mind The idiom "be a load off one's mind" means to experience a sense of relief or release from worry or anxiety. It signifies the feeling of unburdening oneself from a heavy emotional or mental weight.
  • take your mind off something The idiom "take your mind off something" means to distract or divert your thoughts or attention from a specific subject or problem, usually to find temporary relief or relaxation from it.
  • eye/mind candy The idiom "eye/mind candy" refers to something that is visually or mentally appealing, but lacks depth or substance. It typically refers to something that is primarily superficial and meant to be enjoyed or appreciated for its aesthetic qualities, without providing any meaningful or significant content.
  • bear something in mind The idiom "bear something in mind" means to remember or be mindful of something, to keep it in one's thoughts or considerations.
  • spring to mind The idiom "spring to mind" means that something comes to someone's thoughts or is remembered suddenly and without much effort.
  • weigh on mind The idiom "weigh on mind" means to consistently cause worry, stress, or concern to someone. It refers to a situation or problem that stays in one's thoughts and affects their mental well-being.
  • sb's state/frame of mind The idiom "sb's state/frame of mind" refers to a person's psychological or emotional condition at a particular time. It encompasses a person's thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and overall outlook on life or a specific situation.
  • bring/call somebody/something to mind The idiom "bring/call somebody/something to mind" means to remind or remember someone or something. It refers to the act of evoking familiar thoughts, memories, or associations with a particular person, thing, or situation.
  • a load/weight off your mind The idiom "a load/weight off your mind" refers to a feeling of relief or release from worry or stress. When a burden or a troubling thought is lifted or resolved, it creates a sense of mental or emotional liberation, making one feel lighter and less burdened.
  • change one's mind The idiom "change one's mind" refers to the act of altering or revising one's opinion, decision, or viewpoint about something. It implies a shift in judgment or perspective after having considered new information or thinking more deeply about a matter.
  • in the back of your mind The idiom "in the back of your mind" refers to something that is constantly present in your thoughts or subconscious, even if not actively acknowledged or expressed. It refers to thoughts, ideas, or concerns that linger or remain unresolved, occupying a less conscious part of your mind.
  • blow someone’s mind The idiom "blow someone’s mind" means to completely astonish or overwhelm someone with a fascinating or highly impressive experience, idea, or piece of information. It refers to the act of surprising someone to such an extent that their mind feels as if it has been greatly impacted or blown away.
  • be all in somebody's/the mind The idiom "be all in somebody's/the mind" refers to something or someone occupying a person's thoughts or preoccupying their mind. It suggests that the person is constantly thinking about or focused on a particular topic or individual, to the exclusion or neglect of other matters.
  • put sth out of your mind The idiom "put something out of your mind" means to intentionally forget about or ignore something, typically a troubling or problematic situation or thought, in order to move on or maintain peace of mind.
  • at/in the back of your mind The idiom "at/in the back of your mind" refers to something that is not at the forefront of one's thoughts or immediate attention, but is still present or lingering in one's subconscious. It typically suggests that the thought or idea is not actively being considered, but is still remembered or considered on some level.
  • mind over matter The idiom "mind over matter" means the ability of the mind to control or overcome physical obstacles, pain, or discomfort. It emphasizes the power of mental strength and determination to triumph over physical challenges.
  • be etched on (one's) mind The idiom "be etched on (one's) mind" refers to something that is permanently remembered or deeply ingrained in one's memory. It describes a vivid, lasting impression that cannot be easily forgotten.
  • Mind your own beeswax. The idiom "Mind your own beeswax" is a playful and slightly humorous way of telling someone to mind their own business or to not interfere in someone else's affairs. It is often used in a lighthearted tone to indicate that the person should focus on their own concerns instead of meddling in other people's matters. It is an alternative form of "Mind your own business."
  • bear in mind The idiom "bear in mind" means to remember or keep something in one's thoughts, to be mindful of something.
  • be of one mind The idiom "be of one mind" means that a group of people share the same opinion or agree on a particular matter. It signifies unity and consensus in thought or decision-making.
  • have (one's) mind on (something) The idiom "have (one's) mind on (something)" means to be fully focused or preoccupied with a particular topic, task, or concern. It implies that the person's thoughts and attention are engrossed in a specific matter, making it difficult for them to think about anything else.
  • the mind boggles The idiom "the mind boggles" is used to express astonishment, disbelief, or confusion when faced with something that is difficult to comprehend or imagine. It signifies that a situation or concept is so overwhelming or incomprehensible that it leaves one feeling bewildered or overwhelmed.
  • be/go out of your mind The idiom "be/go out of your mind" means to be or become crazy, insane, or mentally unstable. It suggests a state of extreme confusion, irrationality, or madness.
  • run through sb's mind/head The idiom "run through sb's mind/head" refers to thoughts or ideas that quickly and fleetingly cross someone's mind. It implies that the thoughts are passing and fleeting, rather than deeply contemplated.
  • get your mind round sth To "get your mind round something" means to understand or comprehend something that may be complex or challenging. It refers to the act of mentally processing and comprehending a particular idea, concept, or situation that initially appears confusing or difficult. It implies overcoming mental obstacles and gaining a clear understanding or grasp of the subject matter.
  • drive one out of mind The idiom "drive one out of mind" is an expression used to describe an event or action that causes extreme frustration, annoyance, or irritation to someone, to the point where it preoccupies their thoughts and becomes difficult to ignore or forget. It implies that the person or situation is so bothersome that it overwhelms one's mind, making it hard to focus on anything else.
  • if you don't mind me saying (so) The idiom "if you don't mind me saying (so)" is a polite expression used before giving an opinion or making a comment that may be critical or potentially offensive. It is often used to soften the impact of the speaker's words or show respect for the listener's feelings.
  • change mind The idiom "change mind" refers to altering one's opinion, decision, or position on a particular matter. It indicates a shift in perspective or a reversal of one's previous stance.
  • blow sb's mind The definition of the idiom "blow someone's mind" is to greatly astonish or impress someone, often to the point of overwhelming their thoughts or understanding. It refers to something so incredible or mind-boggling that it figuratively "blows" a person's mind, causing surprise or amazement.
  • ease sb's mind To "ease someone's mind" means to alleviate or relieve someone's worry, anxiety, or concern about something. It refers to providing reassurance, comfort, or a sense of relief to someone who has been troubled or distressed.
  • recall sth to mind The idiom "recall something to mind" means to remember or bring back a particular memory, feeling, or thought. It refers to the act of consciously bringing something back into one's thoughts or awareness.
  • call something to mind The idiom "call something to mind" means to remember or recall something. It refers to the act of bringing into one's consciousness a specific memory, thought, or idea.
  • set/put your mind to sth To set/put your mind to something means to concentrate your thoughts, attention, or efforts on a particular task or goal. It implies a determination or commitment to achieving something by dedicating your mental focus and energy towards it.
  • be all in somebody’s/the mind The idiom "be all in somebody’s/the mind" refers to a situation where someone thinks about or obsesses over something or someone constantly. It implies that the person cannot stop thinking about the subject and it occupies their thoughts completely.
  • a contented mind is a perpetual feast The idiom "a contented mind is a perpetual feast" means that a peaceful and satisfied mindset can bring utmost happiness and fulfillment. It suggests that being mentally content and at ease with oneself can create a lasting sense of joy and abundance, regardless of external circumstances or material possessions. It emphasizes the notion that true wealth and contentment come from within and do not rely on external factors.
  • flash into one's mind The idiom "flash into one's mind" refers to a sudden and brief occurrence or realization that comes to one's thoughts or memory unexpectedly and quickly. It can describe the spontaneous surfacing of a thought, idea, or memory in one's mind.
  • put sb's mind at ease The idiom "put sb's mind at ease" means to alleviate someone's worries or anxieties, to calm their mind, or to make them feel more relaxed and comfortable about a particular situation.
  • it boggles the mind The idiom "it boggles the mind" means to be incredulous, astonished, or unable to comprehend something because it is so confusing, strange, or surprising. It refers to a situation or concept that is difficult or perplexing to understand or believe.
  • make up one's mind The idiom "make up one's mind" refers to the act of reaching a decision or finalizing one's thoughts on a particular matter or situation. It indicates the process of resolving uncertainty and choosing a course of action.
  • pass through sm's mind The idiom "pass through someone's mind" refers to a fleeting thought or idea that briefly enters and leaves someone's thoughts or consciousness. It suggests that the thought or idea was not given much attention or consideration.
  • give someone a piece of one's mind The idiom "give someone a piece of one's mind" means to express one's true thoughts or feelings to someone, often in a direct, forceful, or confrontational manner. It implies speaking one's mind honestly and without holding back, typically in response to something that has angered or frustrated the speaker.
  • put/set/turn your mind to something The idiom "put/set/turn your mind to something" means to direct your focus, attention, and efforts towards a particular task or goal. It signifies actively engaging your thoughts and mental abilities to concentrate on a specific matter in order to achieve desired results.
  • don't mind (someone) The idiom "don't mind (someone)" means to not be bothered or offended by someone's actions, opinions, requests, or presence. It indicates a willingness to tolerate or accommodate the other person without any objection or annoyance.
  • have a onetrack mind The definition of the idiom "have a one-track mind" is to be excessively focused or preoccupied with one particular thing or idea, often to the exclusion of everything else. It implies a lack of flexibility or ability to consider alternative perspectives or interests.
  • keep an open mind The idiom "keep an open mind" means to be receptive to new ideas, perspectives, and possibilities, and to refrain from forming fixed opinions or judgments prematurely. It involves being flexible, unbiased, and willing to consider different viewpoints before making a final decision or forming a conclusion.
  • time out of mind The idiom "time out of mind" refers to a period of time so far in the past that it is difficult to recall or remember. It suggests a time so long ago that it has been lost in the mists of time or forgotten by current generations.
  • mind your own business The idiom "mind your own business" means to refrain from interfering in or being concerned with someone else's affairs or matters that do not involve oneself. It is an admonition to focus on one's own responsibilities and not meddle in the affairs or personal lives of others.
  • jog the/(someone's) mind The idiom "jog the/(someone's) mind" means to stimulate or resurface someone's memory or thoughts, often by reminding or prompting them about something. It is used when someone needs to remember or recall information or ideas that are currently eluding them.
  • boggle someone's mind The idiom "boggle someone's mind" refers to the act of overwhelming or astonishing someone with something that is difficult to comprehend or believe.
  • lose your mind The idiom "lose your mind" means to become mentally unstable or to exhibit irrational or crazy behavior. It can also refer to being extremely upset, confused, or overwhelmed to the point of losing control.
  • blow your/somebody's mind The idiom "blow your/somebody's mind" means to astonish or amaze someone, often to the point where their thoughts or perceptions are dramatically altered or expanded. It refers to an experience or information that is so unexpected or mind-boggling that it completely overwhelms and surprises the person, leaving a lasting impact.
  • have a mind of its own The idiom "have a mind of its own" means that something does not behave or function in the way it is intended to, and instead acts independently or unpredictably. It implies that the thing or situation has its own will or intentions, separate from those of its owner or operator.
  • turn over in mind The idiom "turn over in mind" means to carefully consider or think deeply about something. It suggests that one is reflecting and contemplating various aspects or possibilities of a particular topic or issue.
  • to my mind The idiom "to my mind" is used to express one's personal opinion or perspective on a particular matter. It signifies that an idea or belief is based on an individual's own thoughts and feelings rather than being an objective or universally shared view.
  • If you don't mind! The idiom "If you don't mind!" is used to politely ask for permission or to request someone's agreement before proceeding with a certain action or stating something. It implies a respect for the other person's preferences or opinions.
  • have in mind sb/sth The idiom "have in mind" typically means to have someone or something in consideration or as a possible option for a specific purpose or plan. It implies that there is a particular person or thing that is being thought of or contemplated.
  • never mind (sb/sth) The idiom "never mind (sb/sth)" means to disregard or ignore someone or something, suggesting that it is not important or relevant to the current situation. It can also imply that there is no need to worry or make a fuss about someone or something.
  • mind p's and q's The idiom "mind your p's and q's" means to be cautious, mindful, or careful about one's words, behavior, or actions. It is often used as a reminder to pay attention to etiquette, manners, or social norms in order to avoid offending or upsetting others.
  • the thought crosses sb's mind The idiom "the thought crosses someone's mind" means that a particular idea or notion briefly occurs or passes through someone's thoughts. It refers to a fleeting or momentary consideration of something.
  • run in/through sb's head/mind The idiom "run in/through someone's head/mind" refers to the act of thoughts or ideas constantly occupying someone's thoughts or preoccupying their mind. It often implies that the person is unable to stop thinking about something or the thoughts are repeating in their mind.
  • be a load/weight off your mind The idiom "be a load/weight off your mind" refers to the feeling of relief and relaxation that comes when a worrying or burdensome problem or concern is resolved or lifted. It suggests a sense of release from mental or emotional stress, as if a heavy burden has been removed, thereby granting peace of mind.
  • be a weight off (one's) mind The idiom "be a weight off (one's) mind" means to experience a sense of relief or peace after a burden or worry has been resolved or lifted.
  • have a mind to do The idiom "have a mind to do" means to have the intention or inclination to do something. It implies a strong desire or determination to carry out a particular action or activity.
  • Make your mind up The idiom "make your mind up" means to make a decision or reach a conclusion about something. It implies the need to choose a specific course of action or make a definite choice.
  • take a load off (of) sm's mind The idiom "take a load off (of) someone's mind" means to alleviate someone's worries, concerns, or anxieties. It implies helping someone to relax or find relief from mental burden or stress.
  • out of sight, out of mind The idiom "out of sight, out of mind" means that when something or someone is not visible or present, they are easily forgotten or not thought about.
  • back of one's mind The idiom "back of one's mind" refers to a thought or idea that is not immediately prominent or at the forefront of one's consciousness, but is still present or lingering subtly. It represents the notion of having something in mind, but not actively focusing on it.
  • in (one's) right mind The idiom "in (one's) right mind" means to be sane or mentally stable. It implies that someone has the ability to think and make rational decisions.
  • cross someone's mind The idiom "cross someone's mind" means that a thought or idea briefly enters a person's thoughts or occurs to them, often momentarily or fleetingly.
  • come (or spring) to mind The idiom "come (or spring) to mind" refers to the action of thinking or remembering something suddenly or without much effort. It implies that a thought, idea, or memory arises spontaneously in one's consciousness.
  • keep mind on The idiom "keep mind on" means to stay focused, attentive, or concentrated on something. It implies paying close attention to a task, idea, or goal without getting distracted or losing interest.
  • I'll thank you to mind your own business The idiom "I'll thank you to mind your own business" means that the person speaking wants the other person to stop interfering or being nosy in their affairs or matters. It serves as a polite way of telling someone to stay out of one's personal or private affairs.
  • have/keep an open mind (about/on something) The idiom "have/keep an open mind (about/on something)" means to be receptive to new ideas, opinions, or information without preconceived notions or prejudices. It implies being willing to consider different perspectives or possibilities without immediately rejecting or dismissing them. Having an open mind encourages a fair and unbiased approach to understanding and forming judgments.
  • of one mind (about sm or sth) The idiom "of one mind (about sm or sth)" means that a group of people or individuals have the same opinions, beliefs, or agreements on a particular subject or issue. They are in complete harmony or agreement with each other, sharing a common point of view.
  • a turn of mind The idiom "a turn of mind" refers to a person's habitual way of thinking or their natural mental disposition. It describes an individual's particular mindset or inclination towards certain thoughts, perceptions, or attitudes.
  • mind your p's and q's The idiom "mind your p's and q's" means to be careful and attentive to one's manners, behavior, or actions in order to avoid making mistakes or offending others. It is often used as a reminder to be polite, considerate, and well-behaved.
  • boggle the mind The idiom "boggle the mind" means to surprise, astonish, or perplex someone greatly. It refers to something that is so incredible or complex that it overwhelms or confuses the mind.
  • fuck someone’s mind The idiom "fuck someone's mind" is an informal expression that refers to confusing, disturbing, or overwhelming someone mentally or emotionally. It implies the act of causing extreme confusion, disbelief, or astonishment that has a profound impact on someone's thoughts or perceptions.
  • have half a mind to The idiom "have half a mind to" means to be strongly considering or contemplating doing something, usually with a hint of reluctance or hesitation. It implies that the person is almost certain or inclined to take a particular action, but not fully committed or convinced yet.
  • close your mind to The idiom "close your mind to" means to refuse or be unwilling to consider or accept new ideas, perspectives, or possibilities. It refers to the act of being intentionally closed-minded or narrow-minded, usually due to preconceived notions or biases. It implies an unwillingness to engage in open-minded thinking or to entertain alternative viewpoints.
  • be a weight off your mind The idiom "be a weight off your mind" means to feel relieved or unburdened after resolving a problem or worry. It refers to the removal of a mental or emotional burden, leading to a sense of calm or release.
  • be out of your mind with worry, etc. The idiom "be out of your mind with worry, etc." means to be extremely worried, anxious, or upset about something to the point of distr-acting oneself from other activities or thoughts. It implies being consumed or overwhelmed by intense emotions.
  • don't mind me The idiom "don't mind me" is used to express that someone does not want to interrupt or inconvenience others, and they do not want to be noticed or given attention.
  • changed your mind? To "change your mind" means to alter or modify your previous decision, opinion, or belief about something. It refers to the act of reconsidering and ultimately coming to a different conclusion than the one initially held.
  • have (one's) mind on other things The idiom "have one's mind on other things" means to be preoccupied or distracted by other thoughts or concerns, making it difficult to focus or concentrate on the task at hand.
  • all in (one's) mind The idiom "all in (one's) mind" means that something exists or is happening only in a person's imagination or perception, and does not have a concrete or tangible reality. It suggests that what a person believes or perceives might not necessarily be true or real.
  • cast your mind back (to something) The idiom "cast your mind back" means to intentionally think and remember about something that happened in the past. It involves actively recalling and reflecting upon a specific event, situation, or memory.
  • stick in sb's mind/head/memory The idiom "stick in someone's mind/head/memory" means that something is firmly and vividly remembered or remembered for a long time. It refers to an event, information, or experience that has made a lasting impression on someone's thoughts or memory.
  • have a good mind The idiom "have a good mind" typically means having the intention or inclination to do something. It refers to considering or seriously thinking about undertaking a specific action or making a particular decision.
  • set (one's) mind at ease The idiom "set (one's) mind at ease" means to calm or relieve someone's worries, anxieties, or concerns. It refers to taking action or providing reassurance that helps a person feel more relaxed, content, or peaceful about a particular situation or problem.
  • blow (one's) mind The idiom "blow (one's) mind" means to astonish, amaze, or overwhelm someone with something extraordinary, unexpected, or mind-boggling. It refers to something that is so surprising or impressive that it figuratively overwhelms or "blows" a person's mind. It often relates to experiences, ideas, or information that defy expectations or push the boundaries of what one thought was possible.
  • be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind" implies being extremely bored, intoxicated, or experiencing a heightened state of any mentioned emotion or condition, to the point where it becomes overwhelming or excessive. It suggests that one is so consumed by the feeling or state that it dominates their thoughts and actions.
  • be engraved on sb's memory/mind The idiom "be engraved on someone's memory/mind" means that a particular event or experience is deeply imprinted in someone's mind, and they remember it very clearly and vividly. It suggests that the memory is deeply etched and will stay with them for a long time.
  • prey on sb's mind The idiom "prey on someone's mind" means that something is constantly bothering or occupying someone's thoughts, causing them worry, anxiety, or distress. It denotes a situation or problem that one cannot stop thinking about or that haunts their thoughts.
  • bring to mind The idiom "bring to mind" means to cause someone to remember or think of something. It suggests that something or someone evokes a memory or association in someone's thoughts.
  • come/spring to mind The idiom "come/spring to mind" means to suddenly remember or think of something without much effort or conscious deliberation. It refers to a thought or idea that naturally emerges in one's mind spontaneously.
  • blow your mind The idiom "blow your mind" means to astonish or surprise someone to such an extent that their thinking or perception is profoundly affected or altered. It refers to an experience or information that is so amazing or mind-boggling that it overwhelms and challenges one's current understanding or beliefs.
  • never you mind The idiom "never you mind" is a phrase used to instruct or suggest to someone not to worry or pay attention to something. It implies that the information or issue at hand is not their concern and they should not bother themselves with it.
  • bend your mind/efforts to something The idiom "bend your mind/efforts to something" means to exert or direct all of one's mental or physical energy towards a particular task, goal, or problem. It implies a focused and determined approach, often involving intense concentration or effort. It suggests giving one's full attention and using all available resources to accomplish or understand something.
  • have sth on your mind The idiom "have something on your mind" means to be preoccupied or constantly thinking about something, often a worry or concern. It refers to being mentally absorbed or troubled by a specific matter, causing distraction or a lack of ability to concentrate on other things.
  • have a mind like a sieve The idiom "have a mind like a sieve" means to have a poor memory or the tendency to forget things easily. It implies that one's mind is unable to retain information, much like a sieve allows liquid or small particles to pass through it.
  • sb's heart/mind/pulse races The idiom "sb's heart/mind/pulse races" means that someone's heart beats quickly and forcefully, or that their mind is racing with excitement, fear, or agitation. It signifies a heightened level of emotion or anticipation.
  • stick in your mind The idiom "stick in your mind" means to be remembered or to leave a lasting impression on someone's memory.
  • have a mind to The idiom "have a mind to" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing something. It indicates a strong inclination or desire to undertake a particular action or behavior.
  • have mind in the gutter The idiom "have your mind in the gutter" refers to someone who constantly has inappropriate or vulgar thoughts or suggests. It implies that the person tends to interpret innocent or ambiguous statements, actions, or situations in a more salacious or dirty way.
  • put someone in mind of The idiom "put someone in mind of" means to cause someone to remember or recall something. It implies that something or someone is reminiscent of another person, thing, or situation, triggering a recollection or association. It can also be used to refer to an object or event that evokes a similar feeling or thought in someone's mind.
  • mind (one's) own business The definition of the idiom "mind (one's) own business" is to not interfere in someone else's affairs or to refrain from prying or meddling in other people's matters.
  • have a memory/mind like a sieve The idiom "have a memory/mind like a sieve" refers to someone who has a poor or unreliable memory. It implies that information or memories easily slip out of their mind, similar to how liquid passes through the holes of a sieve. Thus, it highlights the individual's forgetfulness or lack of the ability to retain information.
  • pass through mind The idiom "pass through mind" refers to thoughts or ideas that come and go quickly, without leaving a lasting impression or being given much consideration. It suggests that these thoughts have entered one's mind but have not been thoroughly processed or remembered.
  • keep people straight (in one's mind) The idiom "keep people straight (in one's mind)" means to properly remember and distinguish between different individuals, particularly when they have similar names or appearances. It refers to the ability to avoid confusion and accurately recall information about different people.
  • get sth out of your mind The idiom "get something out of your mind" means to stop thinking about or dwelling on a particular thought, idea, or concern. It implies the need to mentally or emotionally dismiss or let go of something that is bothering or preoccupying one's thoughts.
  • out of your mind/head The idiom "out of your mind/head" refers to someone being irrational, crazy, or behaving in an illogical or nonsensical manner. It implies that the person's thoughts, beliefs, or actions are disconnected from reality or sanity.
  • a mind of own The idiom "a mind of its/their own" refers to someone or something having independent thoughts, opinions, or a strong will that may not align with others or follow a predictable pattern. It suggests that the person or thing tends to act or think independently, regardless of external influences or expectations.
  • get (one's) mind around (something) The idiom "get (one's) mind around (something)" means to understand or comprehend something that is difficult, complex, or unfamiliar. It refers to the process of mentally grasping or accepting a concept, idea, or situation.
  • cross your mind The idiom "cross your mind" means for a thought or idea to briefly enter one's thoughts or consideration. It refers to something that is briefly thought of or considered, but may not be dwelled upon or given significant attention.
  • Mind own business! The idiom "Mind your own business!" is a phrase used to tell someone to stop interfering or meddling in the affairs or matters that do not concern them. It is an admonition to focus on one's own affairs and refrain from involvement in other people's affairs.
  • sticks in the/ mind The idiom "sticks in the mind" refers to something that is memorable or difficult to forget. It describes a situation or experience that leaves a lasting impression or keeps coming back to one's thoughts.
  • if you wouldn’t mind The idiom "if you wouldn't mind" is a polite way to ask someone if they would be willing to do something or if a particular action would inconvenience them. It implies a respectful consideration for the other person's time, preferences, or comfort.
  • stick in mind The idiom "stick in mind" means to be remembered or remain firmly implanted in one's memory. It refers to something that is memorable or unforgettable.
  • pissed out of your brain/head/mind, at pissed as a newt/fart The idiom "pissed out of your brain/head/mind" typically means someone is extremely drunk or intoxicated to the point where they have lost control of their thoughts and actions. It implies a state of being highly impaired due to excessive alcohol consumption. On the other hand, "pissed as a newt" or "pissed as a fart" convey the same meaning of being drunk or intoxicated but with a humorous or exaggerated tone. It suggests that the person is so heavily under the influence of alcohol that they resemble the erratic and unsteady behavior of a newt or the loud and unpredictable nature of flatulence.
  • put (one's) mind at ease The idiom "put (one's) mind at ease" means to alleviate someone's worries or concerns and provide reassurance or comfort to them, allowing them to feel more peaceful and calm.
  • to one's mind The idiom "to one's mind" means to have a particular opinion or viewpoint about something. It refers to the subjective thoughts or beliefs of an individual.
  • I don't mind if I do The idiom "I don't mind if I do" is an expression commonly used to politely accept an offer or invitation. It implies that the person is more than willing to partake in the suggested action or take advantage of the opportunity presented.
  • prey on mind The idiom "prey on mind" means to constantly occupy someone's thoughts or to cause someone worry, anxiety, or guilt, often in a persistent or troubling manner.
  • have a lot on mind The idiom "have a lot on mind" refers to feeling preoccupied or overwhelmed by various thoughts, worries, or concerns. It means having a significant amount of thoughts or issues to think about or deal with simultaneously.
  • be of sound/unsound mind The idiom "be of sound/unsound mind" refers to one's mental or psychological state, indicating whether someone is rational, mentally stable, and capable of making sound, logical decisions (sound mind) or the opposite, someone who is irrational, mentally unstable, or incapable of making sound decisions (unsound mind). This phrase is often used in legal contexts when assessing a person's mental capacity to perform certain actions or make important decisions.
  • go out of (one's) mind The idiom "go out of (one's) mind" refers to a state of extreme mental agitation, confusion, or insanity. It means to lose one's sanity or to become mentally overwhelmed or unable to think clearly.
  • make your mind up, at make up your mind The idiom "make your mind up" or "make up your mind" means to come to a decision or reach a conclusion about something. It suggests that someone should make a choice or resolve their doubts in order to move forward or take action.
  • know your own mind The idiom "know your own mind" means to have a clear and confident understanding of your own thoughts, opinions, beliefs, and desires, and to be able to express and act upon them independently without being easily influenced by others. It implies having a strong sense of self-awareness and the ability to make decisions based on your own convictions and values.
  • a mind like a sieve The idiom "a mind like a sieve" is used to describe someone who has a poor memory or is forgetful. It implies that information or ideas often slip out of their mind, just like water passing through the holes in a sieve.
  • put one's mind to The idiom "put one's mind to" means to apply focus, concentration, and effort towards accomplishing or achieving something. It implies a strong determination, mental dedication, and actively engaging one's thoughts and abilities in a particular task or goal.
  • keep someone or something in mind (for someone or something) The idiom "keep someone or something in mind (for someone or something)" means to remember someone or something and consider them later when making a decision or taking action. It expresses the idea of not forgetting about a person or thing and retaining awareness of their importance or suitability for a particular purpose.
  • put sb in mind of sth The idiom "put sb in mind of sth" means to remind or bring someone's thoughts or memories to a particular thing or person. It evokes a similarity or resemblance between something being experienced or seen and another thing or person from the past.
  • keep in mind The idiom "keep in mind" means to remember or be aware of something, to not forget or overlook it. It implies the importance of maintaining a particular thought or idea in one's thoughts or considerations.
  • keep something in mind The idiom "keep something in mind" means to remember or not forget about something. It suggests the act of holding a particular piece of information or consideration prominently in one's thoughts.
  • Travel broadens the mind. The idiom "Travel broadens the mind" means that traveling to different places and experiencing new cultures, ideas, and perspectives can expand one's knowledge, understanding, and outlook on life. It suggests that immersion in different environments and encountering diverse people can lead to personal growth, development, and open-mindedness.
  • keep (one's) mind on (something) The idiom "keep (one's) mind on (something)" means to remain focused, attentive, or concentrated on a particular task, topic, or situation without getting distracted or losing concentration. It implies the necessity of paying close attention and avoiding mental distractions or wandering thoughts.
  • exercise sb's mind The idiom "exercise sb's mind" means to engage someone mentally or intellectually in order to challenge and stimulate their thinking abilities, often through problem-solving, critical thinking, or puzzles.
  • if you don't mind me/my saying so... The phrase "if you don't mind me/my saying so" is an idiomatic expression used to politely introduce a potentially disagreeable or critical statement or opinion. It serves as a precursor or disclaimer indicating that the speaker is about to express their viewpoint, even though it may not align with the listener's perspective or could be perceived as impolite or offensive. It acts as a gentle way of requesting permission to speak candidly.
  • anyone in their right mind The idiom "anyone in their right mind" refers to someone who is rational, logical, and reasonable in their thinking or behavior. It implies that only a person who is mentally sound and sensible would hold a particular opinion, make a certain decision, or engage in a specific action.
  • give sb a piece of your mind The idiom "give someone a piece of your mind" means to express one's feelings, thoughts, or opinions to someone in a forceful, straightforward, and often confrontational manner. It typically implies expressing anger, frustration, or discontent with someone's actions or behavior.
  • close your mind to something To close your mind to something means to deliberately refuse to consider or accept an idea, opinion, or perspective. It implies being unwilling to entertain different thoughts or possibilities and having a fixed, rigid mindset.
  • put mind to
  • Mind step
  • cross mind
  • get out of mind
  • have on mind
  • have mind on
  • be out of mind
  • bear/keep in mind that…
  • sow a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind) To sow the seed of doubt means to plant or instill uncertainty or skepticism in someone's mind. It is typically done by raising questions or concerns that make the person begin to doubt a belief, idea, or plan.
  • in your mind's eye "In your mind's eye" refers to the ability to visualize or imagine something in your thoughts, without actually seeing it with your physical eyes. It is the mental picture or image that one creates in their mind.
  • have a mind/memory like a sieve The idiom "have a mind/memory like a sieve" is used to describe someone who has a poor memory or is forgetful. Just as a sieve allows things to pass through easily, someone with a mind like a sieve has difficulty retaining information.
  • plant a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind) To plant a seed of doubt in someone's mind means to raise suspicions or uncertainties about a person or situation, leading them to question or doubt the truth, validity, or trustworthiness of something.
  • in mind's eye The idiom "in mind's eye" refers to visualizing or imagining something in one's thoughts or imagination, rather than physically seeing it. It is often used to describe the act of mentally picturing something.
  • keep (something) straight (in one's mind/head) To maintain clarity and accuracy in one's understanding or memory of something, to avoid confusion or misunderstanding.
  • if you don’t mind me/my saying so… This phrase is typically used as a polite way to express an opinion or make a comment that may be slightly controversial or critical. It is often used to soften the impact of a potentially offensive or confrontational statement.
  • mind-bender A mind-bender is something that is mentally challenging, confusing, or difficult to comprehend. It can refer to a complex problem, puzzle, or situation that requires a great deal of mental effort to understand or solve.
  • the mind's ear The mental faculty or ability to imagine and perceive sounds or music in one's thoughts, often likened to the sense of hearing but occurring entirely within the mind.
  • in (one's) mind's eye In (one's) mind's eye is a phrase that refers to visualizing something in one's imagination or memory, rather than seeing it with one's physical eyes. It can also mean seeing or understanding something through introspection or contemplation.
  • drive somebody out of their mind/wits To drive somebody out of their mind/wits means to irritate or frustrate someone to the point of causing them to become extremely agitated, restless, or upset.
  • mind-blower A mind-blower is something that is incredible, astonishing or mind-boggling. It typically refers to something that is so amazing or surprising that it blows your mind.
  • set your heart/mind on something/on doing something To be determined or committed to achieving a particular goal or desire.
  • nothing could be further from my mind, the truth, etc. This idiom is used to emphasize that a particular thought or idea is completely opposite or far removed from one's current thoughts or beliefs. It indicates a strong denial or contradiction of something that is being suggested or implied.

Similar spelling words for MIND

Plural form of MIND is MINDS

Conjugate verb Mind

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have minded
you would have minded
he/she/it would have minded
we would have minded
they would have minded
I would have mind
you would have mind
he/she/it would have mind
we would have mind
they would have mind

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been minding
you would have been minding
he/she/it would have been minding
we would have been minding
they would have been minding

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would mind
you would mind
he/she/it would mind
we would mind
they would mind

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be minding
you would be minding
he/she/it would be minding
we would be minding
they would be minding

FUTURE

I will mind
you will mind
he/she/it will mind
we will mind
they will mind

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be minding
you will be minding
he/she/it will be minding
we will be minding
they will be minding

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have minded
you will have minded
he/she/it will have minded
we will have minded
they will have minded

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been minding
you will have been minding
he/she/it will have been minding
we will have been minding
they will have been minding

IMPERATIVE

you mind
we let´s mind

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to mind

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was minding
you were minding
he/she/it was minding
we were minding
they were minding

PAST PARTICIPLE

minded

PAST PERFECT

I had minded
you had minded
he/she/it had minded
we had minded
they had minded

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been minding
you had been minding
he/she/it had been minding
we had been minding
they had been minding

PRESENT

I mind
you mind
he/she/it minds
we mind
they mind

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am minding
you are minding
he/she/it is minding
we are minding
they are minding

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

minding

PRESENT PERFECT

I have minded
you have minded
he/she/it has minded
we have minded
they have minded

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been minding
you have been minding
he/she/it has been minding
we have been minding
they have been minding

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it mind

SIMPLE PAST

I minded
you minded
he/she/it minded
we minded
they minded

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